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ND's Schoolism Class (nsf56k) - Final Assignment - Week 9

NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade UsernameRegistered User regular
edited December 2014 in Artist's Corner
ND made a thread! Pigs are flying. Hell hath frozen over.

I just started taking Nathan Fowke's Environment Design class through Schoolism. I'm going to keep this thread updated with each completed assignment as I finish it, which should be once a week. This is a class I'm really serious about, and it's not just me holding myself accountable, so you can count on this thread sticking around for a bit longer than my other threads tend to. :P The course runs for nine weeks, and I'm currently on the second assignment. Last assignment I'm guessing will be due right before Christmas.

Images are going to be LARGE and unspoiler'd.

If you want to read detailed descriptions of what the assignment is each week, you can click on the "Lesson Plan" here.

Week 1:
Color studies! Find artwork/images that have a strong sense of "environment", and make thumbnail studies of each. Spend under an hour with each image. Simplify the piece, and try to capture what the piece is "about".

These are not exactly in the order that I completed them...I felt like I spent too much time on a few pieces due to being a perfectionist and wanting to get all the shapes and colors hyper-accurate...but then towards the end, I actually messed up the days of the week and had to get a few done much more quickly (which was honestly probably the speed at which I should have been aiming to complete most of them, anyhow). Most of these are pieces of art as reference, but two are photographs. I'm pretty happy with what I ended up with, and I surprised myself at how the faster studies were not as bad as I thought they'd be. I felt like I started to get a "hang" of simplifying the more I did these...and I learned that you can sell scale pretty quickly by using a smaller brush and getting some tiny detail in without having to go overboard and adding a LOT of tiny detail. I think doing more studies like this and learning to really simplify even further would be beneficial to me (and was suggested to me in critique)!

This is resized in the post...but if you click on it you'll see a larger version, which is roughly a third of the original size.
JMills_Schoolism_Week1.jpg

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  • DirtyDirtyVagrantDirtyDirtyVagrant Registered User regular
    Really awesome stuff, ND.

    tapeslingerNightDragonTam
  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck the search for the means to put an end to things an end to speech is what enables the discourse to continue ~ * ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) excelsior * ~Registered User regular
    edited October 2014
    holy shit those are fucking dope

    the best one for showing the accuracy of your colour choice is the snowy one at the bottom

    from a distance it looks perfect, colourwise

    surrealitycheck on
    obF2Wuw.png
    tapeslingertynicNightDragonOllieTam
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    So are you going to get feedback from the teacher?

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    So are you going to get feedback from the teacher?

    Yep! I actually just got and watched the feedback this morning. I think overall he felt like I did a really good job, but mentioned that I tend to enhance contrast a little bit too much sometimes. He mentioned it's subtle, and I can see [with some difficulty, at times!] what he's talking about. He made some piece-specific suggestions here and there (i.e. "soften the background edges of the clouds and mountains in the windmill piece a bit more"), made the suggestion to continue practicing very simplified studies, and answered a few questions I had about what he was looking for in this assignment. He also confirmed that he thought I hit the right balance of detail in a few pieces I was concerned about (the tower from Tangled, and the city street piece, for instance). I kinda struggled at times to figure out how much detail was necessary and how much would be excessive, since I'm very detail-oriented and often find it hard to simplify a lot. SO, as he suggested, I think doing more studies like this and really trying to nail down the studies in a simplified way would be really beneficial to me. :) Something I'd like to practice, for sure.

    Irukatapeslinger
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    Cool, I'm really curious about the quality of feedback and I hope you'll give us some idea of what hes telling you as you go along. I think it would be informative for us as spectators, and also probably good advertising for the class itself. summarizing feedback here may also be a good way to internalize it (but I also just selfishly want to know how in depth it is if I want to take a class, I am still considering online watts)

    I'm looking forward to seeing what comes out of it, and seeing you produce some slightly more regular work, especially with direct feedback from someone with such solid skills.

    tapeslinger
  • lyriumlyrium Registered User regular
    Those are awesome!
    He made a good point about softening some areas.

    NightDragon
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    Cool, I'm really curious about the quality of feedback and I hope you'll give us some idea of what hes telling you as you go along. I think it would be informative for us as spectators, and also probably good advertising for the class itself. summarizing feedback here may also be a good way to internalize it (but I also just selfishly want to know how in depth it is if I want to take a class, I am still considering online watts)

    I'm looking forward to seeing what comes out of it, and seeing you produce some slightly more regular work, especially with direct feedback from someone with such solid skills.

