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Let's talk about [Autism]

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  • EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    The whole thing of using autism or aspies as the new version of retarded is fucking aggravating.

    I reserve the right to judge the fuck out of anyone using it maliciously.

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  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    That's the problem, though, isn't it? Social intelligence is the means by which we gain any respect. Don't have that, and people are culturally permitted to walk all over you.

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    Doc: That's right, twenty five years into the future. I've always dreamed on seeing the future, looking beyond my years, seeing the progress of mankind. I'll also be able to see who wins the next twenty-five world series.
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  • MetalbourneMetalbourne Inside a cluster b personalityRegistered User regular
    So the only evidence I have is that my neice doesn't make eye contact, she's almost three and doesn't talk, and I got a picture of her yesterday riding through the supermarket with a baby blanket over her head.

  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    So the only evidence I have is that my neice doesn't make eye contact, she's almost three and doesn't talk, and I got a picture of her yesterday riding through the supermarket with a baby blanket over her head.

    If she's not talking by 3 there's probably another process going on. Early child autism generally affects receptive more than expressive communication abilities, and by this time many of the markets for autism assume the capability of speech.

    Marty: The future, it's where you're going?
    Doc: That's right, twenty five years into the future. I've always dreamed on seeing the future, looking beyond my years, seeing the progress of mankind. I'll also be able to see who wins the next twenty-five world series.
  • MuzzmuzzMuzzmuzz Registered User regular
    So, I had to bribe my (mid-level adult autistic) brother into going out for dinner with me. I cannot make plans with him ahead of time, because if he doesn't want to go out that very moment, he extrapolates that he doesn't want to go out in a week. So I bribed him with a book of Marvel movie posters. Cheap move, but it worked.

    So when I announced that he was going to be an uncle at the restaurant, he stared at me, looked at my stomach, and proceeded to continue talking about Captain America. God, I love him.

    Mr. Muzz is totally okay with my brother entertaining the upcoming kid, when they get slightly older. He's memorised practically all the classic Robert Munsch books and Dr. Seuss, complete with all the vocal animation. I'll have to keep him away from feeding and baby changing, because it's probably going to gross him out, going by how he reacted to his other nephew.

    Andy JoeEchoShadowhopeAnialoscabsyMetalbourneCorehealerThe BetgirlVegemyteRMS OceanicGoldenSeducer
  • MetalbourneMetalbourne Inside a cluster b personalityRegistered User regular
    Paladin wrote: »
    So the only evidence I have is that my neice doesn't make eye contact, she's almost three and doesn't talk, and I got a picture of her yesterday riding through the supermarket with a baby blanket over her head.

    If she's not talking by 3 there's probably another process going on. Early child autism generally affects receptive more than expressive communication abilities, and by this time many of the markets for autism assume the capability of speech.

    I'm kinda thinking about asl classes just in case it turns out she's just deaf

  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    edited August 2015
    One of the volunteers in our current batch has Asperger's, and Auditory Processing Disorder, apparently. I say apparently because if she hadn't told us then I don't think I would have noticed anything. She's relatively quiet but not the quietest. I don't really know what the APD entails exactly. She said it can take her a while to comprehend what people say to her but she seems to keep up fine. Hopefully she's not actually struggling and just pretending. I have never (knowingly) spent time with any autistic people so it's all new to me.

    Brovid Hasselsmof on
  • MetalbourneMetalbourne Inside a cluster b personalityRegistered User regular
    Auditory processing disorders manifest in a few ways.

    For me, I have trouble listening to people in crowded spaces and sometimes when people I just don't understand it. Like perfectly formed words that I had no problem hearing just make no sense to me.

    grrmushacabsyThe BetgirlPLAEupfhoriaGoatmon
  • grrmushagrrmusha Registered User regular
    edited August 2015
    since girls/women are hard to diagnose, and even harder as adults, does anyone here know someone who actually got diagnosed as an adult? i used to think one can't have aspergers if they're not good at math, and good at reading faces, until i met an aspie who told me he was fine with reading faces, shit at math, and way better with languages and art lol. my best friend has aspergers, and whenever i meet someone i click with, they end up telling me they have it too. coincidence or not, im not sure.

