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Let's talk about [Autism]

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  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    I wouldnt call it problem to have Autism refer to many different kinds

    Like it is literally called the Autism Umbrella in some places

    Its not like they are unrelated issues, they are all related

    It's a problem when we try to talk about it in general terms of "what should be cured" and "how bad is it", etc. ala this thread.

    I think everyone could also benefit from reading the chapter in Oliver Sacks "The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat" in which he discusses people who didn't want to be entirely cured of their mental afflictions, some elected certain levels of cure. Like the man with Tourettes who would take his medicine during the week to get along at his job, and not on the weekend. Because after he was "cured" he felt like all the color had gone out of his life.

    Sometimes entirely normal isn't the greatest state of affairs.

    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
  • RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    Officially I am diagnosed with Asperger's. However in recent years my Mother, who has become something of a self-taught expert on this, suspects I'm much closer to having high-functioning Autism. The key factor in this assessment is that unlike my Sister, also diagnosed, I generally don't have high levels of anxiety. Also my early development was textbook autism. I didn't speak until I was three, for example. Also my mother had to struggle when I cried because we were going to checkout 4 instead of checkout 7.

    What are my "tells"? A few. I think I have an above-average rate of missed sarcasm, especially online where text robs your voice of the tones I've learned to pick up. Also despite being born and raised in Northern Ireland, television has warped my accent to where it's been interpreted as many things, though American primarily. Curve balls and short term changes in routine can stress me out more than usual, as can being asked to process multiple things at once. I can also get overstimulated in crowded places, as I reaffirmed at the Trafford Center in Manchester during the sales. All the noise and bustle makes me super uncomfortable. As a young one my default operating system was thought => express thought. I had to learn to actually process the thought and occasionally decide not to express it. Same with my sense of empathy I think. I had to intellectually understand someone's emotions a lot before I could really appreciate what they're going through, though these days the totally unbiased witness that is my Mum judges me as one of the more empathetic folk around. My speech can be unusually formal, and even today I can be difficult to get information out of if you don't ask me right. For example, recently I had a temporary manager who asked me about the Blackberry I used for On Call work, and I truthfully told him I didn't have a Blackberry. However I'm self aware of this flaw enough to mention that I do have an old Nokia dumbphone that is my on call phone. In ages past because select * where phonetype = Blackberry is null, I'd have been silent. I've a pretty solid memory, and also perfect pitch, although puberty has robbed me of the ability to avail of it in a wide range.

    The internet fad of self-diagnosis a while back annoyed me, although I admit to speaking to very few of such people directly. People who feel they have above average intelligence and are socially awkward look at this condition and think "welp, that explains it". To expand on this, I have to discuss a boy in my (other) sister's class. He unmistakably had autism, including a formal speech pattern and an accent slightly deviant from the norm, but not as extreme as mine. With Autism, you know it when you see it. Though a local MTG club, and our mothers meeting frequently at an Autism support group, I would see him on and off again for a few years. My own observation is that he was quite stuck in his ways, moreso than me, and I heard his attitude at school was growing stinky. My Mother reported that his mother would mention his behaviour and say "well, he's autistic." This was NOPE material for my Mother. She had raised me under a core philosophy: Autism explains, it does not excuse. It's fine to appreciate when you're asking me to change a plan for going out at the last minute that that's a stressful thing for me, but it's not okay for me to insist on going a particular route just because. She worked very hard to keep me from developing negative routines, and to make sure I understood when I misbehaved why it was bad, and to be more flexible with my own scheduling. To my knowledge despite being roughly as smart as I was and having aspirations that required a degree, he just wouldn't do the work and ended up working in a shop. This boy's mother seems in part to have seem the autism and though "welp, that explains it", to segue back to self-diagnosers. The few people whose accounts I read never had symptoms like poor grasp of metaphor, freakouts from routine changes or anything, it was smart & socially awkward, and they said "and that's why I have no friends". Like my mother, that's NOPE material. Setting the questionable diagnosis aside, you're defining yourself by the autism label and thinking you can't change, which isn't the case. It's hard and it's stressful at times, but you can break your habits. @Pony's been great in helping me shape my general thoughts about labels, and their usefulness to me has withered as time goes on. It's why it's better to say someone has Autism rather than someone is Autistic. It's a subtle distinction, but it's there.

    And now, to toot my own horn, an article I wrote ten years ago about Autism and MTG. I should probably go back and reassess how I feel about it now.