    For sure. I'm probably not going to give super huge amounts of detail, just because I'd feel a little weird (like scanning a copyrighted textbook and posting it? :P ) but I'll certainly mention what he says about my work in his feedback.

    As far as quality goes...even though I've only watched two lessons and gotten one feedback video, I feel like it's going to be a really good class! He seems very thorough, and one of the most incredibly useful things Schoolism offers is access to other students' feedback videos (not sure if this differs, but so far it's been 30+ of them per lesson)! After watching a lesson, I tend to try and find some student feedback videos that show students' work that seems similar to what I think I would do, and I see what Nathan thinks of it. That has actually been pretty invaluable to me so far, and what's great is that he seems to drop other pieces of wisdom in those videos that he may not have had reason to in the lesson. They are surprisingly informative, and a great supplemental to the lesson videos.
    lyrium wrote: »
    Those are awesome!
    He made a good point about softening some areas.

    He did indeed!

    Iruka
  • kevindeekevindee Registered User regular
    Ooh! I took this class earlier this year. It's really great. It all fell apart at the seams for me when we had to work from value into colour, though, since that's one thing I have never been able to deal with. It just...feels wrong. I'd take his composition class when it comes out, but I just can't afford to drop a grand on these things anymore. It's a shame.

    You'll get a lot out of it, especially with your experience. Made me realise I have to work on composition and fundamental drawing skills a whole lot more.

    NightDragon
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited October 2014
    So minutes after sending off the assignment for Week 2, I check my email and see a message confirming that the due dates will always be on Thursdays....and that the due date for this assignment only showed up as Wednesday in the system because Nathan sent out the lesson videos a day early, last week. :P WELP. It's all sent off anyhow, so I'll post it here.

    Week 2:
    Limited-Value studies! Find artwork/images that have a strong sense of environment and/or conveys a story element. Pick reference that focuses on architecture and landscapes. At least half of the refs should have characters present. Use three values ONLY - no soft edges or blending. Simplify the piece, and try to capture what the piece is "about". (Matching the exact values seen in the reference piece is not as important as making sure the piece reads clearly, and the focus is drawn to the proper areas and/or characters. Make sure that the viewer can tell what the piece is about and that there are no confusing parts, just by looking at your study.)

    I tried not to be toooo concerned with exact shape/composition accuracy, and just focused on getting the "gist" of the piece down.

    This is resized in the post...but if you click on it you'll see a larger version, which is roughly a third of the original size. (I apologize for some of the images - the figures are a little small at this size...but trust me, they're there! :P )
    JMills_Schoolism_Week2.jpg

    NightDragon on
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  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited October 2014
    I love what you've done with the two in the top right hand corner especially - the values manage (I think) to tell a stronger story than the originals, at least in thumbnail form.

    edit: the wet city street in the middle, I feel like it could have used more of the lightest shade in the street itself? to evoke the reflective nature of the surface. But I know it's tough with only 3 values.

    tynic on
    NightDragontapeslinger
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    edit: the wet city street in the middle, I feel like it could have used more of the lightest shade in the street itself? to evoke the reflective nature of the surface. But I know it's tough with only 3 values.

    Yeah, that was actually something that I tried, at first. It seemed to compete too much with the sky and was causing the street to read weirdly. I think if complexity was okay, I might've been able to show reflectivity on the cobblestones using lots of little dots/lines...but I was kind of afraid of over-complicating everything and making the figures and horse carriages harder to read. It was a hard call but I agree more of that would have been nice! I just wasn't personally able to find something that I thought would work.

    I'm really curious to see what my feedback is for this week, actually. The last time I did an assignment like this - in college - the purpose of the studies had not really been explained to me very well...and what had been explained was confusing. This time, though, I felt like I understood the intent of the assignment much, much more.

    It's funny you mention the top right corner one - that was one of the pieces I was more nervous about. So thanks! :)

    tynic
  • NibCromNibCrom Registered User regular
    Wait. You made each of these studies in under an hour?

    F87
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    NibCrom wrote: »
    Wait. You made each of these studies in under an hour?

    To be totally honest, I'm not completely sure how long I spent on most of these, though the "under an hour" requirement seemed only explicitly stated for the first week's assignments. For the second week, because these were much further simplified and didn't have all the intricacies as the first week's assignment, I generally think I did spent under an hour on each. I didn't really keep track but I had a vague sense sometimes.

