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Latin America Thread: Because North American politics are too dang tame.

RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
So Latin American news and politics.

I asked myself why we don't have a thread for that.

Then I realized the only possible answer was because someone hadn't created one.

And that was unacceptable. Because Latin America is filled, filled mind you, with the kind of drama Hollywood Hacks would give their souls to write and that Shakespeare copyrighted before copyright was a thing.

For example:

Venezuela:

vene-MMAP-md.png


Following the death of popular leader Hugo "Authoritarian Santa" Chavez, the government was left in the hands of Nicolas "Ralph Kramden" Maduro. Chavez and Maduro both believe(d) (one of them is dead now) in using their countries wealth to uplift the masses. Free-housing, health care and education among other things. They also believe in suppressing the opposition.

This worked well when Oil (a major export for Venezuela) was $110 per barrel. Well maybe not well, but they were holding shit together.

Not so much now. Now the Venezuelan economy looks like Godzilla just stomped through town. Life is now ultra hard, supplies are hard to get scarce, the black market is running at extortionate prices and people are a little pissed.

So they voted in the opposition. Who are kind of yuppies.

And the opposition wants Maduro out of office and a bunch of their jailed friends released.

They are running into a little problem though. The Supreme Court of Venezuela keeps blocking them. You see before the election Maduro was granted "Emergency Powers" and his party had control of Parliament. So at pretty much what was literally (not figuratively) the last minute, they rammed a bunch of appointments onto the Supreme Court.


Outgoing National Assembly president Diosdado Cabello called a number of extraordinary sessions last week at which 13 new Supreme Court judges and 21 substitute judges were named.

So that's interesting.

Next Example:

Brazil:

bigstock-D-Map-of-Brazil-29202350.jpg


The B in BRICs.

A Country that used to have a larger economy than the UK.

Until the economy fell to shit. Due to the collapse of... can you guess what commodity collapsed?

If you guessed Oil you're right! Also China slowing down and not needing so many raw resources.

Ultimately the effect of the collapse of oil just brings to mind what the Wu-Tang clan said so many years ago. "Diversify your stocks and bonds, bitches!"

Unfortunately the collapse of oil is not the only thing sucking money out of Brazil's pockets.


It turns out that Petrobras (the state-run Oil Company) was kind of used like a private piggy bank for politicians

So that was costly.

And it turns out the fairly popular ex-President Lula may have been involved.

He's the mentor to the current President Dilma Rouseff. Who offered him a Cabinet level job to shield him from Prosecution. On Tape.

Now Dilma is going through the impeachment process.

But this has nothing to do with Lula or Petrobras (at least officially). And its nothing to do with being the one corrupt official in the Brazilian government. Since a lot of Brazilian politicians are corrupt. A LOT

Dilma is being impeached for juggling the books to make the GDP look better before the last election.

Get live updates on todays impeachment proceedings Here!

shryke wrote: »
The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
thatassemblyguyshrykeRMS OceanicShadowfireLoisLaneKaputaHefflingNSDFRandDisruptedCapitalistElldrenMvrckShadowenDesktop HippieCorehealerDevlin_DragonusKristmas Kthulhu
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Posts

  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    Oh and don't think I am done yet.

    Latin America is just getting warmed up and so am I.

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    Another piece of Latin American news,
    A nasty earthquake hit Ecuador.

    Less fascinating slice of corrupt political infighting and more "Depressing Tragedy made worse through systemic poverty"

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
  • The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    Following the death of popular leader Hugo "Authoritarian Santa" Chavez, the government was left in the hands of Nicolas "Ralph Kramden" Maduro. Chavez and Maduro both believe(d) (one of them is dead now) in using their countries wealth to uplift the masses. Free-housing, health care and education among other things. They also believe in suppressing the opposition.

    This worked well when Oil (a major export for Venezuela) was $110 per barrel. Well maybe not well, but they were holding shit together.

    Not so much now. Now the Venezuelan economy looks like Godzilla just stomped through town. Life is now ultra hard, supplies are hard to get scarce, the black market is running at extortionate prices and people are a little pissed.

