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Rest in peace, Terry Pratchett

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    QuothQuoth the Raven Miami, FL FOR REALRegistered User regular
    People think my cat is named Carrot because he's orange

    Nope

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    PoorochondriacPoorochondriac Ah, man Ah, jeezRegistered User regular
    Thanks for the quotes, y'all.

    They've got me crying on the bus, which is never a good look, but I need 'em

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    411Randle411Randle Librarian Oook.Registered User regular
    Oook.

    1) Silence 2) Books must be returned by the last date shown 3) Do not interfere with the nature of causality
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    Lost CanuckLost Canuck World's Greatest Escape Artist Doctor Vundabar's Murder MachineRegistered User regular
    I first picked up Discworld one summer on vacation in Paris. I needed some reading material and this English bookstore had a book combining Colour Of Magic and The Light Fantastic.

    I was extremely amused by Twoflower selling the bartender "inn-sewer ants".

    I think I was sold by the rampaging Luggage.

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    Nintendo Switch friend code: SW-4012-4821-3053
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    mrmrmrmr nameless protagonist Registered User regular
    This is a bummer. I only read the first few books but I liked them. The first two Rincewind ones were fun, the Wyrd Sisters one I could forget, but Mort was truly great. Guards Guards I don't remember much of, but I've always heard that Night Watch is one of the best ones and I think I want to read that one. Will I be totally lost just diving into that one? Or should I follow the reading path of the Night's Watch first?

    But this is even more of a shame because only a few days ago I was at a book store thinking that I should give more of the Discworld books a go. Now I guess I have to.

    Practice Round, my blog where I talk (mostly) about comics.
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    FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    I wasn't ready. But then again, most aren't.

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    WearingglassesWearingglasses Of the friendly neighborhood variety Registered User regular
    Named all my electronic devices after Ankh Morporkians.

    @mrmr It's not necessary to read the books before Night Watch to enjoy it. But you'll appreciate the continuity nods that are there if you have.

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    FalxFalx Registered User regular
    Vetinari as a character is a work of art. Pratchett somehow created a character smarter than pretty much anyone and you never felt it was unbelievable.

    Like when he suddenly reveals some information only you as the reader were aware of... or maybe you weren't. You never thought, "oh plot device."

    You always go... "Holy shit, of course he knew that. It's Vetinari."

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    chiasaur11chiasaur11 Never doubt a raccoon. Do you think it's trademarked?Registered User regular
    mrmr wrote: »
    This is a bummer. I only read the first few books but I liked them. The first two Rincewind ones were fun, the Wyrd Sisters one I could forget, but Mort was truly great. Guards Guards I don't remember much of, but I've always heard that Night Watch is one of the best ones and I think I want to read that one. Will I be totally lost just diving into that one? Or should I follow the reading path of the Night's Watch first?

    But this is even more of a shame because only a few days ago I was at a book store thinking that I should give more of the Discworld books a go. Now I guess I have to.

    Night Watch was my third Discworld book. Still understood it, and it's still my favorite.

    If you just want to dive in the deep end, it's worth a go.

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    GundiGundi Serious Bismuth Registered User regular
    My first Discworld book was Reaper Man:

    WHAT CAN THE HARVEST HOPE FOR, IF NOT THE CARE OF THE REAPER MAN?

    S'pretty good first impression.

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    Cilla BlackCilla Black Priscilla!!! Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    Yeah, while later books refined his technique quite a bit, a lot of the big concepts from Colour of Magic stayed front and center through the entire series. And while Rincewind isn't exactly a great role model, he's incredibly sympathetic. Granny, Vimes, Death, Susan, Moist, and even Tiffany (no, especially Tiffany) are all iconic and admirable. They're not just protagonists, they're heroes, whether or not any of them would be comfortable with the label. But the inside of Rincewind's head is a lot more familiar to me, and I really think the Disc feels as true as it does, as a setting, because it was most thoroughly charted out from his perspective.

    Just seeing the word 'Wizzard' makes me get emotional, because of the utter bathos. Poor ol' Rincewind.

    Sourcery is my favorite Rincewind novel because it does more than any of the others to establish just how important being a wizard is to Rincewind, even if he's the worst one on the entire disc

    Absolutely my favorite aspect of the character, by a longshot.