    The first week I think I spent just over an hour on a few (whoops), and 15-20 minutes on the super quick ones. The second week I think the fastest were done in 15-30 minutes, and I may have taken just under an hour for the very complex ones.

    NibCrom
  • NibCromNibCrom Registered User regular
    NibCrom wrote: »
    Wait. You made each of these studies in under an hour?

    To be totally honest, I'm not completely sure how long I spent on most of these, though the "under an hour" requirement seemed only explicitly stated for the first week's assignments. For the second week, because these were much further simplified and didn't have all the intricacies as the first week's assignment, I generally think I did spent under an hour on each. I didn't really keep track but I had a vague sense sometimes.

    The first week I think I spent just over an hour on a few (whoops), and 15-20 minutes on the super quick ones. The second week I think the fastest were done in 15-30 minutes, and I may have taken just under an hour for the very complex ones.

    guhhh howwwww

    I'm sure your answer will be practice and experience, but…

    Dang. That's really awesome. Keep at it. If I wanted to make anything look even 25% as good as those, it would probably take me like 18 hours.

  • KallistiKallisti Registered User regular
    Are these studies meant to be built on top of or would you put them to the side and use them as a visual aid when starting a real painting?

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Kallisti wrote: »
    Are these studies meant to be built on top of or would you put them to the side and use them as a visual aid when starting a real painting?

    I think the last set of studies was meant to be more of an exercise in simplifying and finding "what the piece is about" than it was meant to be used as a preliminary step towards a final rendering.

    While you probably could paint on top of them, I think they'd be more useful as a visual aid, since the values don't always necessarily correspond to the values in the final piece. This kind of study seemed to help me simplify a piece, and determine what was important and what was not important...and how to call the viewer's attention to the "main point" of the piece, and how to keep everything clear and easy to understand without the assistance of color, soft edges, or a full value range.

    He seemed to encourage the use of this method as a visual aid if a student felt they were struggling to simplify their environment (from this next week's assignment) into a clear statement.

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    Week 3:
    Shape and Line Language! Create five black and white thumbnails showcasing a variety of environments whose shape conveys a specific emotional quality. Create a prop for each thumbnail that exhibits the same emotional quality as the environment it is in.

    Students were a little lax with whether they were picking an emotion or an adjective, and Nathan didn't seem to mind when that happened, so I did that with my chosen "emotions", as well. I focused more on the environments than on the props...and I also tried to change up the genre of emotion, the camera angles/horizon line, and the value keys, to keep everything diverse.

    I felt a lot better about these towards the end than I did in the beginning...I messed around with a few a LOT, because I kept making everything too moody and soft, or even and compositionally boring. It's made me realize how much I level things out and kill any rhythm a piece may've had...a good thing to realize! :P I think some of the compositions are better than others - my favorite for composition is probably the last one, but I rushed the prop on that piece and it looks like a butt. I think it works well enough in the environment, though!

    The next assignment will involve picking one environment and prop, and rendering 'em up to a black and white final.

    This is resized in the post...but if you click on it you'll see a larger version, which is roughly a third of the original size.
    JMills_Schoolism_Week3.jpg

    NightDragon on
    ChicoBluetapeslingerKallistiNatriF87ProspicienceAngel_of_Bacon
  • KallistiKallisti Registered User regular
    Wow I really like the second one. Did you do the thumbnails first or the props?

    NightDragonProspicience
  • OllieOllie Registered User regular
    holy shit these are fantastic. How do I schoolism? I NEED TO SCHOOLISM. o____o

    actually I have a question...how do you motivate yourself to stay on top of your work? I've never been good at any online courses.

    NightDragon
  • NatriNatri Registered User regular
    Absolutely wonderful! So these are done without reference? Really beautiful work.

    www.instagram.com/ceneven
    NightDragon
  • sampangolinsampangolin Registered User regular
    Agree with Kallisti - Reverence is brilliant, the values feel perfect.

    Terror might work better from the guy's perspective. From up here I feel a bit removed and not very scared.

    Really enjoying this thread, keep it up!

    NightDragon
  • Arden CaneloArden Canelo Registered User regular
    You continue to be an inspiration to me, ND. Keep on keepin' on.

