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The Even Cooler Stuff From [History] Thread

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Posts

  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    Man, I just fell down a wikipedia hole reading about naval line battles, like with tallships and that, and movies and video games really don't communicate the scale of historic naval battles at all do they? Like the battle of the Nile, one of Nelson's most famous victories. The French ship L'Orient exploded after a fire started belowdecks and a thousand sailors died in the explosion.

    A thousand dudes on one ship gone in a flash of gunpowder that was so powerful that it ejected material in a radius of more than 500 meters, and actually burst seams on nearby vessels, nearly sinking them with the concussive force alone.

    It's kind of staggering even imagining the brutality of naval warfare of the time. Dudes missing 3/4 of their limbs propped up on deck barking orders and whatnot.

    ElvenshaeDuke 2.0Kana
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    Fun fact, they recovered the Mainmast from Orient and made it into a coffin, which Nelson later was laid in

    ElvenshaeGnome-Interruptuschrishallett83Metzger MeisterL Ron HowardSmrtniknever die
  • [Expletive deleted][Expletive deleted] The mediocre doctor NorwayRegistered User regular
    Man, I just fell down a wikipedia hole reading about naval line battles, like with tallships and that, and movies and video games really don't communicate the scale of historic naval battles at all do they? Like the battle of the Nile, one of Nelson's most famous victories. The French ship L'Orient exploded after a fire started belowdecks and a thousand sailors died in the explosion.

    A thousand dudes on one ship gone in a flash of gunpowder that was so powerful that it ejected material in a radius of more than 500 meters, and actually burst seams on nearby vessels, nearly sinking them with the concussive force alone.

    It's kind of staggering even imagining the brutality of naval warfare of the time. Dudes missing 3/4 of their limbs propped up on deck barking orders and whatnot.

    Master and Commander is pretty good, at least. (I'm thinking of the movie; I haven't read the book.)

    Sic transit gloria mundi.
    ElvenshaeFairchilddoomybearDuke 2.0DisruptedCapitalistEvermourn
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    edited October 2018
    The books are, as is so often the case, much better - and my love for the movie is difficult to overstate.

    I have the honor to be your humble and most obendient servant, et c., et c.

    Elvenshae on
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    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
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  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    Man, I just fell down a wikipedia hole reading about naval line battles, like with tallships and that, and movies and video games really don't communicate the scale of historic naval battles at all do they? Like the battle of the Nile, one of Nelson's most famous victories. The French ship L'Orient exploded after a fire started belowdecks and a thousand sailors died in the explosion.

    A thousand dudes on one ship gone in a flash of gunpowder that was so powerful that it ejected material in a radius of more than 500 meters, and actually burst seams on nearby vessels, nearly sinking them with the concussive force alone.

    It's kind of staggering even imagining the brutality of naval warfare of the time. Dudes missing 3/4 of their limbs propped up on deck barking orders and whatnot.

    Dude. Oh, dude. The mental imagery of a cannonball punching through a hull and showering everyone within ~30-40 feet with wood splinter shrapnel is utterly horrifying, that shit was absolutely barbaric. Sailors getting minced by grape shot, cannonballs scoring direct hits just punching a human being into an assortment of flying limbs and blood trails, actual footage of a real golden age of sail naval battle between two powers like Britain and France would far FAR exceed anything in even the most gruesome horror movie.

    ElvenshaeMetzger MeisterFiendishrabbitL Ron HowardSkeithfurlionMvrckBrainleechdoomybear
  • RedTideRedTide Registered User regular
    Man, I just fell down a wikipedia hole reading about naval line battles, like with tallships and that, and movies and video games really don't communicate the scale of historic naval battles at all do they? Like the battle of the Nile, one of Nelson's most famous victories. The French ship L'Orient exploded after a fire started belowdecks and a thousand sailors died in the explosion.

    A thousand dudes on one ship gone in a flash of gunpowder that was so powerful that it ejected material in a radius of more than 500 meters, and actually burst seams on nearby vessels, nearly sinking them with the concussive force alone.

    It's kind of staggering even imagining the brutality of naval warfare of the time. Dudes missing 3/4 of their limbs propped up on deck barking orders and whatnot.

