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[Need for Speed (2015)] Nocturnal Urban Open World Car Tuning Car Culture Racing Videogame

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Posts

  • descdesc Goretexing to death Registered User regular
    edited October 2015
    Erlkönig wrote: »
    Considering that I have zero interest in Fallout 4, NFS is definitely on my "Most Likely Going To Buy" list. It really is unfortunate that its launch is sandwiched between Halo 5 and StarCraft 2, though. But, since I tend towards a slightly-hoarding personality type when it comes to games, I'll probably pick it up and casually play it between shooting the Covenant and commanding my Protoss troops.

    If only you could combine these games so that your Protoss could drift through a turn and run over the Covenant in the process

    desc on
  • BranniganSeppBranniganSepp Swiss Burrito Enthusiast PSN: ExMaloBonumRegistered User regular
    edited October 2015
    Beltaine wrote: »
    So will this continue to be in EA access once release day is here?

    No. As far as I know, subscribers can play all newly releasing EA games for 10 hours for free, a week early before release, to help decide whether or not they like the game. That's what Need for Speed on EA Access is - an extended 10 hour demo. It seems like full games get added to the EA Vault (the selection of full games) like a half a year to a year later, depending on if they keep selling or not. Also - you get 10% off all your purchases of EA games.

    Not too shabby for 5 bucks a month. Like I'd never buy into a sports game, but I'd quite likely develop a minor FIFA habit, if I'd get to play it from the vault. If/when I get an Xbox One, I'll definitely sub up, alone to play all the EA games I already bought on PS4, and might want to play again. Plus I'm a sucker for DICE, Bioware, Criterion/Ghost, Visceral games, so the discounts would pay off for me too. Shame Sony didn't allow EA Access onto PSN, I'd be its target audience.

    BranniganSepp on
  • descdesc Goretexing to death Registered User regular
    Played a few more hours. The framerate drops are making me wish I hadn't preordered. I've never played an Xbone game that had this level of glaring technical hiccups.

    Hmm.

  • BranniganSeppBranniganSepp Swiss Burrito Enthusiast PSN: ExMaloBonumRegistered User regular
    edited November 2015
    Reviews are out...

    IGN
    Gamespot
    Gamesradar+
    Metacritic

    ...and it looks like Ghost games managed to turn my once favorite racing game franchise from a guaranteed day 1 purchase into a bargain bin franchise yet again (I came on board with 2011's Hot Pursuit). While the core racing seems to be great, and the tuning is deep and rewarding, and the presentation is obviously stellar (but apparently tends to frequently hitch), everything else looks like its been dipped in the crapper.

    Short campaign with too few events. Always online seamless multiplayer that adds nothing to the game, unless one organizes *playdates* with friends. It is a total inconvenience, reducing playability of the game a lot. No pausing. No instant restarts. The list goes on. Proper matchmaking multiplayer? There's none of that. The cringeworthy storyline may be a plus for trash fans, but I was never into these games for the story. I also think that because they tied all their events to such video productions, the game ended up light on content. Slapping together a race in their editor must be a matter of minutes, so why did we end up with only 79 events? The open world also seems devoid of anything interesting to do.

    Personally, I think Criterion's Most Wanted had the best open world of any Need for Speed game to date. Crashing through billboards, stunt jumps, speed traps, finding hidden cars, that stuff kept me playing for tens, if not hundreds of hours. In concept, I also think that it had the best online multiplayer, at least if it had flowed any better. It dropped tens of players into the open world and then started one event after another, with brief pauses inbetween for players to fuck around a bit, or to race to the location of the next event. Sadly, it allowed for too much goofing off, so often the idiocy of others would mess with the pacing of events, to the point that events didn't start at all - if that had been adressed though (as it should have been with a patch, but didn't), it would be the perfect way to handle multiplayer in an open world racer.

    So yeah, it seems that Ghost games didn't realize that their half baked always online seamless multiplayer was the main issue with Rivals, and perpetuated its brand of stupidity into the next game, without improving on it at all. On top of that, it's a light package with technical issues, lacking any proper multiplayer whatsoever. Jeez! I'm out. Thanks for ruining my favorite racing franchise. I'll see you on the bottom of the bargain bin in a year or two. What a shame!