    OllieNightDragontapeslinger
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    Wow, thanks guys! :D
    Kallisti wrote: »
    Wow I really like the second one. Did you do the thumbnails first or the props?
    I did the thumbs first...I wanted to play with the prop shapes within the environment, rather than try to develop a prop when I wasn't 100% sure on what the environment would look like.

    Ollie wrote: »
    holy shit these are fantastic. How do I schoolism? I NEED TO SCHOOLISM. o____o

    actually I have a question...how do you motivate yourself to stay on top of your work? I've never been good at any online courses.
    YES YOU SHOULD SCHOOLISM! Everybody Schoolism! :3

    It's actually funny you ask that question...I'm honestly not all that great at self-motivation if I'm by myself, but I become very motivated and competitive in a school or class setting...and very motivated if I'm doing something for a job, since I have people relying on me and I know I'm part of a system that has to have all the "parts" working. Paying for this class and having the chance to learn and interact with Nathan Fowkes (whose work I've admired for a long time) has also been a great motivator - I want to get the most out of the class that I can.

    I recently got to a point where I looked at my work, saw the repeated problems I was making over and over...and said, "ya know what? The only way to fix this is with practice. Everybody makes mistakes - professionals make mistakes, I'm going to make mistakes, and I'm going to be okay with them." I've always kinda had this fear about making bad work...but something just clicked in my head recently where I feel a little better about making bad work, because in doing so I'll still be learning. I was told a few months ago to stop telling myself "I should be doing _____, I should be doing ____..." because it was a self-shaming mantra that made me feel bad and guilty. I was told to, instead, say "I WANT to do ____! I want to do _____!" because it's healthier...and if I learn that I don't want to do _____, then...maybe I don't do it right then. I've been training myself to switch over to the "want" for the past few months and realized that hey, I really want to improve. I really want to be great. And that has really changed my outlook on studies and making work in general - I feel like making bad art is just a step in the process of "getting better" now, as opposed to a hindrance.

    Not sure if that's at all useful to you, but that's where my recent motivation has come from. :)

    Natri wrote: »
    Absolutely wonderful! So these are done without reference? Really beautiful work.
    Thank you! I didn't use reference explicitly...but I would browse a handful of images that had the camera angle/subject/"mood" that I was aiming for before jumping into creating a thumbnail. For this assignment, I definitely used reference as more of a "brainstorming-assistant" than I used it as something to copy directly from.

    Terror might work better from the guy's perspective. From up here I feel a bit removed and not very scared.
    Yes, totally agree with you on that. I made a few initial sketches that I kept drawing over to make the terror more intense, and that would have been a very effective change as well. :)

    NightDragon on
    GethKallistisampangolin
  • ScosglenScosglen Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    These are some handsome studies, week 1 in particular is great.

    The latest assignment looks interesting, a bit tough, and very subjective. Personally, I read the gesture of monster in the Terror piece as being a little closer to "talk to the hand" than "rar I'm gonna get you". It's a sassy demon. I think Reverence is probably the most successful one of the bunch, even if it is a little bit on the nose conceptually.

    Scosglen on
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    Scosglen wrote: »
    These are some handsome studies, week 1 in particular is great.

    The latest assignment looks interesting, a bit tough, and very subjective. Personally, I read the gesture of monster in the Terror piece as being a little closer to "talk to the hand" than "rar I'm gonna get you". It's a sassy demon. I think Reverence is probably the most successful one of the bunch, even if it is a little bit on the nose conceptually.

    It was a pretty tough assignment. I can see what you mean with the demon - I tried to draw the hand as grasping initially, but I kept fiddling with it and trying to make it not feel "weak", and ended up just saying "whatevs", and taking the easy way out so I could just move on. If that's the one I end up rendering out, I'll take another shot at it for sure.

    I saw a lot of students do "awe", and I knew I wanted something that felt really...mystical/pious/impressive/"graceful in strength"/etc...without using the term "awe", and landed on "reverence". I tried to find something not as literal (and something that was an actual emotion rather than an adjective), but I couldn't find the exact term I was looking for. I did have a lot of fun coming up with some intriguing word-lists, though! (thesaurus.com is my BFF.)

    NightDragon on
    Geth
  • kevindeekevindee Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    This is all really subjective, and all those thumbs read nicely, but I feel like you relied more on what your subject matter is to get the emotion, rather than the shape language itself. I mean, i get reverence, because there's a giant statue of a praying woman. I get terror, cause there's a huge monster in there. I get mystery, because it's foggy and there's ghosts. But if the subjects were left out, or replaced, or left vague, what could be done to make the simple shapes of the environment suggest the same emotion? You also have a similar value structure in a lot of the thumbs, going from dark to light, and being generally low-key. I did too, and I got chewed out a bit for it.

