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Loretta Lynch Nominated to Replace Eric Holder As Attorney General

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Posts

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    The fact of the matter is nothing will be passed or confirmed until after January.

    MarathonjmcdonaldAManFromEarthshrykezagdrob
  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited November 2014
    Quid wrote: »
    The fact of the matter is nothing will be passed or confirmed until after January.

    There's a CR that needs to be done before the end of December though, I think.

    Fencingsax on
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  • AManFromEarthAManFromEarth Let's get to twerk! The King in the SwampRegistered User regular
    Waiting for the new congress is good tactics.

    It lets the GOP show their true colors. Doing it before would make it seem like Obama didn't even try and the media would absolutely love that.

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    TinklesQuidDoctorArchMillzagdrob
  • DivideByZeroDivideByZero Social Justice Blackguard Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    The fact of the matter is nothing will be passed or confirmed until after January 2017.

    fixed

    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKERS
    Polaritie
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    You have a higher opinion of the democrats than I do.

    Edith Upwards
  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2014
    My pub congressman just polled:

    "Do you think the two political parties should be more willing to compromise, even if it means they strike a deal you don't agree with?

    My heavy pub district votes:

    Yes: 61.16
    No: 30.49
    Undecided: 8.32

    Just_Bri_Thanks on
    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
  • DivideByZeroDivideByZero Social Justice Blackguard Registered User regular
    Follow up question:

    "Who specifically should be willing to compromise?"

    Us: 3%
    Them: 92%
    Undecided: 5%

    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKERS
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  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    My congressman is a champion at useless constituent polling.

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
    MrVyngaard
  • PhyphorPhyphor Building Planet Busters Tasting FruitRegistered User regular
    I will compromise with you. I get everything I want, you get nothing you want, but I don't get a pony either this week

    Magic Box
    Academician Prokhor "Phyphor" Zakharov, Chief Scientist of China, Provost of the University of Planet - SE++ Megagame
    PolaritieNartwakEdith Upwards
  • enlightenedbumenlightenedbum Registered User regular
    New title to reflect news.

    PwH4Ipj.jpg
  • monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    Lynch, ey? Senate hearings don't have a good history with that.

    moniker on
  • programjunkieprogramjunkie Registered User regular
    I hope you don't have anything nice you don't want the police to take:

    http://poorrichardsnews.com/post/102336560238/obamas-ag-nominee-has-seized-904-million-in-private
    As a prosecutor Ms. Lynch has also been aggressive in pursuing civil asset forfeiture, which has become a form of policing for profit. She recently announced that her office had collected more than $904 million in criminal and civil actions in fiscal 2013, according to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Liberals and conservatives have begun to question forfeiture as an abuse of due process that can punish the innocent.

    Wicked Demiurge in most games. Solacus is my main in GW2.
  • spacekungfumanspacekungfuman Poor and minority-filled Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    I hope you don't have anything nice you don't want the police to take:

    http://poorrichardsnews.com/post/102336560238/obamas-ag-nominee-has-seized-904-million-in-private
    As a prosecutor Ms. Lynch has also been aggressive in pursuing civil asset forfeiture, which has become a form of policing for profit. She recently announced that her office had collected more than $904 million in criminal and civil actions in fiscal 2013, according to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Liberals and conservatives have begun to question forfeiture as an abuse of due process that can punish the innocent.

    Yikes. I don't know a lot about her but she seems qualified and generally inoffensive enough, but civil forfeiture makes me very uncomfortable.

    7zh9uu9etcor.jpg
    Chanus wrote:
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  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    I hope you don't have anything nice you don't want the police to take:

    http://poorrichardsnews.com/post/102336560238/obamas-ag-nominee-has-seized-904-million-in-private
    As a prosecutor Ms. Lynch has also been aggressive in pursuing civil asset forfeiture, which has become a form of policing for profit. She recently announced that her office had collected more than $904 million in criminal and civil actions in fiscal 2013, according to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Liberals and conservatives have begun to question forfeiture as an abuse of due process that can punish the innocent.

    Civil asset forfeiture isn't always bad. It's often a powerful tool for large scale busts and such.

