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Let's talk about [Autism]

SomestickguySomestickguy Registered User regular
edited March 2015 in Social Entropy++
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In some ways, SE++ has certainly changed for the better over the years.

I remember when I first started browsing these forums. I was sixteen years old. Now I'm twenty-three, for reference, so it was seven years ago. It was only two years before that I'd been diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome, and it was here that I first discovered the attached stigma. "Sperging" was often used in a derogatory way, and when I brought up that I actually had Asperger's the reception ranged from sceptical to hostile.

Times have changed, though, and I thought it would be a good time to have a thread dedicated to discussion about autism, all throughout the spectrum! There's a lot of us out there, and I have no doubt that many browse these forums. Share your experiences! They can be positive or negative, personal, about someone you know, connected with current events or activist campaigns... Perhaps you can share ways that you handle personal challenges, or the cool little things you've noticed about yourself that you later discovered were connected with autism! I know I've got more than a few of those.

That's that. Get your discuss on!

Somestickguy on
MetalbourneRMS OceanicCorehealerGoatmonSlacker71Anialos
«134567

Posts

  • Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    I am looking forward to learning a whole lot from this thread.

    PsykomaRaijin QuickfootJebusUDMortal SkyjgeisRainfallChomp-ChompCreaganVegemyteKarlBrovid HasselsmofseasleepyAbsurdPropositionMacro9mageormike
  • WotanAnubisWotanAnubis Registered User regular
    I've been diagnosed with Schizoid Personality Disorder, which I guess falls somewhere on the autism spectrum.

    But to be honest, that doesn't really bother me much. Although I do get annoyed when people use 'schizoid' when they don't feel like typing out 'schizophrenic'.

    No, it's all the fear and social anxiety which really bother me.

  • SomestickguySomestickguy Registered User regular
    To help get the conversation started...

    Last year I had a rough summer. It was for a few different reasons (one such reason being girl-related), but I can only describe the underlying feeling as a black hole that sucked any feeling of happiness out of everything I did.

    A lot of my problems were in some way connected to my autism, so as a bit of a therapeutic release I wrote a two-part article on my blog about my personal experiences with autism.

    It helped me a lot, and even better, I saw that it helped other people. It was shared far more than any other post I'd made, and I got all kinds of positive responses and encouraging tweets. Some were people dealing with challenges related to autism. Some were parents of autistic children that had been looking for more insight into how their children were different.

    Here it is. The first part is much more light-hearted, but fair warning, the second half gets pretty dark and personal.

    Coping With Autism: My Perspective, Part 1

    Coping With Autism: My Perspective, Part 2

    RMS OceanicSeriouslyRainfallSlacker71Andy JoeAnialos
  • DodgeBlanDodgeBlan PSN: dodgeblanRegistered User regular
    I worked in disabled care during university. Some of the people I worked with were extremely autistic. It's a horrible disease and one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever witnessed.

    Read my blog about AMERICA and THE BAY AREA

    https://medium.com/@alascii
    Cliff
  • Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    Autism is something I don't know a lot about. I have heard a lot of people make claims about their child being in the autism spectrum and I often wonder if doctors use autism now the same way they used ADD when I was a kid.

    Back when I was a kid if a parent thought their kid wasn't completely normal they would end up getting them diagnosed with ADD even if they didn't really have it. In that way, a lot of kids who really had ADD got ignored because people started to oftentimes ignore it when people said they were ADD.

    Magic PinkDoctorArchKane Red RobeknitdanVegemyteWiseManTobesOlivawBarcardiAnialos
  • Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    I feel the same way Rajin

    Just maybe don't mention it to people

    One of my biggest pet peeves is people telling me "you don't seem autistic" when it took me until I was 16 to consitently be able to function like a normal person

    God what does seeming to be autistic even mean with high functioning autism. Should I start clapping my arms like I did when I was 5 again?

    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
    Magic PinktinaunVegemyte
  • Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    I would absolutely never say that to someone and I have no idea if it happens or not. I would love to be proven wrong.

  • Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    I feel like autism is much harder to falsely diagnosed

    There is a pretty clear list of ticks and issues that people with autism face

    I looked up a list of things common for people with Aspergers and it's almost funny how it fit every tick I've had to a T

    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
  • SomestickguySomestickguy Registered User regular
    edited March 2015
    I feel the same way Rajin

    Just maybe don't mention it to people

    One of my biggest pet peeves is people telling me "you don't seem autistic" when it took me until I was 16 to consitently be able to function like a normal person

    God what does seeming to be autistic even mean with high functioning autism. Should I start clapping my arms like I did when I was 5 again?