    It is worth saying that there is no consensus about how much of Venezuela's economy under Chavez was held together by Petrodollars. Things fell apart well before the $/barrel of oil even came close to where it is now, and the height of Venezuela's standard of living does not correlate with the peak prices of oil.

    Oil represented maybe 30%~ of the country's reserves; a whopping 60%~ was held in gold bullion, which saw large value growth rather than contraction while Chavez was in office.


    The infamous shortages were almost certainly caused by a failed price control regime, foreign exchange control & agricultural reforms (people sometimes ask why socialists are so fixated on agricultural norms & making sure agriculture works; this would be why). Nobody in the Chavez government had the necessary expertise to competently run a body like CADIVI even if the idea was sound (which it may or may not have been), and they weren't willing to bring in experts to help (for fear of polluting the system with free market / capitalist modeling).


    Oil or not, there is little reason that Venezuela couldn't have established a service-based economy and functioned similarly to any of the Nordic socialist-democratic countries; unfortunately, Chavez ideologically isolated himself & refused to take the humble road of asking for western help in complex economic arenas where he was simply ignorant (and it certainly didn't help that free & fair elections in Venezuela always seemed to be an 'oh we'll get around to it any day now' priority for the administration. In fairness, Chavez was popular enough that he probably would have easily won most elections right up until his death - but that's hardly an excuse not to at least put the structure in place & hold the damn elections, and probably impose a term limit while you're at it to demonstrate that you're interested in the future of the country more than self-aggrandizement).

    With Love and Courage
    Elldren
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    The Ender wrote: »
    Following the death of popular leader Hugo "Authoritarian Santa" Chavez, the government was left in the hands of Nicolas "Ralph Kramden" Maduro. Chavez and Maduro both believe(d) (one of them is dead now) in using their countries wealth to uplift the masses. Free-housing, health care and education among other things. They also believe in suppressing the opposition.

    This worked well when Oil (a major export for Venezuela) was $110 per barrel. Well maybe not well, but they were holding shit together.

    Not so much now. Now the Venezuelan economy looks like Godzilla just stomped through town. Life is now ultra hard, supplies are hard to get scarce, the black market is running at extortionate prices and people are a little pissed.

    It is worth saying that there is no consensus about how much of Venezuela's economy under Chavez was held together by Petrodollars. Things fell apart well before the $/barrel of oil even came close to where it is now, and the height of Venezuela's standard of living does not correlate with the peak prices of oil.

    Oil represented maybe 30%~ of the country's reserves; a whopping 60%~ was held in gold bullion, which saw large value growth rather than contraction while Chavez was in office.


    The infamous shortages were almost certainly caused by a failed price control regime, foreign exchange control & agricultural reforms (people sometimes ask why socialists are so fixated on agricultural norms & making sure agriculture works; this would be why). Nobody in the Chavez government had the necessary expertise to competently run a body like CADIVI even if the idea was sound (which it may or may not have been), and they weren't willing to bring in experts to help (for fear of polluting the system with free market / capitalist modeling).


    Oil or not, there is little reason that Venezuela couldn't have established a service-based economy and functioned similarly to any of the Nordic socialist-democratic countries; unfortunately, Chavez ideologically isolated himself & refused to take the humble road of asking for western help in complex economic arenas where he was simply ignorant (and it certainly didn't help that free & fair elections in Venezuela always seemed to be an 'oh we'll get around to it any day now' priority for the administration. In fairness, Chavez was popular enough that he probably would have easily won most elections right up until his death - but that's hardly an excuse not to at least put the structure in place & hold the damn elections, and probably impose a term limit while you're at it to demonstrate that you're interested in the future of the country more than self-aggrandizement).

    But ... this is latin america.

    The EnderTryCatcher
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    The Ender wrote: »
    Following the death of popular leader Hugo "Authoritarian Santa" Chavez, the government was left in the hands of Nicolas "Ralph Kramden" Maduro. Chavez and Maduro both believe(d) (one of them is dead now) in using their countries wealth to uplift the masses. Free-housing, health care and education among other things. They also believe in suppressing the opposition.