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  • EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    Officially I am diagnosed with Asperger's. However in recent years my Mother, who has become something of a self-taught expert on this, suspects I'm much closer to having high-functioning Autism.

    DSM-V got rid of Asperger's as a stand-alone diagnosis. It's an autism spectrum disorder now.

    VivixenneAndy JoeFoolOnTheHillAngelinaAnialos
  • Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    So do they know what causes Autism? I remember a while ago they said it was caused by aluminum I think.

    Can it get worse or any better at all?

    What exactly is the difference between Autism and Aspergers?

  • RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    Echo wrote: »
    Officially I am diagnosed with Asperger's. However in recent years my Mother, who has become something of a self-taught expert on this, suspects I'm much closer to having high-functioning Autism.

    DSM-V got rid of Asperger's as a stand-alone diagnosis. It's an autism spectrum disorder now.

    's probably more accurate.

    Speaking of, Munkus was asking about classification, disease or disability? I think disorder is a better word for it.

  • GnizmoGnizmo Registered User regular
    My wonderful child is currently in the process of being tested. The current outlook is not if she is autistic, but what do we need to do to help manage it. Through the testing though I have come to see far far too many symptoms in myself for my own comfort level. It has left me wondering where I fall, and if that hits just inside or just outside the spectrum. I suppose this thread shall teach me plenty either way and I am glad to have it.

  • Munkus BeaverMunkus Beaver You don't have to attend every argument you are invited to. Philosophy: Stoicism. Politics: Democratic SocialistRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    I was more disagreeing with using the term disability, particularly to describe something that has a full spectrum of severity.

    Humor can be dissected as a frog can, but dies in the process.
  • Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    JebusUD wrote: »
    I wouldnt call it problem to have Autism refer to many different kinds

    Like it is literally called the Autism Umbrella in some places

    Its not like they are unrelated issues, they are all related

    It's a problem when we try to talk about it in general terms of "what should be cured" and "how bad is it", etc. ala this thread.
    You can't really compare how bad one form of autism to another. It's not a linear progression from one to the next

    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
  • LorahaloLorahalo Registered User regular
    edited March 2015
    Magic Pink wrote: »
    So do they know what causes Autism? I remember a while ago they said it was caused by aluminum I think.

    Can it get worse or any better at all?

    What exactly is the difference between Autism and Aspergers?

    No known cause as far as I'm aware. It just kinda happens. Some people think there's genetics at play.

    Depends on what you mean by worse and better. You can learn to adapt, but it's never perfect. I've seen lots of cases with young kids (I sometimes do some work with kids diagnosed under 6) where they have significant milestone delays and regression though. In severe cases, it's pretty rough. I don't have much experience with adults on the spectrum thiugh, since all my experience is kids under 6.

    In the DSM-V, they are the same thing. Autism is on a spectrum, and Aspergers falls into a different place on the spectrum is all.

    Lorahalo on
    I have a podcast about Digimon called the Digital Moncast, on Audio Entropy.
  • CorehealerCorehealer The Apothecary The softer edge of the universe.Registered User regular
    Echo wrote: »
    Officially I am diagnosed with Asperger's. However in recent years my Mother, who has become something of a self-taught expert on this, suspects I'm much closer to having high-functioning Autism.

    DSM-V got rid of Asperger's as a stand-alone diagnosis. It's an autism spectrum disorder now.

    's probably more accurate.

    Speaking of, Munkus was asking about classification, disease or disability? I think disorder is a better word for it.

    As someone also diagnosed with Asperger's at age 8 and sharing a lot of similar developmental experiences to RMS, I agree that spectrum disorder is probably a better way to describe it.

    Everyone experiences autism differently for a variety of reasons, and at least from my experience as well, some aspects of it feel like a blessing which have helped me just as much as other aspects of it have hindered me when relating to people and the world.

    488W936.png
  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    JebusUD wrote: »
    I wouldnt call it problem to have Autism refer to many different kinds

    Like it is literally called the Autism Umbrella in some places

    Its not like they are unrelated issues, they are all related

    It's a problem when we try to talk about it in general terms of "what should be cured" and "how bad is it", etc. ala this thread.
    You can't really compare how bad one form of autism to another. It's not a linear progression from one to the next

    I agree, which is why I find it strange that it is an umbrella term instead of discrete diagnoses. I think that the reason it is an umbrella may have more to do with lack of understanding of mechanism and of lack of good categorizations of different type.