    @metalbourne, that's one of my issues too. it's like they're speaking some fictional language, i hear sound/words but have no idea what they said. focusing on more than one sound source at the same time is overwhelming, unless they are music, then i can hear and separate specific sounds from multiple sources. hard to explain.

    grrmusha on
    Metalbourne
  • Masamune42Masamune42 Registered User regular
    I have a partner with an APD, and it sounds very similar to what Metalbourne describes. If the dishwasher is running, or I'm running the mixer, or the TV is on loud or stuff is banging around I've learned to not even attempt conversation as they simply cannot parse the multiple audio streams. Also, at work, they learn much more efficiently via written communication, trying to parse spoken information isn't the best experience.

    grrmusha
  • cabsycabsy the fattest rainbow unicorn Registered User regular
    It can also be only in certain circumstances, like most of the time I'm fine but phone calls are really hard for me to understand, and double hard if the person has an accent because I have no ability to pick out context clues

    also social dysfunction is a requirement of an autism dx but I actually know a lot of people who are autistic who don't really have a traditional problem with socializing, either because they learned how to act neurotypical or because people are one of their special interests or whatever. and then you have things like - I realize now looking back at my behaviour I didn't really "social" very neurotypically but I didn't realize that until I was well into high school so I had zero anxiety about socializing, I used to love to go out by myself and meet new people, had no problem chatting up basically anyone for any reason any time, but then once I got into college for the first time especially it felt like I hit a wall and I realized that I wasn't sure what it was but something I was doing was "wrong" and now instead I have social anxiety... yay

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  • PLAPLA The process.Registered User regular
    Auditory processing disorders manifest in a few ways.

    For me, I have trouble listening to people in crowded spaces and sometimes when people I just don't understand it. Like perfectly formed words that I had no problem hearing just make no sense to me.

    Hm, I don't think I ever told the doc about that. Wouldn't be the first time I just nodded and handwaved the questions.

  • MetalbourneMetalbourne Inside a cluster b personalityRegistered User regular
    PLA wrote: »
    Auditory processing disorders manifest in a few ways.

    For me, I have trouble listening to people in crowded spaces and sometimes when people I just don't understand it. Like perfectly formed words that I had no problem hearing just make no sense to me.

    Hm, I don't think I ever told the doc about that. Wouldn't be the first time I just nodded and handwaved the questions.

    I actually thought I had a hearing loss for a long time, even though every hearing test came back normal

  • StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    it feels like everyone my age hates phone calls so I'd have a hard time using that to determine anything

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  • Albino BunnyAlbino Bunny Jackie Registered User regular
    cabsy wrote: »
    It can also be only in certain circumstances, like most of the time I'm fine but phone calls are really hard for me to understand, and double hard if the person has an accent because I have no ability to pick out context clues

    also social dysfunction is a requirement of an autism dx but I actually know a lot of people who are autistic who don't really have a traditional problem with socializing, either because they learned how to act neurotypical or because people are one of their special interests or whatever. and then you have things like - I realize now looking back at my behaviour I didn't really "social" very neurotypically but I didn't realize that until I was well into high school so I had zero anxiety about socializing, I used to love to go out by myself and meet new people, had no problem chatting up basically anyone for any reason any time, but then once I got into college for the first time especially it felt like I hit a wall and I realized that I wasn't sure what it was but something I was doing was "wrong" and now instead I have social anxiety... yay

    Yeah, so much this. Nothing burns your ability to communicate faster than being actually worried about how you communicate and it's a thing I've heard from a bunch of aspies who I actually think do a better job at it than me.

    And then I get my work coach telling me I do just fine at it and that just makes me even more confused and hateful.

    Honestly think the most harmful aspect of aspergers for me has being the second guessing of alot of stuff in my life.

    CorehealercabsyShadowhopeGoatmon
  • cabsycabsy the fattest rainbow unicorn Registered User regular
    it feels like everyone my age hates phone calls so I'd have a hard time using that to determine anything

    It's not that I hate phone calls so much as I literally can't understand them, it's just this side of Charlie Brown's teacher for me, and I have also been tested for hearing loss (though more for tinnitus) and I actually have fantastic hearing! There's no physical reason I shouldn't be able to understand. I have my phone turned to max volume and its still super difficult. With some people I can do OK because their speech pattern is so familiar - my mom - but then I have a sister that if I have to talk to her on the phone she is absolutely unintelligible to me and I never have any idea what I'm agreeing/disagreeing with

  • ShadowhopeShadowhope Baa. Registered User regular
    cabsy wrote: »
    It can also be only in certain circumstances, like most of the time I'm fine but phone calls are really hard for me to understand, and double hard if the person has an accent because I have no ability to pick out context clues

    also social dysfunction is a requirement of an autism dx but I actually know a lot of people who are autistic who don't really have a traditional problem with socializing, either because they learned how to act neurotypical or because people are one of their special interests or whatever. and then you have things like - I realize now looking back at my behaviour I didn't really "social" very neurotypically but I didn't realize that until I was well into high school so I had zero anxiety about socializing, I used to love to go out by myself and meet new people, had no problem chatting up basically anyone for any reason any time, but then once I got into college for the first time especially it felt like I hit a wall and I realized that I wasn't sure what it was but something I was doing was "wrong" and now instead I have social anxiety... yay

    Yeah, so much this. Nothing burns your ability to communicate faster than being actually worried about how you communicate and it's a thing I've heard from a bunch of aspies who I actually think do a better job at it than me.