    This worked well when Oil (a major export for Venezuela) was $110 per barrel. Well maybe not well, but they were holding shit together.

    Not so much now. Now the Venezuelan economy looks like Godzilla just stomped through town. Life is now ultra hard, supplies are hard to get scarce, the black market is running at extortionate prices and people are a little pissed.

    It is worth saying that there is no consensus about how much of Venezuela's economy under Chavez was held together by Petrodollars. Things fell apart well before the $/barrel of oil even came close to where it is now, and the height of Venezuela's standard of living does not correlate with the peak prices of oil.

    Oil represented maybe 30%~ of the country's reserves; a whopping 60%~ was held in gold bullion, which saw large value growth rather than contraction while Chavez was in office.


    The infamous shortages were almost certainly caused by a failed price control regime, foreign exchange control & agricultural reforms (people sometimes ask why socialists are so fixated on agricultural norms & making sure agriculture works; this would be why). Nobody in the Chavez government had the necessary expertise to competently run a body like CADIVI even if the idea was sound (which it may or may not have been), and they weren't willing to bring in experts to help (for fear of polluting the system with free market / capitalist modeling).


    Oil or not, there is little reason that Venezuela couldn't have established a service-based economy and functioned similarly to any of the Nordic socialist-democratic countries; unfortunately, Chavez ideologically isolated himself & refused to take the humble road of asking for western help in complex economic arenas where he was simply ignorant (and it certainly didn't help that free & fair elections in Venezuela always seemed to be an 'oh we'll get around to it any day now' priority for the administration. In fairness, Chavez was popular enough that he probably would have easily won most elections right up until his death - but that's hardly an excuse not to at least put the structure in place & hold the damn elections, and probably impose a term limit while you're at it to demonstrate that you're interested in the future of the country more than self-aggrandizement).

    Good point. The economy was mismanaged earlier and the collapse of oil by itself was probably not the only or even primary reason they are screwed now.

    Of course it really did not help for a massive section of the economy to take a giant (50%) dive.

    If they were already on their knees this was a GIANT kick in the nuts.

    Distinctly unhelpful.

    Oh and not going to get better in the next few months either.

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    edited April 2016
    Remember when I said that alot of Brazilian politicians were corrupt?

    From the BBC livestream
    Staggering statistic from Brazilian watchdog Congresso em Foco - more than 300 of those who will vote on Ms Rousseff's future are under investigation for corruption, fraud or electoral crimes.

    Rchanen on
    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
    RMS OceanicGiggles_Funsworth
  • RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    Just as a tangent, I have to thank Hank Green's video covering the recent Brazillian scandal for giving me a wonderful expression for when a scandal does not result in any major blowback: "Ending in pizza".

    Though this is not what is happening here it seems.

    JusticeforPluto
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    edited April 2016
    Okay. I may have discovered a flaw with Brazil's system.

    From the BBC
    Five hours after the voting began, almost 400 MPs have had their say. The tally so far is: 293 "yes" votes; 96 "no" votes; four abstentions and two absent MPs.

    Edit:

    To Clarify: This is a YES or NO vote.

    Even with 500 people this does not have to take this long.

    Rchanen on
    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
    Julius
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    Vote Passed.

    Now to the Senate!

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
  • Knuckle DraggerKnuckle Dragger Explosive Ovine Disposal Registered User regular
    It should be noted that the way Venezuela's Supreme Court is blocking the opposition is by barring just enough members from taking office that they do not have a supermajority.

