The [chat] Who Circumnavigated Fairyland

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  • earthwormadamearthwormadam ancient crust Registered User regular
    See what I mean!? You give tips advice even when uninformed on a subject. Bacon 4 prez.

    Got it, I will bring a raincoat, and a coffee mug. Also I don't wanna hug strangers so I will pull a "Shaun of the Dead" and try my best to blend in.

    tynicFlayProspicience
  • FlayFlay Registered User regular
    edited April 2019
    Bacon 4 prez.

    All we need is a catchy slogan

    WAKE UP
    TO BACON

    Let's be honest though the real AoB slogan would be a 40 page treatise of helpful wisdom

    Flay on
    earthwormadamProspicienceNightDragon
  • ProspicienceProspicience The Raven King DenvemoloradoRegistered User regular
    edited May 2019
    Thought I'd post this here first. Got a bunch of Corel software with my newest camera, thought I'd share for free if anyone wants it since I don't really need any of it. Figured this was a good place since there are always a few people who can't afford photoshop or whathaveyou.

    Don't be greedy. First come first serve. Shoot me a DM with what you want and I'll send the serial number for the software!
      [*] Paintshop Pro 2018
      [*] Aftershot Pro 3
      [*] Painter Essentials 6


      I probably won't be back on here until tomorrow so I may be slow to respond.

      Prospicience on
      Angel_of_BaconacadiaFlayDoodmannNightDragon
    • FlayFlay Registered User regular
      Don't need the software, but that's cool of you Prosp

    • ProspicienceProspicience The Raven King DenvemoloradoRegistered User regular
      No takers just yet though! I'll leave it here for another week before trying on FB, in the mean time if y'all have any friends you know that might need any of them - send them my way. Aftershot is a photo editing software, I suppose I should post that in the photo thread as well.

    • GumpyGumpy There is always a greater powerRegistered User regular
      Don't know if this is against the rules - please put me back in my box if it is! I'm looking to commission art (portrait/profile) of my significant other as a present - But I have no general concept of how much I should be budgeting and how I go about doing so. I'd also like to chat with one of the art crowd about it - would rather spend money in the forum community than outside it!

      Any tips appreciated

    • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
      edited June 2019
      It's perfectly fine to ask in here! We also have a commissions/advertising thread stickied at the top of the page, though it's probably a bit out of date.

      If you're on a tight budget it's a good idea to figure out your hard upper limit first. If you can be flexible, the next question I would ask is: what kind of portrait style would you be looking for? Cartoon-ish? B&W ink sketch? Digital painting? Full-on John Singer Sargent -esque oils? (those are listed in roughly increasing order of cost, though it will depend on the artist)
      Take a google on the web, or look at threads in the forum, and figure out what suits your and your wife's aesthetics. Then you'll be able to find an artist who works in the style you like and start communicating about budgets.

      tynic on
      GumpyDoodmannIruka
    • PeasPeas Registered User regular
      Hey folks can anyone in here recommend me some amazing fantasy artists to drool at?

      5myiokloks5d.png
    • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
      Ugh. I usually put my PayPal deets somewhere on my commission invoices because it's easier for private transactions, but I don't expect companies to use it. Did some work a few months back as a favour for a corporation, sent them an invoice with all my bank info up front, they cheerfully popped back with "we paid you through PayPal because it's quicker!" Of course they put it down as a sale/business transaction, so PayPal took a cut.

      So this time when I did another set of work for them, I only sent them my bank details. (It's Australia so all direct bank transfers are free and easy, this is not a big deal). The cheeky buggers wrote back asking for my PayPal account.

      no, you can't have it.

    • FlayFlay Registered User regular
      Oh shit, I landed a full time concept gig!

      I definitely don't feel like my skills are there yet, so I guess I'll have to do a lot of learning on the job

      Angel_of_BaconacadiatynicYoshisummonsIrukaNightDragondanxPeasDoodmanntapeslingerSublimusbombardierProspicienceJuggernutMayday
    • Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator mod
      @Flay That's awesome, congratulations!

    • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
      This is exactly the kind of bullshit that made me want to be a painter as a kid

      seokin-chung-turtleboys.jpg

      IrukaYoshisummonsacadiabowendanxtapeslingerhonovereAimbombardierGrifterProspicienceJuggernutDidgeridooNightDragonTheBigEasy
    • PeasPeas Registered User regular
      cehr7938l877.jpg

      Hi folks i was wondering if anyone know what this means
      This only happens when I draw diagonal lines and in a specific section of the screen, it's driving me nuts

      5myiokloks5d.png
    • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
      Probably a screen/pen interface problem. What are you using?

      Peas
    • PeasPeas Registered User regular
      edited September 2019
      Using a laptop hooked to another monitor
      My tablet is an old intuos pro
      Switching between the screen didn't solve the issue
      i hope my tablet is not dying or something

      edit: I tried clip paint and ms paint and apparently it's photoshop, still can't find a fix though

      Peas on
      5myiokloks5d.png
    • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
      Hmm. When you say 'screen', is it actually localised to an area on the monitor, or is it related to the part of the tablet you're drawing on?
      If it's the latter, then yeah you've probably got a fault on in the tablet electronics, which isn't likely to be fixable. If it's the monitor, then it's more likely to be a driver issue.

    • PeasPeas Registered User regular
      Thanks for the help Tynic, really appreciate it!
      I think I broke photoshop somehow by using their [email protected] template
      Going back to 2000 x 2000 pixels @300ppi and below solved my issue

      5myiokloks5d.png
    • SublimusSublimus Registered User regular
      Flay wrote: »
      Oh shit, I landed a full time concept gig!

      I definitely don't feel like my skills are there yet, so I guess I'll have to do a lot of learning on the job

      Very late to the party! Holy shit dude, congrats!! You'll learn so much in the studio environment, it's insane.

    • JuggernutJuggernut Registered User regular
      How kosher is it to reach out to an artist you admire on instagram and ask them, not really for general advice, but if they could reccomend any resources that helped them develop their personal style or helped them progress?

      I obviously don't want to bother anybody but it also seems likes they might have some kind of secret tome or scroll they might be willing to share for somebody who asks?

    • Juggernut wrote: »
      How kosher is it to reach out to an artist you admire on instagram and ask them, not really for general advice, but if they could reccomend any resources that helped them develop their personal style or helped them progress?

      I obviously don't want to bother anybody but it also seems likes they might have some kind of secret tome or scroll they might be willing to share for somebody who asks?

      I haven't really done this (I'd probably be better off if I were the sort of person to actively reach out like this), but I'd say it probably can't hurt- I think most artists would be flattered to have you ask, and the worst you're likely to get it is them being too busy to respond or an apology that they don't have time to write out a thorough response.

      Doodmann
    • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
      edited September 2019
      I doubt anyone would be a jerk about it.

      I had a dude on twitter just ask "Are you influenced by *Name of Extremely Current Artist who sells art online*? Reminds me of them." and I deflected that because I was not going to put out the idea on twitter that I'm barking up another current artists tree. As long as you phrase it so it allows them the freedom to respond openly, you'll be fine.

      Iruka on
    • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
      left my big wallet at home* and the life drawing session I wanted to go to only takes cash payments, so I can't go. I was actually looking forward to it tonight, too.
      I guess this means at least I'll get to have dinner before 10pm? silver linings.

      * (I have a transport wallet with my bus pass and a credit card in it which gets me through most of the day, which is why I didn't notice until ten minutes before the class)

    • tynic wrote: »
      left my big wallet at home* and the life drawing session I wanted to go to only takes cash payments, so I can't go. I was actually looking forward to it tonight, too.
      I guess this means at least I'll get to have dinner before 10pm? silver linings.

      * (I have a transport wallet with my bus pass and a credit card in it which gets me through most of the day, which is why I didn't notice until ten minutes before the class)

      Probably a good idea to skip- I think the other way you could have went- bartering with whatever you happened to have on you- would have been a hard sell.

      I mean maybe an art model would have been amenable to disrobing and posing for 3 hours in exchange for a particularly nice pair of socks or a recently released hardcover novel, but I know I wouldn't have the gumption to suggest that deal.

      tynic
    • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
      Actually anyone who models can sit in the class for free, so there was a viable means of exchange to hand. But I don't know if I have it in me to hold a pose for more than about five seconds.

    • tynic wrote: »
      Actually anyone who models can sit in the class for free, so there was a viable means of exchange to hand. But I don't know if I have it in me to hold a pose for more than about five seconds.

