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The 2016 Downticket Elections Thread for People Who Are Capable of On-Topic Civility

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    HachfaceHachface Not the Minister Farrakhan you're thinking of Dammit, Shepard!Registered User regular
    Zephyr Teachout won her primary and will go on to face Faso in November.

    Kirsten Gillibrand and Chuck Schumer have both endorsed her. I want her to win pretty badly; it'll be good to get some new blood in the progressive wing of the party.

    I love Zephyr Teachout. Her book on political corruption should be required reading.

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    VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    edited June 2016
    That's a real name? That's like krystal ball levels of bad.

    I mean, I'd vote for her anyways, but jeez. Take it easy parents.

    VishNub on
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    PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    Don't hate on Krystal I always loved her analysis on Lawerence. And she even ran for congress once, so topical!

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    pleasepaypreacher.net
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    joshofalltradesjoshofalltrades Class Traitor Smoke-filled roomRegistered User regular
    VishNub wrote: »
    That's a real name? That's like krystal ball levels of bad.

    I mean, I'd vote for her anyways, but jeez. Take it easy parents.

    I think it's an awesome-sounding name for an awesome candidate. Just look at her Ballotpedia positions:

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    Even if that's all you ever learn about her, and it absolutely should not be, that'd be enough to get the most jaded liberal on board. She's awesome!

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    AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    And California brings forth Son of Proposition 13:
    Two of Gov. Jerry Brown's favorite projects -- building a high-speed rail system and a pair of massive tunnels under the Delta -- face a serious threat if California voters pass a measure heading for the November ballot.

    The "No Blank Checks Initiative," bankrolled with $4.5 million from Stockton farmer and businessman Dean Cortopassi, would require a public vote on any state project in which $2 billion or more in revenue bonds would be issued. And since both the bullet train and twin-tunnels projects would most likely require that kind of financing, voters could ultimately get a chance to decide their fate.

    Cortopassi's initiative is one of more than a dozen measures California voters are expected to decide in November -- the final list of which will be announced Thursday by the Secretary of State's Office. Among them are proposals to legalize recreational marijuana, tighten gun laws, eliminate the state's death penalty and authorize $9 billion in school bonds.

    Although it has received less attention than many of the others, Cortopassi's measure could be the most significant in the long term and have a huge impact on the governor's legacy. It's also setting up a major battle involving taxpayer groups on one side and labor unions and business organizations on the other -- the same interest groups that lined up against each other 38 years ago when Californians passed Proposition 13, the landmark initiative that reined in property taxes and required that voters approve taxes.

    "I am concerned about my grandkids' generation," Cortopassi said. "There's too much debt in our state. I'm 79 and my wife is going to turn 80. This isn't about us. It's about the red ink, the pension liabilities and the fact that the state doesn't pay its bills."

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
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    PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    And California brings forth Son of Proposition 13:
    Two of Gov. Jerry Brown's favorite projects -- building a high-speed rail system and a pair of massive tunnels under the Delta -- face a serious threat if California voters pass a measure heading for the November ballot.

    The "No Blank Checks Initiative," bankrolled with $4.5 million from Stockton farmer and businessman Dean Cortopassi, would require a public vote on any state project in which $2 billion or more in revenue bonds would be issued. And since both the bullet train and twin-tunnels projects would most likely require that kind of financing, voters could ultimately get a chance to decide their fate.

    Cortopassi's initiative is one of more than a dozen measures California voters are expected to decide in November -- the final list of which will be announced Thursday by the Secretary of State's Office. Among them are proposals to legalize recreational marijuana, tighten gun laws, eliminate the state's death penalty and authorize $9 billion in school bonds.

    Although it has received less attention than many of the others, Cortopassi's measure could be the most significant in the long term and have a huge impact on the governor's legacy. It's also setting up a major battle involving taxpayer groups on one side and labor unions and business organizations on the other -- the same interest groups that lined up against each other 38 years ago when Californians passed Proposition 13, the landmark initiative that reined in property taxes and required that voters approve taxes.

    "I am concerned about my grandkids' generation," Cortopassi said. "There's too much debt in our state. I'm 79 and my wife is going to turn 80. This isn't about us. It's about the red ink, the pension liabilities and the fact that the state doesn't pay its bills."

    The fuck it isn't. This is about not wanting to have your taxes go up a slight bit you asshole.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    pleasepaypreacher.net
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    Knight_Knight_ Dead Dead Dead Registered User regular
    If anywhere has proven direct democracy doesn't work, it's California.

    aeNqQM9.jpg
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    PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    Knight_ wrote: »
    If anywhere has proven direct democracy doesn't work, it's California.

    Or washington state, both suffer from rich dick holes who keep the rest of the state from having upgraded infrastructure.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    pleasepaypreacher.net
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    CptKemzikCptKemzik Registered User regular
    I would also like to submit Massachusetts for repealing automatic gas tax increases tied with inflation in the 2014 midterms

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    knitdanknitdan In ur base Killin ur guysRegistered User regular
    We're about to hike the gas tax again, supposedly it will put us at 2nd highest state gas tax in the country.

