As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/
Options

Hitting the gas pedal, not getting any acceleration, and it revs. (Automatic 2008 Aveo)

[Michael][Michael] Registered User regular
My girlfriend is having some issues with her 2008 Chevy Aveo (automatic). She called last week and said she couldn't go in reverse after trying immediately after starting the car.

Today, she was driving home, and it started giving less acceleration, and the RPMs went up. She kept going as long as it would let her, and it kept giving less acceleration, and higher RPMs if she pressed the gas, until finally it was like the car was in neutral. She turned the car off, turned it back on 5 seconds later, and it worked again for a little bit (she says maybe a minute or two), then did the same thing.

I got home and gave it a shot, and it seems like after ignition, after around 1 minute, it'll give less acceleration / rev the engine more if you hit the gas. After 2 minutes, no acceleration, just revving if you hit the gas.

The shifting seems smooth and fine for that minute it works.

Any ideas what could be wrong with it? We're taking it to a mechanic tomorrow or Friday, but we're just curious what it could be and maaybe the ballpark range of what it may cost to fix what it may be. Though we realize there's a huge range there.

Posts

  • Options
    The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    It sounds like a transmission problem. If so, that can be extremely expensive I'm afraid.

    With Love and Courage
  • Options
    PirusuPirusu Pierce Registered User regular
    Does she have an engine light on?

    I had something similar happen in my '07 Nissan Sentra (Not as pronounced, but I'd floor the gas pedal, and would have no acceleration for up to 10 seconds), and it ended up being an O2 sensor.

    I'm not sure what the cost on fixing the O2 sensor is, as my car was still under warranty, but a quick google search puts an OEM sensor in the ~$100 range, and I'm not sure what labor rates are.

  • Options
    GonmunGonmun He keeps kickin' me in the dickRegistered User regular
    Definitely getting it checked is advised. Something like that can become extremely dangerous given the right circumstances (ie on the highway). It sounds very much like a transmission issue which unfortunately can be quite costly but I wouldn't rule out a sensor issue either. Hope things work out for the best.

    desc wrote: »
    ~ * swole patrol flying roundhouse kick top performer recognition: April 2014 * ~
    If you have a sec, check out my podcast: War and Beast Twitter Facebook
  • Options
    davidsdurionsdavidsdurions Your Trusty Meatshield Panhandle NebraskaRegistered User regular
    Get it checked. Something wrong with the transmission is my suspicion. Hopefully not too expenditure being a Chevy. The brakes should still be able to stop the vehicle if during the revving the gears catch and you get massive acceleration suddenly.

    Half joke real problem within:
    It's an Aveo

  • Options
    BouwsTBouwsT Wanna come to a super soft birthday party? Registered User regular
    edited October 2014
    An automatic transmission is complicated, but there's not a lot that would ususally cause it to slip like that. First step, check the fluid level. First thing the technician is going to check, and could save you the trip.

    http://www.carcarekiosk.com/video/2009_Chevrolet_Aveo_LS_1.6L_4_Cyl./transmission_fluid/check_fluid_level

    Edit: I will say that if the transmission fluid level is good though, there is something deeper wrong and will require professional attention. Always check the fluid first, though.

    BouwsT on
    Between you and me, Peggy, I smoked this Juul and it did UNTHINKABLE things to my mind and body...
  • Options
    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    the transmission is broken.. you need to get a professional to look at it.. given that it's that severe of a problem, it won't take them long to find the root cause

  • Options
    [Michael][Michael] Registered User regular
    So, you were right. It's the transmission. I took it to a general repair shop, and they took a look, then referred us to a transmission shop, who then estimated it would be between 1500 and 2500 to repair.

    My new question is: Is that even worth it?

    It's a 2008 Chevrolet aveo with 106k miles on it. In the next 15k miles, it probably needs new brakes and tires. I think Kelly Blue Book gave it a 2400 trade in or 3200 private party value for good condition.

    As far as I can tell, my options are:

    - Sell the car somewhere as is (I assume for next to nothing?), buy another car (budget is limited to maybe a $6000 loan)
    - Fix the car, keep driving it
    - Fix the car, look to sell it and buy another car as soon as possible

    What would you do in my shoes?

  • Options
    Inquisitor77Inquisitor77 2 x Penny Arcade Fight Club Champion A fixed point in space and timeRegistered User regular
    It's always difficult to gauge when it's appropriate to buy a new car vs. when it's better to just keep the old one alive. Essentially you have to be able to predict the future to know with any certainty...

    Do you have the maintenance history of the car available? You could at least estimate when you will need to pay for things like new tires, spark plugs, brake pads, etc. using that information and the owner's manual. If everything is coming up within the next few years, then it is probably worth it to just buy a used car that has all of those things already replaced (assuming you get it from a reputable place).