    Dude. Oh, dude. The mental imagery of a cannonball punching through a hull and showering everyone within ~30-40 feet with wood splinter shrapnel is utterly horrifying, that shit was absolutely barbaric. Sailors getting minced by grape shot, cannonballs scoring direct hits just punching a human being into an assortment of flying limbs and blood trails, actual footage of a real golden age of sail naval battle between two powers like Britain and France would far FAR exceed anything in even the most gruesome horror movie.

    Hey, that little kid has a sword, look at him go!

    Oh....that grown man just kicked him into a pile of burning debris.

    RedTide#1907 on Battle.net
    Come Overwatch with meeeee
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  • FairchildFairchild Rabbit used short words that were easy to understand, like "Hello Pooh, how about Lunch ?" Registered User regular
    edited October 2018
    Man, I just fell down a wikipedia hole reading about naval line battles, like with tallships and that, and movies and video games really don't communicate the scale of historic naval battles at all do they? Like the battle of the Nile, one of Nelson's most famous victories. The French ship L'Orient exploded after a fire started belowdecks and a thousand sailors died in the explosion.

    A thousand dudes on one ship gone in a flash of gunpowder that was so powerful that it ejected material in a radius of more than 500 meters, and actually burst seams on nearby vessels, nearly sinking them with the concussive force alone.

    It's kind of staggering even imagining the brutality of naval warfare of the time. Dudes missing 3/4 of their limbs propped up on deck barking orders and whatnot.

    Dude. Oh, dude. The mental imagery of a cannonball punching through a hull and showering everyone within ~30-40 feet with wood splinter shrapnel is utterly horrifying, that shit was absolutely barbaric. Sailors getting minced by grape shot, cannonballs scoring direct hits just punching a human being into an assortment of flying limbs and blood trails, actual footage of a real golden age of sail naval battle between two powers like Britain and France would far FAR exceed anything in even the most gruesome horror movie.

    The Patrick O'Brian series of Aubrey/Maturin novels, the source of the movie MASTER & COMMANDER, gives a very good sense of this, altho the main characters purposefully do not take part in fleet actions in the novels.

    EDIT- Just scrolled up and read some of the earlier posts. The O'Brian books are very much worth reading; Itunes has all of them as books-on-tape read by the late Broadway actor Patrick Tull, who performs the dialogue with great skill and panache.

    Fairchild on
    Elvenshaedoomybear
  • AkilaeAkilae Registered User regular
    Fairchild wrote: »
    Man, I just fell down a wikipedia hole reading about naval line battles, like with tallships and that, and movies and video games really don't communicate the scale of historic naval battles at all do they? Like the battle of the Nile, one of Nelson's most famous victories. The French ship L'Orient exploded after a fire started belowdecks and a thousand sailors died in the explosion.

    A thousand dudes on one ship gone in a flash of gunpowder that was so powerful that it ejected material in a radius of more than 500 meters, and actually burst seams on nearby vessels, nearly sinking them with the concussive force alone.

    It's kind of staggering even imagining the brutality of naval warfare of the time. Dudes missing 3/4 of their limbs propped up on deck barking orders and whatnot.

    Dude. Oh, dude. The mental imagery of a cannonball punching through a hull and showering everyone within ~30-40 feet with wood splinter shrapnel is utterly horrifying, that shit was absolutely barbaric. Sailors getting minced by grape shot, cannonballs scoring direct hits just punching a human being into an assortment of flying limbs and blood trails, actual footage of a real golden age of sail naval battle between two powers like Britain and France would far FAR exceed anything in even the most gruesome horror movie.

    The Patrick O'Brian series of Aubrey/Maturin novels, the source of the movie MASTER & COMMANDER, gives a very good sense of this, altho the main characters purposefully do not take part in fleet actions in the novels.

    EDIT- Just scrolled up and read some of the earlier posts. The O'Brian books are very much worth reading; Itunes has all of them as books-on-tape read by the late Broadway actor Patrick Tull, who performs the dialogue with great skill and panache.

    Gee, thanks. After spending all that money to get the complete collection, I now have to spend more money to get the audiobooks!

    [Expletive deleted]ElvenshaeV1mdoomybearnever die
  • Kipling217Kipling217 Registered User regular
    Man, I just fell down a wikipedia hole reading about naval line battles, like with tallships and that, and movies and video games really don't communicate the scale of historic naval battles at all do they? Like the battle of the Nile, one of Nelson's most famous victories. The French ship L'Orient exploded after a fire started belowdecks and a thousand sailors died in the explosion.