    I write you a story
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  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    Gnizmo wrote: »
    My wonderful child is currently in the process of being tested. The current outlook is not if she is autistic, but what do we need to do to help manage it. Through the testing though I have come to see far far too many symptoms in myself for my own comfort level. It has left me wondering where I fall, and if that hits just inside or just outside the spectrum. I suppose this thread shall teach me plenty either way and I am glad to have it.

    I think like most things in the DSM it is easy to self diagnose, but only a trained professional can really tell you if what you have is an issue.

    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
    Echo
  • SomestickguySomestickguy Registered User regular
    bigpost

    This is exactly the kind of thing I wanted to see when I made this thread. Thank you.

    I'm from North Wales myself, and likewise have an American-ish accent. I didn't even know it was a symptom of autism until like a year ago, I just assumed it was due to my American dad.

    I haven't really thought of my lack of a verbal filter in the concept of my autism... That's certainly food for thought!

  • LorahaloLorahalo Registered User regular
    edited March 2015
    Officially my diagnosis is for ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder), but if I end up telling someone I always say Aspergers. Just makes it simpler. If I say I have a form of autism, I get the "You don't seem autistic" reply, but if I say Aspergers I get "Oh is that the one that makes you smart" which is still a pretty goddamn fuckin stupid response. No, having autism doesn't make you into a super intelligent asshole like Sherlock, sorry.

    Lorahalo on
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  • Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    God dammit stop comparing people to fictional characters people

    No I am no Sheldon

    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
    Zibblsnrt
  • Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    God dammit stop comparing people to fictional characters people

    No I am no Sheldon

    I know, right? You're totally a Leonard!

    Brovid Hasselsmof
  • SomestickguySomestickguy Registered User regular
    Lorahalo wrote: »
    Officially my diagnosis is for ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder), but if I end up telling someone I always say Aspergers. Just makes it simpler. If I say I have a form of autism, I get the "You don't seem autistic" reply, but if I say Aspergers I get "Oh is that the one that makes you smart" which is still a pretty goddamn fuckin stupid response. No, having autism doesn't make you into a super intelligent asshole like Sherlock, sorry.

    Huh. I avoid using the term "aspergers" because I've typically had worse responses to that. I guess different parts of the world...?

  • DodgeBlanDodgeBlan PSN: dodgeblanRegistered User regular
    I was in high school during peak ADD diagnosis era. I think at one point roughly half my friends were on ADD medication. Most of them were put on it after only cursory examination and had very little in the way of actual doctor follow ups afterwards. It was just something that you did because there was something that wasn't 'quite right' about them. They didn't quite fit in in class or they had a sudden drop in grades at some point. Most of them say now that being put on ADD medication hindered rather than helped their transition into adulthood.

    I have no real experience with the aspergers end of the autism spectrum outside of people talking about it on the internet. I don't really interact with teenagers in real life anymore. I have no idea if psychiatry has become more responsible in the administering of powerful psychoactive medications to adolescents. That being said I am extremely opposed to the cavalier attitude with which adolescents were put on dexamphetamine when I was young.

    And if the people in this thread say that aspergers isn't like ADD was then that's great, progress has been made. But the way a lot of my friends were treated when they were vulnerable has not engendered within me a trust for the psychiatric profession.

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  • CorehealerCorehealer The Apothecary The softer edge of the universe.Registered User regular
    Lorahalo wrote: »
    Officially my diagnosis is for ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder), but if I end up telling someone I always say Aspergers. Just makes it simpler. If I say I have a form of autism, I get the "You don't seem autistic" reply, but if I say Aspergers I get "Oh is that the one that makes you smart" which is still a pretty goddamn fuckin stupid response. No, having autism doesn't make you into a super intelligent asshole like Sherlock, sorry.

    I get this all the time, still, whenever it comes up. Annoys me to no end.

    488W936.png
  • StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    Magic Pink wrote: »
    So do they know what causes Autism?
    Vaccinations, duh...haven't you read my very scientific blog???

    YL9WnCY.png
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  • RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    edited March 2015
    Gonna talk about an interesting test you can give to someone who may have Autism, The Sally-Anne test!

    Using dolls, you roleplay a story with the person where there are three boxes, and "Sally" puts a marble she owns in one of the boxes. Then, when Sally leaves the room, "Anne" takes the marble and puts it in another box. Then you ask the person: When Sally comes back, which box does she check for her marble first?

    The correct answer is the box she put it in, because obviously if she was out of the room she won't know what Anne did. However a child with autism is more likely (but not certain) to say the box that the marble is actually in, because the child knows its there.

