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Hey you, I saw that. Put it back! [Kids]

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    MorivethMoriveth BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWNRegistered User regular
    Entriech wrote: »
    A book some of you might not have heard of, as it's a seemingly well-kept Canadian secret is Robert Munsch's "Love You Forever". So far neither my wife nor her mother managed to make it through the book without weeping.

    Man fuck that book

    what are you talking about where did all these tears come from

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    bloodyroarxxbloodyroarxx Casa GrandeRegistered User regular
    Like seriously that book isn't fair you just cant make people cry on command like that

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    XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    Why not read the velveteen rabbit right after?!

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    Mom2KatMom2Kat Registered User regular
    Ah man now I have to dig my daughters copy out and read it to the boy.

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    GrobianGrobian What's on sale? Pliers!Registered User regular
    I don't really want to start this topic up, because we're all on the same page here anyway, but fucking 600 cases of measles in my city in 2015 (!) and some closed schools and day cares and already one dead toddler just makes me so angry.

    And my son will get his shot end of March, because he's still to little.

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    LanglyLangly Registered User regular
    Yeah I had love you forever as a kid

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    Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    We have it. I get the sweetness of it but I also find it kind of creepy.

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    TenTen Registered User regular
    Haha, we have a bunch of Robert Munsch - Taz really loves Moose, he follows along and says 'MOOOOSE' at the right times, as well as making snoring sounds when we get to the pages where the kid is waking up his parents, it's adorable.

    Love You Forever is great, but yes, it's a bit creepy - when I first read it and got to the bit about the mother climbing the ladder into her adult son's bedroom and crawling across the floor to see if he was asleep, I laughed my head off.

    I'm a little unsure about some of Munsch's books, the kids in them can be little shits and while Taz isn't really old enough to be influenced by that now, I'm a bit worried about it as he gets older. Thomas's Snowsuit in particular just rewards the little kid for being an obstinate shit.

    Taz loves books so much though, and that makes me so happy. He's constantly bringing us books to read and seeing him start to follow along and do little actions at the right time is so damned cool.

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    TenTen Registered User regular
    edited February 2015
    Relevant:
    xegllia4z6sh.png

    Ten on
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    El SkidEl Skid The frozen white northRegistered User regular
    Good Night Moon is a great book- I read it to my daughter every night for like a couple of years, and I think it's a super great book for development.

    One of the best things about it is it has very detailed backgrounds with stuff in it, so you can play I spy type games even before they're verbal. "There's the red baloon! *you point*. What else in the room is red? Where's the puppy?"

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    SassoriSassori Registered User regular
    I read this book a lot as a kid. Shockingly, I liked it because it was about a little brunette girl with the name Sarah.

    Also, she had a lion.

    cuLyigz.jpg?1

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    DaMoonRulzDaMoonRulz Mare ImbriumRegistered User regular
    Does the lion represent Jesus?

    3basnids3lf9.jpg




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    XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    El Skid wrote: »
    Good Night Moon is a great book- I read it to my daughter every night for like a couple of years, and I think it's a super great book for development.

    One of the best things about it is it has very detailed backgrounds with stuff in it, so you can play I spy type games even before they're verbal. "There's the red baloon! *you point*. What else in the room is red? Where's the puppy?"

    For your little Who fan!

    http://goodnightkeithmoon.com/

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    SassoriSassori Registered User regular
    DaMoonRulz wrote: »
    Does the lion represent Jesus?

    Well, the lion shows up whenever Sarah's mother tells her she has to stay locked up in the castle and can't go out.

    So he's probably more like Satan because he encourages you not to listen to your parents and sneak outdoors.

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    Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    Grayson really enjoys Good Night IPad which is like a modern parody of Good Night Moon

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    Lindsay LohanLindsay Lohan Registered User regular
    I miss reading to Lucas. While I love that we still have a very specific bedtime routine, he is now reading giant books by himself instead of having us read him stories about sheep in a jeep or llamas who are wearing pajamas or hungry caterpillars. The positive is that kids that like to read really have it great now - there are so many options in the juvenile fiction age group compared to when I was a kid.

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    TheCanManTheCanMan GT: Gasman122009 JerseyRegistered User regular
    This is by far my favorite bedtime story. Nice rhyming scheme. Super fun cadence to read aloud. And the pacing is absolutely perfect for bedtime.

    Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site

    s0hh5HA.jpg

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    JihadJesusJihadJesus Registered User regular
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    This is by far my favorite bedtime story. Nice rhyming scheme. Super fun cadence to read aloud. And the pacing is absolutely perfect for bedtime.

    Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site

    s0hh5HA.jpg

    My son loves the shit out of this book. Love You Forever is horrible and clingy and I fucking loathe it.

    My favorites are the Martin Waddell Little Bear books, especially Let's Go Home, Little Bear. I almost fall asleep reading that out loud most times.

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    PeenPeen Registered User regular
    My beef is with "Guess how much I love you?" or as it should be titled, "I"m better than you in every way kid and you can't measure up so get used to it." What a piece of crap. I hate that book.

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    XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    I can't wait to spend the whole weekend with both of my boys.

    It's been a rough year for my oldest especially and I'm looking forward to just being around him.

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    Lindsay LohanLindsay Lohan Registered User regular
    My son was all about Sarah Boynton books when he was super little - The Bedtime Book, Bellybutton Book, Moo Baa La La La, and But Not the Hippopotamus all come to mind.

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    Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    The llama llama books are annoying.

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    DenadaDenada Registered User regular
    We're just about finished with the Magic Tree House series, or at least with the ones we have. The kids have really enjoyed it, although I do some light editing as I'm reading because sometimes Jack and Annie can be kind of insufferable. I'm glad to be finishing, because I'm getting a little tired of them.

    Unfortunately, that means I have to find some new chapter books to read at night. We tried the narnia books, but had to stop because the white witch was giving the girls nightmares. I'm hoping a few more My Little Pony books will be out soon, because those are always a safe bet.

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    DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    I never read the Dr. Seuss books when I was a kid, so it wasn't until we got them for Weston that I discovered just how wonderful they are. Green Eggs and Ham is clever, creative and teaches positive lessons. I love it.

    Switch Friend Code: SW-6732-9515-9697
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    schussschuss Registered User regular
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    I never read the Dr. Seuss books when I was a kid, so it wasn't until we got them for Weston that I discovered just how wonderful they are. Green Eggs and Ham is clever, creative and teaches positive lessons. I love it.

    Dr Seuss is rad. Some of the tongue twisters absolutely wreck me and bring out my slight speech impediment though, so I try to avoid those.

    First tooth is in at 6 months! The wave of happiness from it breaking through was insane. Kid must have been in crazy amounts of pain.

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    QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    My kid likes a lot of books. His current jam is the If You Give A... Specifically If You Give a Cat a Cupcake.

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    DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    I never read the Dr. Seuss books when I was a kid, so it wasn't until we got them for Weston that I discovered just how wonderful they are. Green Eggs and Ham is clever, creative and teaches positive lessons. I love it.

    Dr Seuss is rad. Some of the tongue twisters absolutely wreck me and bring out my slight speech impediment though, so I try to avoid those.

    First tooth is in at 6 months! The wave of happiness from it breaking through was insane. Kid must have been in crazy amounts of pain.

    Weston is getting his second molars. Poor guy was whimpering through the night and ibuprofen apparently wasn't doing the trick.

    Switch Friend Code: SW-6732-9515-9697
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    SyphyreSyphyre A Dangerous Pastime Registered User regular
    Quoth wrote: »
    My kid likes a lot of books. His current jam is the If You Give A... Specifically If You Give a Cat a Cupcake.

    My wife and I have started quoting these and making our own things up on these books.

    If you give a Jillian some yogurt...
    She'll want some cartoons to go with it.
    She'll ask you to watch Sofia. She'll want to sit in your lap.
    Sofia will remind her of other princesses. She'll ask you where's Elsa?

    And so on.

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    Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    If you get a chance read Owl Moon. It's a really sweet story

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    LanglyLangly Registered User regular
    one of henry's favorites right now is

    Journey

    12journey-articleLarge.jpg

    and the sequel

    Quest

    Quest-interior-2_zpsf5ecf06f.jpg


    They're by Aaron Becker, and they are really good. They are just pictures, you tell the story yourself.

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    Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    Oh wow, I should get those.

    My favorite thing now is Grayson wants to tell me a story so he'll sit there and make up a story and it's awesome.

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    SyphyreSyphyre A Dangerous Pastime Registered User regular
    TheCanMan wrote: »
    This is by far my favorite bedtime story. Nice rhyming scheme. Super fun cadence to read aloud. And the pacing is absolutely perfect for bedtime.

    Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site

    s0hh5HA.jpg

    I need to get this, this looks great.

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    davidsdurionsdavidsdurions Your Trusty Meatshield Panhandle NebraskaRegistered User regular
    Ugh. My child doesn't even like listening to books being read to her but I'm about to buy all these books aren't I? What have you done kids thread??

