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Most Artisanal of Cozies [Artsy Farts and Crafty Asses]

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Posts

  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    Drilled out the fretboard today

    The actual fretboard, not a practice one. I slightly messed up the depth on the third fret. In an effort to not have to sand the dots as much I stupidly made the hole a tad deeper than it should have been. It's not a tragedy or anything it just means I'll have to sand a lot more than I would have had to otherwise =/

    z4y2ayit2k6j.jpg

    va1g3i8worzb.jpg

    DoodmannlonelyahavaN1tSt4lkerTyphoid MannyCaulk Bite 6CambiataElvenshaeSporkAndrewbowenknitdanJansonpookaGvzbgulBelruel
  • knitdanknitdan Registered User regular
    Ruined! Ruined!

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
    Xaquin
  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    Haha yeah

    I sort of finished tonight

    By sort of I mean that most of the fret markers are installed and are perfect .... except the two I screwed up.

    Fortunately, I saved rosewood dust in a tiny bag for just such an occasion!

    I can inundate some epoxy with said dust, patch the tear out, sand it, recut the fret slots, sand some more, and be done!

    Ah shit!
    n5pab7w2miuw.jpg

    Hooray!
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    lonelyahavaknitdanRadiationCambiataCaulk Bite 6bowenpookawebguy20ElvenshaeNightDragonCalicaSporkAndrewSlacker71GvzbgulDoodmannBelruel
  • knitdanknitdan Registered User regular
    I love the “save the dust” trick. Granted it’s one of the few things I remember from HS shop class

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
    XaquinCaulk Bite 6ElvenshaeNightDragon
  • pookapooka Registered User regular
    okay, so i got another wild hair, and naturally, there have been some challenges.

    i picked up a bit of framed 'wall art' from Home Goods a couple months ago that looks like an oversized sheet of notebook paper, and been using that as a dry-erase board. i have filled it with miscellaneous to-do items, and been tempted to get another for planning, weekly or long-term; having something in my face, compiled and readily updated, seems to be pretty helpful in countering anxiety from forgetting things.

    there's a spit of land wall (perpendicular to my current memo board) next to the fridge, that would be great for overflow listmaking or grocery inventory needs, in particular.
    knocked on it, definitely a stud or two there -- found a glass thing at ikea (4.5 x 19.25"), 1/4" tempered glass with smooth edges, perfect listmaking and available space -sized, and hey, there's two in a pack. i'd like to float it with an edge standoff mount, but i grab some mirror mounting hardware for immediate gratification and much cheaper cost.

    turns out, the stud is steel. i am not drilling into that, reason not least of which is i rent (also, potential fire hazard.) while drilling into a wood stud i can justify, i'm not keen to chance drywall and make large holes in the process. even if the glass is less than a pound, and tempered.
    so, then i had a brainwave.. maybe magnets?
    and now i'm trying to determine what size neodymium magnets would work best, with a bit of padding to protect the paint and introduce friction to slow sliding from gravity, and what adhesive i'd need to bond magnets to glass. a little shelf underneath to act as a stop to help keep it in place and maybe stow a marker, which i can probably find as a locker accessory.

    lfchwLd.jpg
  • QuantumTurkQuantumTurk Registered User regular
    pooka wrote: »
    okay, so i got another wild hair, and naturally, there have been some challenges.

    i picked up a bit of framed 'wall art' from Home Goods a couple months ago that looks like an oversized sheet of notebook paper, and been using that as a dry-erase board. i have filled it with miscellaneous to-do items, and been tempted to get another for planning, weekly or long-term; having something in my face, compiled and readily updated, seems to be pretty helpful in countering anxiety from forgetting things.

    there's a spit of land wall (perpendicular to my current memo board) next to the fridge, that would be great for overflow listmaking or grocery inventory needs, in particular.
    knocked on it, definitely a stud or two there -- found a glass thing at ikea (4.5 x 19.25"), 1/4" tempered glass with smooth edges, perfect listmaking and available space -sized, and hey, there's two in a pack. i'd like to float it with an edge standoff mount, but i grab some mirror mounting hardware for immediate gratification and much cheaper cost.

    turns out, the stud is steel. i am not drilling into that, reason not least of which is i rent (also, potential fire hazard.) while drilling into a wood stud i can justify, i'm not keen to chance drywall and make large holes in the process. even if the glass is less than a pound, and tempered.
    so, then i had a brainwave.. maybe magnets?
    and now i'm trying to determine what size neodymium magnets would work best, with a bit of padding to protect the paint and introduce friction to slow sliding from gravity, and what adhesive i'd need to bond magnets to glass. a little shelf underneath to act as a stop to help keep it in place and maybe stow a marker, which i can probably find as a locker accessory.

