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Help me not get heatstroke (best gear for super hot weather)

HypatiaHypatia Registered User regular
edited October 2015 in Help / Advice Forum
I've just had a death in the family that requires me to go to a tropical area in the middle of June for a funeral.
I will need to wear all black and the ceremonies will take several days, a lot of which will take place outdoors in the sun.
The average temperature in this region is going to be 95-100 degrees and humidity will generally be at least 60-70%.

The last time I went for a funeral in this area, I ended up getting heat stroke and nearly collapsing. I would like to plan better this time. What is the best brand or gear to get to survive this? Is it Under Armour or is there some other brand that makes very lightweight and ridiculously breathable black clothing?

Hypatia on

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    davidsdurionsdavidsdurions Your Trusty Meatshield Panhandle NebraskaRegistered User regular
    Sorry for your loss, I hope my recommendations help.

    I don't know much about clothing, but I do know what you will want to do is begin each day fully hydrated and continue rehydrating throughout each day. Your body does a poor job of telling you how close you are to dehydration and heat stroke before it is too late, so best practice is to drink plenty of liquids while limiting caffeine and alcohol.

    Finding cool, shaded areas to relax and rehydrate shouldn't be something avoided over the social situation you find yourself in. No need to make everyone visit you in the hospital during the services for your family member!

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    DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    Linen is one of the best options for lightweight, breathable fabric for hot environments, especially if you'll need to be dressy at all.

    But yeah, stay hydrated and in the shade as much as possible.

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    EnigmedicEnigmedic Registered User regular
    Make sure you also get some food in you early in the day. You'll need the electrolytes and only drinking water can actually mess you up if you don't have some sort of balance. Also try to wear some loose clothing if it is an option. Drink water early, if you're thirsty you're already behind the curve for hydration.

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    WiseManTobesWiseManTobes Registered User regular
    Get a few towels, wet them down and freeeze them , ( and if worried about getting small areas of clothes weet, can also bag them.

    Wear them just under shirt along back of neck, will help a TON. ( adjust sizes/bagging/towel color etc for personal preference to go with clothing worn)

    Steam! Battlenet:Wisemantobes#1508
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    StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    Would it be rude to bring a sun umbrella?

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    CabezoneCabezone Registered User regular
    edited June 2015
    Daenris wrote: »
    Linen is one of the best options for lightweight, breathable fabric for hot environments, especially if you'll need to be dressy at all.

    But yeah, stay hydrated and in the shade as much as possible.

    Nylon clothes are also excellent in the heat. You tend to get the swishy noises from the fabric tho. For a funeral I'd think linen would be my top choice and if you see something in nylon you'd like it's also good. I live in the devils anus of California known as Stockton, nylon is my top choice for kayaking in the sun. Linen for out of the water.

    Also gonna beat the hydration drum some more, you gotta drink tons of water. This really is the number one thing. Everything else is about comfort.

    EDIT: I thought I'd add, if you are wearing proper clothing and it's hot and breezy, your'e going to feel like you're not sweating. There's a good chance you are actually dehydrating faster and need to keep drinking the same amount of water.

    Cabezone on
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    CreaganCreagan Registered User regular
    edited June 2015
    I have massive problems with heat stroke too, (85 degrees is too hot for me) although I've never collapsed. Probably because my mom has the same problem, and actually did throw up and pass out once. So I was trained from a young age to be really obsessive about my well-being in heat.
    • Pick an outfit that shows the most skin possible while being socially acceptable funeral attire.
    • If you're a girl, take a huge purse and fill it with ice packs and water bottles filled with ice water.
    • If you're a guy, stick ice packs in all your pockets. (Wrap them in a paper towel so they don't sweat and ruin your clothing.) Take the biggest water bottle you can find, fill it with ice water.
    • Make sure you're sitting in a shaded place where you can still feel a breeze, if there is one.
    • Take a drink from the water bottle every five minutes if you can.
    • Whenever you start to feel "off" pull out an ice pack. Hold it against your left wrist, or your neck. You want it on a vein, because that'll cool you off the fastest.
    • Take a cap full of ice water and pour it into your hand. Rub it onto whatever exposed skin you can- arms, legs, whatever. (It's possible to do this discreetly.) This will act as pseudo-sweat and cool you off.
    • If there's a fan, do the cap of water thing, and then immediately stand in front of the fan.
    • Don't try to push yourself. If you feel really "off" let somebody know you're feeling sick, and immediately head to a place with air conditioning (then don't come back until you feel better.) People will be more upset if you collapse at the funeral than if you leave.