    If you don't have that information, or you're doing a private transaction, then basically you're flipping a coin.

    People love to throw around the "half" rule, where you replace the car when the repairs cost half as much as you'd be willing to spend on a replacement, but that rule is, frankly, asinine. Particularly at the lower end of the price spectrum (<$10,000), there is no guarantee that any car you purchase with that money is actually going to last longer than just fixing your old one, and the way those contracts are drawn up you could drive off the lot with a lemon and the seller would be under no obligation to fix it (yes, there are lemon laws, but do you really want to spend the time going to court over it?). A new car, even a used one, generally goes hand-in-hand with an insurance spike as well, not to mention the taxes and fees that go along with the purchase.

  • Options
    DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    106k miles is not that much, assuming that regular maintenance has been done on it. You should be able to drive the car till the wheels fall off, in which case spending that regular maintenance money is the right thing.

    If you've neglected to maintain it, though, and it's a very hard-ridden 106k? I dunno, I guess try to pawn it off on some poor sucker.

    What is this I don't even.
  • Options
    BouwsTBouwsT Wanna come to a super soft birthday party? Registered User regular
    This is very much a "devil you know" situation. I'd be partial to repairing the vehicle, if what you're going to have in the end is something reasonably reliable. Even with the transmission expense, new brakes and tires within the next year, that's still likely less than the $6,000 cost of buying a different vehicle, which may have some other poor soul's issues.

    Inquisitor77 and Darkewolfe have very good points though, regarding the maintenance. Timing belts are recommended every 60,000 mi for that vehicle, so you may be coming up on your second maintenance interval for that. Check your maintenance, find out what expenses are coming up, and make an informed decision based on the dollars and cents of the situation.

    Between you and me, Peggy, I smoked this Juul and it did UNTHINKABLE things to my mind and body...
  • Options
    RaekreuRaekreu Registered User regular
    Shop around before you make a decision. You might be able to find another mechanic that can fix it for cheaper. I have to stress *might*, though. Transmission work is tricky and it's never not expensive.

    If it were me, I'd ditch the vehicle and get something new(er). With the busted transmission, though, you'll be lucky to get $1k for an as-is sale.






  • Options
    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    106k for most cars might not be much but for an aveo ill wager that car is shot

    see if you can get an honest inspection of the car to see if there are any other issues lurking

  • Options
    BouwsTBouwsT Wanna come to a super soft birthday party? Registered User regular
    Jasconius wrote: »
    106k for most cars might not be much but for an aveo ill wager that car is shot

    see if you can get an honest inspection of the car to see if there are any other issues lurking

    This.

    I don't know if you have any connections to a repair garage, but spending money for (what would be the equivalent of) a pre-purchase inspection. Spending $100 to find out the current condition of your vehicle (suspension, brakes, other fluid conditions, tune up condition) could save you years of heartache if you decide to keep a lemon, or let go of the one perfect Aveo that only needed maintenance.

    Between you and me, Peggy, I smoked this Juul and it did UNTHINKABLE things to my mind and body...
  • Options
    GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    edited October 2014
    If it were a Corolla, or a Civic, or a Sentra, or something along those lines...I would say fix it, that thing will run forever...but it's an Aveo, a car that has been blasted multiple times by multiple publications for being one of the cheapest, worst put together cars ever put on the road. We're talking Ford Pinto levels of terrible here.

    I'm with everyone else: I would get it inspected by a neutral party, even if that inspection costs you money. If they come back and half the car is about to fall off, replace it. If, as Bouws said, you found the one Aveo on the planet that isn't about to fall apart at 100k miles, repair the transmission and move on.

    For your 6k price, you could get an older Civic or Corolla that may not be much of a looker, but will have internals to last you forever. Just make sure if you do buy a used vehicle, get a full vehicle maintenance record and some sort of VIN search (CarFax) to make sure you aren't buying another lemon.

    GnomeTank on
    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • Options
    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    I don't quite understand how you expect to sell a car that doesn't drive. I've never bought a car that I didn't test drive thoroughly before I slapped down the cash, and they're not going to want to buy her car once they find out it doesn't do the one thing a car is meant to do, that is, move under its own power.

  • Options
    The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    edited October 2014
    I don't quite understand how you expect to sell a car that doesn't drive. I've never bought a car that I didn't test drive thoroughly before I slapped down the cash, and they're not going to want to buy her car once they find out it doesn't do the one thing a car is meant to do, that is, move under its own power.