      Maybe try the installment plan, where you show up for the next 15 weeks and just have to keep one arm real still the whole time.

      tynic
    • DidgeridooDidgeridoo Registered User regular
      edited October 2019
      It's a bit of a trip when I'm trying to draw something and realize I don't actually know what that thing looks like. Not in a meaningful sense.

      I see my cat every damn day. If I'm trying to sketch her I'm like "wait what the fuck does a cat's eye look like from the side, how far away are the ears from the nose, have I ever actually seen a cat before why can't I remember this

      My brain is apparently pretty lazy, all waving its hands after imagining a general cat shaped blob and saying "you get the idea"

      Anyone got a favorite beginner set of exercises to try out? I mean, like. VERY beginner

      Didgeridoo on
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      tynic
    • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
      In olden times this is probably where the forum would recommend ‘Drawing on the right side of the brain’, with a lot of caveats about the junk neuroscience. (It’s still a decent place to start). I like ‘Fun with a pencil’, primarily because Loomis works with volume from the very beginning. you can get it for free download here:
      https://www.alexhays.com/loomis/Andrew Loomis - Fun WIth a Pencil.pdf

      There’s probably loads of other resources around now, too, I’m well out of date!

      Didgeridoo
    • @Didgeridoo
      I'd suggest starting with Stan Prokopenko's Youtube channel, going through the various drawing basics/figure drawing/head drawing playlists. While he's going for a pretty realistic figure drawing style, which may be not what you're looking to do/could be intimidating to a beginner, it's a great place to start. Even if your goal is more cartoony stuff down the line, it'll get you up to speed with the concepts you'll need to know (ie: having strong gesture skills is important for cartooning, but if you've never heard of the concept, you won't know to pick up a book on how to apply gesture drawing in cartooning).

      https://www.youtube.com/user/ProkoTV/playlists

      If books are more your thing, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain as Tynic mentioned I'll say is still good, but mostly for the exercises (which do work) and not for the text (which I guess is inaccurate scientifically). I'd say the best way to use that book is to check it out from a library and just go through the exercises, because once you've done it once, you won't be looking back at it.

      I know it might seem remedial, but I actually think How To Draw Comics The Marvel Way by Stan Lee and John Buscema is one of the better books to throw at a beginner. If you've walked through a bookstore you've probably seen a lot of these 'how to draw' books aimed at kids/teens that are largely junk, but this is the much better drawn/written/explained book that all those books poorly knocked off to try to make a quick buck.

      I could recommend a ton of other books- every artist I know winds up with a ton of them because there's no one book or resource that covers everything completely- but I'll refrain so as not to overwhelm you by throwing a whole bookshelf your way.


      As to your wondering about the 'why don't I know what this thing I see all the time looks like???'- my understanding (ie: pretty sure this was on a Radiolab episode or something) is this is definitely how everyone's brain works, and it works that way in order to keep you alive.
      The brain is designed to take a bunch of information from your senses- vision, smell, touch. sound, etc. and process it unconsciously before presenting your conscious mind with the information you actually need to know- because if it didn't, you'd get killed pretty easily.
      For example, if a baseball is being thrown at your head at 90 mph, and your brain was bringing to your attention everything about that situation ("Look at the stitching on that baseball, why is that stitching angled, what is the exact shape of the coverings on it, oh hey look at the shade of green of the grass, let's examine the exact contour of this leaf on the ground and oh hey there's a dog what kind of breed is that and...."), you'd wind up getting hit in that head with that baseball. So your brain reduces the information down to "HEY BASEBALL'S COMING, DO SOMETHING!!" to keep you alive.
      Similarly, you know what a smile looks like- your brain can recognize that there's a certain pattern of muscles flexing that create a certain range of shape modifications in the human face that create something called a "smile"- but your conscious brain doesn't need to know the physiological details of that, it needs to know, "is this person in front of me happy or not?"

      So a lot of learning to draw (and what Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is about as a whole), is about tricking your brain to pay attention and hang on to to a lot of information it wants to just interpret, process, and dispense with. You've never had to think about what the exact distance between eyes of the face are before, because not knowing that is not a physically or socially dangerous thing- so while you'd definitely notice if you ran across somebody- or a drawing of somebody, or you drew a drawing of somebody- where that distance was too wide or too narrow, you can easily go your whole life without even asking the question of what that distance is. Now that you're drawing, you've got to observe and study that fact explicitly- a fairly odd thing to do, for most people.