    Rchanen
  • GatorGator An alligator in Scotland Registered User regular
    Disclaimer: I have some Brazilian roots (my mother's family is from Chile, and before emigrating to the USA thanks to Pinochet they spent some years in Brazil)

    I've been accompanying some of the Brazilian crisis, and oh wow it's a doozy

    Not Venezuela level of bonkers but still pretty ugly

    http://www.economist.com/news/americas/21697095-hardly-any-federal-deputies-favour-impeachment-gave-stated-charges-their?fsrc=scn/tw_ec/why_vote_to_impeach_dilma_rousseff_

    I'm not sure if Dilma Rouseff's impeachment process, seen in a vacuum, isn't richly deserved; I am sure this process was a farce

    (There's also this article by Perry Anderson, which is a very long read. PA is a Marxist, so some of his comments on economical matters need to be taken with a healthy pinch of salt: http://www.lrb.co.uk/v38/n08/perry-anderson/crisis-in-brazil)

  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    Gator wrote: »
    Disclaimer: I have some Brazilian roots (my mother's family is from Chile, and before emigrating to the USA thanks to Pinochet they spent some years in Brazil)

    I've been accompanying some of the Brazilian crisis, and oh wow it's a doozy

    Not Venezuela level of bonkers but still pretty ugly

    http://www.economist.com/news/americas/21697095-hardly-any-federal-deputies-favour-impeachment-gave-stated-charges-their?fsrc=scn/tw_ec/why_vote_to_impeach_dilma_rousseff_

    I'm not sure if Dilma Rouseff's impeachment process, seen in a vacuum, isn't richly deserved; I am sure this process was a farce

    (There's also this article by Perry Anderson, which is a very long read. PA is a Marxist, so some of his comments on economical matters need to be taken with a healthy pinch of salt: http://www.lrb.co.uk/v38/n08/perry-anderson/crisis-in-brazil)

    A BBC article pretty much backing up your point.

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    Rousseff issues new statement: 'If I'm going down I'm taking all of you with me'

    This is a pretty desperate play that may cost her some support. She just put a gun to the head of what's left of the economy. Furthermore America has rules about aid to countries whose heads of state have been illegally overthrown. These could be some hard times coming up.

    You get a feeling that she thinks the whole game is rigged from the beginning. That no matter how much support she has on the streets or from the people, the halls of power are against her. She is also probably upset that most of the sons of bitches lining up to replace her have done worse things.

    I think she is corrupt, I think she tried to shield her old really corrupt boss from prosecution and I think she rigged the numbers before the last election to make the economy look better than it was. I just don't know if I would call those egregious sins in you know Brazil. Where I needn't have to remind you: 300 out of the 500 or so members of parliament are under investigation.

    Whatever happens it is the people who will suffer.

    Poor Brazilians. They just cannot catch a break.

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
  • The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    Ms Rousseff has repeatedly described the impeachment process as a political coup by her rivals to oust her.

    She is accused of manipulating budget figures ahead of her re-election in 2014, but has denied any wrongdoing.

    Mercosur has a provision which can be triggered if the elected government of a member state is overthrown.

    It could lead to a series of sanctions by the bloc against the country, including trade benefits.

    "I would appeal to the democracy clause if there were, from now on, a rupture of what I consider democratic process," she told reporters in New York.
    Ms Rousseff and her supporters have repeatedly said there is no legal basis in the process.

    She is accused of juggling accounts to make her government's economic performance appear better than it was, ahead of her election campaign.

    The president has defended her government's fiscal manoeuvres as common practice in Brazil.

    ...Depending on how the numbers were massaged, honestly that's a pretty common practice even in the most large & stable countries.

    'I'LL BURN DOWN THE HOUSE IF YOU KICK ME OUT!'

    Doesn't breed much confidence in her innocence, though.

    :|

    With Love and Courage
    RchanenKnuckle DraggerHarry Dresden
  • SolventSolvent Econ-artist ኢትዮጵያRegistered User regular
    So.

    Tell me about Paraguayan politics. I want to hear about the dark heart of South America.

    Have they been engaged in any questionable engagements recently?

    I don't know where he got the scorpions, or how he got them into my mattress.
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    Solvent wrote: »
    So.

    Tell me about Paraguayan politics. I want to hear about the dark heart of South America.

    Have they been engaged in any questionable engagements recently?

    Not that I have heard.