    Post your crits when you get 'em, because this kind of stuff is easy to pick at but reaaaallly hard to try and improve on - these are all good, so it'd be interesting to see what Nathan says.

    kevindee on
    m3nace
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    kevindee wrote: »
    This is all really subjective, and all those thumbs read nicely, but I feel like you relied more on what your subject matter is to get the emotion, rather than the shape language itself. I mean, i get reverence, because there's a giant statue of a praying woman. I get terror, cause there's a huge monster in there. I get mystery, because it's foggy and there's ghosts. But if the subjects were left out, or replaced, or left vague, what could be done to make the simple shapes of the environment suggest the same emotion? You also have a similar value structure in a lot of the thumbs, going from dark to light, and being generally low-key. I did too, and I got chewed out a bit for it.

    Post your crits when you get 'em, because this kind of stuff is easy to pick at but reaaaallly hard to try and improve on - these are all good, so it'd be interesting to see what Nathan says.

    Well, I wanted to try to get the shape and line language in without it reading as cartoony or too stylized...I could have pushed it more, but I think I held back a little because I was afraid it might be too much if I was aiming for a bit more realism. I didn't really focus enough on the props at all, but I'd like to for this week's render. Here's what I was thinking for the shape and line language:
    For contentment, I tried to include soft, rounded shapes and a background that was mostly flat, but slightly curved. For reverence I focused mainly on very strong vertical lines and a sense of order and regularity. Terror involved sharp shapes, lack of order, hard edges and a slightly askew horizon. Mystery was also a bit "creepy", and I think was the least successful for shape-language...I tried misted, wavy shapes in the background, and uneven spindly twigs in the foreground. Exhilaration involved a sharply tilted horizon and large swooping dynamic contrails.

    In the lesson and feedback videos, it seemed that things like atmospheric perspective/fogginess were okay...even though that isn't really "shape" language. I decided to use that now and then, even though it wasn't necessarily the lesson focus.

    He marked my environment thumbs as "excellent" and the props "good", but did mark me down for the lack of development (polish in all, shape/line language in some) in the props, which I agree with. He made a few adjustments on the environment thumbs which I thought were really good crits, and hit the nail on the head with what I struggled with a bit (I'm not very good at allowing black and white thumbnails to get really dark or really bright, it always felt like too little contrast, too small of a value range...he had emphasized "clarity" in previous lessons so I was afraid to have things not read clearly). His changes were: he lessened the contrast in "Contentment", and brought the background to a more non-contrasted midtone (I kept feeling like I was somehow making things feel too "harsh", mainly due to the dark canopy, but I couldn't tell how to remove that darkness and "fix it"....turned out that when he removed the contrast from the tree a bit AND brought the whole background contrast down, that really calmed down the entire picture). "Reverence" and "Terror" he made no changes to. "Mystery" was stretched vertically, had the horizon tilted much more sharply, brought the values down a lot but kept the glowing figures bright (he hilariously said "you might hate what I'm doing here" as he was tweaking that image, but I really, really liked what he ended up with. It was much more mysterious/creepy after his tweaks). Exhilaration only got a contrast boost.

    I think if I'd allowed myself to go cartoony or really stylized, the shape/line language would've been way, way easier for me to make obvious. I probably held myself back too much in my attempt to hit a more realistic look - I initially considered making some thumbs/props cartoony or whimsical, but cartoony isn't really what I want to do. So yeah. I think that above all, this class has really opened my eyes on the specific things I need to be working on. :P I might've had a vague sense of a few things that needed work (composition, architecture, etc), but seeing all these other parts that need work (contrast variance, camera angle variance, etc) is kind of....awesome? It feels like I have more clear directions on what to focus on than I did before.

    NightDragon on
    Iruka
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    So is your end goal pretty much totally photo-realistic work? What do you consider to be "too cartoony", out of curiosity?

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    So is your end goal pretty much totally photo-realistic work? What do you consider to be "too cartoony", out of curiosity?

    Not photo-real necessarily, but realistic. I consider Dreamworks/Pixar movies to generally be "too cartoony" for what I'd like to do, though artistically they are stunning and gorgeous. I'm not 110% sure on the exact look that I want to aim for, yet, but I have some strong preferences.