    Edit: I should also add, doing all of this helped me survive a four hour graduation ceremony in a 90 degree unconditioned gymnasium. I have problems in 85 degree weather. And I was wearing a tight floor length dress. (Floor-length white dresses were mandatory.)

    Creagan on
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    Void SlayerVoid Slayer Very Suspicious Registered User regular
    Seconding the ice packs for neck/wrist/under arms for cooling, even those chemical/medical ones that you break and shake could be useful if you can not carry around wet ice packs.

    Any water you drink should be cool but not ice cold, otherwise you can fool your body into thinking it is too cold and trying to heat up.

    He's a shy overambitious dog-catcher on the wrong side of the law. She's an orphaned psychic mercenary with the power to bend men's minds. They fight crime!
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    CabezoneCabezone Registered User regular
    edited June 2015
    Seconding the ice packs for neck/wrist/under arms for cooling, even those chemical/medical ones that you break and shake could be useful if you can not carry around wet ice packs.

    Any water you drink should be cool but not ice cold, otherwise you can fool your body into thinking it is too cold and trying to heat up.

    That's just a myth, drink ice cold water.

    Cabezone on
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    Pure DinPure Din Boston-areaRegistered User regular
    As far as sunblock goes, I've found that some brands can make the skin feel hotter because of the chemical reaction that absorbs the UV rays. Sunblocks with zinc oxide or titanium dioxide (often sold as "baby sunblock") bounce the light off your skin instead.

    If you need to stand for any period of time, keep a slight bend to your knees to help with circulation. If at any point you feel as though you're about to faint, IMMEDIATELY lie down with your head on the ground. So you don't hit your head or chip a tooth or something on the way down.

    I'm sorry for your loss.

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    CreaganCreagan Registered User regular
    Seconding the ice packs for neck/wrist/under arms for cooling, even those chemical/medical ones that you break and shake could be useful if you can not carry around wet ice packs.

    You can keep ice packs from getting really wet by wrapping them in a paper towel. It absorbs the "sweat" of the pack

    Oh! And another thing that might help, if you have to wear pants, is to get one of those ankle-wrap ice packs and hide them under your pant legs.

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    bsjezzbsjezz Registered User regular
    would it be acceptable in the context of this funeral to wear grey shorts and a black, lightweight dress shirt? that's what i'd be doing if i knew it was going to be a very hot day

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    TaranisTaranis Registered User regular
    I'll echo the loose clothing suggestion, and recommend a hat if you can find one that's appropriate.

    Though if you're healthy and drink plenty of water you should be fine. Don't drink too many sports drinks as they can flush your body's own electrolytes and monitor the color of your urine. Generally clearer is better.

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    CreaganCreagan Registered User regular
    I would caution that hats, while great for keeping sun off one's face, are also additional clothing and will heat your head up pretty fast because they trap any sweat and heat your scalp releases.

    So if you do wear a hat, take it off every dozen minutes and let your scalp breath a bit. And make sure it's a wide-brimmed hat to maximize sun protection.

    That being said, wide-brimmed hats can be used as hand fans should the need arise, and they work decently as a cooling mechanism in combination with a cap full of water wiped over skin. (Wipe the water on, then fan with the hat. It works better than just waiting for it to evaporate.)

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    HypatiaHypatia Registered User regular
    Thank you for all the advice! Unfortunately, the dress code is pretty strict and I've been told it has to be all black, long pants, no hats. I'll see if it's possible to pack some ice packs and bring a lot of water with a sports drink or two. I am kind of concerned that the day before I'll be flying in and will get all dehydrated on the airplane.

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    WiseManTobesWiseManTobes Registered User regular
    Hypatia wrote: »
    Thank you for all the advice! Unfortunately, the dress code is pretty strict and I've been told it has to be all black, long pants, no hats. I'll see if it's possible to pack some ice packs and bring a lot of water with a sports drink or two. I am kind of concerned that the day before I'll be flying in and will get all dehydrated on the airplane.

    Go a size or two up on the pants if able and belt them, will help a little. ( Basically you want a lot of room in the legs )

    Steam! Battlenet:Wisemantobes#1508
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    CreaganCreagan Registered User regular
    Wear a baggy shirt and pick up some special ice-packs you can wear under your clothing. They make them for physical therapy stuff, and can be pretty inconspicuous.

    Also, talk to the people in charge and explain your health situation. Chances are, they won't want you passing out at the funeral more than they'll want all the attendees to avoid carrying bags with them.

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