    The problem with it is mostly in the way it's used by local police departments who get to keep some or all of the proceeds of that seizure.

    So It GoeszagdrobLord_Asmodeus
  • spacekungfumanspacekungfuman Poor and minority-filled Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited November 2014
    shryke wrote: »
    I hope you don't have anything nice you don't want the police to take:

    http://poorrichardsnews.com/post/102336560238/obamas-ag-nominee-has-seized-904-million-in-private
    As a prosecutor Ms. Lynch has also been aggressive in pursuing civil asset forfeiture, which has become a form of policing for profit. She recently announced that her office had collected more than $904 million in criminal and civil actions in fiscal 2013, according to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Liberals and conservatives have begun to question forfeiture as an abuse of due process that can punish the innocent.

    Civil asset forfeiture isn't always bad. It's often a powerful tool for large scale busts and such.

    The problem with it is mostly in the way it's used by local police departments who get to keep some or all of the proceeds of that seizure.

    The problem is the lack of process involved. People can have property seized and kept by the police for their use without even being convicted.

    spacekungfuman on
    7zh9uu9etcor.jpg
    Chanus wrote:
    It's been a butt come true! I get to work with the absolute best boobs in the business. What more could a money ask for? Kids, aim for the freeloaders !

    @chanus
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    I hope you don't have anything nice you don't want the police to take:

    http://poorrichardsnews.com/post/102336560238/obamas-ag-nominee-has-seized-904-million-in-private
    As a prosecutor Ms. Lynch has also been aggressive in pursuing civil asset forfeiture, which has become a form of policing for profit. She recently announced that her office had collected more than $904 million in criminal and civil actions in fiscal 2013, according to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Liberals and conservatives have begun to question forfeiture as an abuse of due process that can punish the innocent.

    Civil asset forfeiture isn't always bad. It's often a powerful tool for large scale busts and such.

    The problem with it is mostly in the way it's used by local police departments who get to keep some or all of the proceeds of that seizure.

    The problem is the lack of process involved. People can have property seized and kept by the police doe theories use without even being convicted.

    I think the greed-based incentives are even worse then that. Because that's what drives the police to do it so much these days.

  • jothkijothki Registered User regular
    Hopefully the compulsive need to oppose everything she does will trick the conservatives into actually doing their jobs as conservatives.

  • programjunkieprogramjunkie Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    I hope you don't have anything nice you don't want the police to take:

    http://poorrichardsnews.com/post/102336560238/obamas-ag-nominee-has-seized-904-million-in-private
    As a prosecutor Ms. Lynch has also been aggressive in pursuing civil asset forfeiture, which has become a form of policing for profit. She recently announced that her office had collected more than $904 million in criminal and civil actions in fiscal 2013, according to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Liberals and conservatives have begun to question forfeiture as an abuse of due process that can punish the innocent.

    Civil asset forfeiture isn't always bad. It's often a powerful tool for large scale busts and such.

    The problem with it is mostly in the way it's used by local police departments who get to keep some or all of the proceeds of that seizure.

    It's pretty much always bad. It should be attached to a criminal conviction, come after said conviction, and still offer its own procedure. I have no problem with taking drug lord's stuff, but the reality is it is a good reason for bad cops to steal shit from random black people and get away with it. But even the feds, and even without individual incentive will still inevitably fuck it up, because whenever you're dealing with the property of (presumed) innocent people, well, it shouldn't be occuring.

    Wicked Demiurge in most games. Solacus is my main in GW2.
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  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    shryke wrote: »
    I hope you don't have anything nice you don't want the police to take:

    http://poorrichardsnews.com/post/102336560238/obamas-ag-nominee-has-seized-904-million-in-private
    As a prosecutor Ms. Lynch has also been aggressive in pursuing civil asset forfeiture, which has become a form of policing for profit. She recently announced that her office had collected more than $904 million in criminal and civil actions in fiscal 2013, according to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Liberals and conservatives have begun to question forfeiture as an abuse of due process that can punish the innocent.

    Civil asset forfeiture isn't always bad. It's often a powerful tool for large scale busts and such.