    BranniganSepp on
    Sorce
  • ErlkönigErlkönig Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    Reviews are out...

    IGN
    Gamespot
    Gamesradar+
    Metacritic

    ...and it looks like Ghost games managed to turn my once favorite racing game franchise from a guaranteed day 1 purchase into a bargain bin franchise yet again (I came on board with 2011's Hot Pursuit). While the core racing seems to be great, and the tuning is deep and rewarding, and the presentation is obviously stellar (but apparently tends to frequently hitch), everything else looks like its been dipped in the crapper.

    Short campaign with too few events. Always online seamless multiplayer that adds nothing to the game, unless one organizes *playdates* with friends. It is a total inconvenience, reducing playability of the game a lot. No pausing. No instant restarts. The list goes on. Proper matchmaking multiplayer? There's none of that. The cringeworthy storyline may be a plus for trash fans, but I was never into these games for the story. I also think that because they tied all their events to such video productions, the game ended up light on content. Slapping together a race in their editor must be a matter of minutes, so why did we end up with only 79 events? The open world also seems devoid of anything interesting to do.

    Personally, I think Criterion's Most Wanted had the best open world of any Need for Speed game to date. Crashing through billboards, stunt jumps, speed traps, finding hidden cars, that stuff kept me playing for tens, if not hundreds of hours. In concept, I also think that it had the best online multiplayer, at least if it had flowed any better. It dropped tens of players into the open world and then started one event after another, with brief pauses inbetween for players to fuck around a bit, or to race to the location of the next event. Sadly, it allowed for too much goofing off, so often the idiocy of others would mess with the pacing of events, to the point that events didn't start at all - if that had been adressed though (as it should have been with a patch, but didn't), it would be the perfect way to handle multiplayer in an open world racer.

    So yeah, it seems that Ghost games didn't realize that their half baked always online seamless multiplayer was the main issue with Rivals, and perpetuated its brand of stupidity into the next game, without improving on it at all. On top of that, it's a light package with technical issues, lacking any proper multiplayer whatsoever. Jeez! I'm out. Thanks for ruining my favorite racing franchise. I'll see you on the bottom of the bargain bin in a year or two. What a shame!

    The funny thing is that I really liked Rivals because you could turn all that online guff off. In this new NFS, I can't even start a private session...so every single time I play, I get to say "Hello" to a level of anxiety I thought was reserved only for Dark Souls games.

    Oh well, at least I can put rainbows and happy pandas all over my car...

    | Origin/R*SC: Ein7919 | Battle.net: Erlkonig#1448 | XBL: Lexicanum | Steam: Der Erlkönig (the umlaut is important) |
  • BranniganSeppBranniganSepp Swiss Burrito Enthusiast PSN: ExMaloBonumRegistered User regular
    edited November 2015
    Erlkönig wrote: »
    Reviews are out...

    IGN
    Gamespot
    Gamesradar+
    Metacritic

    ...and it looks like Ghost games managed to turn my once favorite racing game franchise from a guaranteed day 1 purchase into a bargain bin franchise yet again (I came on board with 2011's Hot Pursuit). While the core racing seems to be great, and the tuning is deep and rewarding, and the presentation is obviously stellar (but apparently tends to frequently hitch), everything else looks like its been dipped in the crapper.

    Short campaign with too few events. Always online seamless multiplayer that adds nothing to the game, unless one organizes *playdates* with friends. It is a total inconvenience, reducing playability of the game a lot. No pausing. No instant restarts. The list goes on. Proper matchmaking multiplayer? There's none of that. The cringeworthy storyline may be a plus for trash fans, but I was never into these games for the story. I also think that because they tied all their events to such video productions, the game ended up light on content. Slapping together a race in their editor must be a matter of minutes, so why did we end up with only 79 events? The open world also seems devoid of anything interesting to do.