    Man I wish we could get even a %1 income tax passed in this state.

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
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    Commander ZoomCommander Zoom Registered User regular
    Knight_ wrote: »
    If anywhere has proven direct democracy doesn't work, it's California.

    Anywhere in this country, you mean? (*looks at UK thread*)

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    shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Knight_ wrote: »
    If anywhere has proven direct democracy doesn't work, it's California.

    The UK stole your thunder California. Sorry.

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    So It GoesSo It Goes We keep moving...Registered User regular
    edited July 2016
    Patty Judge sent me an email with a poll where she's basically tied with Chuck Grassley.

    I like to believe in my dreams so I celebrated by donating to her campaign again.

    So It Goes on
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    HefflingHeffling No Pic EverRegistered User regular
    Jragghen wrote: »
    13528953_1427683067247803_2267592973300431694_n.jpg?oh=e71f0fee80f404f635e93434c4b7a70e&oe=57F7EF7A

    57f8b27aedb8e862162ab800cae0badaac1b2c24b08f43d7b01babde20c81084.jpg

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    Knight_Knight_ Dead Dead Dead Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    Knight_ wrote: »
    If anywhere has proven direct democracy doesn't work, it's California.

    The UK stole your thunder California. Sorry.

    I dunno, the UK fucked up bad, but only the once. California just can't stop hitting themselves.

    aeNqQM9.jpg
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    Mr KhanMr Khan Not Everyone WAHHHRegistered User regular
    Cali should know better by now, since Brown's current administration is all about undoing the damage of Prop 13.

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    Commander ZoomCommander Zoom Registered User regular
    Going by past administrations, the point when the Ds have finally managed to unfuck everything the Rs did last time is exactly when the Rs get elected to do it again.

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    AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
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    RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    Knight_ wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Knight_ wrote: »
    If anywhere has proven direct democracy doesn't work, it's California.

    The UK stole your thunder California. Sorry.

    I dunno, the UK fucked up bad, but only the once. California just can't stop hitting themselves.

    It's like the Roberts Supreme Court vs Dred Scott

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    PantsBPantsB Fake Thomas Jefferson Registered User regular


    I'm increasingly skeptical that anything more than the WH and Senate can be won but this is counter to that skepticism

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    QEDMF xbl: PantsB G+
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    kaidkaid Registered User regular
    One of the problems with the house is the gerrymandering is so bad you need basically landslide victories to gain seats in a lot of districts. And some are simply so safe there is no feasible way for the republicans not to hold them. I think the dems gain seats in the house this year regardless who wins the top seat but probably does not flip the house. The senate is looking pretty doable but not guaranteed.

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    override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited July 2016
    I hope the district court rules the right way in the Wisconsin gerrymandering case

    hopefully it will have national ramifications if they do

    unfortunately their answer to "no election could possibly result in a democratic victory, even if they had the greatest majority turnout they've ever had" will probably be "The legislature that deliberately did this has to pass a law to change it"

    override367 on
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    enlightenedbumenlightenedbum Registered User regular
    Apportionment. Section 3. [As amended Nov. 1910, Nov. 1962 and Nov. 1982] At its first session after each enumeration made by the authority of the United States, the legislature shall apportion and district anew the members of the senate and assembly, according to the number of inhabitants.

    That's kind of an explicit power of the state legislature.

    Self-righteousness is incompatible with coalition building.
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    JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    California's experiment in Democracy is up to seventeen ballot initiatives, with an additional 16 initiatives approved for circulation. Today's the deadline and I haven't heard anything about any more getting submitted.

    Quick summaries:
    • Require 2/3rds vote for legislature to change medi-cal hospital fees, and changes the manner in which the funds are allocated. Wording of this one's a little funky
    • Repeal prop 227 from 1998, allowing for languages other than English to be used in public education
    • Prohibit single-use plastic carry-out bags
    • Previously-discussed "require voter approval for projects over $2 billion funded by revenue bonds" prop
    • Authorize issuance and sale of $9 billion in bonds for education and schools
    • Require condom use on all porn made in California
    • Prohibits state agencies from paying more for drugs than the Dept. of Veteran Affairs
    • Voters seeking legislature to use what powers available to them to pressure federal level to overturn Citizens United
    • Repeal death penalty
    • A gun control one which I don't know why it's still on the ballot because both measures were already passed by the legislature and signed into law this year
    • Require 72 hours of public commentary (full text published on the Internet) for any bill before passing by legislature
    • Legalize recreational marijuana and industrial hemp (at least I think the latter is industrial).
    • Redirect money allocated from sale of grocery/carry-out bags to a wildlife conservation fund
    • Extend the temporary personal income taxes from Prop 30 on people earning more than $250k/year
    • Increase cigarette tax to $2/pack
    • Increase parole opportunities for non-violent felons
    • Changes to procedures surrounding death penalty appeals (likely would be meaningless if the death penalty were repealed per earlier prop).

