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[Game Dev] I don't have a publisher. What I do have are a very particular set of skills.

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Posts

  • DrovekDrovek Registered User regular
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    Got a blog?

    Not yet, but after the game is released and available for a coupy months I'll be starting one. Also releasing the source code and art assets

    It's an Alexa game, and I am really not a programmer, so it's basically going to be a big "you really can be a game developer" thing. Hoping to lower the barrier for entry and to get more people building games that people can play without sight and hands.

    That actually sounds frikken awesome.

    Got hooked on Alexa after getting a FireTV with the Alexa remote, and I've been eyeing doing some Skills development. Maybe I'll give this a go.

    steam_sig.png
    DisruptedCapitalist
  • IncenjucarIncenjucar Audio Game Developer Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    Drovek wrote: »
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    Got a blog?

    Not yet, but after the game is released and available for a coupy months I'll be starting one. Also releasing the source code and art assets

    It's an Alexa game, and I am really not a programmer, so it's basically going to be a big "you really can be a game developer" thing. Hoping to lower the barrier for entry and to get more people building games that people can play without sight and hands.

    That actually sounds frikken awesome.

    Got hooked on Alexa after getting a FireTV with the Alexa remote, and I've been eyeing doing some Skills development. Maybe I'll give this a go.

    Let me know if you need any tips! I have an excessive knowledge base on the topic.

    It's really an easy platform to get started with, and really quite satisfying how quickly you get something out of it.

    beavisofsmoke
  • LilnoobsLilnoobs Alpha Queue Registered User regular
    edited December 2018
    So, i've been toying around with Unity's render pipeline assets, just because. If you try them out, the lightweight is great but may need you to manually change all your materials (switch the shader part). I've deemed the HD one a waste of half a day because my poor laptop has issues with it, building and in editor mode. It's been building my one scene game for the last half hour and still going.

    Lilnoobs on
    KoopahTroopah
  • KashaarKashaar Low OrbitRegistered User regular
    Lilnoobs wrote: »
    So, i've been toying around with Unity's render pipeline assets, just because. If you try them out, the lightweight is great but may need you to manually change all your materials (switch the shader part). I've deemed the HD one a waste of half a day because my poor laptop has issues with it, building and in editor mode. It's been building my one scene game for the last half hour and still going.

    If unity is anything like unreal, the initial shader compilation will take much longer than subsequent ones, because only modified shaders have to be recooked.

    kashaar.pngDev Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Steam
    Unreal Engine 4 Developers Community.

    I'm working on a cute little video game! Here's a link for you.
    DisruptedCapitalistKoopahTroopahCornucopiistDusda
  • CornucopiistCornucopiist Registered User regular
    Sounds like Lilnoobs is baking lights... That'll take a while. And depending on the light setup, might be repeated every build. So, check out a light baking tutorial, and adjust according to your needs, and perhaps adjust needs according to resources...

  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    Sounds like Lilnoobs is baking lights... That'll take a while. And depending on the light setup, might be repeated every build. So, check out a light baking tutorial, and adjust according to your needs, and perhaps adjust needs according to resources...

    It's getting harder and harder to find real bakelite these days.

    Glal
  • CornucopiistCornucopiist Registered User regular
    LD50 wrote: »
    Sounds like Lilnoobs is baking lights... That'll take a while. And depending on the light setup, might be repeated every build. So, check out a light baking tutorial, and adjust according to your needs, and perhaps adjust needs according to resources...

    It's getting harder and harder to find real bakelite these days.

    I know, right?

  • KoopahTroopahKoopahTroopah The koopas, the troopas. Philadelphia, PARegistered User regular
    Unreal Devs should check this out. Some devs posted their solution to face animations using 2D textures and a few various techniques and rigging in Maya.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/unrealengine/comments/a7emde/2d_animated_faces_in_unreal_engine_4/

    ?username=KoopahTroopah&theme=light

    Steam - Battle.net - Koopah089 - PSN/Xbox - 1639-6388-9968/KoopahTroopah - Switch
    GlalDisruptedCapitalistRoyceSraphimbowenDrovekElvenshaeUselesswarrior
  • HandkorHandkor Registered User regular
    Unreal Devs should check this out. Some devs posted their solution to face animations using 2D textures and a few various techniques and rigging in Maya.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/unrealengine/comments/a7emde/2d_animated_faces_in_unreal_engine_4/

    I always figured this was a good way of doing it by using the bones to drive your material but it's really nice to see it implemented.

    DisruptedCapitalist
  • kaceypkaceyp we stayed bright as lightning we sang loud as thunderRegistered User regular
    Has anyone here used xml or json files to store dialogue for a game? I'm having trouble wrapping my head around exactly to make/structure the files themselves. I've looked up the topic and it feels like almost every tutorial about it focuses on reading the file (in Unity, in this case) and totally glosses over how to go about setting up the file itself.

    Basically, I'm working on a 2D story-heavy adventure game. It's more or less linear and there isn't really any branching in the conversations, they just proceed from beginning to end. Can anyone give me some direction on this? I'm sure it's actually very easy, but of all the things I've had to learn in the last few years, I think this is the first thing I've actually had to ask a question about.