    A thousand dudes on one ship gone in a flash of gunpowder that was so powerful that it ejected material in a radius of more than 500 meters, and actually burst seams on nearby vessels, nearly sinking them with the concussive force alone.

    It's kind of staggering even imagining the brutality of naval warfare of the time. Dudes missing 3/4 of their limbs propped up on deck barking orders and whatnot.

    What sucks even more is that dying in battle was practically an outlier. Most sailors died as a result of disease coupled with malnutrition.

    The Royal Navy lost about 6000 men in battle, 13 000 to drownings, shipwrecks and fire and 72 000 to disease and wounds not caused in battle(accidents). Though a portion of the last part probably did include wounds sustained in battle that caused infection.

    Even so disease alone probably killed more people then all the other causes put together.

    Communicating from the last of the Babylon Stations.
    Ticaldfjam
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Man, I just fell down a wikipedia hole reading about naval line battles, like with tallships and that, and movies and video games really don't communicate the scale of historic naval battles at all do they? Like the battle of the Nile, one of Nelson's most famous victories. The French ship L'Orient exploded after a fire started belowdecks and a thousand sailors died in the explosion.

    A thousand dudes on one ship gone in a flash of gunpowder that was so powerful that it ejected material in a radius of more than 500 meters, and actually burst seams on nearby vessels, nearly sinking them with the concussive force alone.

    It's kind of staggering even imagining the brutality of naval warfare of the time. Dudes missing 3/4 of their limbs propped up on deck barking orders and whatnot.

    Dude. Oh, dude. The mental imagery of a cannonball punching through a hull and showering everyone within ~30-40 feet with wood splinter shrapnel is utterly horrifying, that shit was absolutely barbaric. Sailors getting minced by grape shot, cannonballs scoring direct hits just punching a human being into an assortment of flying limbs and blood trails, actual footage of a real golden age of sail naval battle between two powers like Britain and France would far FAR exceed anything in even the most gruesome horror movie.

    Especially since many naval vessels had what we would view as children on board (children who had combat roles). Both as officers apprentices, and as powder boys (since the gun-decks were cramped children were used to haul gunpowder to the guns).

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    ElvenshaeBlackDragon480
  • FairchildFairchild Rabbit used short words that were easy to understand, like "Hello Pooh, how about Lunch ?" Registered User regular
    O'Brian makes the point that for Midshipmen, the "entry level" officer's rank in the Royal Navy, 15 or 16 was considered too old. 13 or even 12 years old was the preferred age range.

    Elvenshae
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Fairchild wrote: »
    O'Brian makes the point that for Midshipmen, the "entry level" officer's rank in the Royal Navy, 15 or 16 was considered too old. 13 or even 12 years old was the preferred age range.

    Ship/powder boys (recruited from orphanages and seamen's families) could be as young as 6-8 years old when they first went to sea.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    ElvenshaeLoisLaneKana
  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    The Captain of L'Orient actually had his 12 year old son with him. They were both seriously wounded by cannon fire, with the son losing most of a leg, before the ship exploded. Some harrowing tales from those days.

  • EchoEcho Moderator mod
    I give you... HMS Manligheten, built between 1901-1903, pictured here in 1906.

    PDvqXap.jpg

    HMS Manligheten was classified as a "pansarfartyg", which I'm told was known as a coastal defense ship in English. Not quite a battleship, but they had a smaller draft and were thus popular in Nordic navies due to their coastal terrain.

    Also "Manligheten" means "the manliness".

    Here pictured in 1941 after a refit.

    ngVFJoF.jpg

    Echo wrote: »
    Let they who have not posted about their balls in the wrong thread cast the first stone.
    ElvenshaeHefflingkime
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    It's more equivalent to a armored cruiser in terms of capability. It only had two 21cm L/44 guns and a secondary battery of 6x152mm and 10x57mm guns (6 of the 57mm guns would later be replaced by AA guns), which means that the armaments were about equivalent to the USS Pennsylvania class, although packed into a much more compact hull.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    Elvenshae
  • AridholAridhol Registered User regular
    I don't have anything to contribute except that I could go for another 20 pages or so of cool naval shit.

    ElvenshaeHappylilElfRchanenForarDoodmann
  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    Echo wrote: »
    I give you... HMS Manligheten, built between 1901-1903, pictured here in 1906.