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    DidgeridooDidgeridoo Flighty Dame Registered User regular
    edited February 2015
    Denada wrote: »
    We're just about finished with the Magic Tree House series, or at least with the ones we have. The kids have really enjoyed it, although I do some light editing as I'm reading because sometimes Jack and Annie can be kind of insufferable. I'm glad to be finishing, because I'm getting a little tired of them.

    Unfortunately, that means I have to find some new chapter books to read at night. We tried the narnia books, but had to stop because the white witch was giving the girls nightmares. I'm hoping a few more My Little Pony books will be out soon, because those are always a safe bet.

    The Chrestomanci series by Diana Wynne Jones is really good! I hadn't read them as a child and actually started reading them out of curiosity when I saw them at my mother-in-law's place. Apparently her kids were all about them back in the day. Going through them now, they hold up very well, and the author's writing style is very relaxing. Good for bedtime stories, I'd guess.

    Didgeridoo on
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    LanglyLangly Registered User regular
    edited February 2015
    have you considered a series of unfortunate events?

    they actually have a lot of educational stuff in them, mostly vocabulary.

    Langly on
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    LanglyLangly Registered User regular
    like for instance:
    Books about law are notorious for being very long, very dull, and very difficult to read. This is one reason many lawyers make heaps of money. The money is an incentive - the word 'incentive' here means 'an offered reward to persuade you to do something you don't want to do' - to read long, dull, and difficult books.

    they're filled with stuff like that, and they're usually very witty.

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    QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    Diana Wynne Jones is the best. THE BEST.

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    djmitchelladjmitchella Registered User regular
    My 7-year-old's class is doing work about the Arctic and people who live there, and I guess he wound up writing a story about it as part of that work.

    Then he printed it out, made covers, and took it to the school library, where he convinced the librarian to give it a barcode and put it on the shelves.

    Yesterday, it turns out that another kid from his school was at the library and took Oliver's book out.. He is pretty proud of that.

    Story (it printed out to ~6 pages in the original size)
    The Hail Storm
    By Oliver Mitchell

    Bonk! Bonk! I yelled in pain as I was hopelessly destroyed by hail! A baby arctic fox slammed his tail against the door of a warmly - lit trading post. “So! Wut ya tradin` with me, and wut ya givin` me fer it?” I could immediately tell the trader was foreign by his accent. “I would like these.” I said, picking snow goggles off the wall. “And wut are ya givin`me fer it?” The trader asked. “These.” I said. The trader’s eyes widened, and I assumed that they were rare where he came from. I left him to gape at the objects, and went outside.
    Suddenly, I saw a black shape plough through the air. I decided to follow it. It led me to a mostly built igloo (it only had 12 blocks of ice missing). I went back to the trading post and traded more of the items that I gave him for the snow goggles for 12 more ice blocks and finished the igloo.”GROWWL!” “AUGH!” “A polar bear!” I yelled. “Oh,wait that was just my stomach growling - I must be hungry.” I muttered. I went to my bow and arrow I had brought for the trip and less than 20 minutes later, I had hunted and killed a young caribou male. “Whine!” “Whine!” The baby Arctic fox had tracked my igloo,(with his nose,of course,) and was seemingly hungry. “Oh all right, you can come in.” I said. The Arctic fox seemed to understand and bounded in to join me for dinner.

    Oliver has a fairly distinctive authorial voice, though; some other examples:
    i7fkSXf.jpg
    GomwXjl.jpg

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    TenTen Registered User regular
    The Neverending Story is a good read for kids getting in to longer books - it's a little odd at times but it was my absolute favourite when I was a kid.

    I had a good time going around to a bunch of second hand book stores looking for a used copy when we were pregnant with Taz (buying it used was a must!), and we read it to the belly and to him when he was real young. I'm looking forward to pulling it out again when he's old enough to really appreciate it.

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    djmitchelladjmitchella Registered User regular
    edited February 2015
    Tomi Ungerer's books are pretty great, though occasionally surprisingly gruesome; "The Beast of Monsieur Racine" is all fun and games, until the denoument where everything goes crazy, and someone gets an umbrella in the head:
    6a00e5509ea6a18834017c324d4223970b-pi

    But "Zeralda's Ogre" is a favourite, as is "The Three Robbers", and the flow of story through "The Hat" is gorgeous, and all of those are safe.

    (edited to add) Another classic is "Each Peach Pear Plum"; not only is it really really good, it's one of the few books where you really can tell how the entire world is laid out and it's internally consistent and everything.

    The "Little Red Train" books are good for kids that like to spot things, there is just an absurd amount of background detail in there, and, again, as the train goes from A to B a lot of the time you can actually tell where it's been/where it's going to be, which I really appreciate.

    djmitchella on
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