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    JintorJintor Registered User regular
    started rereading night watch for, i don't know, the sixth time?

    vale, pterry. you changed my life

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    RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    I nominate thread title change. "Terry Pratchett, mayherestinpeace"
    A man walked across the moors from Razorback to Lancre town without seeing a single marshlight, head-less dog, strolling tree, ghostly coach or comet, and had to be taken in by a tavern and given a drink to unsteady his nerves.

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    ShadowenShadowen Snores in the morning LoserdomRegistered User regular
    I got my start in high school. The school library had Mort, Soul Music, Small Gods, Sourcery, and Faust Eric. Later, I joined a mail-order book club and got the Color of Magic and Light Fantastic. I think he saved me, really--not from anything major like self-harm, but in high school I also discovered Terry Goodkind, and was at just the right age and just ill-read enough that the less-offensive early books got their hooks into me. But always I had Pratchett to fall back on. "Yes, yes, pure reason is a nice goal," I'd think, "but part of being human means..." Or, "Sure, government bureaucracy meddling in everything can mess things up, but pure private enterprise isn't the way to go either, because the flaws in both systems are the same (i.e. people)." In a way, Pratchett saved me from objectivism.

    Years later, when I was hypothetically an adult, with an adult job, that I went to and worked at five days a week like an adult, I started catching up on books I'd always wanted to read but didn't have the money for. The first thing I did in this program was start at Equal Rites, and then I took them all in order, all the ones I'd missed, all the way up, several weeks later, to Thud, which was the most recent one in paperback. After catching up, even unemployment couldn't stop me from getting the new books. I somehow found the money to get I Shall Wear Midnight in hardcover, or asked for Unseen Academicals for Christmas. Whatever it took.

    I did a reread of the Watch books recently. It's always fun when you can see a writer get better over time, especially when they start out pretty darn good and end up at some of the best writing you've ever seen.

    Au revoir, Sir Pterry.

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    RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    ".", said Granny, and then cleared her throat and tried to speak again.

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    BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Registered User, Moderator Mod Emeritus
    The only things known to go faster than ordinary light is monarchy, according to the philosopher Ly Tin Weedle. He reasoned like this: you can’t have more than one king, and tradition demands that there is no gap between kings, so when a king dies the succession must therefore pass to the heir instantaneously. Presumably, he said, there must be some elementary particles — kingons, or possibly queons — that do this job, but of course succession sometimes fails if, in mid-flight, they strike an anti-particle, or republicon. His ambitious plans to use his discovery to send messages, involving the careful torturing of a small king in order to modulate the signal, were never fully expanded because, at that point, the bar closed.

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    King RiptorKing Riptor Registered User regular
    This hit me like a truck.
    I could post quotes and Im sure Id be bawling before I finished any.
    Enjoy your trip across the sands Terry. Thank you for everything

    I have a podcast now. It's about video games and anime!Find it here.
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    RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    It was a rich and wonderful voice, with every diphthong gliding beautifully into place. It was a golden brown voice. If the Creator of the multiverse had a voice, it was a voice such as this. If it had a drawback, it was that it wasn't a voice you could use, for example, for ordering coal. Coal ordered by this voice would become diamonds.

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    Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    Ly Tin Wheedle, arguably the Disc's greatest philosopher*

    *He always argued that he was

    [Muffled sounds of gorilla violence]
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    BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Registered User, Moderator Mod Emeritus
    The wiki quote page for the Discworld books runs into tens of thousands of words. It's an astonishing legacy and I still feel robbed by his death.

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    JeedanJeedan Registered User regular
    Shadowen wrote: »
    I got my start in high school. The school library had Mort, Soul Music, Small Gods, Sourcery, and Faust Eric. Later, I joined a mail-order book club and got the Color of Magic and Light Fantastic. I think he saved me, really--not from anything major like self-harm, but in high school I also discovered Terry Goodkind, and was at just the right age and just ill-read enough that the less-offensive early books got their hooks into me. But always I had Pratchett to fall back on. "Yes, yes, pure reason is a nice goal," I'd think, "but part of being human means..." .

    My favourite Pratchett quote is on this topic:
    “All right," said Susan. "I'm not stupid. You're saying humans need... fantasies to make life bearable."

    REALLY? AS IF IT WAS SOME KIND OF PINK PILL? NO. HUMANS NEED FANTASY TO BE HUMAN. TO BE THE PLACE WHERE THE FALLING ANGEL MEETS THE RISING APE.

    "Tooth fairies? Hogfathers? Little—"

    YES. AS PRACTICE. YOU HAVE TO START OUT LEARNING TO BELIEVE THE LITTLE LIES.