    PDvqXap.jpg

    HMS Manligheten was classified as a "pansarfartyg", which I'm told was known as a coastal defense ship in English. Not quite a battleship, but they had a smaller draft and were thus popular in Nordic navies due to their coastal terrain.

    Also "Manligheten" means "the manliness".

    Here pictured in 1941 after a refit.

    ngVFJoF.jpg

    Yeah my pants are farty too

    hawkboxCelestialBadgerBlackDragon480knitdanSmrtnik
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    edited October 2018
    Three Pansarskepp more deserving of being called "Not quite a battleship" were HMS Sverige (Sweden), HMS Gustav V, HMS Drottning Victoria (Queen Victoria).
    victorie_o_g5_510d6e449606ee09b735e718.jpg
    In picture we can see HMS Drottning Victoria and HMS Gustav V at rest in a calm sea.

    The history behind these ships are among the most unusual in Sweden. The first ship of the class, HMS Sweden was funded by private individuals in the pre-internet equivalent of a Kickstarter.

    In 1911 the Liberal party under Karl Staaff came to power, and as they had promised in the election they drasticly reduced funds to the military (Great job there. Reducing the military budget in 1911... needless to say that military budget was drasticly increased 3 years later). As a part of that cutback the plans to build an "F-boat", a new more capable coastal defense vessel, was scrapped. Well, some people in Sweden weren't happy about that, not happy at all. In 1912 not one but two separate associations were formed. "Nationalinsamling till förmån för sjöförsvaret" (National fundraiser for the benefit of the coastal defence) and the more famous "Svenska pansarbåtsföreningen" (Swedish armored boat association). Svenskapansarsbåtsföreningen was founded January 26th. By joining each member pledged to contribute a sum equivalent to 1/3rd of his annual taxes, each year between 1912 and 1914, for the purpose of building an F-boat.
    By May 4th the association had raised 17 million SEK, and since the money required to build an F-boat was at that time 11.6 million they decided to approach King Gustav V (who was technically the High commander of the Swedish military, and that title was a lot less ceremonial in 1912 than it is now) with their offer. 22nd May, after a Parlimentary hearing, the king ordered that the navy would start to build what would become HMS Sweden. HMS Sweden was launched in 1915, and put into service in 1917. HMS Drottning Victoria and HMS Gustav V were put into service in 1921 and 1922 respectively and were the largest ships to ever serve in the swedish navy.


    Despite being very compact (with a displacement of 7600 tons) it had a very respectable armament and a top speed of 23 knots. At the beginning of WWII they were armed with:
    Main battery:
    4 x 283mm/L45. Bofors M/12 (~11 inch), mounted in two turrets.

    Secondary battery:
    6 x 152mm/L50 Bofors M/12 (6 inch)
    4 x 25mm Bofors autocannons M/32

    AA armaments:
    4 x 75mm/L60. Bofors AA-guns M/28
    6 x 40mm Bofors AA-guns M/36 (the same model that would grace almost every allied ship in the war)
    3 x 20 mm Bofors AA-autocannons M/40
    4 x 8mm AA-mgs M/36


    P.S: During most of WWII HMS Drottning Victoria had the service of Skeppshunden Nicke (Nicke the ship's dog). He mustered 1940 at the rank of Able Seadog, but were later promoted to Corporal and to Sergeant in 1943.

    medium_012uMWwjqvjV.jpg
    (Nicke in his parade uniform. With him are the Birgit and Margit Forshell, wife and daughter of Captain Forshell, as well as Barbro Ericsson)

    dsc0006-nicke.jpg
    Seadog Nicke's servicebook, and essential part of any sailors documentation.

    Fiendishrabbit on
    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    hawkboxFencingsaxGnome-InterruptusElvenshaeRchanenBlackDragon480furlionForarEvermournL Ron HowardHefflingAresProphetTicaldfjamSmrtniknever die
  • EchoEcho Moderator mod
    Echo wrote: »
    Let they who have not posted about their balls in the wrong thread cast the first stone.
    FiendishrabbitFencingsaxGnome-InterruptusElvenshaehonoveretynicRMS OceanicN1tSt4lkerDouglasDangershrykedestroyah87Duke 2.0lonelyahavaLoisLaneRchanenRedTideDisruptedCapitalistfurlionSkeithEvermourngrumblethornL Ron HowardHefflingvalhalla130Teriferinkimechrishallett83Smrtniknever die
  • KrieghundKrieghund Registered User regular
    Fuck you AND your grill! I got a golden eye, mofo!