    Yeah, do not try to sell that vehicle. IANAL, etc etc, but I do know a guy who did jail time for doing exactly what someone (I assume jokingly?) suggested earlier (he sold someone a truck with a busted transmission. Was nailed for fraud, and the judge was not pleased that day).
    Michael wrote:
    So, you were right. It's the transmission. I took it to a general repair shop, and they took a look, then referred us to a transmission shop, who then estimated it would be between 1500 and 2500 to repair.

    My new question is: Is that even worth it?

    It's a 2008 Chevrolet aveo with 106k miles on it. In the next 15k miles, it probably needs new brakes and tires. I think Kelly Blue Book gave it a 2400 trade in or 3200 private party value for good condition.

    As far as I can tell, my options are:

    - Sell the car somewhere as is (I assume for next to nothing?), buy another car (budget is limited to maybe a $6000 loan)
    - Fix the car, keep driving it
    - Fix the car, look to sell it and buy another car as soon as possible

    What would you do in my shoes?

    It's a difficult call. 1500-2500 to repair a transmission on a 2008 Aveo is basically flushing money down a toilet... but replacing a car is always a risky & expensive investment in it's own right.

    If it were me, and I could afford it, I would just buy a replacement used vehicle. Maybe check to see if there is a local cash for clunkers program that will haul away the PoS & give me a couple hundred or whatever. There's no way I would sink another thousand into that kind of vehicle, one that needs that kind of repair job, unless I had essentially no other options.

    The Ender on
    With Love and Courage
  • Options
    BouwsTBouwsT Wanna come to a super soft birthday party? Registered User regular
    So long as the [Michael] disclosed any known issues, selling this car in it's current condition is no problem. The issues arise when you're falsely claiming a vehicle in in good condition when it clearly was not. If you decide to sell it as a "mechanic's special", you wouldn't be hurting anyone.

    Also, would the transmission shop consider installing a used transmission? Are there any available? It can be a little risky, but some people will opt to try used before condemning a vehicle.

    Between you and me, Peggy, I smoked this Juul and it did UNTHINKABLE things to my mind and body...
  • Options
    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    selling could also mean selling it as is (as stated above) or selling it back to a dealer who don't care about that since they can fix it themselves

    camo_sig.png
  • Options
    DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    I'd call around to other local transmission repair specific shops and ask after how much a rebuilt transmission would cost to get installed net of your giving them your busted one (core). Parts pricing is going to be greatly informed by how big the market is for rebuilt transmissions for your vehicle. I was quoted $3-4.5K for a transmission fix on a 4 speed Subaru, but did some considerable calling around and got it done for $1100 by finding someone who shopped around and getting the work done after hours.

    As for whether or not it is worth it that's something only you and she can decide. IMO putting in a rebuilt tranny and doing a 4 corner brake job and tire replacement is way cheaper over the next year or 2 than a new car payment and higher insurance premiums, but I'm assuming the car has otherwise been well-maintained and there won't soon be other major expenses other than standard maintenance.

  • Options
    MillMill Registered User regular
    First, look at how often you had to do repairs before the transmission went. If you had to do frequent and costly repairs, probably not worth getting the transmission fixed since chances are pretty good it'll have more pricey repairs down the road.

    Second, see if you can get an estimated on how long the professional expects the transmission to last after it's fixed or replaced. If it's a couple years and the care has frequent issues, you're probably better of getting a new car.

    Third, see how easy it is to get parts for the vehicle. Age, model and make will be factors. There is a certain point, where even simple fixes just aren't worth it because the parts are hard to find and people generally tend to up the price on hard to find items.

    I know dealing with transmission issues and fixing them sucks. Have a Hyundai Accent from 1996, that had to have the transmission rebuild a few years ago. That was pricey to say the least and the car had over 100k miles on it. Ultimately, went with just getting the transmission rebuild because the thing has needed few repairs and most of them have not been expensive. Also the rebuild transmission was guaranteed to last for three years before it could become a potential issue again (granted gonna have to get it replaced in the next year or so because parts are becoming hard to find).

  • Options
    BouwsTBouwsT Wanna come to a super soft birthday party? Registered User regular
    Mill wrote: »
    First, look at how often you had to do repairs before the transmission went. If you had to do frequent and costly repairs, probably not worth getting the transmission fixed since chances are pretty good it'll have more pricey repairs down the road.

    There is no reason to suspect a problem vehicle will continue to be a problem vehicle forever in the same way that there is no way to be sure a reliable vehicle won't all of a sudden become unreliable.

    Do your research on the value and reliability of your vehicle (whether it be consumer reports or the like), and base your decision on hard facts, and your own personal finances.