    But I did want to point out that my news sources are limited. I have the BBC, NPR, and Al-Jazeera.

    And all of them seem to treat Latin America like an unloved and an unwanted step-child.

    Anybody have a good Latin America only news source? Like Al-Monitor is for the ME?

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    However if you are looking into potential conflicts might I recommend Belize-Guatemala.

    It probably will end with both parties backing down, but you never know.

    Fights over land end ugly. And of course the poor dead kid.

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
  • TraceTrace GNU Terry Pratchett; GNU Gus; GNU Carrie Fisher; GNU Adam We Registered User regular
    out of beer?

    the country is doomed

    Kayne Red RobeAndy JoethemightypuckshrykeMagellEncGiggles_FunsworthfrandelgearslipShadowenCorehealerKristmas Kthulhu
  • honoverehonovere Registered User regular
    How's Argentina doing? Last time I checked it didn't seem that great either?

  • Captain MarcusCaptain Marcus now arrives the hour of actionRegistered User regular
    honovere wrote: »
    How's Argentina doing? Last time I checked it didn't seem that great either?
    Leftist President Kirchner refused to pay debts to holdout creditors from the 2002 default. She was voted out, and under center-right President Marci Argentina's paid off the 9.4 billion dollar debts, allowing it easier access to credit. Kirchner was the one that kept whining about the Falklands, if you remember, and now she and her husband (who jointly ruled the country for 12 years) are under investigation for money laundering. They also printed money to pay for subsidies to the poor which is always a good idea.

    ISIS delenda est
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    honovere wrote: »
    How's Argentina doing? Last time I checked it didn't seem that great either?
    Leftist President Kirchner refused to pay debts to holdout creditors from the 2002 default. She was voted out, and under center-right President Marci Argentina's paid off the 9.4 billion dollar debts, allowing it easier access to credit. Kirchner was the one that kept whining about the Falklands, if you remember, and now she and her husband (who jointly ruled the country for 12 years) are under investigation for money laundering. They also printed money to pay for subsidies to the poor which is always a good idea.

    The current Argentine president was mentioned in the Panama papers I believe.

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
    Captain Marcus
  • themightypuckthemightypuck MontanaRegistered User regular
    Rchanen wrote: »
    Rousseff issues new statement: 'If I'm going down I'm taking all of you with me'

    This is a pretty desperate play that may cost her some support. She just put a gun to the head of what's left of the economy. Furthermore America has rules about aid to countries whose heads of state have been illegally overthrown. These could be some hard times coming up.

    You get a feeling that she thinks the whole game is rigged from the beginning. That no matter how much support she has on the streets or from the people, the halls of power are against her. She is also probably upset that most of the sons of bitches lining up to replace her have done worse things.

    I think she is corrupt, I think she tried to shield her old really corrupt boss from prosecution and I think she rigged the numbers before the last election to make the economy look better than it was. I just don't know if I would call those egregious sins in you know Brazil. Where I needn't have to remind you: 300 out of the 500 or so members of parliament are under investigation.

    Whatever happens it is the people who will suffer.

    Poor Brazilians. They just cannot catch a break.

    Kinda makes Nixon look good.

    “Reject your sense of injury and the injury itself disappears.”
    ― Marcus Aurelius

    Path of Exile: themightypuck
  • GatorGator An alligator in Scotland Registered User regular
    Rchanen wrote: »
    Rousseff issues new statement: 'If I'm going down I'm taking all of you with me'

    This is a pretty desperate play that may cost her some support. She just put a gun to the head of what's left of the economy. Furthermore America has rules about aid to countries whose heads of state have been illegally overthrown. These could be some hard times coming up.

    You get a feeling that she thinks the whole game is rigged from the beginning. That no matter how much support she has on the streets or from the people, the halls of power are against her. She is also probably upset that most of the sons of bitches lining up to replace her have done worse things.