    I get what you mean. It can be really tiring after a while.

    I've taken the opposite approach, though. I'm super open about it! I figure that people who get to know me, if they know I'm autistic, will know that it's not a handicap or a disease. I want to fight against the stigma.

    Somestickguy on
  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    My future brother in law is 25 and autistic. He is at the level where we can have a conversation, but you definitely would be able to tell right away. He can cook his own food, he has a job at the animal shelter, but he definitely couldn't live on his own. He has trouble understanding the value of money. He understands the concept, but if someone said something cost say, 40 bucks instead of 4, he would have a hard time understanding he was being taken advantage of. Also, he constantly dances around and talks to himself. Mostly about pokemon. He loves that pokemon.

    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
  • SomestickguySomestickguy Registered User regular
    DodgeBlan wrote: »
    I worked in disabled care during university. Some of the people I worked with were extremely autistic. It's a horrible disease and one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever witnessed.

    Are you sure you're talking about the same thing? Autistic people can face some heartbreaking challenges and problems, but I'd never classify it as a disease or even a negative thing. It's just different. There are upsides and downsides. I've been able to cope with some things better because I'm autistic!

    cabsy
  • Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    JebusUD wrote: »
    He loves that pokemon.

    who doesn't

    jgeisnukaLorahaloTofystedethAndy JoeAnialosLoisLanePLA
  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    DodgeBlan wrote: »
    I worked in disabled care during university. Some of the people I worked with were extremely autistic. It's a horrible disease and one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever witnessed.

    Are you sure you're talking about the same thing? Autistic people can face some heartbreaking challenges and problems, but I'd never classify it as a disease or even a negative thing. It's just different. There are upsides and downsides. I've been able to cope with some things better because I'm autistic!

    While I'd say that Aspergers isn't too bad, more just something to cope with, most forms of autism are pretty disabling. Like I said in my last post, my future brother in law will be permanently dependent on family support in the future. He couldn't cope with modern society. And his form of autism is relatively mild.

    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
    DodgeBlan
  • EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    I feel the same way Rajin

    Just maybe don't mention it to people

    One of my biggest pet peeves is people telling me "you don't seem autistic" when it took me until I was 16 to consitently be able to function like a normal person

    God what does seeming to be autistic even mean with high functioning autism. Should I start clapping my arms like I did when I was 5 again?

    Yeah, there's a pretty widespread ignorance about the high-functioning parts. I'm an aspie, and I've been accused of lying just because the other person didn't have sufficient awareness of Asperger's. It's not all Rainman.

    SomestickguyBluedude152N1tSt4lkerVegemyteAndy JoeAnialos
  • SomestickguySomestickguy Registered User regular
    edited March 2015
    JebusUD wrote: »
    DodgeBlan wrote: »
    I worked in disabled care during university. Some of the people I worked with were extremely autistic. It's a horrible disease and one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever witnessed.

    Are you sure you're talking about the same thing? Autistic people can face some heartbreaking challenges and problems, but I'd never classify it as a disease or even a negative thing. It's just different. There are upsides and downsides. I've been able to cope with some things better because I'm autistic!

    While I'd say that Aspergers isn't too bad, more just something to cope with, most forms of autism are pretty disabling. Like I said in my last post, my future brother in law will be permanently dependent on family support in the future. He couldn't cope with modern society. And his form of autism is relatively mild.

    Oh, it's absolutely disabling, I won't argue that. Disease is just a super loaded term that implies things that simply aren't true as far as autism is concerned.

    Somestickguy on
    Shadowhope
  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    Magic Pink wrote: »
    JebusUD wrote: »
    He loves that pokemon.

    who doesn't

    He next level loves that Pokemon. Most every conversation we have involves it. I think maybe the collecting aspect really appeals to autistic people. The way things are numbered and ordered.

    That's another thing I've noticed about him, is that he has a very hard time separating his thoughts into 1 discrete thought. He will say something, and it will be all 10 things on his mind. A sentence might come out like this. "So, hi guys, today I was hanging out with ____, but I really need to go to the gym and work out, because I have to catch all of the Pokemon today, and do some drawings, or something."