    What this test indicates is that for some kids with Autism, the idea that people know different things than you doesn't develop organically, making it really hard for them to imagine things from someone else's perspective, because all there is is their own. This also suggests a reason why many folk with Autism are poor liars; a subconscious belief that the person they're lying to knows the truth already.

    It's not a foolproof test, and it's possible to be taught the idea that other folks' experiences are different from your own, but I always found it interesting.

    RMS Oceanic on
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  • Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    Magic Pink wrote: »
    So do they know what causes Autism?
    Vaccinations, duh...haven't you read my very scientific blog???

    I mean besides that

    I think webcomics

  • DoobhDoobh She/Her, Ace Pan/Bisexual 8-) What's up, bootlickers?Registered User regular
    hi, yes

    I'm on the spectrum

    diagnosed about... two months ago, now? I'm 28, now, so I had to make do without that knowledge for far too long

    also, there are tons of trans folk who are also on the spectrum
    this is a known thing

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  • GoatmonGoatmon Companion of Kess Registered User regular
    I was diagnosed with AS when I was 18. Had I been diagnosed a little earlier, It might have spared me from a lot of stress and difficulty through school, but alas.

    To say I was met with some hostility when my Aspergers came up in discussion in the old forum days would be a slight understatement.

    I was immediately accused of bullshitting about it (By a mod, no less), and it was a while before people stopped suggesting I was a self-diagnosed prick just trying to get attention.

    Suffice to say, the forums are a much more pleasant environment these days.

    Coming to terms with Aspergers took a while. It wasn't until years after my diagnosis that I began to understand what it actually meant for me, and once I understood that I realized how screwy I was around others, and started working on self-awareness.

    It took a lot of personal effort to become comfortable with myself around others, but I'm pretty confident these days.

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  • LorahaloLorahalo Registered User regular
    edited March 2015
    Gonna talk about an interesting test you can give to someone who may have Autism, The Sally-Anne test!

    Using dolls, you roleplay a story with the person where there are three boxes, and "Sally" puts a marble she owns in one of the boxes. Then, when Sally leaves the room, "Anne" takes the marble and puts it in another box. Then you ask the person: When Sally comes back, which box does she check for her marble first?

    The correct answer is the box she put it in, because obviously if she was out of the room she won't know what Anne did. However a child with autism is more likely (but not certain) to say the box that the marble is actually in, because the child knows its there.

    What this test indicates is that for some kids with Autism, the idea that people know different things than you doesn't develop organically, making it really hard for them to imagine things from someone else's perspective, because all there is is their own. This also suggests a reason why many folk with Autism are poor liars; a subconscious belief that the person they're lying to knows the truth already.

    It's not a foolproof test, and it's possible to be taught the idea that other folks' experiences are different from your own, but I always found it interesting.

    This is called theory of mind, and is something parents of the kids I work with have to be told about quite often. It's especially common in diagnosed kids.

    Lorahalo on
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  • LorahaloLorahalo Registered User regular
    I think with the Sally-Anne test in particular, most kids get it right at about 4. One study had something like 80% of kids at the same age with ASD failed the test. It's really interesting.

    I have a podcast about Digimon called the Digital Moncast, on Audio Entropy.
  • EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    Lorahalo wrote: »
    Officially my diagnosis is for ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder), but if I end up telling someone I always say Aspergers. Just makes it simpler. If I say I have a form of autism, I get the "You don't seem autistic" reply, but if I say Aspergers I get "Oh is that the one that makes you smart" which is still a pretty goddamn fuckin stupid response. No, having autism doesn't make you into a super intelligent asshole like Sherlock, sorry.

    One of the criteria for Asperger's is "average or above average intelligence", though. One of the many stereotypes about ASD.
    God dammit stop comparing people to fictional characters people

    No I am no Sheldon

    I got pretty annoyed at one interview where whatshisface that plays him said he doesn't play a character that has Asperger's. He sure manages to fit every single ASD stereotype in there.

  • GoatmonGoatmon Companion of Kess Registered User regular
    edited March 2015
    While we have an Autism thread, I'm gonna just drop this here.

    There's a delightful little claymation movie called Mary and Max, about how a young Australian Girl and a man from the US with Aspergers become pen pals.

    It's a funny, super heartfelt film, and it provides some great insight into how one with Aspergers deals with everyday life, among other things.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZ3vlMO-Z-I

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  • EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    Lorahalo wrote: »
    This is called theory of mind, and is something parents of the kids I work with have to be told about quite often. It's especially common in diagnosed kids.