    "So we can believe the big ones?"

    YES. JUSTICE. MERCY. DUTY. THAT SORT OF THING.

    "They're not the same at all!"

    YOU THINK SO? THEN TAKE THE UNIVERSE AND GRIND IT DOWN TO THE FINEST POWDER AND SIEVE IT THROUGH THE FINEST SIEVE AND THEN SHOW ME ONE ATOM OF JUSTICE, ONE MOLECULE OF MERCY. AND YET—Death waved a hand. AND YET YOU ACT AS IF THERE IS SOME IDEAL ORDER IN THE WORLD, AS IF THERE IS SOME...SOME RIGHTNESS IN THE UNIVERSE BY WHICH IT MAY BE JUDGED.

    "Yes, but people have got to believe that, or what's the point—"

    MY POINT EXACTLY.”

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    BeastehBeasteh THAT WOULD NOT KILL DRACULARegistered User regular
    Yeah that one will probably be the most enduring

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    TofystedethTofystedeth Registered User regular
    Bogart wrote: »
    Vimes is an amazing creation. One of the Guardian articles about Pratchett today calls him something like "maybe the best portrait of a decent man in modern literature". I particularly loved seeing Vimes from afar in books that weren't about him, when you see just how terrifying and imposing this decent, incorruptible man is to someone like Moist. He is The Law.

    Now I'm just remembering a billion little moments from the books. The bit at the end of one of the Guards books where Carrot reads a list of demands to Vetinari and Vetinari smiles a bit and says dear me another dartboard so soon and Carrot says yes sorry about that Nobby is a bit clumsy or something and then pulls a second bit of paper out of his pocket and starts reeling off another list that includes new towers and several hundred new men. Vetinari stops smiling.

    Death investigating life. TO HEAR LOUD MUSIC IN HOT ROOMS IS FUN?

    Macbeth, all of it, in Wyrd Sisters.

    Finding out what all the Latin meant years later.

    I think you mean Latatin ;)

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    CaptainBeyondCaptainBeyond I've been out walking Registered User regular
    I am absolutely gutted, thought glad it didn't drag out. I watched my granddad gradually disappear through Alzheimers, I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy, let alone someone I consider an idol.

    I just reread the Tiffany Aching series over winter, and I'm going to take this as a sign to step up my writing efforts.

    Thanks Sir Terry.

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    DeadfallDeadfall I don't think you realize just how rich he is. In fact, I should put on a monocle.Registered User regular
    http://m.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/31867210?ocid=socialflow_facebook

    Fans petition Death to bring Pratchett back.

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    BlankZoeBlankZoe Registered User regular
    Oh god

    That

    Nope can't handle it

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    FalxFalx Registered User regular
    Rincewind stared at the badge. He'd never had one before. Well, that was technically a lie ... he'd had one that said 'Hello, I Am 5 Today!', which was just about the worst possible present to get when you are six.

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    Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    edited March 2015
    The author, who sold over 85 million books around the world, died with his cat sleeping on his bed, surrounded by his family.

    man I hope I go with my kitties :cry:
    my boyfriend would be nice too but the kitties are a must have

    Magic Pink on
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    Cilla BlackCilla Black Priscilla!!! Registered User regular
    85 million books

    That is incredible

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    RadiusRadius Registered User regular
    I will always love his copious use of footnotes.

    It's like having 40 or so extra surprises in each book.

    Everyday we stray further from God's light
    Steam Switch FC: 2799-7909-4852
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    Devlin_DragonusDevlin_Dragonus Gorgeous Dallas, TXRegistered User regular
    I have been trying hard to not constantly post in this thread of my enjoyment over reading his book(s) for the first time.

    But this bit where everyone who summoned this dragon (with exception of the grand master)

    they are sitting there, not knowing that the dragon is on its way to kill them.

    and i realize, as one of the Brothers realize, one of these robed, cowled figures is not like the others.

    Oh go once i realized it was was laughing my ass off.

    I think i found my new favorite author.


    And so , so many books to read.

    I got nothing for you now. Try again later.

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    Devlin_DragonusDevlin_Dragonus Gorgeous Dallas, TXRegistered User regular
    edited March 2015
    It’s worth waiting just a bit longer, okay?”

    The circle of robed and cowled figures shuffled in grudging agreement.

    “Okay.”
    “Fair enough.”
    “Yeah.”
    CERTAINLY .
    “Okay.”
    “If you say so.”