    I'd like to incorporate some level of painterly-ness, like Craig Mullins' or Jaime Jones' work, thought probably not to the full extent that they use it:
    Barbarian%20Hill%20mainpage.jpg
    pirate.jpg

    I'd like to be able to sell scale like Thom Tenery:
    ThomTenery_GethenRising.jpg

    Understand how to play with color and lighting, and play with the inclusion of unusual/"imagined" colors and light like Nathan Fowkes:
    Look at all the colors in the grass!
    spirit_stallion_of_the_cimarron_background_01.jpg
    fowkes4.png

    ...or Thomas Scholes:
    respite.jpg
    ...or Ruan Jia:
    ruan_jia_01.jpg
    ...or this person from ArtStation (you can see what I'm looking for in the rocks, and the hyper-saturated colors that are unusually placed:
    ju-hui-zhou-20140830-2.jpg

    There are a LOT of artists' work that I can look at and say "wow, that is incredible, I want to be able to do that" but I think the main things that I keep on coming back to are the inclusion of interesting/unusual colors and light...a strong composition, and a look that is not too digitally clean/soft (aka the inclusion of SOME painterly strokes and texture here and there). Sometimes I also look at much less interpretive work, like the concept art from The Last of Us, and I think, "dang, that looks really good and is probably more along the lines of what high-end game and film studios would like to see"...but that look seems to have more technical/realistic requirements, and less room for playing with color. I think I'd like to try that out a bit too, and I think I can sneak some fun color into that look to keep it interesting to me, while still hitting more-or-less the level of realism that [the studio or vfx house or whathaveyou] would be looking for.

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Week 4:
    Rendering up the previous image. This one is a bit late!

    I honestly am not too happy with this. I tried to develop the prop more, and get some detail into the environment, but due to a handful of things this past week, I spent most of my free time sleeping really excessive amounts. I think I've been more interested in other weeks' assignments than this week's, since I know that if I'm given enough time, I can render everything to my heart's content. I didn't really feel like I'd learn much this week, which kinda killed my drive, and I also didn't really feel like rendering up any of my previous images, as I didn't feel I'd really developed any of them enough to make them really interesting.

    The plus side of this is that I do feel really motivated to do lots of sketches and stick with the rougher, earlier stages, and get lots of ideas out...through thumbnails, roughs, whathaveyou. Rendering is usually my favorite thing, and the earlier stages had always seemed like a necessary evil, so I'm glad at least that I'm feeling excited about the actual development process, now.

    I'm listening to music so if I'm run-on-sentencey that is why!

    Next assignment is due in two days and is supposed to be pretty involved, so we'll see how much I'm able to get done. I'm mainly focused on just catching up at this point, since next week is Thanksgiving and I've already mentioned that I will likely have to turn in that assignment a bit late (which should be fine). :)

    AUGH GO GO GO *flurry of papers and wacom pens*

    This is resized in the post...but if you click on it you'll see a larger version, which is roughly a third of the original size.
    JMills_Schoolism_Week4.jpg

    ChicoBlueAngel_of_BaconIrukatapeslingerKallistiProspicienceMoorkusJudasDisruptedCapitalist
  • OllieOllie Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    Sorry if you already described this and I just missed it...but when you do work like that, do you create the object first and the scenery second? If so, do you paint over the object or just do a whole new piece?


    also this last thing is siiiiiiq

    Ollie on
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Ollie wrote: »
    Sorry if you already described this and I just missed it...but when you do work like that, do you create the object first and the scenery second? If so, do you paint over the object or just do a whole new piece?

    When I was doing the thumbnail versions, I sketched the prop within the environment first, since I wanted to make sure it worked as part of the environment. I didn't want the environment to have to suit the prop - I wanted the reverse.

    Once I had an idea of what I wanted for the enviro/prop, I finished the prop first (drawing on top of the sketch to match the general silhouette/proportions), and then copied it over into the environment, where I gave it a lighting pass that matched the original sketch.

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited November 2014
    Week 5:
    Illustration! Create a new concept illustration of any subject that interests you based on the principles taught in the demonstration. Emphasize creating a compelling sense of space and environment through the use of shape language, color and light.

    I kinda threw the perspective down quickly, didn't pay too much attention to it, broke it, and didn't really have the time to correct it...:P I was trying to avoid losing too much time worrying about exact architecture and perspective...I think if I'd had a full week to do this it would've been more polished in those areas, but eh. I feel decent about it for a quick-ish environment.