    It's gonna be a crazy year. You can definitely tell which groups went "OOH, IT'S A PRESIDENTIAL YEAR, QUICK, GET THIS SHIT IN."

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    enlightenedbumenlightenedbum Registered User regular
    Like two of those (repeal 227 and death penalty) should actually be on the ballot in a sane governing system.

    Self-righteousness is incompatible with coalition building.
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    override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    can california's legislature please do something about these ballot initiatives

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    knitdanknitdan In ur base Killin ur guysRegistered User regular
    They'd have to change the state constitution I'm pretty sure.

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
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    JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    knitdan wrote: »
    They'd have to change the state constitution I'm pretty sure.

    To be fair, some of these ones may technically be changing the state constitution :V

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    JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    There was also a $15 minimum wage one which was approved, but withdrawn in late June.

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    OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    Hachface wrote: »
    Zephyr Teachout won her primary and will go on to face Faso in November.

    Kirsten Gillibrand and Chuck Schumer have both endorsed her. I want her to win pretty badly; it'll be good to get some new blood in the progressive wing of the party.

    I love Zephyr Teachout. Her book on political corruption should be required reading.

    The biggest decision facing me right now is whether to claim Pennsylvania residency for a chance to vote against Toomey again and in a state that might actually matter for the Presidential race or in New York so I can back Teachout. I've got a legitimate claim in both places based on residency at least for the moment.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
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    joshofalltradesjoshofalltrades Class Traitor Smoke-filled roomRegistered User regular
    Yeah I'm going to be pessimistic about taking back the House probably right up until the day it actually happens.

    It will be painful if it ends up being close.

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    RozRoz Boss of InternetRegistered User regular
    edited July 2016
    Weren't the numbers something like we'd have to win 95%+ of the competitive districts and even then have to make a few uncompetitive ones actually winnable?

    I thought it was virtually mathematically impossible for us to regain the house unless it was a massive wave year with general democrat being 10%+ points ahead?

    Roz on
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    enlightenedbumenlightenedbum Registered User regular
    Roz wrote: »
    Weren't the numbers something like we'd have to win 95%+ of the competitive districts and even then have to make a few uncompetitive ones actually winnable?

    I thought it was virtually mathematically impossible for us to regain the house unless it was a massive wave year with general democrat being 10%+ points ahead?

    Yeah and we're approaching that point.

    Self-righteousness is incompatible with coalition building.
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    Mr KhanMr Khan Not Everyone WAHHHRegistered User regular
    The Republican majority getting smaller will actually lead to a more dysfunctional House, i think, due to the Hastert rule and the fact that the burn-it-all-down-iest among them are probably from the safest districts.

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    PellaeonPellaeon Registered User regular
    I'd like to know how many past, current, and future state projects meet or exceed the $2 billion threshold. Seems like a rather arbitrary number

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    OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    Roz wrote: »
    Weren't the numbers something like we'd have to win 95%+ of the competitive districts and even then have to make a few uncompetitive ones actually winnable?

    I thought it was virtually mathematically impossible for us to regain the house unless it was a massive wave year with general democrat being 10%+ points ahead?

    Yeah and we're approaching that point.

    And we're redefining "competitive" in some places.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
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    enlightenedbumenlightenedbum Registered User regular
    Pellaeon wrote: »
    I'd like to know how many past, current, and future state projects meet or exceed the $2 billion threshold. Seems like a rather arbitrary number

    I think it's mostly the proposed high speed rail route.

    Self-righteousness is incompatible with coalition building.
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    JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    Pellaeon wrote: »
    I'd like to know how many past, current, and future state projects meet or exceed the $2 billion threshold. Seems like a rather arbitrary number

    I think it's mostly the proposed high speed rail route.

    It's because of the rail and the water project stuff, but the bar is set pretty low for a state California's size.

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    PellaeonPellaeon Registered User regular
    edited July 2016
    Jragghen wrote: »
    Pellaeon wrote: »
    I'd like to know how many past, current, and future state projects meet or exceed the $2 billion threshold. Seems like a rather arbitrary number

    I think it's mostly the proposed high speed rail route.

    It's because of the rail and the water project stuff, but the bar is set pretty low for a state California's size.

    Right, I know the reason is the rail and water, just wondering if anything else gets caught up in it? Are we suddenly voting every time we want to retrofit a dam or bridge?

    Pellaeon on
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    PantsBPantsB Fake Thomas Jefferson Registered User regular
    edited July 2016
    Gerrymandering is a nice excuse but it can only go so far. Republicans won the Congressionalvote by 6% 2 years ago, by 1.2 % 4 years ago and by 6% 6 years ago. Ultimately that's why the House is Republican controlled. And it can't honestly be blamed on the DNC/DCCC because they leave fewer uncontested seats than Republicans most years and it's not like the national Republican party outclasses anyone in pure competence.

    The core problem is Democratic Presidential voters don't turn out in midterms and are more likely to split their tickets, possibly for a veneer of independence. It's the central factor that all US politics hinges on in the current party system

    PantsB on
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