    I think she is corrupt, I think she tried to shield her old really corrupt boss from prosecution and I think she rigged the numbers before the last election to make the economy look better than it was. I just don't know if I would call those egregious sins in you know Brazil. Where I needn't have to remind you: 300 out of the 500 or so members of parliament are under investigation.

    Whatever happens it is the people who will suffer.

    Poor Brazilians. They just cannot catch a break.

    Kinda makes Nixon look good.

    Just remember: if she's Nixon, the opposition's Spiro Agnew

  • cckerberoscckerberos Registered User regular
    Rchanen wrote: »
    That no matter how much support she has on the streets or from the people, the halls of power are against her.

    Does she have much support? My impression was that her popular approval ratings are abysmal.

  • TryCatcherTryCatcher Registered User regular
    From Venezuela here, and can testify to the sheer fun of wiping my ass with napkins, long food lines, and going to 4 hours without electricity starting Monday. Specially lovely the bright idea of setting up a cut from midnight to 4 am. Fuckers.

    The goverment is so hated that they managed to revive one of the two big parties of the pre-Chavez era, Democratic Action.

    You can see the Venezuelan political distortion, where anything that isn't batshit Castro-Communist Military worship is "the ultra right allied with Imperial United States interests". The center of Democratic Action's revival is the new President of the Congress, DA's Secretary Henry Ramos Allup.

    Yep, the VP of Socialist International is a member of the "ultra right". :rotate:

    For keeping up with the news, I recommend Caracas Chronicles. They are a blog in English that manages to put the day to day misfortunes of the country, and the go-to authority now that people are realizing that maybe the likes of George Cicahello-Maher and Eva Golinger are full of shit. They also manage to explain the distortions of the country, like this helpful chart that explains how the country's economy was destroyed in order to steal the profits from Oil sales:
    %E3%83%99%E3%83%8D%E3%82%BA%E3%82%A8%E3%83%A9%E3%81%8C%E9%A3%9F%E6%96%99%E4%B8%8D%E8%B6%B3%E3%81%AB%E3%81%AA%E3%82%8B%E4%BB%95%E7%B5%84%E3%81%BF-3.002.jpeg?w=1024

    RchanenShadowfireNoughtHefflingEncThe EnderSealNSDFRandRockinXShadowenCorehealer
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    You know that Friday off thing in Venezuela?

    It just got worse.

    2-day work week.

    I don't know how Venezuela is going to avoid collapsing at this point.

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
    Knuckle Dragger
  • GatorGator An alligator in Scotland Registered User regular
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    So Dilma Rousseff's political advisor was arrested today.

    I can't tell at this point if this is some organized political conspiracy (it feels a little like the Godfather doesn't it) or if its just that Brazil if THAT fucking corrupt.

    I really can't tell.

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
  • RchanenRchanen Registered User regular
    The Venezuelan opposition has collected way more signatures than they need to start the process of unseating Maduro.

    Or at least that's what they claim.

    Countdown towards the Supreme Court ruling that those signatures don't count in 3....2...

    shryke wrote: »
    The Democrats aren't crazy but they are still, you know, running the US and it's foreign policy. Which is in the "you don't have a global hegemony without bombing a few eggs" wheelhouse.
    Knuckle Dragger
  • Knuckle DraggerKnuckle Dragger Explosive Ovine Disposal Registered User regular
    Venezuela can't afford to keep printing money

    That is not an economic opinion regarding runaway inflation. A few months ago, dozens of cargo planes delivered billions of new banknotes to Venezuela. 10 billion more notes are on order for next year, but they may not get printed. According to a leaked letter from De La Rue, Venezuela still owes the currency printer $71 million for previous orders. Venezuela owes so much to so many different printers that they are having trouble even getting bids to print next year's order. To date, all the bids received amount to only one third of what they are seeking. The currency houses are convinced that Venezuela literally cannot afford to have that money printed.

    The EndertinwhiskersGiggles_Funsworth
  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    Rchanen wrote: »
    So Dilma Rousseff's political advisor was arrested today.

    I can't tell at this point if this is some organized political conspiracy (it feels a little like the Godfather doesn't it) or if its just that Brazil if THAT fucking corrupt.