    Just use drywall anchors? Even some cheap little ones will give you a huge safety margin on a couple pounds, and easy enough to cut off the heads and spackle over when you leave. We've never been called on it, your landlord should be repainting between tenants anyway, and the holes aren't very big.

    NightDragontynic
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    And if you're extremely apprehensive and don't want to risk anything, you can get toggle bolts!

  • QuantumTurkQuantumTurk Registered User regular
    And if you're extremely apprehensive and don't want to risk anything, you can get toggle bolts!

    Ha ha, I looked at a toggle bolt and said mentally "well why the hell is that better?" and read to "unscrew and let it drop into the wall" Which, hey, I've used the thing, it's reasonable, and it's not like I wasn't leaving dry wall anchors behind, but it's still funnier somehow to have a little metal bit clinking on down the way they used to do used razor slots.

  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    And if you're extremely apprehensive and don't want to risk anything, you can get toggle bolts!

    Ha ha, I looked at a toggle bolt and said mentally "well why the hell is that better?" and read to "unscrew and let it drop into the wall" Which, hey, I've used the thing, it's reasonable, and it's not like I wasn't leaving dry wall anchors behind, but it's still funnier somehow to have a little metal bit clinking on down the way they used to do used razor slots.

    do they sound like Plinko?

    cause that might make it worth it.

    Caulk Bite 6
  • pookapooka Registered User regular
    edited August 12
    Just use drywall anchors? Even some cheap little ones will give you a huge safety margin on a couple pounds, and easy enough to cut off the heads and spackle over when you leave. We've never been called on it, your landlord should be repainting between tenants anyway, and the holes aren't very big.
    And if you're extremely apprehensive and don't want to risk anything, you can get toggle bolts!
    our initial landlord here was basically opposed to signs of tenancy, eg no holes in the wall, so the beau is leery of doing so. despite the landlord's quote bodyman --the guy we interact with for whatever, his nephew (who has since inherited the place)-- being like, "Treat this as your home," and vocally admiring the art I'd hung the few times he's had to swing through. so while i think the landlord won't care about the need to spackle holes larger than nails, my dude does. like, i'm about to hang some shelves and screw into thankfully available wood studs, and he referred to thinking of drywall anchors as, "A bridge too far."

    i'll admit to being spoiled on studs, and wary of drywall anchors myself, since i've never hung anything on drywall heavy enough to require one; the only art coming close is covered by a monkey/gorilla hook. and i'd have to, like, unscrew a cover to measure the drywall thickness because i cannot retain that info apparently, and that's just obviously too much work. (a joke, since to figure the pull strength needed for the magnet to adhere well, i will need to know the distance between it and the stud, roughly matching the drywall depth. probably 3/8", but nnnhh.)

    plus, now it's an interesting challenge, magnets are cool, and with clear glass, aesthetics is a factor. i'd slap some command strips on it and call it a day if it weren't glass, ie my usual MO. there's a reason i put this in the craft thread and not the house thread. ;)

    but yeah, if i did go for a drywall anchor, i'd probably just use a self-drilling one, or for pure overkill, a strap toggle since it leaves a smaller hole.

    pooka on
    lfchwLd.jpg
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    I got my spindle! And my wool!

    And I sat through a meeting at work and did some spinning! Hahahaha.

    I will get better at these things and leave these corporates in my dust!

    You know. In a few years.

    webguy20CalicaElvenshaeXaquinpooka
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    Double posting cause I'm giddy

    JansonCalicaCambiataElvenshaeXaquinmccartCaulk Bite 6webguy20RadiationknitdanNightDragonDisruptedCapitalistBelruel
  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    All plied up! Now I just need to figure out how to finish it. My spinning journey so far:

    RadiationCaulk Bite 6
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    Ok so!

    You start with some fluff.

    RqwR1p3l.jpg

    The pretty colours up there were what my spindle came wrapped in, It was a batt blended with merino, alpaca, and silk. First thing that you need to do is called drafting, essentially you pull off a small bit of the wool/fiber as thin as you like, keeping an eye on the staple (length of individual fibres). Once you get that figured out the best way to start with spinning on your spindle, especially if you're a learning, is called "park and draft".