      You never needed to figure out the angles of the hips and ribcage and head in a pose before, because your brain only cares about "what does this body language mean"- now you've got to painstakingly measure those angles manually or order to replicate them in your drawing, all while your brain is probably saying, "WHO CARES! I ALREADY DID THIS CRAP FOR YOU, JEEZ!".

      So I guess the point here is, congratulations- you have a perfectly normal, well-functioning brain, not a "lazy" one.
      But that means when you go to draw, you're going to have to goad your brain into doing some stuff in a lot of ways is unnatural to it, and it's gonna fight you along the way. Just know that that's just a part of learning to draw and literally every other artist (excepting perhaps ones with genuinely non-standard brain functioning) has had the same frustrations, and fought that same battle. Diligence and patience and acting on good lessons will get you through it, but it's something that never 100% goes away or is entirely defeated. Even if you draw every single day and live to be 200 years old, you'll still have moments where you're gonna ask, "wait, how does a cat work again???" and you'll have to go look at a cat to find out.

      tynicDidgeridooPeas
    • DidgeridooDidgeridoo Registered User regular
      Thank you AoB and Tynic, I really appreciate it! I've asked my local library for Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain and will definitely check out that Youtube series. I tried a few of the Loomis exercises today too. I found his breakdown of spheres and grid lines very helpful for imagining proper feature placement when thinking of a subject turning its head. I have 'mickey mouse' syndrome where I'm tempted to make sure all features (ears especially) are visible at all times, regardless of whether it should be visible based on the angle of the drawing.

      The aspect of my drawing I've always been most frustrated with has been that my drawings feel very 'stiff.' Like there's no life to them. Do y'all have gesture or motion exercise suggestions that you like?

      Thank you again, it's really heartening to get advice from experienced artists who have had similar roadblocks and trucked through them.

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    • Didgeridoo wrote: »
      The aspect of my drawing I've always been most frustrated with has been that my drawings feel very 'stiff.' Like there's no life to them. Do y'all have gesture or motion exercise suggestions that you like?

      @Didgeridoo

      I'm going to break down the stumbling blocks you might be running into- I could go into specific exercises, but the Proko vids/suggested books will probably be able to explain themselves more thoroughly and usefully on that front. Hopefully if this doesn't give you the answers, it'll at least help guide you to where you can find the answers you're looking for.

      'Stiffness' can be chalked up to one or a combination of a variety of things:

      -Stilted gesture
      -Inarticulate shape design
      -Line quality
      -Rendering quality

      A gesture can be stiff if the pose in general is lacking- no motion, opportunity to show foreshortening or any sort of force in the body. It can also appear stiff even if working from a model with a good pose, as it is easy for an artist to mentally default to certain easy to draw angles, rather than ones they are observing defaulting the angles of the hips and shoulders to horizontal positions, the spine to a straight vertical, etc.

      But even if you have a good pose and a good gesture drawing, it can fall flat when you go to make a more finished drawing, because you can either over-simplify or overdo the anatomy. Oversimplifying might mean reducing say an arm to two simple cylinders and leave it at that- which can be ok in a cartoon with a dynamic broad gesture, but in a more realistic or subtle treatment, gets rid of the natural variety that makes the arm look balanced and interesting- how on the rear of the arm you have a curve of the triceps going into the long straight of the tendon, which is counterbalanced on the other side by the bicep, which has a longer mass of muscle and a shorter tendon- capturing this counterbalancing well can be the difference between an 'ok' drawing and a great, dynamic one. You can think of it like a sub-'gesture' of the anatomy, that's subservient to the main 'gesture' of the body.
      On the other hand, one can study a lot of anatomy from books and wind up killing a pose by obsessing too much about the anatomy- you can see this in mediocre comic book art where the artist kills the action being portrayed by flexing every single muscle in the body at once, which would make the body stiff and immobile in reality.