    There's also the intense world theory.
    People with Asperger’s syndrome, a high functioning form of autism, are often stereotyped as distant loners or robotic geeks. But what if what looks like coldness to the outside world is in fact a response to being overwhelmed by emotion—an excess of empathy, not a lack of it?

    This idea resonates with many people suffering from autism-spectrum disorders and their families. It also jibes with new thinking about the nature of autism called the “intense world” theory. As posited by Henry and Kamila Markram of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, suggests that the fundamental problem in autism-spectrum disorders is not a social deficiency, but rather an hypersensitivity to experience, which includes an overwhelming fear response.

    “I can walk into a room and feel what everyone is feeling. The problem is that it all comes in faster than I can process it.”

    “There are those who say autistic people don’t feel enough,” says Kamila Markram. “We’re saying exactly the opposite: They feel too much.” Virtually all people with ASD report various types of oversensitivity and intense fear. The Markrams argue that social difficulties of those with ASDs stem from trying to cope with a world where someone has turned the volume on all the senses and feelings up past 10. If hearing your parents’ voices while sitting in your crib felt like listening to Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music on acid, you, too, might prefer to curl in a corner and rock.

    LorahaloRMS OceanicDoobhtinaunAndy Joe
  • DoobhDoobh She/Her, Ace Pan/Bisexual 8-) What's up, bootlickers?Registered User regular
    The way my therapist described the social aspect of asberger's is not that we don't empathize with people, but rather along the lines that our brains process things differently, thus making it harder for us to understand who people who are not on the spectrum work.

    Plus, it's BS that we don't empathize with others. We feel, and feel hard.

    Again, I'm new to this and have only just got my feet wet as far as research goes. Glad that @Somestickguy opened up this thread.

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  • RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    Hmm. I always felt that because I had to manually learn a lot of social cues that maybe included my empathy, but maybe I'm wrong.

    I know I'm empathetic now anyway. There are a few D&D threads I'm having to disengage from because the sadness and/or anger they generate can be overwhelming.

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  • EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    Here, have my little bookmark collection.

    https://pinboard.in/u:echo/t:autism/

    Lorahalo
  • GoatmonGoatmon Companion of Kess Registered User regular
    edited March 2015
    At times it can feel like I'm speaking another language from other people.

    Though it depends on who I'm talking to.

    Most people I can click with well enough, but occasionally I run into problems.

    The worst is dealing with folks who not only don't click, but refuse to grasp that there's any confusion going on, and don't bother trying to meet me half way when trying to communicate.

    It can be infuriating.

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  • CorehealerCorehealer The Apothecary The softer edge of the universe.Registered User regular
    My mother helped me a lot with learning social cues and learning to be empathetic with others, but I think the biggest turning point in that regard for me was in high school when I realized that I wasn't ignored and bullied just because I was different/acted different, but because all the other students and teachers had their own issues to deal with and couldn't even begin to process mine, and were themselves different. Not everyone was just like me, nor should they be.

    I turned from being angry at them and the world for not conforming more to how I had come to see and interpret things to being sad at how much others around me were suffering, and I starting listening more to people and letting them open up to me, especially when they had no one else to go to. And that further taught me a lot about how to interact with them on their level and use normal vocabulary and make eye contact without it feeling painful to do so, which it did when I was young.

    488W936.png
  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    Echo wrote: »
    Lorahalo wrote: »
    This is called theory of mind, and is something parents of the kids I work with have to be told about quite often. It's especially common in diagnosed kids.

    There's also the intense world theory.
    People with Asperger’s syndrome, a high functioning form of autism, are often stereotyped as distant loners or robotic geeks. But what if what looks like coldness to the outside world is in fact a response to being overwhelmed by emotion—an excess of empathy, not a lack of it?

    This idea resonates with many people suffering from autism-spectrum disorders and their families. It also jibes with new thinking about the nature of autism called the “intense world” theory. As posited by Henry and Kamila Markram of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, suggests that the fundamental problem in autism-spectrum disorders is not a social deficiency, but rather an hypersensitivity to experience, which includes an overwhelming fear response.

    “I can walk into a room and feel what everyone is feeling. The problem is that it all comes in faster than I can process it.”

    “There are those who say autistic people don’t feel enough,” says Kamila Markram. “We’re saying exactly the opposite: They feel too much.” Virtually all people with ASD report various types of oversensitivity and intense fear. The Markrams argue that social difficulties of those with ASDs stem from trying to cope with a world where someone has turned the volume on all the senses and feelings up past 10. If hearing your parents’ voices while sitting in your crib felt like listening to Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music on acid, you, too, might prefer to curl in a corner and rock.