    A lot of tutorials will start you with a leader string, but I didn't want one and didn't use one. Just looped a staple length double over through the hook and started to spin. And literally, that's what you're doing. You are spinning the spindle with one hand, and holding the length of fibre with the other. Whichever direction you choose/start to spin in that is the direction you will be using for the entire length of your yarn. So be consistent.

    Once you have the first section between your pinched fingers (for me right hand) and the hook well spun up, it should look like an old phone cord, you Park the spindle between your knees, pinch the fibre end with your left fingers, use your right hand to draft out your fibre sourceas thin or thick as you like without it breaking, and then slowly slide your left fingers up your fibre source. This will release the spun up twist in the lower fibre and the twist will travel up your fibre, twisting and locking your fibres together as ti goes. Continue with the pinch, draft, slide until your twist has run out of energy.

    Then you wrap the singles yarn (this is what you're making right now!) around the shaft of your spindle, leaving about 2 inches or so still twisted and able to be wrapped around the hook again. Repeat with the spinning (same direction!), park, pinch, draft, slide until your fibre supply is all used up.

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    Woo! You have spun a singles yarn. Now, it's time to ply. Now I've only done this once, so I might not be the best to go from here, but here we go.

    I took an empty toilet paper holder, cut a notch in an edge and tucked my end of my singles yarn into the holder. I then started unwrapping from the spindle and onto the holder, creating a double pull ball of yarn for myself.

    Once that's done, take both ends of your singles yarn, tuck them into the hook, or use a leader yarn with a slipknot in it and then start spinning. But here's the important thing. *Go the opposite direction from what you spun your singles with* You want to create twist in the other direction! So if you went clockwise for your single, then you want to go counterclockwise for your plying. The process is the same, pinch, spin, 'draft', slide, etc. Until you get to the end of your ball and poof! You now have a 2 ply yarn! This is going to be much more sturdy than a simple single spun.

    ZdODkFvl.jpg

    But you are still not done! Not yet!

    Most natural fibres (animal fiber, cottons, silk, linen, etc) have a natural crimp to them. In order for this crimp to be useful to the fiber artist we need to get them locked into place. How do we do this? Hot water! This is the same concept as blocking (for the other knitters/crochet artists here). But you have to get the yarn off the spindle! The references that I saw said to use a niddy noddy, but I didn't have one of those, so I used a tupperware lid. I wrapped the yarn around the lid, then used another string (cotton for me) to tie the yarn together into a group. I used some figure 8 knots with the yarn.

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    I then submerged the whole thing into a tub of hot (not boiling but Hot) water for about 15 minutes.

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    Take the yarn out, take it off the niddy noddy or lid or whatever you're using and squeeze the water out. Do not wring or you will risk over felting.

    Once you have squeezed it out, wrap the bundle in a towel and do some dance moves on it to squeeze a bit more water out. Then, you want to hit the floor with the bunch of yarn. This will felt it a little bit, and also drive more water out as well. Then, hang it up somewhere, give it a little bit of weight dangling, and then let it dry!

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    And once it's dry, use it! I plan on using this in a weaving project of some sort, once I get a bit more spun up maybe.


    RadiationCambiatawebguy20SporkAndrewElvenshaeXaquinSlacker71Caulk Bite 6
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    That sounds fun and like a LOT of work, but I've always been really intrigued by the whole "WHAT IF I MADE BREAD BUT GREW MY OWN DANG WHEAT AND SHIT" - like, making something from scratch....but....REALLY making something from scratch, even the ingredients themselves.

    Your next step is obviously to sheer a sheep and dye the wool yourself. With dyes you made. From berries in the woods. It's the only way.

    Cambiatawebguy20chrishallett83bowenElvenshaeDoodmannSlacker71DisruptedCapitalistBelruel
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    Hubby has already told me that I can't have a sheep.

    Usually the dying is done after the spinning, but you can dye the naked fibres as well, which is how I got the gorgeous blank that I had. Also, my bestie has a whole section of her garden set aside for growing native dye plants. So. You know. What you say is not realllly too far fetched. I have a daydream of trying to grow some linum flax eventually to try and make my own linen.

    I have about 500g of pure corriedale fibre waiting for me to spin it. I am soooo excited. I'll see if I can get hubby to take a video or something so I can show you that it's not really that complicated.

    But I also have an adult jumper to finish up, and some baby gifts to work on, and some things to weave. So.

    I need to just quit my job.