      Of course, it's not just figures that can wind up stiff- you can make a stiff drawing of car or a sack of potatoes as well. While human gestures and anatomy provide a natural opportunity to get a shape variety in, in other objects you need to look for opportunities to introduce shape variety. If you've got a sack of potatoes, you could 'pose' it in a way where is standing up straight, perfectly balanced, even and symmetrical- but the parallel lines of the even sides of the bag would lack variety and interest. If you take a couple of potatoes out so the bag is a little lob sided, stretching on one side and wrinkling together on the other, you're going to have a bag that feels a lot more dynamic.

      On these points, I think the best resource I've seen is the book Force: Dynamic Life Drawing for animators- the illustrations are pretty exaggerated, but the principles are valid regardless of drawing style. (There's actually someone who teaches in the manner of the book that posts tips in the Resources subforum: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/219935/force-figure-drawing/p1).
      How To Draw Comics the Marvel Way also gives a very good breakdown of what makes for a good gesture versus a lousy one.
      If you really want to go all in the acting potential of gesture, the Drawn To Life books by Walt Stanchfield are a great resource.
      But again, I'd suggest going through and exercising from the Proko resources first, because it'll put you on a solid foundation and won't cost you money.

      I would also say that it's easy for beginners to get too caught up in gesture. They're seductive because they're quick, they're dynamic, they're fun to do, it really feels like you're doing something.
      But without doing the work studying anatomy/construction/light and shade/proportions/perspective etc. at the same time, even the best gesture drawing won't be something you can actually use in a practical sense- try making it into a real drawing, and it'll all fall down. So even though this might be the thing you really want to put a bunch of time into and solve ASAP because this is the one thing that bugs you the most, I would try to make sure you're not neglecting those other areas. Without them, the return on investment on gesture is relatively low- I could get a job with a portfolio of drawings where all I'm demonstrating is excellent perspective and construction, but I couldn't say the same about a portfolio just of gesture drawings and no more finished work to back it up.


      Now even if you have all this, a 'dead', or even line weight can make for a stiff drawing. If you study comic books, you'll notice how lines will vary from thick to thin to create a more dynamic appearance. Since contour lines are not actual physical objects that exist, treatment of line weight varies a lot between artists, being a wholly abstract concept. However, you can notice certain trends- thinner lines facing the light, thicker on the shadow side. Thinner lines where the object is more distant from the 'camera', thicker as they get closer. Thinner near the ends of lines describing a muscle, thicker near the center. Depending on the treatment of the line quality, a drawing can look like a wonderfully dynamic action scene, or a mediocre tracing off a photo.

      I like the book The Art of Comic Book Inking as the best explainer I've seen on line weight, though I feel it was a little overpriced for the size when I looked it up last. Unfortunately I don't know what other comparable resources I could suggest (I know there's a DC Guide to Inking book by Klaus Janson, but since I'm not a huge fan of his work I've never looked at it long enough to see if it's worthwhile)- I'm sure there are alternatives, I just haven't looked deeply enough into it.
      Doing studies on what various inkers do and trying to emulate their styles is a good way to pick up what makes their inking/line weight work.


      If you get into fully tonal drawings or paintings with realistic light and shade, you can also 'stiffen up' your work with your rendering treatment- if you're trying to portray a high-speed flying martial arts kick, a high Renaissance era level of immaculate rendering could wind up killing all sense of motion and life. But if you want to portray an austere, stoic temple, a really brushstoke heavy, impasto treatment might work against that mood as well. It doesn't sound like you're at that point quite yet, but it's a future thing you may run into.

      DidgeridootynicPeas
    • PeasPeas Registered User regular
      Hi folks I am watching this video but I don't understand how he actually does the smoothing part at 4:16, I am using the same default brush as him but the strokes don't blend as well compared to what he is doing

      5myiokloks5d.png
    • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
      It should be an option in the brush to toggle what pen pressure is adjusting.

      Whippy wrote: »
      nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
      Torchlight | Steam | ART
      Peas
    • SublimusSublimus Registered User regular
      You may also want to lower the spacing in the brush settings

      Peas
    • DidgeridooDidgeridoo Registered User regular
      edited October 2019
      Okay I am probably WAY late to the party on this one, but in case there are any other newbies out there:

      http://reference.sketchdaily.net/en

      This is a site which has a collection of reference images it will randomize for you based on your chosen parameters. You can set a timer so it will move to the next image automatically after a certain period of time.