    Usually you have to take a few seconds and parse out all the different elements, and it helps to know what is going on in his life anyway. Him talking to strangers is usually very confusing for them.

    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
  • DodgeBlanDodgeBlan PSN: dodgeblanRegistered User regular
    JebusUD wrote: »
    Magic Pink wrote: »
    JebusUD wrote: »
    He loves that pokemon.

    who doesn't

    He next level loves that Pokemon. Most every conversation we have involves it. I think maybe the collecting aspect really appeals to autistic people. The way things are numbered and ordered.

    That's another thing I've noticed about him, is that he has a very hard time separating his thoughts into 1 discrete thought. He will say something, and it will be all 10 things on his mind. A sentence might come out like this. "So, hi guys, today I was hanging out with ____, but I really need to go to the gym and work out, because I have to catch all of the Pokemon today, and do some drawings, or something."


    Usually you have to take a few seconds and parse out all the different elements, and it helps to know what is going on in his life anyway. Him talking to strangers is usually very confusing for them.

    I have a family friend who is similar to this, except his thing is medieval history. He knows fucking everything about medieval history.

    He's slightly further down the spectrum though, and hasn't really been able to form relationships or maintain a job. It's really tough.

    Read my blog about AMERICA and THE BAY AREA

    https://medium.com/@alascii
  • SomestickguySomestickguy Registered User regular
    DodgeBlan wrote: »
    JebusUD wrote: »
    Magic Pink wrote: »
    JebusUD wrote: »
    He loves that pokemon.

    who doesn't

    He next level loves that Pokemon. Most every conversation we have involves it. I think maybe the collecting aspect really appeals to autistic people. The way things are numbered and ordered.

    That's another thing I've noticed about him, is that he has a very hard time separating his thoughts into 1 discrete thought. He will say something, and it will be all 10 things on his mind. A sentence might come out like this. "So, hi guys, today I was hanging out with ____, but I really need to go to the gym and work out, because I have to catch all of the Pokemon today, and do some drawings, or something."


    Usually you have to take a few seconds and parse out all the different elements, and it helps to know what is going on in his life anyway. Him talking to strangers is usually very confusing for them.

    I have a family friend who is similar to this, except his thing is medieval history. He knows fucking everything about medieval history.

    He's slightly further down the spectrum though, and hasn't really been able to form relationships or maintain a job. It's really tough.

    I can relate to that: I got a summer job at KFC, but it wasn't long before I was fired because I "wasn't picking it up fast enough". Yes, they were fully aware I'm autistic.

  • Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    I have had someone ask me what my superpower was unironically

    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
  • DodgeBlanDodgeBlan PSN: dodgeblanRegistered User regular
    DodgeBlan wrote: »
    I worked in disabled care during university. Some of the people I worked with were extremely autistic. It's a horrible disease and one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever witnessed.

    Are you sure you're talking about the same thing? Autistic people can face some heartbreaking challenges and problems, but I'd never classify it as a disease or even a negative thing. It's just different. There are upsides and downsides. I've been able to cope with some things better because I'm autistic!

    I won't call it a disease if you'd rather but severe autism is a terrible thing. In the case of the most severely affected kid I worked with it wasn't even really clear if he experienced a relationship with his parents.

    Read my blog about AMERICA and THE BAY AREA

    https://medium.com/@alascii
  • Bé ChuilleBé Chuille Registered User regular
    I've worked with kids all along the ASD spectrum. I did volunteer work in Romania with institutionalised young adults with ASD and that was really tough because they had never formed attachments and had really regressed as a result. Such sweet kids though, I still keep in touch with the program director.

    On the other hand, I help out at surf camps for ASD kids/teens for a few weeks in the summer. It's run by a local group of occupational therapists etc who work with these families year round. And it is so much fun, the tactile aspect is great and for the high-functioning attendees, they pick up a new hobby.

    I think a lot depends on getting the help you need as you need it and I'm acutely aware of he fact that some places are way better at this than others.

  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    JebusUD wrote: »
    DodgeBlan wrote: »
    I worked in disabled care during university. Some of the people I worked with were extremely autistic. It's a horrible disease and one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever witnessed.