    Personally, I think Criterion's Most Wanted had the best open world of any Need for Speed game to date. Crashing through billboards, stunt jumps, speed traps, finding hidden cars, that stuff kept me playing for tens, if not hundreds of hours. In concept, I also think that it had the best online multiplayer, at least if it had flowed any better. It dropped tens of players into the open world and then started one event after another, with brief pauses inbetween for players to fuck around a bit, or to race to the location of the next event. Sadly, it allowed for too much goofing off, so often the idiocy of others would mess with the pacing of events, to the point that events didn't start at all - if that had been adressed though (as it should have been with a patch, but didn't), it would be the perfect way to handle multiplayer in an open world racer.

    So yeah, it seems that Ghost games didn't realize that their half baked always online seamless multiplayer was the main issue with Rivals, and perpetuated its brand of stupidity into the next game, without improving on it at all. On top of that, it's a light package with technical issues, lacking any proper multiplayer whatsoever. Jeez! I'm out. Thanks for ruining my favorite racing franchise. I'll see you on the bottom of the bargain bin in a year or two. What a shame!

    The funny thing is that I really liked Rivals because you could turn all that online guff off. In this new NFS, I can't even start a private session...so every single time I play, I get to say "Hello" to a level of anxiety I thought was reserved only for Dark Souls games.

    Oh well, at least I can put rainbows and happy pandas all over my car...

    Well, there's no Rival factions though, so that's really less of an issue this time around. It just really eggs me that I can't restart races quickly over and over again to get my speedwall competition fix. And I also quite enjoyed some of the proper multiplayer options in the past, of which there is nothing this time around... again.

    Seriously, Ghost games must have been completely deaf to that particular part of the criticisms levelled against Rivals. For some reason Ghost games is dead set on thinking their whole always online seamless multiplayer angle is good and welcome design, when in fact it's a dealbreaker for many, and certainly cripples the playability of their game, to the point that I have practically no interest in playing the game anymore myself. I find especially baffling that Ghost games seems to consider it an apt replacement for proper matchmaking multiplayer, which is the most hairbrain assumption to make, because it obviously isn't. In my countless hours with Rivals, not once did I race with or against a human opponent. All I got from it was annoyance in the open world getting trolled by randos, and a lack of comfort and quality of life options, which are all paramount to how I tend to play Need for Speed games, namely obsessing over asynchronus speedwall/autolog competition.

    So yeah, as far as I'm concerned, Ghost games lost me as a day 1 customer, and as a fan of the franchise. Ugh. Way to be the Need for Speed super group, you guys!

    BranniganSepp on
  • descdesc Goretexing to death Registered User regular
    edited November 2015
    The always online hasn't bothered me as you barely even see other players. Someone drove up and hit my car when I was sitting in the garage lot once, but that was it.

    The lack of quick drop-in races is weird though. I challenged a few people to races like the game wants you to but all of the other players just ignored me.

    The vehicle customization is good, although parts only come a few at a time, so like my mustang has a rear fender wide body type kit available, but no front fenders yet. I'm level 20-something.

    I dunno, I enjoy the cheesy story (that probably doesn't speak well of me) and stuff but after 8 hours I am more turned off by framerate drops that interrupt the sound than anything else, given that it's only 900p / 30 FPS.

    I thought I was used to rubber banding because NFS has always been super band fest, but it's too obvious. You can take a turn while AI cars are crashing each other, then hit your dumb nitrous expertly in the straightaway and look at the radar as you do this -- the AI cars stay exactly the same distance behind you the whole time.

    One thing the reviews haven't pointed out that is really odd is that some parts of the town are always raining, some are at midnight, and some are at dawn with the sun almost rising. The area that's pre-dawn actually looks nice, with big clouds and a little golden light on the horizon. But you'll be in a race and turn down some straightaway and the environment swiftly goes from 5:00 AM to midnight with a big full moon. It's really bizarre. I assume it's some limitation of the lighting engine but it's very noticible.