      Something I've been struggling with over the past couple days is deciding what to draw. I'll look for a reference image and then get all up in my head about it (ooh I dunno if I can draw THAT, the perspective's weird, etc). This is like a no-nonsense instructor looming ominously over me and telling me to just draw the stupid thing already!

      Edit: This one too- https://www.quickposes.com/en/gestures/random

      Didgeridoo on
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    • DidgeridooDidgeridoo Registered User regular
      So I nabbed "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" from the library on the recommendation of the dear members of Artist's Corner. The recommendation came with a caveat concern the book's dabbling in garbage faux neuroscience about left-brain vs right brain cognitive function.

      Word of such criticisms must have gotten back around to the author by the time my copy was printed, because I am loving the incredibly defensive nature of this introduction:
      While the so-called location controversy continues to engage scientists, along with myriad other areas of brain research, the existence in every brain of two fundamentally different cognitive modes is no longer controversial.... Clearly, for educators, the precise location of these modes in the individual brain is not an important issue.... In short, the method works, regardless of the extent to which future science may eventually determine exact location and confirm the degree of separation of brain functions in the two hemispheres.

      Switch Friend Code: SW-0999-1072-9696
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      tynicPeasacadiaNightDragon
    • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
      ha!
      Keep us updated on your progress - start a thread if you like! Sorry this place is a bit slow nowadays (notwithstanding the heavy lifting of angel of bacon and Iruka), but I'll definitely stop in. I keep meaning to post more (... said for the 1000th time in five years)

      DidgeridooYoshisummonsIrukaPeas
    • Didgeridoo wrote: »
      So I nabbed "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" from the library on the recommendation of the dear members of Artist's Corner. The recommendation came with a caveat concern the book's dabbling in garbage faux neuroscience about left-brain vs right brain cognitive function.

      Word of such criticisms must have gotten back around to the author by the time my copy was printed, because I am loving the incredibly defensive nature of this introduction:
      While the so-called location controversy continues to engage scientists, along with myriad other areas of brain research, the existence in every brain of two fundamentally different cognitive modes is no longer controversial.... Clearly, for educators, the precise location of these modes in the individual brain is not an important issue.... In short, the method works, regardless of the extent to which future science may eventually determine exact location and confirm the degree of separation of brain functions in the two hemispheres.

      In her defense, I don't think she ever set out to make a book with nonsense science, so much as science made a lot more discoveries after she got published. Back in 1979, it was probably a decently accurate reflection of the current understanding of the day.
      In any case, as long as you're reading it for drawing exercises and not to pass your exam for your neuroscience class, it's legit enough for that purpose.

      NightDragonProspicience
    • gavindelgavindel The reason all your software is brokenRegistered User regular
      Saw Bacon post this in advice on another thread:
      Bridgman's Complete Drawing From Life again gives a lot good information, but the illustrations can be hard to make heads or tails of sometimes, and figuring out how to use that information usefully is a whole thing in and of itself. Hogarth and Bridgman also stick to their own preferred body shapes (Tarzans and chunky muscle folk, respectively), which can give you a skewed idea of what a human being is actually shaped like.

      Ain't that the truth. I'm paging through Bridgman's Drawing from Life right now, and not a single person in this book skipped the protein shake and leg day.

      Angels, innovations, and the hubris of tiny things:
      Seraphim
    • gavindel wrote: »
      Saw Bacon post this in advice on another thread:
      Bridgman's Complete Drawing From Life again gives a lot good information, but the illustrations can be hard to make heads or tails of sometimes, and figuring out how to use that information usefully is a whole thing in and of itself. Hogarth and Bridgman also stick to their own preferred body shapes (Tarzans and chunky muscle folk, respectively), which can give you a skewed idea of what a human being is actually shaped like.

      Ain't that the truth. I'm paging through Bridgman's Drawing from Life right now, and not a single person in this book skipped the protein shake and leg day.

      It's one of those cases where it helps to have a little context going in- as quick drawings done live to a lecture hall full of art students who would have also been drawing from live models, it was perfectly fine to have done a fair bit of exaggeration in order to get his points about body mechanics across.

      It's when you study from the book without the tempering factor of studying from real models, where you risk making every person you draw look like they make a living by pulling ox carts with their teeth.

      NightDragon
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