    The problem with it is mostly in the way it's used by local police departments who get to keep some or all of the proceeds of that seizure.

    It's pretty much always bad.
    It should be attached to a criminal conviction, come after said conviction, and still offer its own procedure. I have no problem with taking drug lord's stuff, but the reality is it is a good reason for bad cops to steal shit from random black people and get away with it. But even the feds, and even without individual incentive will still inevitably fuck it up, because whenever you're dealing with the property of (presumed) innocent people, well, it shouldn't be occuring.

    No, that's overly simplistic. It's been used in fraud cases, in cases against organized crime and instances where they can show that the property itself is ill-gotten but for various reasons can't show who specifically committed the crime that got it. It's been used to recover assets from guys like Bernie Madoff to get them back to his victims. Even the recent scathing articles on the subject talk about the benefits of the idea.

    shryke on
  • PolaritiePolaritie Oh I didn't see this box. Registered User regular
    Good, then make them prove it was ill gotten, instead of making the other person prove it wasn't.

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  • lazegamerlazegamer Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    I hope you don't have anything nice you don't want the police to take:

    http://poorrichardsnews.com/post/102336560238/obamas-ag-nominee-has-seized-904-million-in-private
    As a prosecutor Ms. Lynch has also been aggressive in pursuing civil asset forfeiture, which has become a form of policing for profit. She recently announced that her office had collected more than $904 million in criminal and civil actions in fiscal 2013, according to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Liberals and conservatives have begun to question forfeiture as an abuse of due process that can punish the innocent.

    Civil asset forfeiture isn't always bad. It's often a powerful tool for large scale busts and such.

    The problem with it is mostly in the way it's used by local police departments who get to keep some or all of the proceeds of that seizure.

    It's pretty much always bad.
    It should be attached to a criminal conviction, come after said conviction, and still offer its own procedure. I have no problem with taking drug lord's stuff, but the reality is it is a good reason for bad cops to steal shit from random black people and get away with it. But even the feds, and even without individual incentive will still inevitably fuck it up, because whenever you're dealing with the property of (presumed) innocent people, well, it shouldn't be occuring.

    No, that's overly simplistic. It's been used in fraud cases, in cases against organized crime and instances where they can show that the property itself is ill-gotten but for various reasons can't show who specifically committed the crime that got it. It's been used to recover assets from guys like Bernie Madoff to get them back to his victims. Even the recent scathing articles on the subject talk about the benefits of the idea.

    Sometimes you get a benevolent dictator (you never actually get a benevolent dictator). The process can be bad even if the results are sometimes good.

    Surprise.
    - Spy
    Polaritie
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    lazegamer wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    I hope you don't have anything nice you don't want the police to take:

    http://poorrichardsnews.com/post/102336560238/obamas-ag-nominee-has-seized-904-million-in-private
    As a prosecutor Ms. Lynch has also been aggressive in pursuing civil asset forfeiture, which has become a form of policing for profit. She recently announced that her office had collected more than $904 million in criminal and civil actions in fiscal 2013, according to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Liberals and conservatives have begun to question forfeiture as an abuse of due process that can punish the innocent.

    Civil asset forfeiture isn't always bad. It's often a powerful tool for large scale busts and such.

    The problem with it is mostly in the way it's used by local police departments who get to keep some or all of the proceeds of that seizure.

    It's pretty much always bad.
    It should be attached to a criminal conviction, come after said conviction, and still offer its own procedure. I have no problem with taking drug lord's stuff, but the reality is it is a good reason for bad cops to steal shit from random black people and get away with it. But even the feds, and even without individual incentive will still inevitably fuck it up, because whenever you're dealing with the property of (presumed) innocent people, well, it shouldn't be occuring.

    No, that's overly simplistic. It's been used in fraud cases, in cases against organized crime and instances where they can show that the property itself is ill-gotten but for various reasons can't show who specifically committed the crime that got it. It's been used to recover assets from guys like Bernie Madoff to get them back to his victims. Even the recent scathing articles on the subject talk about the benefits of the idea.

    Sometimes you get a benevolent dictator (you never actually get a benevolent dictator). The process can be bad even if the results are sometimes good.

