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Using Old Router with U-Verse Gateway

ahcobrasahcobras Registered User regular
I recently switched from AT&T DSL to U-Verse. As part of the process, they replaced my existing modem+Linksys WRT54G setup with a Pace 5031NV gateway that handles the jobs of both of the former devices. However, I feel like the wireless from this new device is way spottier on my iPhone and iPad than the Linksys ever was. I even had to hook up my Xbox 360 with a cable to make it stop dropping the signal, which never happened.

Is there a way to make the gateway just handle modem duty and hook my old WRT54G to handle the WiFi that involves little-to-no dark magicks? Everything I've Googled seems to start about 4 steps into the process or only covers specific gateway-router combinations.

Posts

  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    Method 1 - the dual layer configuration.

    1. Turn off wireless on the Gateway.
    2. Note what Class C network the Gateway is using (what the 192.168.x range it uses is.)
    3. Plug the Router into the gateway, making sure the cable goes into the WAN port of the Router.
    4. Configure the Router DNS so that it is using a different Class C network. (That is, make sure it's set to 192.168.y, where y!=x.)

    The usefulness of this is it creates a dual layer network, plus gives you a ready-made DMZ if you need it. Port forwarding can be potentially messy, though.

    Method 2 - the split hardware method.

    1. Note what Class C network the Gateway is using (what the 192.168.x range it uses is.) Also note what its network address is (most likely, it will be 192.168.x.1.)
    2. Plug into the Router with it DISCONNECTED from the Gateway. Turn DNS OFF on the Router.
    3. While it is DISCONNECTED, assign a static network address to the Router:

    Address: 192.168.x.y (must be different from the Gateway address.)
    Network Mask: 255.255.255
    Gateway address: the address of the Gateway above.

    4. Plug the Router into the gateway, making sure the cable goes into a LAN port of the Router.

    This will be a bit more complicated to administrate, since the devices split duties. However, it will be easier to forward ports if needed.

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  • Psychotic OnePsychotic One The Lord of No Pants Parts UnknownRegistered User regular
    Method 1 - the dual layer configuration.

    1. Turn off wireless on the Gateway.
    2. Note what Class C network the Gateway is using (what the 192.168.x range it uses is.)
    3. Plug the Router into the gateway, making sure the cable goes into the WAN port of the Router.
    4. Configure the Router DNS so that it is using a different Class C network. (That is, make sure it's set to 192.168.y, where y!=x.)

    The usefulness of this is it creates a dual layer network, plus gives you a ready-made DMZ if you need it. Port forwarding can be potentially messy, though.

    Method 2 - the split hardware method.

    1. Note what Class C network the Gateway is using (what the 192.168.x range it uses is.) Also note what its network address is (most likely, it will be 192.168.x.1.)
    2. Plug into the Router with it DISCONNECTED from the Gateway. Turn DNS OFF on the Router.
    3. While it is DISCONNECTED, assign a static network address to the Router:

    Address: 192.168.x.y (must be different from the Gateway address.)
    Network Mask: 255.255.255
    Gateway address: the address of the Gateway above.

    4. Plug the Router into the gateway, making sure the cable goes into a LAN port of the Router.

    This will be a bit more complicated to administrate, since the devices split duties. However, it will be easier to forward ports if needed.

    It's going to use 192.168.1.x for the routing by default (.64 and higher) and the residental gateway will have 192.168.1.254 for the router address.
    Subnet by default is 255.255.255.0

    You could setup the router to obtain an IP from the 5031NV and place the router itself then on DMZ+ mode. Then you should be able to connect your devices to the router and manage just the router itself. Uverse is a certificate based authentication system so it won't have a bridge mode available to allow the router to authenticate for it.

  • fightinfilipinofightinfilipino Angry as Hell #BLMRegistered User regular
    there's a decent step by step guide on how to do this over at Broadband Reports: http://www.dslreports.com/faq/17734

    this should also allow your UVerse TV boxes/phone to work if you've got em.

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