    Are you sure you're talking about the same thing? Autistic people can face some heartbreaking challenges and problems, but I'd never classify it as a disease or even a negative thing. It's just different. There are upsides and downsides. I've been able to cope with some things better because I'm autistic!

    While I'd say that Aspergers isn't too bad, more just something to cope with, most forms of autism are pretty disabling. Like I said in my last post, my future brother in law will be permanently dependent on family support in the future. He couldn't cope with modern society. And his form of autism is relatively mild.

    Oh, it's absolutely disabling, I won't argue that. Disease is just a super loaded term that implies things that simply aren't true as far as autism is concerned.

    What terminology would be preferable?

    I'd think people in university disabled care are probably debilitated to the point I'd think it qualifies, and if you could cure them you should. I'd even say that my brother in laws is debilitating to the point where if we could flip a switch and make him closer to normal, so he could get along on his own and live a more fulfilling life, we would.

    Now for people with Aspergers I think it is less of a "disease" since, while it might be challenging at times, it isn't debilitating.

    It seems like we have a problem of "Autism" being an umbrella term for many different conditions and levels of effect.

    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
  • Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    I have had someone ask me what my superpower was unironically

    did you tell him it was the ability to recognize assholes from the questions they ask?

    DodgeBlan
  • Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    No because it was a youth minister and that would not go over well

    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
    Magic Pink
  • DodgeBlanDodgeBlan PSN: dodgeblanRegistered User regular
    I can give youth ministers stigmata

    Read my blog about AMERICA and THE BAY AREA

    https://medium.com/@alascii
    Andy Joe
  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    DodgeBlan wrote: »
    JebusUD wrote: »
    Magic Pink wrote: »
    JebusUD wrote: »
    He loves that pokemon.

    who doesn't

    He next level loves that Pokemon. Most every conversation we have involves it. I think maybe the collecting aspect really appeals to autistic people. The way things are numbered and ordered.

    That's another thing I've noticed about him, is that he has a very hard time separating his thoughts into 1 discrete thought. He will say something, and it will be all 10 things on his mind. A sentence might come out like this. "So, hi guys, today I was hanging out with ____, but I really need to go to the gym and work out, because I have to catch all of the Pokemon today, and do some drawings, or something."


    Usually you have to take a few seconds and parse out all the different elements, and it helps to know what is going on in his life anyway. Him talking to strangers is usually very confusing for them.

    I have a family friend who is similar to this, except his thing is medieval history. He knows fucking everything about medieval history.

    He's slightly further down the spectrum though, and hasn't really been able to form relationships or maintain a job. It's really tough.

    Well, my brother in law does have a job, MN is pretty good about providing opportunities for disabled people. The only relationships he has are ones with family, and with a state sponsored thing where he works with a couple different people, where her groups up with others to do things like... bowling and movies. Swimming.

    But he doesn't have any friends he would just call up on his own and hang out with. He wouldn't really be able to form that kind of new relationship.

    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    No because it was a youth minister and that would not go over well

    Should have gone with X-ray vision.

    Then stare down at his pants.

    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
    Raijin QuickfootMagic PinkZilla360UsagiAnialosPLA
  • SomestickguySomestickguy Registered User regular
    JebusUD wrote: »
    JebusUD wrote: »
    DodgeBlan wrote: »
    I worked in disabled care during university. Some of the people I worked with were extremely autistic. It's a horrible disease and one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever witnessed.

    Are you sure you're talking about the same thing? Autistic people can face some heartbreaking challenges and problems, but I'd never classify it as a disease or even a negative thing. It's just different. There are upsides and downsides. I've been able to cope with some things better because I'm autistic!

    While I'd say that Aspergers isn't too bad, more just something to cope with, most forms of autism are pretty disabling. Like I said in my last post, my future brother in law will be permanently dependent on family support in the future. He couldn't cope with modern society. And his form of autism is relatively mild.

    Oh, it's absolutely disabling, I won't argue that. Disease is just a super loaded term that implies things that simply aren't true as far as autism is concerned.

    What terminology would be preferable?

    I'd think people in university disabled care are probably debilitated to the point I'd think it qualifies, and if you could cure them you should. I'd even say that my brother in laws is debilitating to the point where if we could flip a switch and make him closer to normal, so he could get along on his own and live a more fulfilling life, we would.