    This doesn't make any sense as it applies to the situation though.

    The problem seems to be primarily the incentives created by giving the funds directly to the people seizing the assets (which just encourages corruption) and the way you get your assets back. And, as always with the police, a lack of oversight.

    rockrnger
  • PolaritiePolaritie Oh I didn't see this box. Registered User regular
    No, the problem starts with the bar being way too fucking low to sieze them in the first place. I dont know how it qualifies as the constitutionally mandated due process even.

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  • AthenorAthenor Who needs lions when you have a battlecruiser? Registered User regular
    NPR was just talking this morning about how NYC is going to use Civil Forfeiture funds to pay for backlogged testing of rape kits, which is apparently a big problem. I didn't catch all the details, but that seems like a legit use, assuming the forfeiture money was gotten above board.

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  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    Look, I don't know about you but I don't want to live an a 'murica where dem terrorists dun have their stuff seized by the good guys immediately when they look at me sideways.

    BUT KEEP YER GUBBAHMEN OUTTER MY FORD TRUCK AND KILOS OF CRACK!

    Guns make you stupid. Better to fight your wars with duct tape. Duct tape makes you smart.

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  • TaramoorTaramoor Registered User regular
    Athenor wrote: »
    NPR was just talking this morning about how NYC is going to use Civil Forfeiture funds to pay for backlogged testing of rape kits, which is apparently a big problem. I didn't catch all the details, but that seems like a legit use, assuming the forfeiture money was gotten above board.

    The problem with civil forfeiture is that it's treated as a revenue stream.

    Much like treating tickets/fines as a revenue stream, this can lead to bad behavior and unfair targeting of those who can't fight back in order to get those sweet sweet dollars.

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  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    Just kidding, Kilos are a unit of measurement only used by communists!

    Haha.

    Kilos.

    Guns make you stupid. Better to fight your wars with duct tape. Duct tape makes you smart.

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  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    Seriously though, civil forfeiture is pretty much the reason the 4th amendment was made in the first place and is terrible.

    Guns make you stupid. Better to fight your wars with duct tape. Duct tape makes you smart.

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    Doodmann
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    Enc wrote: »
    Seriously though, civil forfeiture is pretty much the reason the 4th amendment was made in the first place and is terrible.

    That's what I was thinking. How is this not straight forward 4th amendment abuse?

  • CaptainNemoCaptainNemo Registered User regular
    Now, if the Republicans were smart, they'd slide her through and then wait for a scandal to be made up to come to light, and then rip her apart. By bullshitting and denying her, it's another bit of ammo for Dems who can spin it as the racism and sexism it actually probably is.

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  • CogCog Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    Enc wrote: »
    Seriously though, civil forfeiture is pretty much the reason the 4th amendment was made in the first place and is terrible.

    That's what I was thinking. How is this not straight forward 4th amendment abuse?

    Paper thin probable cause is pretty much all they need to throw unreasonable search and seizure out the window.

    I smelled marijuana in the car. We called in the K9 unit. It alerted to possible drugs because OF COURSE it did. Are you carrying any cash in the vehicle? You must be going to buy/sell drugs. We'll take all your things because they're being used in the suspected perpetration of a crime. Prove they're not.

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  • PolaritiePolaritie Oh I didn't see this box. Registered User regular
    5th or 6th has "nor deprived of ... property ... without due process of law", which is what I was referring to. The abuse of trained dogs to bypass the 4th is definitely a problem too though.

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  • DaimarDaimar A Million Feet Tall of Awesome Registered User regular
    I think I saw a John Oliver piece on this, I guess cops asking if you have more than $5K or $10K in the car is becoming a standard question for some areas.

    Found it:

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  • CogCog Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    Polaritie wrote: »
    5th or 6th has "nor deprived of ... property ... without due process of law", which is what I was referring to. The abuse of trained dogs to bypass the 4th is definitely a problem too though.