    Between you and me, Peggy, I smoked this Juul and it did UNTHINKABLE things to my mind and body...
  • Options
    MillMill Registered User regular
    Unless you got the vehicle in piss poor shape, used shitty parts, had an awful mechanic, the company made major improvements in quality of replacement parts or some combination of those things. Then yes, it's quite reasonable to expect a problem vehicle to continue to have issues and generally things tend to have more issues as they get older and more worn out. My experience with cars and other durable goods is that they don't suddenly stop needing as much repair, if they they were problematic before getting an expensive fix.

    Likewise for reliable vehicles. If it's well made and has few issues. Barring hitting the point where things fail because of wear and tear, chances are it will remain reliable if you continue to have a good mechanic and part quality stays consistent.

    Repair history is a very good barometer of whether someone wants to keep sinking money into an old vehicle or not. It can at least be used to ballpark out how much more money one can expect to sink into the thing in the next few years, giving the person an idea of how close they are to the point where "might as well buy a new one because the costs (both money and time) can't be justified.

  • Options
    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    Mill wrote: »
    Unless you got the vehicle in piss poor shape

    It's an Aveo. it was in bad shape the day it rolled off the assembly line

    I guess that's a mean thing to say but seriously I would tell anyone in my life to just scrap that car, sell it for parts, and start afresh.

    An Aveo is going to break again and a full transmission replacement is a ridiculous amount of money to sink into a car that cheap

  • Options
    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Selling it in the condition it is in to a dealership so they could fix it and resell it themselves would net you about $50. The dealership still has to pay for the parts and the labour to fix it, and then they have to try and sell it on for a profit.

  • Options
    a5ehrena5ehren AtlantaRegistered User regular
    edited October 2014
    My wife had a Suzuki Forenza that ate through its head gasket at 75k miles (it was a known issue online). We actually got it fixed for some reason, but we dumped it as soon as the transmission started acting funny. Sometimes you really are better off cutting bait on a bad car and trying over.

    a5ehren on
  • Options
    Natas_XnoybisNatas_Xnoybis Registered User regular
    [Michael] wrote: »
    So, you were right. It's the transmission. I took it to a general repair shop, and they took a look, then referred us to a transmission shop, who then estimated it would be between 1500 and 2500 to repair.

    My new question is: Is that even worth it?

    It's a 2008 Chevrolet aveo with 106k miles on it. In the next 15k miles, it probably needs new brakes and tires. I think Kelly Blue Book gave it a 2400 trade in or 3200 private party value for good condition.

    As far as I can tell, my options are:

    - Sell the car somewhere as is (I assume for next to nothing?), buy another car (budget is limited to maybe a $6000 loan)
    - Fix the car, keep driving it
    - Fix the car, look to sell it and buy another car as soon as possible

    What would you do in my shoes?

    off the cuff, if it was a 2008 Toyota or Honda, then totally worth it... a chevy /meh

    I hate Computers
    GIS is evil
  • Options
    [Michael][Michael] Registered User regular
    We're still trying to decide what to do with it. She won't have the money ready for either a repair or a loan for another week or two, so we've got some time to decide.

    On one hand, it hasn't had any problems prior to this. On the other, it's an Aveo. Hah.

    I think our plan is going to be: call every transmission place around here, get a ballpark range for repairing / rebuilding / replacing. Then, if we can get it for a little cheaper than that 1500-2500 we were originally quoted, we'll take it to a different mechanic to take a look at the car and give us a rundown of the state of the car and any trouble areas. Then, if the outlook of the car is alright and the repair costs are reasonable (Maybe less than 1500, if everything else is looking good) in comparison to the cost of buying a new car on our limited budget, we'll opt for repairing the Aveo.

    I wouldn't have thought to ask about rebuild vs replacement with either new or repaired transmissions, or warranties on a transmission job, or about 10 other things mentioned here. This thread has been super helpful!

  • Options
    DraygoDraygo Registered User regular
    You can sell it for salvage value to a scrapper. Should net you more than a dealer would trade you for it.

  • Options
    WezoinWezoin Registered User regular
    edited October 2014
    I'm not sure if theres the option to do it in your area but I know around here we have stuff like 'Teen Challenge' (for recovering drug addicted youth to help them get to job sites) and one for kidney disease fundraising. Basically you donate your car in whatever condition, they give you a tax receipt (most of the ones around here guarantee you a minimum of $300) and then they either fix it and sell it or scrap it for whatever they can get. You save a bit on your taxes, you help out a great cause.

    But yes, to echo the rest of the thread: when it comes to an Aveo turn and run away as fast as you can. Literally the worst vehicle on the planet.

    Wezoin on
Sign In or Register to comment.