    The game is fun despite flaws and since I preordered it I might as well finish it, but Forza Horizon 2 is clearly the open world car game to buy.

    desc on
  • NaloutoNalouto Registered User regular
    Signed in for the first time in months to express my disappointment in this one. I really just wanted a nice, smooth open world racer. Instead, ....i got this. What a horrible disaster this is, and I really REALLY loved the flashy/corny over the top characters from previous FMV Speed games, I'm glad my wife was out of the room for that first grueling half hour of video, cringeworthy and unskippable, I get bumped off the track on that first checkpoint race... no pause button, no restart button.... yeah maybe I'm getting old, but this is not a good time.

    :winky:
  • Ah_PookAh_Pook Registered User regular
    so is this worse than rivals or what? i enjoyed that game well enough, and would play another game of similar quality with cheez fmv.

  • ErlkönigErlkönig Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    Ah_Pook wrote: »
    so is this worse than rivals or what? i enjoyed that game well enough, and would play another game of similar quality with cheez fmv.

    You know what...personally, I wouldn't say that NFS is worse than Rivals. Yes, I'm annoyed that I can't play in a private-session/invite-only like I could in Rivals. And I am also annoyed at the lack of a race restart option (which, if I remember, was how it also was in Rivals). But there is one thing that NFS doesn't do that Rivals did that eminently pissed me off so much that it makes me hesitant to even pop in and play: NFS doesn't wipe out an entire session's worth of SpeedPoints if I take two or three crashes (or just brush against objects (and even destructible fluff)). Losing several hundred thousand SpeedPoints because you were miles away from a garage and the cops will beeline for you even if you're driving under their posted speed limits doesn't enhance the thrill for me. At the worst, it makes me not want to play...and at best, it makes me want to stick to the half or quarter mile section that is easily farmable...which kills any desire to actually play the game.

    | Origin/R*SC: Ein7919 | Battle.net: Erlkonig#1448 | XBL: Lexicanum | Steam: Der Erlkönig (the umlaut is important) |
  • Ah_PookAh_Pook Registered User regular
    Erlkönig wrote: »
    Ah_Pook wrote: »
    so is this worse than rivals or what? i enjoyed that game well enough, and would play another game of similar quality with cheez fmv.

    You know what...personally, I wouldn't say that NFS is worse than Rivals. Yes, I'm annoyed that I can't play in a private-session/invite-only like I could in Rivals. And I am also annoyed at the lack of a race restart option (which, if I remember, was how it also was in Rivals). But there is one thing that NFS doesn't do that Rivals did that eminently pissed me off so much that it makes me hesitant to even pop in and play: NFS doesn't wipe out an entire session's worth of SpeedPoints if I take two or three crashes (or just brush against objects (and even destructible fluff)). Losing several hundred thousand SpeedPoints because you were miles away from a garage and the cops will beeline for you even if you're driving under their posted speed limits doesn't enhance the thrill for me. At the worst, it makes me not want to play...and at best, it makes me want to stick to the half or quarter mile section that is easily farmable...which kills any desire to actually play the game.

    Yea you just gotta not worry about losing those points at some point. There is a way to insanely easily get more points than you can ever spend, so it doesn't really matter. It is annoying though.

  • GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    edited November 2015
    Well this is all pretty disappointing to hear. I was actually fairly hyped for this game, visuals looked great, car list was fairly strong, and it seemed like it would have good "arcade with some depth" blend. Plus just free-roaming through the city and highways seems like it would have been pretty chill.

    Between the PC version pushback to spring and all of the "meh" reactions though my enthusiasm is rapidly fading.

    Gaslight on
  • BranniganSeppBranniganSepp Swiss Burrito Enthusiast PSN: ExMaloBonumRegistered User regular
    edited November 2015
    Funny thing is, if EA wouldn't serve Europe two days late everytime, I might actually have fallen for Need for Speed. Whatever hairbrain reason EA has that makes it incapable of releasing games on the same day in the US and Europe, I bet it costs them more money in lost sales, than whatever keeps them from doing simultaneous releases. Also - the Xbox One version will always be the weakest version of any of their games, yet the world's first impression will always be the EA Access Xbox One version of it. I bet the frequent and regular framerate stutters of the Xbox One version did hurt their day 1 sales too.