    Unfortunately civil forfeiture only requires a "preponderance of evidence" to assume guilt rather than belief "beyond reasonable doubt" that criminal forfeiture requires. "I smelled pot, and the drug dog went off" is enough to cover their asses, or carrying 20k in cash is enough for them to assume you're making a drug deal or laundering it. Additionally, the action is taken against the property itself, not against the person.

    The legality of it is, in the shittiest technical sense of the word, "legitimate", but fucking repugnant. (At least, it's been upheld by the courts so far) Basically "I believe it's more likely this <object> is involved in criminal activity than not. It is therefore detained to prevent any possible crimes it may have been used to commit. If that's not the case, please provide proof to the contrary. We'll hold onto it in the meantime."

    Don't want to give it up? Don't believe for a moment they won't find a reason (associated with their assumed crime, or trumped up and unrelated) to jail you, and your shit is seized in that case just the same. Or you can just give them the <money/jewelry/car/whatever> and not spend the night/weekend in jail.

    Anyway, this is getting off topic, and probably belongs in the Policing thread. The fact that Lynch is into it is not reassuring. I'd rather an AG who was fully against the practice. It's a tool that is far far too easy to abuse.

    Cog on
    steam_sig.png
  • Alinius133Alinius133 Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    Cog wrote: »
    Polaritie wrote: »
    5th or 6th has "nor deprived of ... property ... without due process of law", which is what I was referring to. The abuse of trained dogs to bypass the 4th is definitely a problem too though.

    Unfortunately civil forfeiture only requires a "preponderance of evidence" to assume guilt rather than belief "beyond reasonable doubt" that criminal forfeiture requires. "I smelled pot, and the drug dog went off" is enough to cover their asses, or carrying 20k in cash is enough for them to assume you're making a drug deal or laundering it. Additionally, the action is taken against the property itself, not against the person.

    The legality of it is, in the shittiest technical sense of the word, "legitimate", but fucking repugnant. (At least, it's been upheld by the courts so far) Basically "I believe it's more likely this <object> is involved in criminal activity than not. It is therefore detained to prevent any possible crimes it may have been used to commit. If that's not the case, please provide proof to the contrary. We'll hold onto it in the meantime."

    Don't want to give it up? Don't believe for a moment they won't find a reason (associated with their assumed crime, or trumped up and unrelated) to jail you, and your shit is seized in that case just the same. Or you can just give them the <money/jewelry/car/whatever> and not spend the night/weekend in jail.

    Anyway, this is getting off topic, and probably belongs in the Policing thread. The fact that Lynch is into it is not reassuring. I'd rather an AG who was fully against the practice. It's a tool that is far far too easy to abuse.

    It is worse than that actually. In many cases due to the "War on Some Drugs(TM)", the laws have been loosened so much that the police just confiscate things under the razor thin legal standard of "probable cause", then the accused has to sue to get it back. Because the accused is now the plantiff, they now have to prove beyond a "preponderance of evidence" that they were not involved in anything illegal.

    To make matters worse, the drugs laws are completely screwed up with things like federal and state laws disagreeing on what is illegal. This allows a state police officer in say Colorado to confiscate something because it is part of a pot related drug crime. Pot is legal in Colorado, and charges are never filed, but the preponderance of the evidence will still show that they were doing something that was illegal at a federal level.

    It is somewhat related, because any AG nomination that is strongly in favor of the current civil forfiture laws is someone I would not want to have the position.

    Alinius133 on
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  • Dark_SideDark_Side Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    Alinius133 wrote: »
    Cog wrote: »
    Polaritie wrote: »
    5th or 6th has "nor deprived of ... property ... without due process of law", which is what I was referring to. The abuse of trained dogs to bypass the 4th is definitely a problem too though.

    Unfortunately civil forfeiture only requires a "preponderance of evidence" to assume guilt rather than belief "beyond reasonable doubt" that criminal forfeiture requires. "I smelled pot, and the drug dog went off" is enough to cover their asses, or carrying 20k in cash is enough for them to assume you're making a drug deal or laundering it. Additionally, the action is taken against the property itself, not against the person.