    Interestingly enough that's kind of how I would describe ADHD. You walk into any room, experience almost anything and you're immediately bombarded with stimulus from every sense and the overload makes it difficult to concentrate AND you have difficulty finding the important information in the barrage of stimulus.

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  • Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited March 2015
    Mmmmmm asberger

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  • DoobhDoobh She/Her, Ace Pan/Bisexual 8-) What's up, bootlickers?Registered User regular
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    Echo wrote: »
    Lorahalo wrote: »
    This is called theory of mind, and is something parents of the kids I work with have to be told about quite often. It's especially common in diagnosed kids.

    There's also the intense world theory.
    People with Asperger’s syndrome, a high functioning form of autism, are often stereotyped as distant loners or robotic geeks. But what if what looks like coldness to the outside world is in fact a response to being overwhelmed by emotion—an excess of empathy, not a lack of it?

    This idea resonates with many people suffering from autism-spectrum disorders and their families. It also jibes with new thinking about the nature of autism called the “intense world” theory. As posited by Henry and Kamila Markram of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, suggests that the fundamental problem in autism-spectrum disorders is not a social deficiency, but rather an hypersensitivity to experience, which includes an overwhelming fear response.

    “I can walk into a room and feel what everyone is feeling. The problem is that it all comes in faster than I can process it.”

    “There are those who say autistic people don’t feel enough,” says Kamila Markram. “We’re saying exactly the opposite: They feel too much.” Virtually all people with ASD report various types of oversensitivity and intense fear. The Markrams argue that social difficulties of those with ASDs stem from trying to cope with a world where someone has turned the volume on all the senses and feelings up past 10. If hearing your parents’ voices while sitting in your crib felt like listening to Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music on acid, you, too, might prefer to curl in a corner and rock.

    Interestingly enough that's kind of how I would describe ADHD. You walk into any room, experience almost anything and you're immediately bombarded with stimulus from every sense and the overload makes it difficult to concentrate AND you have difficulty finding the important information in the barrage of stimulus.

    for a while, I thought I had ADHD

    I think there's some symptom overlap?

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  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    Dubh wrote: »
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    Echo wrote: »
    Lorahalo wrote: »
    This is called theory of mind, and is something parents of the kids I work with have to be told about quite often. It's especially common in diagnosed kids.

    There's also the intense world theory.
    People with Asperger’s syndrome, a high functioning form of autism, are often stereotyped as distant loners or robotic geeks. But what if what looks like coldness to the outside world is in fact a response to being overwhelmed by emotion—an excess of empathy, not a lack of it?

    This idea resonates with many people suffering from autism-spectrum disorders and their families. It also jibes with new thinking about the nature of autism called the “intense world” theory. As posited by Henry and Kamila Markram of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, suggests that the fundamental problem in autism-spectrum disorders is not a social deficiency, but rather an hypersensitivity to experience, which includes an overwhelming fear response.

    “I can walk into a room and feel what everyone is feeling. The problem is that it all comes in faster than I can process it.”

    “There are those who say autistic people don’t feel enough,” says Kamila Markram. “We’re saying exactly the opposite: They feel too much.” Virtually all people with ASD report various types of oversensitivity and intense fear. The Markrams argue that social difficulties of those with ASDs stem from trying to cope with a world where someone has turned the volume on all the senses and feelings up past 10. If hearing your parents’ voices while sitting in your crib felt like listening to Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music on acid, you, too, might prefer to curl in a corner and rock.

    Interestingly enough that's kind of how I would describe ADHD. You walk into any room, experience almost anything and you're immediately bombarded with stimulus from every sense and the overload makes it difficult to concentrate AND you have difficulty finding the important information in the barrage of stimulus.

    for a while, I thought I had ADHD

    I think there's some symptom overlap?

    I've always thought so. Root cause may be different but symptoms can be expressed in similar ways. For example, I absolutely sympathize with the interpersonal/social relationship issues autistic-spectrum people have because ADHD raises similar problems.

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  • MetalbourneMetalbourne Inside a cluster b personalityRegistered User regular
    I might have an ASD based on indicators that I've heard. Where's a good place to start? Do I just talk to my normal doctor?

    Would anything change with a positive diagnosis? Would it give a doctor a better insight into what brain meds I should be taking? Would it help learning new coping techniques?

  • StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    The symptoms they list online for Asperger's are super general (no joke, Google lists "anxiety and depression" as one) and could apply to a host of other things.

    It's really something you want a professional to look at.

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