    I really can't tell.

    Isn't something like 2/3 of the legislature also under investigation for corruption?

    torchlight-sig-80.jpg
  • honoverehonovere Registered User regular
    Rchanen wrote: »
    So Dilma Rousseff's political advisor was arrested today.

    I can't tell at this point if this is some organized political conspiracy (it feels a little like the Godfather doesn't it) or if its just that Brazil if THAT fucking corrupt.

    I really can't tell.

    Why not both?

    Harry Dresden
  • ronyaronya Arrrrrf. the ivory tower's basementRegistered User regular
    edited April 2016
    I remember arguing over the promise of Chavism when Chavez was still alive.

    It's important to recognize that this is in full swing:
    TryCatcher wrote: »
    dgEajoM.jpg

    but, at the same time, if you cannot afford flour at $5 but you can afford to queue to buy it at $3, it's still unambiguously better off for you.

    ronya on
    aRkpc.gif
  • tinwhiskerstinwhiskers Registered User regular
    edited April 2016
    ronya wrote: »
    I remember arguing over the promise of Chavism when Chavez was still alive.

    It's important to recognize that this is in full swing:
    TryCatcher wrote: »
    dgEajoM.jpg

    but, at the same time, if you cannot afford flour at $5 but you can afford to queue to buy it at $3, it's still unambiguously better off for you.

    IDK is being able to only afford 3lbs or flour worse of than being able to afford 5lbs, but not being able to buy any because there is no flour at any of the stores.

    Me being able to afford all the Unobtanium in the universe hasn't done me much good lately.

    tinwhiskers on
    TryCatcher
  • TryCatcherTryCatcher Registered User regular
    edited April 2016
    ronya wrote: »
    I remember arguing over the promise of Chavism when Chavez was still alive.

    It's important to recognize that this is in full swing:
    TryCatcher wrote: »
    dgEajoM.jpg

    but, at the same time, if you cannot afford flour at $5 but you can afford to queue to buy it at $3, it's still unambiguously better off for you.

    IDK is being able to only afford 3lbs or flour worse of than being able to afford 5lbs, but not being able to buy any because there is no flour at any of the stores.

    Me being able to afford all the Unobtanium in the universe hasn't done me much good lately.

    Yep. Making lines as a full time job (hello 10x Black Market, and fuck you) is that awful. And of course, completely military controlled.

    Any conversation about Venezuelan politics, both past and present, starts with how despictable is our military and how they have always tried to rule their country as their personal fiefdom. Which is now a reality thanks to Chavez (a military man himself, let's not forget).

    TryCatcher on
  • jothkijothki Registered User regular
    One thing that the chart doesn't cover but I'm wondering about is the fact that government-held flour is worth $3 if shipped to a store but $10 if shipped out of the country. Wouldn't that give corrupt officials an incentive to ship flour out of the country (maybe even right back to the original source), claim that they shipped it to a store, and then pocket the $7 surplus?

  • DraygoDraygo Registered User regular
    That's what they were doing when they were pretending to import 100t. Why bother shipping it back when you can just ship out half that to begin with and pretend you shipped out the full 100t.

  • TryCatcherTryCatcher Registered User regular
    edited April 2016
    jothki wrote: »
    One thing that the chart doesn't cover but I'm wondering about is the fact that government-held flour is worth $3 if shipped to a store but $10 if shipped out of the country. Wouldn't that give corrupt officials an incentive to ship flour out of the country (maybe even right back to the original source), claim that they shipped it to a store, and then pocket the $7 surplus?
    One of the reasons of the closing of the frontier with Columbia is that the people that lived on the frontier went to the press and talked about how their supermarkets were empty while trucks filled with food crossed the border with a wink and a nod from the National Guard. The whole business is, of course, controlled by the Chavista governors of those states, and, to nobody's surprise, they are both old Army buddies of Chavez. Is the trend that continued after their loss of Congress: The people must be punished for not supporting the revolution.

    TryCatcher on
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