    It began to creep over Brother Watchtower that something wasn’t right, but he couldn’t quite put a name to it.

    “Uh,” he said.
    “Brothers?”

    They, too, shifted uneasily. Something in the room was setting their teeth on edge. There was an atmosphere.

    “we are all here, aren’t we?”

    There was a worried chorus of agreement.

    “Of course we are.”
    “What’s the matter?”
    “Yes!”
    YES.
    “Yes.”

    There it was again, a subtle wrongness about things that you couldn’t quite put your finger on because your finger was too scared.

    Devlin_Dragonus on
    I got nothing for you now. Try again later.

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    PhotosaurusPhotosaurus Bay Area, CARegistered User regular
    Radius wrote: »
    I will always love his copious use of footnotes.

    It's like having 40 or so extra surprises in each book.

    I really love the footnotes, but does anyone else find that in some of the ebooks you can't click the little asterisk to jump back to the page you came from?

    "If complete and utter chaos was lightning, then he'd be the sort to stand on a hilltop in a thunderstorm wearing wet copper armour and shouting 'All gods are bastards'."
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    TofystedethTofystedeth Registered User regular
    I only have that problem on my Nook if the footnote spans a page or has another footnote link in that you click, and it only knows 1 page of history.

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    RedBeardJimRedBeardJim Registered User regular
    85 million books

    That is incredible

    There was a period of time in the 90s where something like 10% of all books sold in the UK were by him.

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    Grey GhostGrey Ghost Registered User regular
    The physical copies of all my Death books were lent to a friend and are now somewhere in New York

    So I just re-bought Reaper Man on my Kindle and for a new one I also got Equal Rites

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    Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    Radius wrote: »
    I will always love his copious use of footnotes.

    It's like having 40 or so extra surprises in each book.

    I really love the footnotes, but does anyone else find that in some of the ebooks you can't click the little asterisk to jump back to the page you came from?

    I've reached the point with most of the books that I don't need to read the footnotes on my Kindle. I'll see the asterisk, remember the footnote, laugh at the memory, then keep reading. Then at the end of the book are all the footnotes waiting to be read properly.

    [Muffled sounds of gorilla violence]
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    sarukunsarukun RIESLING OCEANRegistered User regular
    edited March 2015
    My boss is a pretty big Terry Pratchett fan. Lately we've been trying to expand the amount of reading our students are doing, especially the older ones, and I was like "Man, I would just die if we could get them to read the Hobbit", and he was like "Nah, man, the Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents" and I was like "The fuck?"

    So when I came back to the States in February I snagged a paperback on Amazon and read it on the flight to Virgina.

    I need to buy more Discworld. And we will absolutely be reading The Amazing Maurice in my advanced class this year.

    sarukun on
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    NeoTomaNeoToma Registered User regular
    I've always been a fan of this one from Small Gods
    ASTONISHING, said Death. REALLY ASTONISHING. LET ME PUT FORWARD ANOTHER SUGGESTION: THAT YOU ARE NOTHING MORE THAN A LUCKY SPECIES OF APE THAT IS TRYING TO UNDERSTAND THE COMPLEXITIES OF CREATION VIA A LANGUAGE THAT EVOLVED IN ORDER TO TELL ONE ANOTHER WHERE THE RIPE FRUIT WAS?

    Fighting for breath, the philosopher managed to say: "Don't be silly."

    THE REMARK WAS NOT INTENDED AS DEROGATORY, said Death. UNDER THE CIRCUMSTANCES, YOU HAVE ACHIEVED A GREAT DEAL.

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    PiptheFairPiptheFair Frequently not in boats. Registered User regular
    NeoToma wrote: »
    I've always been a fan of this one from Small Gods
    ASTONISHING, said Death. REALLY ASTONISHING. LET ME PUT FORWARD ANOTHER SUGGESTION: THAT YOU ARE NOTHING MORE THAN A LUCKY SPECIES OF APE THAT IS TRYING TO UNDERSTAND THE COMPLEXITIES OF CREATION VIA A LANGUAGE THAT EVOLVED IN ORDER TO TELL ONE ANOTHER WHERE THE RIPE FRUIT WAS?

    Fighting for breath, the philosopher managed to say: "Don't be silly."

    THE REMARK WAS NOT INTENDED AS DEROGATORY, said Death. UNDER THE CIRCUMSTANCES, YOU HAVE ACHIEVED A GREAT DEAL.

    that's not from small gods

    it's from the short story Death and What Comes Next

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