    And then I get my work coach telling me I do just fine at it and that just makes me even more confused and hateful.

    Honestly think the most harmful aspect of aspergers for me has being the second guessing of alot of stuff in my life.

    I'm in a bizarre place right now at work, as my current job basically boils down to communication. However, it's very structured communication - going to management and saying "this is a thing that has happened, this is why it happened, this is the impact, this is what we're doing, this is when we expect this to be resolved." It helps a great deal that most of the communication is via e-mail. Body language, tone, and other social queues that I normally miss entirely aren't a factor in e-mail communications.

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  • EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    edited August 2015
    There's a fairly recent theory called the Intense World Theory. I'll just cut'n'paste:

    edit: I should mention that the father is a neuroscientist, so it's not just parental wishful thinking.
    IMAGINE BEING BORN into a world of bewildering, inescapable sensory overload, like a visitor from a much darker, calmer, quieter planet. Your mother’s eyes: a strobe light. Your father’s voice: a growling jackhammer. That cute little onesie everyone thinks is so soft? Sandpaper with diamond grit. And what about all that cooing and affection? A barrage of chaotic, indecipherable input, a cacophony of raw, unfilterable data.

    Just to survive, you’d need to be excellent at detecting any pattern you could find in the frightful and oppressive noise. To stay sane, you’d have to control as much as possible, developing a rigid focus on detail, routine and repetition. Systems in which specific inputs produce predictable outputs would be far more attractive than human beings, with their mystifying and inconsistent demands and their haphazard behavior.

    This, Markram and his wife, Kamila, argue, is what it’s like to be autistic.

    The behavior that results is not due to cognitive deficits—the prevailing view in autism research circles today—but the opposite, they say. Rather than being oblivious, autistic people take in too much and learn too fast. While they may appear bereft of emotion, the Markrams insist they are actually overwhelmed not only by their own emotions, but by the emotions of others.

    Consequently, the brain architecture of autism is not just defined by its weaknesses, but also by its inherent strengths. The developmental disorder now believed to affect around 1 percent of the population is not characterized by lack of empathy, the Markrams claim. Social difficulties and odd behavior result from trying to cope with a world that’s just too much.

    Echo on
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  • PLAPLA The process.Registered User regular
    "Oh, I'm screaming on the inside."

    WhippyYukiraCorehealerGoatmonShadowhope
  • CorehealerCorehealer The Apothecary The softer edge of the universe.Registered User regular
    Echo wrote: »
    There's a fairly recent theory called the Intense World Theory. I'll just cut'n'paste:

    edit: I should mention that the father is a neuroscientist, so it's not just parental wishful thinking.
    IMAGINE BEING BORN into a world of bewildering, inescapable sensory overload, like a visitor from a much darker, calmer, quieter planet. Your mother’s eyes: a strobe light. Your father’s voice: a growling jackhammer. That cute little onesie everyone thinks is so soft? Sandpaper with diamond grit. And what about all that cooing and affection? A barrage of chaotic, indecipherable input, a cacophony of raw, unfilterable data.

    Just to survive, you’d need to be excellent at detecting any pattern you could find in the frightful and oppressive noise. To stay sane, you’d have to control as much as possible, developing a rigid focus on detail, routine and repetition. Systems in which specific inputs produce predictable outputs would be far more attractive than human beings, with their mystifying and inconsistent demands and their haphazard behavior.

    This, Markram and his wife, Kamila, argue, is what it’s like to be autistic.

    The behavior that results is not due to cognitive deficits—the prevailing view in autism research circles today—but the opposite, they say. Rather than being oblivious, autistic people take in too much and learn too fast. While they may appear bereft of emotion, the Markrams insist they are actually overwhelmed not only by their own emotions, but by the emotions of others.

    Consequently, the brain architecture of autism is not just defined by its weaknesses, but also by its inherent strengths. The developmental disorder now believed to affect around 1 percent of the population is not characterized by lack of empathy, the Markrams claim. Social difficulties and odd behavior result from trying to cope with a world that’s just too much.

    I think the above sums up my experience of Aspergers quite appropriately.

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  • Albino BunnyAlbino Bunny Jackie Registered User regular
    I like that theory. Mainly because it proposes that autism isn't a disorder so much as just a different state of mind from the norm. Which I think is fair, alot of the issues aspies tend to have aren't directly caused by them so much as the expectations of the world around them.

    Goatmon
  • GoatmonGoatmon Companion of Kess Registered User regular
    edited September 2015
    It's not a disability, so long as you're brought up to understand how you are different and are taught how to live accordingly.

    If you're not, you basically go through like as a square peg in a world of round holes; always wondering why the hell it's so difficult to get anywhere and why everyone else seems to have no trouble with things you endlessly struggle with.

    Goatmon on
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