    Now for people with Aspergers I think it is less of a "disease" since, while it might be challenging at times, it isn't debilitating.

    It seems like we have a problem of "Autism" being an umbrella term for many different conditions and levels of effect.

    Absolutely.

    I can't speak for anyone else, but I know that it I were ever given the option to "cure" myself, I wouldn't take it. I find the whole idea a bit unsavoury.

    As for terminology... I'm not the word police, or an expert on the subject, but I'd say referring to it as a disability is both technically correct and inoffensive. There's a deeper discussion to be had on why it's a disability, however. I'll save that for another time.

    Shadowhope
  • Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    I wouldnt call it problem to have Autism refer to many different kinds

    Like it is literally called the Autism Umbrella in some places

    Its not like they are unrelated issues, they are all related

    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
  • Munkus BeaverMunkus Beaver You don't have to attend every argument you are invited to. Philosophy: Stoicism. Politics: Democratic SocialistRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    Ok, I kinda want you to elaborate on why it's not a disease, but is a disability. As disability carries a pretty hefty load with it.

    Humor can be dissected as a frog can, but dies in the process.
  • Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    Its a disability because its something you can learn to work with and """cure""" yourself

    Its not like cancer, I cant go to therapy to make cancer better

    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
    SomestickguyPLA
  • Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    Also disease carries the idea that I need to be cured

    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
    GethSomestickguycabsy
  • Munkus BeaverMunkus Beaver You don't have to attend every argument you are invited to. Philosophy: Stoicism. Politics: Democratic SocialistRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    Disability implies you need special protections in order to gain proper equity with non disabled persons, and one huge misconception is that you can "overcome" a disability.

    Humor can be dissected as a frog can, but dies in the process.
  • SomestickguySomestickguy Registered User regular
    edited March 2015
    Ok, I kinda want you to elaborate on why it's not a disease, but is a disability. As disability carries a pretty hefty load with it.

    Well, like I said, "disease" carries certain incorrect connotations as part of its very definition.

    There are a couple of definitions on dictionary.com, the applicable ones being:

    "a disordered or incorrectly functioning organ... resulting from effect of genetic or developmental errors"

    "any harmful, depraved, or morbid condition, as of the mind or society"

    The only thing I can see that applies to autism is the term "disordered", but everything else? Not really a great definition of autism.

    Somestickguy on
  • Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    I mean I dont really know what to tell you Munkus

    We literally do not know if it is a disease

    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
  • SomestickguySomestickguy Registered User regular
    edited March 2015
    Disability implies you need special protections in order to gain proper equity with non disabled persons, and one huge misconception is that you can "overcome" a disability.

    Ah, so you're more objecting to the term "disability" than you are arguing for "disease"?

    I suppose I can see your case there. I mean, I certainly don't need special protections, but the stuff in place for me here in the UK is certainly helpful.

    As for "overcoming", you're right. Autism is for life. I'd absolutely say that to a degree I've overcome a lot of the related challenges, though.

    Somestickguy on
  • Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    Its a disability because I got to Disability Services to get help for stuff dealing with being an autistic person in college

    Boom blam kapow case closed

    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
    Magic PinkSCREECH OF THE FARGAnialos
  • Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    The Curious Case of the Dog in the Nighttime is a really good book with a main character who is autistic.

    RMS OceanicDr. FlamingoCaptain MarcusUsagiLucedes
  • EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    edited March 2015
    As for terminology... I'm not the word police, or an expert on the subject, but I'd say referring to it as a disability is both technically correct and inoffensive. There's a deeper discussion to be had on why it's a disability, however. I'll save that for another time.

    Yeah, disability is the word. It's not a disease under any medical definition of the word. Also fits well with "high-functioning" - disability means it impairs your function, and being high-functioning means it's less of an impairment.

    edit: I suppose it's "disorder" in a strictly medical context, "disability" when talking to bureaucrats about getting the support you need.

    Echo on
    RMS OceanicGoatmonPLA
  • Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    I absolutely LOVE that there are folks in here on the spectrum, and folks not on the spectrum, all discussing things and learning and sharing experiences.

    But now it is time for some TISM:

    This Is Serious Mum;

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENnAa7rqtBM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmDGrtgoY8Y

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYwQ9wOOLxA

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwI2NrVYqIE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GiHdpAVIHgo

    Magic PinkVegemyteGvzbgul
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