    Xbox One EA Access subscribers will be playing Battlefront five days from now. It's the weakest version by far. 720p rendering resolution, more framerate hitches, and that's going to be first impression the game makes on the general gaming population. If there are any significant issues with that version, it'll cost them dearly, even if the PS4 an PC versions are fine.

    Oh well, at least I'll have 9 days to focus on Fallout 4, before Battlefront will inevitably intoxicate my brain with pew pew competition. Still, it's ridiculous that EA still isn't capable or willing to do worldwide simultaneous releases, especially with the liability that is EA Access flaunting the weakest version of every game 9 days early of every European release. Everytime something goes wrong, day 1 sales will suffer from 9 days worth of bad word of mouth. Not that I think Battlefront will have a bad launch, but it certainly is possible. EA Access didn't help Need for Speed, that's one thing for sure though.

    BranniganSepp on
  • BranniganSeppBranniganSepp Swiss Burrito Enthusiast PSN: ExMaloBonumRegistered User regular
    edited February 2016
    Ah jeez. I finally caved and bought the game on the current EA PSN sale (EU) for under 30 bucks. The thing is, both my gamepads are *battledamaged* by extensive use, and don't register the full range of pressure on their trigger buttons anymore. The conductive silicone pads get worn out over time, I guess I have somewhere between 1,500 and and 2,000 hours of play on each of those dualshocks. I can't go full speed ever, and it's impossible to win a race. Shame EA Ghost didn't add an option to decrease the maximum pressure value somewhat, like for example Helldivers does, because it's a commonly known issue with all DS4s.

    Translation. Now I have to order a new DS4. Great savings indeed, that sale. Or just import conductive silicone pads and repair the triggers myself. I already took one apart and put it back together with no issue multiple times, just to work out if I could do it. Either way, the lacking build quality of the DS4 is a real bummer.

    I actually intended to wait for this year's E3, since I have high hopes that Sony will enter the premium gamepad market like Microsoft, which seems to do real well with their Elite gamepad, but now I guess I forced my own hand. How bloody darn weak of me. Oh well, guess it's time to place an order for a new DS4 now. Shame on me! On the upside, I can again use bolt action sniper rifles in BF4 and Hardline. I've missed that so much.

    BranniganSepp on
  • BranniganSeppBranniganSepp Swiss Burrito Enthusiast PSN: ExMaloBonumRegistered User regular
    edited February 2016
    Gamedesign by Buzzword. That's what Need for Speed is guilty of. Putting adherence to the marketing buzzword before designing proper mechanical fun. EA Ghost's gamedesigners are either being hobbled by EA's marketing, or they're just not particularly good at it.

    I mean the game is technically marvellous, and the driving physics are more satisfying than not, but gosh darn this thing is a huge step backwards, after a whole bunch of steps back since Criterion's Most Wanted. Case and point, the open world collectibles. Where Most Wanted had billboards to jump through, some of which were even kind of stunt puzzles, that were tied into asynchronus autolog competition, giving each jump potentially nigh infinite replay value, we get to do a single doughnut that's nothing to no-one, and doesn't add anything of value to the game, beyond me checking off that doughnut spot once. Trading a great concept for gutter trash, just because it's new and fits the *authentic street culture* buzzword, that's poor as shit gamedesign in my eyes. Same goes for all the other collectibles. None of 'em are worthwhile side activities, and far from perpetually valuable, like the ones we have seen in game's like Criterion's Most Wanted or Burnout Paradise.

    Rivals introduced so many half cooked and downright detrimental concepts to the franchise, it's pigheaded to keep these things in the game. While the always online aspect isn't as much of a bummer as the last time, it still adds nothing worthwhile, while being obstructive in countless little ways. For example - who thought it to be a good idea to have players and AI mimicking player behavior on the streets during events? Bopping and weaving in and out of traffic is part of the DNA and fun of Need for Speed for me. On the one hand, there's way less traffic on the streets to do so in a satisfying manner, on the other hand there's players and "AI-players" coming at me at 150 mph, making it absolutely impossible to avoid them, because we approach each other at a relative speed of over 300 mph.