    NightDragonSlacker71Caulk Bite 6
  • pookapooka Registered User regular
    ... i am reminded that my bits of wheel spinning are still in the freezer, heh (was done at a reenactment farm, and i ain't risking my stash.)

    hmm, i got my sister hooked on knitting, maybe i can get her onto spinning so i can eventually live vicariously through shearing her own sheep (she has chooks, and had talked about horses again after retirement, it's possible.) i'd love a bit of land and maybe a few sheep, goats, and dog to keep me in line, but the beau is decidedly not a country boy, and i only ever helped the neighbors with feeding their cows.

    you are making me want to get my spindle out, especially since i have no knitting mojo, so thanks for sharing your fun.

    lfchwLd.jpg
    lonelyahava
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    Hubby has already told me that I can't have a sheep.

    Usually the dying is done after the spinning, but you can dye the naked fibres as well, which is how I got the gorgeous blank that I had. Also, my bestie has a whole section of her garden set aside for growing native dye plants. So. You know. What you say is not realllly too far fetched. I have a daydream of trying to grow some linum flax eventually to try and make my own linen.

    I have about 500g of pure corriedale fibre waiting for me to spin it. I am soooo excited. I'll see if I can get hubby to take a video or something so I can show you that it's not really that complicated.

    But I also have an adult jumper to finish up, and some baby gifts to work on, and some things to weave. So.

    I need to just quit my job.

    You live in NEW ZEALAND and he won't let you get a sheep?

    Disgraceful!

    bowenElvenshaeNightDragonXaquinJansonSlacker71DisruptedCapitalistpookaCaulk Bite 6webguy20Belruel
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    Hubby has already told me that I can't have a sheep.

    Usually the dying is done after the spinning, but you can dye the naked fibres as well, which is how I got the gorgeous blank that I had. Also, my bestie has a whole section of her garden set aside for growing native dye plants. So. You know. What you say is not realllly too far fetched. I have a daydream of trying to grow some linum flax eventually to try and make my own linen.

    I have about 500g of pure corriedale fibre waiting for me to spin it. I am soooo excited. I'll see if I can get hubby to take a video or something so I can show you that it's not really that complicated.

    But I also have an adult jumper to finish up, and some baby gifts to work on, and some things to weave. So.

    I need to just quit my job.

    You live in NEW ZEALAND and he won't let you get a sheep?

    Disgraceful!

    Well, we do live in an urban area. My bestie might end up with some sheep.

    Xaquinchrishallett83Slacker71CambiataElvenshaeDisruptedCapitalistCaulk Bite 6Radiation
  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    tell him too baaaaad

    :cool:

    lonelyahavachrishallett83Slacker71ElvenshaeDisruptedCapitalistCaulk Bite 6webguy20RadiationCarpy
  • RadiationRadiation Registered User regular
    So I'm pretty sure I posted about it previously. But I'm starting solid work on making the ghost from Destiny out of wood. This thing takes a crazy amount of time to machine. I machine the winglets as a pair and I think I've got machine time down to about 5 hours. And I need 4 pairs per ghost shell. Anyways, I'm finishing the last winglet today on the CNC. And then I'll be moving on to the off colored tips and wing inserts. Then I'll need to figure out the best way to do the middle sphere bit.




    PSN: jfrofl
    XaquinbowendavidsdurionsElvenshaeCaulk Bite 6lonelyahavaBelruel
  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
  • Blake TBlake T Registered User regular
    G
    Hubby has already told me that I can't have a sheep.

    Usually the dying is done after the spinning, but you can dye the naked fibres as well, which is how I got the gorgeous blank that I had. Also, my bestie has a whole section of her garden set aside for growing native dye plants. So. You know. What you say is not realllly too far fetched. I have a daydream of trying to grow some linum flax eventually to try and make my own linen.

    I have about 500g of pure corriedale fibre waiting for me to spin it. I am soooo excited. I'll see if I can get hubby to take a video or something so I can show you that it's not really that complicated.

    But I also have an adult jumper to finish up, and some baby gifts to work on, and some things to weave. So.

    I need to just quit my job.

    You live in NEW ZEALAND and he won't let you get a sheep?

    Disgraceful!

    Well, we do live in an urban area. My bestie might end up with some sheep.

    I hear this happens pretty often in New Zealand.

  • BelruelBelruel NARUTO FUCKS Registered User regular
    That steotchalong cross stitch thing I mentioned is starting up soon here, first pattern in 2 days and I'm pretty excited about it. My sister is going to bring me a qsnap to try out, and I plan to try and make some grime guards for hers/mine in the next day or so. The pattern takes like 60 different colors with blends and partial stitches so that's gonna be a ride, but I'm excited to try it out and see what the hell we're making.

    vmn6rftb232b.png
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