    The legality of it is, in the shittiest technical sense of the word, "legitimate", but fucking repugnant. (At least, it's been upheld by the courts so far) Basically "I believe it's more likely this <object> is involved in criminal activity than not. It is therefore detained to prevent any possible crimes it may have been used to commit. If that's not the case, please provide proof to the contrary. We'll hold onto it in the meantime."

    Don't want to give it up? Don't believe for a moment they won't find a reason (associated with their assumed crime, or trumped up and unrelated) to jail you, and your shit is seized in that case just the same. Or you can just give them the <money/jewelry/car/whatever> and not spend the night/weekend in jail.

    Anyway, this is getting off topic, and probably belongs in the Policing thread. The fact that Lynch is into it is not reassuring. I'd rather an AG who was fully against the practice. It's a tool that is far far too easy to abuse.

    It is worse than that actually. In many cases due to the "War on Some Drugs(TM)", the laws have been loosened so much that the police just confiscate things under the razor thin legal standard of "probable cause", then the accused has to sue to get it back. Because the accused is now the plantiff, they now have to prove beyond a "preponderance of evidence" that they were not involved in anything illegal.

    To make matters worse, the drugs laws are completely screwed up with things like federal and state laws disagreeing on what is illegal. This allows a state police officer in say Colorado to confiscate something because it is part of a pot related drug crime. Pot is legal in Colorado, and charges are never filed, but the preponderance of the evidence will still show that they were doing something that was illegal at a federal level.

    There are so many horror stories of how forfeiture is being abused..

    I'm pretty circumspect about Lynch now, but I can't get access to the WSJ article that blog cites, so I have no idea where the forfeitures came from. Holder has been pretty good about thawing our country's fucked up view on recreational drugs, and I fear that progress will greatly regress if the new AG is someone who made bank off of forfeitures in drug cases, of which I'd wager comprise the vast majority of its use in the US.

    Dark_Side on
  • CogCog Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    OH yeah, I almost forgot..

    After Lynch was nominated, Breitbart blew up about Lynch being one of the Clinton's Whitewater defense attorneys, as well as a campaign aid. Only problem with that is, that was a completely different Loretta Lynch. Breitbart then proceeded to leave the goddamn article up, but waaaay down at the bottom of the page, issue a correction that read:
    Correction: The Loretta Lynch identified earlier as the Whitewater attorney was, in fact, a different attorney.

    Stephen Colbert let them know that we all noticed.

    The article is gone now.

    Cog on
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  • CaptainNemoCaptainNemo Registered User regular
    Ahahahahahahahahahaha oh wow.

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  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Cog wrote: »
    Polaritie wrote: »
    5th or 6th has "nor deprived of ... property ... without due process of law", which is what I was referring to. The abuse of trained dogs to bypass the 4th is definitely a problem too though.

    Unfortunately civil forfeiture only requires a "preponderance of evidence" to assume guilt rather than belief "beyond reasonable doubt" that criminal forfeiture requires. "I smelled pot, and the drug dog went off" is enough to cover their asses, or carrying 20k in cash is enough for them to assume you're making a drug deal or laundering it. Additionally, the action is taken against the property itself, not against the person.

    The legality of it is, in the shittiest technical sense of the word, "legitimate", but fucking repugnant. (At least, it's been upheld by the courts so far) Basically "I believe it's more likely this <object> is involved in criminal activity than not. It is therefore detained to prevent any possible crimes it may have been used to commit. If that's not the case, please provide proof to the contrary. We'll hold onto it in the meantime."

    Don't want to give it up? Don't believe for a moment they won't find a reason (associated with their assumed crime, or trumped up and unrelated) to jail you, and your shit is seized in that case just the same. Or you can just give them the <money/jewelry/car/whatever> and not spend the night/weekend in jail.

    Anyway, this is getting off topic, and probably belongs in the Policing thread. The fact that Lynch is into it is not reassuring. I'd rather an AG who was fully against the practice. It's a tool that is far far too easy to abuse.

    Is she "into it" though? Is she actually "into it" in the way most of the people in this thread are implying?

    The only information I've seen on this says that she has just been involved in a bunch of these cases. And, you know, as an attorney. There seems little indication she has any involvement in the shady aspects of the practice or that she supports those aspects of it.

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