    The ugly and obstructive racing line projected on the streets is absolutely inadequate when it comes to sudden sharp turns, and it dimishes the game's visuals and overall visiblity, often obstructing crucial information, like off-ramps and oncoming traffic, and is simply put a bloody grotesque.

    I still have lots of fuel to keep firing on this rant, but long story short, EA has some of the most talented and efficient game developers when it comes to the technical aspects of game making, and nailing the core mechanics, but gosh darn EA's gamedesign on all the other levels is grotesquely weak, often diminishing the games, and turning them into less than they actually would be, if they weren't hobbled by bad ancillary gamedesign. Just look at that clusterfuck of a map, making it nigh impossible to find the specific event I want to play. Jeez!

    How hard is it to understand, that when you have hunderds of things to do, maybe one should categorize these things for parsability? That makes me think of Battlefield Hardline with its countless assignments, just vomited onto the screen without concessions to making them managable and parsable. Hell, good gamedesigners would make 'em trackable. It's like questdesign 101. Oh well, I don't know how EA studios approach gamedesign, but as far as I can tell, it's A. deteriorating company-wide, and B. is the key to making great games. In conclusion, EA is doing it wrong. Manage that, why don't you!

    BranniganSepp on
  • BranniganSeppBranniganSepp Swiss Burrito Enthusiast PSN: ExMaloBonumRegistered User regular
    edited February 2016
    I can't get over how at least half the content in the game is about drifting, with its totally busted scoring system, that emphasizes jostling around like a drunk figure skater on ice without ice skates on his feet.

    It doesn't help either that all this drift shenannigans heavily influences REP-gains (currency for lvl-ups) regardless of activity, and that it gets tracked in autolog for asynchronus competition, which makes no bloody sense to me. Why would I want to jostle around the streets of Ventura Bay like a drunk figure skater on ice without ice skates on? In every flippin' race? Get the flip out of here!

    It's Need for SPEED damnit! Don't get me wrong, I love Ridge Racer-like drifting. Criterion's Hot Pursuit nailed that better than any other game I've ever played, including Ridge Racer, but that was all about speed and winning races, not a self serving and unfun purpose in itself. Sure, I can set the cars to drift like they would in Ridge Racer, and that's great fun for the most parts, but speed doesn't matter in drift events. All that matters is how fucking far I oversteer. Ugh!

    When over half your content is not about SPEED, but about supposed STYLE, you decidedly do not have the first clue about what a NEED FOR SPEED game should be about, in my opinion. Major thumbs down for the gamedesign in this game. What a shame, for its technical and mechanical foundations could easily allow for a much much better Need for Speed game.

    P.S. All the customization of the car handling, and the need therefor to complete game, make the handling feel absolutely inconsistent, and thusly practically impossible to master. Where I could go on a 45-minute-all-around-the-map-final-race in Hot Pursuit and not fuck up once, because I've achieved mastery, that's never going to happen in this game - also I'm going to quit this wreck of a game way before that could conceivably happen.

    P.P.S. Visual customization aside, which great, I find the extensive customization to be to the detriment of the game. It's shit for pacing, and going back to the garage after every level-up to check for performance upgrades isn't fun. Another negative side effect? I'm almost done with the game, and have driven like two cars. In Criterion's Most Wantend, I've driven practically every car in the game extensively, and most of them felt like they had a purpose in the game, and custom built content available. Definitely not the case with this thing. Why not just have car-specific autolog competition, for example?

    BranniganSepp on
  • BranniganSeppBranniganSepp Swiss Burrito Enthusiast PSN: ExMaloBonumRegistered User regular
    edited February 2016
    Huge rant aside, when the game is about speed, it's actually quite darn great - aside from the fact that it would be so much better, if drifting was handled a lot more consistently, so it doesn't feel like a guessing game everytime. Racing games feel so much better with some semblance of mastery behind the wheel, which isn't really in the books for this one, because of how inconsistent the car handling is due to extensive performance customization. That said, here's the last speed event of the game, and probably the final highlight for me. Now all that's left is like sickeningly shitty drift trains and Gymkhana and what have you. Ugh!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dk-eMiEOGXg