    FencingsaxElvenshaeLoisLaneBlackDragon480furlionSkeithEchoN1tSt4lkervalhalla130chrishallett83TicaldfjamSmrtniknever die
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    "Yeah, I'll take 'Historical Badasses' for $500, Alex."

    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
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  • RedTideRedTide Registered User regular
    I could see people 5,000 years ago centering their local religious practices around a six foot tall woman, yes.

    RedTide#1907 on Battle.net
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  • NyysjanNyysjan FinlandRegistered User regular
    RedTide wrote: »
    I could see people 5,000 years ago centering their local religious practices around a six foot tall woman, yes.

    It's better basis for religion than we got today.

    EchoDouglasDangervalhalla130RedTidechrishallett83Ticaldfjam
  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    a giiiant wooomaaan, a giant woman~! :whistle:

    tynicFencingsaxhonovereDouglasDangerdoomybearchrishallett83
  • Eat it You Nasty Pig.Eat it You Nasty Pig. tell homeland security 'we are the bomb'Registered User regular
    further naval history: you see upthread some examples of dazzle camoflage, or in more colloquial terms, 'the ol' razzle dazzle.' Ships painted like these guys

    razzledazzle02.jpg?auto=compress,format&cs=tinysrgb&max-w=1300&fit=max

    3fg8ttcxmmtqkftqj20r.jpg

    saw service beginning in WW1 through the end of WW2.

    in an era when naval gunnery was usually sighted using manual triangulation (two overlapping scopes with a known angle between them), dazzle camo was thought to make rangefinding more difficult, and also to disguise ships' heading.

    By the end of WW2 radar made this sort of thing mostly irrelevant, but the british navy still painted similar designs on their ships as a morale booster (competitions would be held between crews)

    NREqxl5.jpg
    do you lack faith, brother?
    or do you believe?
    LindMetzger MeisterRMS OceanicfurlionN1tSt4lkerL Ron HowardGnome-InterruptusHefflingForarDoodmannKasynvalhalla130adejaanchrishallett83Mvrcknever die
  • Styrofoam SammichStyrofoam Sammich WANT. 5386-8443-8937Registered User regular
    The Royal Navy just spent a ton of money on a the cosmetic micro transations, that's all.

    FencingsaxMetzger MeisterDirtmuncherPolaritieElvenshaeCaptain InertiaN1tSt4lkerAridholL Ron HowardHefflingKasynkimeAresProphetRhesus Positivechrishallett83SmrtnikMvrckVerminionnever die
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    edited October 2018
    Sweden actually never used Dazzle camoflage. Dazzle camoflage was only used by high seas navies, while Swedens navy was mainly intended to be used to defend the archipelago.

    As such, Swedish ships had camoflage that was supposed to help them to do this
    nkmnowi6u9zz.jpg
    (I am NOT HMS Göta Lejon. I am totally just a part of this small island. Just one of 80000+ Islands. Nothing to see here.).

    Fiendishrabbit on
    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    FencingsaxMoridin889knitdanBrainleechSkeithMetzger MeisterSolarshrykefurlionPolaritieKayne Red RobeElvenshaeDuke 2.0EchoKruiteKadokenShortyAridholL Ron HowardGnome-Interruptusdestroyah87HefflingForarKasynMagellvalhalla130doomybearTeriferinBurtletoykimeAresProphetchrishallett83CarpyAl_watSmrtnikMvrcklonelyahavaVerminionMr Raynever die
  • TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    I fuckin' love dazzle camo

    LindMetzger MeisterfurlionElvenshaeKadokenStyrofoam SammichKasynvalhalla130adejaanchrishallett83
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Oh, and if you think "That would be waaay easier to see if it was in colour!"

    This is a WIllemoes-class fast attack craft.
    WILLEMOESKorsoer1999.jpg

    This is also a Willemoes-class fast attack craft.
    Kamoufleret-Willemoes.jpg

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    FencingsaxSkeithBursarMetzger MeisterEvermournLindshrykeNyysjanfurlionElvenshaeEchoCouscousL Ron HowardGnome-InterruptusTynnanHefflingForarvalhalla130doomybearkimeRhesus Positivechrishallett83SmrtnikMvrcklonelyahavaVerminionnever die
  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    The painting of ships has a long tradition! Ancient people would often paint their vessels, and Horatio Nelson would have a pattern (black and yellow stripes, such as on the HMS Victory) after him, Nelson's Chequer. It aided in differentiation of friendly ships vs enemy ships in the heat of battle. Obviously you'd look for the colors, but it wasn't always so easy, especially if a vessel had lost it's masts!