    That being said, I feel pretty good about the colors and the general "idea". Could've been better, but I'll take it. :) I also feel pretty good about being caught up! WOO!

    This is resized in the post...but if you click on it you'll see a larger version, which is roughly a third of the original size.
    JMills_Schoolism_Week5.jpg


    NightDragon on
    ChicoBlueIrukatapeslingerF87Angel_of_BaconNatriMoorkustynicScottyJudasBrolo
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited December 2014
    Week 6:
    Architecture! Design and style a section of architecture to give it a specific emotion and history using the principles of visual communication discussed in class. Clearly label your work with the emotion you're targeting.

    Still catching up from the week off I had during Thanksgiving...

    I like the overall idea for this, and noticed that in many of Nathan's feedback videos for other students, he mentioned that he hadn't really seen any organic architecture. I decided to try that out rather than do the standard "built" architecture that I was originally planning.

    This had to be done faster than I would've liked (today is actually when the 7th week's assignment is due - but I'm going to try to get it done by the weekend...it's already in progress!) and needs more set-dressing, more "whimsy", more built elements...more development sketches and a few material callouts.....BUT! I like the end result pretty well, all that aside. :)

    JMills_Schoolism_Week6.jpg

    NightDragon on
    tynicJudas
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    Some foreground elements would do wonders for this one, but I do like the playful shape of the building. I feel like I need something in there for scale.

    NightDragon
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    Some foreground elements would do wonders for this one, but I do like the playful shape of the building. I feel like I need something in there for scale.

    Yep, totally agree. I was also considering the word "playful" for this, as opposed to whimsical...which, after having just watched my feedback from Nathan - ended up being the way that he described it as well. :)

    He also suggested adding additional bits of intentionally-manipulated setdressing (as I had figured would be good to add)...and to further the "whimsical" aspect, he suggested I could focus more on caricaturization and silly shapes, as opposed to keeping everything so elegant.

    I've realized through taking this class that I reeeeally, really love creating elegant shapes, perhaps to a fault. I like images that have a pretty level balance of lights, midtones and darks, and images that have really theatrical lighting. I should probably practice making environments that are radically different to avoid hiding in that comfort zone of "I know how to do this relatively well".

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited December 2014
    Week 7:
    Catching up! Week 7 is the start of our final assignment. I am feeling insanely rushed through this due to my current life-schedule, but I came up with a handful of ideas that I'm pretty happy with. I need to complete a color rough by Thursday night.

    Here's what I'm generally aiming for:

    Port City
    Moroccan/Babylonian/Alhambra styling
    Epic, tall structures (emphasize verticality)
    Smooth, graceful
    Ancient architecture that is highly advanced, maybe almost futuristic
    Wealthy, opulent
    Dark framing foreground?

    Materials:
    Limestone (pale cream colored stone, various vibrant fabrics, maybe paint)
    Winches, ropes
    Mediterranean decorative plants

    Style:
    Hudson River School / Romantic Orientalism
    Thomas Cole / Hubert Robert / David Roberts
    - many small figures give sense of scale
    - figures dwarfed by large architecture
    - atmospheric perspective
    - largest structures extend out of frame


    The green dots are the ones I feel best about right now. Let me know what you think!

    JMills_Schoolism_Week7.jpg

    NightDragon on
    Kallisti
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    I feel like the bottom two are the only ones that have potential to really show off your theme, as the others are so pulled back they feel almost ghostly. I think you can really get a grand sense from the bottom right and still get in some context and detail in the middle and forground. You'll have more opportunities to get your materials in play a little more up close, where on the other two it would only be suggested.

    tapeslingertynic
  • NatriNatri Registered User regular
    My favorite is the bottom right one. If you're going for verticality, I think the more square composition of the right one helps emphasize that, compared to the wider comp of the bottom left. Iruka also made a good point about the possibility for detail up close.

    P.S.
    I am friggin jealous of your overall skill level.

    www.instagram.com/ceneven
    NightDragontapeslingertynic
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    I'm leaning towards the bottom right as well, for the same reasons. It's funny because I never do square compositions...but after stretching the 2nd-to last around a bit, I noticed that the square aspect ratio might actually work in this case. I feel like the composition isn't......completely there, yet...needs more value-shape design and less "leaving this to chance olol" but hopefully I'll figure that out a bit further in this upcoming assignment for Thursday.

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