    BranniganSepp on
  • SorceSorce Not ThereRegistered User regular
    On the upside, you're not alone in having some major issues in the game.

    https://youtu.be/jXznBK020oU

    I didn't even know they got rid of having a manual transmission. That's... really dumb.

    sig.gif
  • BranniganSeppBranniganSepp Swiss Burrito Enthusiast PSN: ExMaloBonumRegistered User regular
    edited February 2016
    I definitely agree with the AI complaint, though the problem for me lies not so much with the rubberbanding, because I beat pretty much all speed races on my first go and had no problems with that (I guess they might have patched that by now), but rather it's just the AI doesn't give a shit about what the player does. It just does its thing. Regardless if we speak of just regular traffic or opponents/NPC-mates.

    In most games, traffic AI slows down oncoming cars when they are on a collision course with the player, because it's natural behavior, and because it gives the player more leeway to react, and successfully bop and weave through traffic. In this game? Traffic just crashes full speed into the player, not giving a damn.

    Looking at modes like Drift Train, that want the player to actively stick with the AI and do coordinated drifts, while the AI doesn't give two hoots about what the player does, and doesn't adapt at all to the player's presence - these things simply turn the game into *Bumper Cars - The Game*. So yeah. The AI in this game is a huge bummer.

    I think it's Blizzard's baseline gamedesign philosophy to not do something, unless it can do it right. So much in Need for Speed is underdeveloped and undercooked, and just doesn't work properly. I feel like practically the entire drift-centric mechanics and systems and content are not done right, and the game would have been so much better without all of that shit.

    So yeah. If you can't do a thing right, don't do it at all. It's like gamedesign 101, according to some of the best game studios out there. Cutting all the messy drift shit out of the game would have made the game better. I guess it's counterintutive for a studio that's struggling to produce enough content in time for their deadline, to cut mediocre stuff out of their game, but it's simply how it's done. Make more of the shit that you know is great instead. Like going really fast, trying to go faster than everybody else, enjoying a downright hypnothic flow of great arcade racing.

    BranniganSepp on
  • SorceSorce Not ThereRegistered User regular
    I've been playing Most Wanted on Origin and at least here, this game is okay. The cop AI is ridiculous (the aforementioned Give No Fucks driving), and it seriously has gotten in the way of a couple of races I've been in, but other than that... I'm having a bit of fun driving around and crashing through things intentionally in my Maserati.

    sig.gif
  • SorceSorce Not ThereRegistered User regular
    Yeah, uh, adding Burnout-style crashes to the actual street races was a bad fucking decision. Especially since the AI is pretty much FUCK YOU all the time.

    sig.gif
  • ErlkönigErlkönig Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    System requirements and supported wheels have been announced for NFS PC!

    (source: http://www.pcgamer.com/need-for-speed-system-requirements-published/ )

    The minimum requirements for 720p and 30fps at low settings:
    •OS: 64-bit Windows 7 or later
    •Processor: Intel Core i3-4130 or equivalent with four hardware threads
    •Memory: 6GB RAM
    •Graphics Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB, AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB, or equivalent DX11 compatible GPU with 2GB memory
    •Hard Drive: 30 GB free space

    And the recommended requirements for 1080p and 60fps at high settings:
    •Windows 7 or later
    •Intel Core i5-4690 or equivalent with four hardware threads
    •8GB RAM
    •NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 4GB, AMD Radeon R9 290 4GB, or equivalent DX11 compatible GPU with 4GB memory
    •30 GB free space

    And wheels:
    •Logitech G27
    •Logitech G29
    •Logitech G920
    •Thrustmaster TX
    •Thrustmaster T150
    •Thrustmaster T300
    •Thrustmaster T500
    •Fanatec CSR

    | Origin/R*SC: Ein7919 | Battle.net: Erlkonig#1448 | XBL: Lexicanum | Steam: Der Erlkönig (the umlaut is important) |
  • SorceSorce Not ThereRegistered User regular
    Well then. Most Wanted has a Lamborghini Countach.

    GOTY, all years.

    sig.gif
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