  • EvermournEvermourn Registered User regular
    RedTide wrote: »
    I could see people 5,000 years ago centering their local religious practices around a six foot tall woman, yes.

    I believe she even inspired a film, of course being Hollywood they had to exaggerate.
    hslzxjym706t.jpg

    LoisLaneElvenshaeKadokenL Ron HowardFencingsaxnever die
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    I was reminded of H Rider Haggard's She

    GvzbgulN1tSt4lker
  • Mc zanyMc zany Registered User regular
    The Royal Navy just spent a ton of money on a the cosmetic micro transations, that's all.

    Gold plated ships incoming!

    Elvenshae
  • PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    The Royal Navy just spent a ton of money on a the cosmetic micro transations, that's all.

    I think at that scale they're clearly macro transactions.

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  • NyysjanNyysjan FinlandRegistered User regular
    Polaritie wrote: »
    The Royal Navy just spent a ton of money on a the cosmetic micro transations, that's all.

    I think at that scale they're clearly macro transactions.

    Not when compared to the price of the ship itself.

    Elvenshae
  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    Nyysjan wrote: »
    Polaritie wrote: »
    The Royal Navy just spent a ton of money on a the cosmetic micro transations, that's all.

    I think at that scale they're clearly macro transactions.

    Not when compared to the price of the ship itself.

    Mobile games are already charging like One-Fucking-Hundred USD or more for some of their bullshit (Galaxy of Heroes, I'm looking at you), so 'micro transactions' can just be assumed to be said sarcastically and possibly with a wanking motion included for effect.

    Also, those Swedish ships are amazing. It's a real life 3D eye puzzler thing, and I really do want to see the sailboat there, but at best I can kind of pick out where one end is and maybe some detailing that probably isn't natural terrain.

    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKER!
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  • valhalla130valhalla130 13 Dark Shield Perceives the GodsRegistered User regular
    Tynnan wrote: »
    I fuckin' love dazzle camo

    I love it so much I tried to do a simple dazzle pattern on my Imperial Guaard Valhallan tanks for Warhammer 40k.

    KadokenHefflingnever die
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    So, in an interesting revelation, apparently 1988 presidential candidate Gary Hart was set up by legendary ratfucker Lee Atwater, who set things up to get the infamous picture from the Monkey Business:
    Considering what American culture has swallowed as irrelevant or forgivable since then, it may be difficult to imagine that allegations of a consensual extramarital affair might really have caused an otherwise-favored presidential candidate to leave the race. Yet anyone who was following American politics at the time can tell you that this occurred. For anyone who wasn’t around, there is Bai’s book and an upcoming film based on it: The Front Runner, starring Hugh Jackman as Hart.

    But was the plotline of Hart’s self-destruction too perfect? Too convenient? Might the nascent Bush campaign, with Atwater as its manager, have been looking for a way to help a potentially strong opponent leave the field?

    “I thought there was something fishy about the whole thing from the very beginning,” Strother recalled. “Lee told me that he had set up the whole Monkey Business deal. ‘I did it!’ he told me. ‘I fixed Hart.’ After he called me that time, I thought, My God! It’s true!”

    What is really disheartening is that it took so long for this to come out.

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    valhalla130
  • ShortyShorty JUDGE BROSEF Registered User regular
    gary hart was a notorious womanizer anyway and we're well rid of him

    the fact that he was a frontrunner, and that it took lee Atwater to force him out of politics, is a fact that democrats should be ashamed of

    Tube wrote: »
    I was legit hoping that Shorty was somehow mistaken and the world wasn't that fucked
    Gvzbgul
  • doomybeardoomybear Hi People Registered User regular
    edited October 2018
    Anyone here watched the Netflix (US) show Empire Games? I'm curious, but I'm not expecting the actual history to be very accurate

    edit: nevermind, i watched half an episode and gave up on it

    the facts seem okay, if a bit big-man-history-y? but also, they're doing their darned-est to try and make it ominous/portentous/dramatic. I understand why they're trying to do that (it's a show), but i found it cringe-worthy

    doomybear on
    what a happy day it is
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