  • agoajagoaj Now is the time of my revengeRegistered User regular
    kaceyp wrote: »
    Has anyone here used xml or json files to store dialogue for a game? I'm having trouble wrapping my head around exactly to make/structure the files themselves. I've looked up the topic and it feels like almost every tutorial about it focuses on reading the file (in Unity, in this case) and totally glosses over how to go about setting up the file itself.

    Basically, I'm working on a 2D story-heavy adventure game. It's more or less linear and there isn't really any branching in the conversations, they just proceed from beginning to end. Can anyone give me some direction on this? I'm sure it's actually very easy, but of all the things I've had to learn in the last few years, I think this is the first thing I've actually had to ask a question about.

    If it's linear then you should be able to just have a dictionary of conversations, and a conversation is just an array of message data.
    here's how branching might work.
    "Conversation1" : [
        {
            "Speaker" : "Old Man",
            "Text" : "Do you have any Strawberries?",
            "Type" : "Choice",
            "Choices" : ["Yes", "No"]
            "Branches" : {
                "Yes" : [
                {
                    "Speaker" : "Old Man",
                    "Text" : "Lovely!"]
                }
                "No" : [{ "Speaker" : "Old Man", "Text" : "You have made a great enemy this day!"}]
            }
        },
    ],
    

    qnu0EMk.png
    ElvenshaeDisruptedCapitalistkaceyp
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    Ah look at you guys! You guys! Just look at cha! You’re all wonderful, keep making games!

    I’ve no experience in any part of game design but I have a hankering to make a simple vertical space shooter. I keep starting a design document and starting again as it gravitates to “just make new levels for Ikaruga”.

    templewulf
  • templewulftemplewulf The Team Chump USARegistered User regular
    Ah look at you guys! You guys! Just look at cha! You’re all wonderful, keep making games!

    I’ve no experience in any part of game design but I have a hankering to make a simple vertical space shooter. I keep starting a design document and starting again as it gravitates to “just make new levels for Ikaruga”.

    Hey, there's nothing wrong with that. In fact, most people would recommend making something that plays like an existing game before getting wild.

    That kind of practice can be really helpful while keeping scope under control.

    Twitch.tv/FiercePunchStudios | PSN | Steam | Discord | SFV CFN: templewulf
    Kashaar
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    Thank you. I agree that a small scope is best for a first project. It’d probably be even simpler graphically and gameplay wise to the game it’d steal from.

    Honestly half of it is a desire to make art and a soundtrack to the theme of “pew pew space dogfights”.

    templewulfRoyceSraphim
  • templewulftemplewulf The Team Chump USARegistered User regular
    Thank you. I agree that a small scope is best for a first project. It’d probably be even simpler graphically and gameplay wise to the game it’d steal from.

    Honestly half of it is a desire to make art and a soundtrack to the theme of “pew pew space dogfights”.

    That sounds great! Not that it means much since I haven't published anything, but I would recommend starting with the parts that you're excited to work on. If you end up making an entire album before a game, that's okay! You've got something to put on bandcamp at least.

    The important part is to work with your motivation. I've been programming infrastructure for like a goddamn year now, and I think it's slowly draining the life out of me.

    Twitch.tv/FiercePunchStudios | PSN | Steam | Discord | SFV CFN: templewulf
    DisruptedCapitalist
  • kaceypkaceyp we stayed bright as lightning we sang loud as thunderRegistered User regular
    agoaj wrote: »
    kaceyp wrote: »
    Has anyone here used xml or json files to store dialogue for a game? I'm having trouble wrapping my head around exactly to make/structure the files themselves. I've looked up the topic and it feels like almost every tutorial about it focuses on reading the file (in Unity, in this case) and totally glosses over how to go about setting up the file itself.

    Basically, I'm working on a 2D story-heavy adventure game. It's more or less linear and there isn't really any branching in the conversations, they just proceed from beginning to end. Can anyone give me some direction on this? I'm sure it's actually very easy, but of all the things I've had to learn in the last few years, I think this is the first thing I've actually had to ask a question about.
    If it's linear then you should be able to just have a dictionary of conversations, and a conversation is just an array of message data.
    here's how branching might work.
    "Conversation1" : [
        {
            "Speaker" : "Old Man",
            "Text" : "Do you have any Strawberries?",
            "Type" : "Choice",
            "Choices" : ["Yes", "No"]
            "Branches" : {
                "Yes" : [
                {
                    "Speaker" : "Old Man",
                    "Text" : "Lovely!"]
                }
                "No" : [{ "Speaker" : "Old Man", "Text" : "You have made a great enemy this day!"}]
            }
        },
    ],
    

    Thanks! I'm going to try to get some work done tonight so I'll mess around with this stuff and see how it goes.

  • LaCabraLaCabra Registered User regular
    Blog | Impromptu Games | twitter | patreon

    totally buy my video game InFlux on Steam or Humble Store or GOG or Amazon!
    RoyceSraphimKoopahTroopahIanatorironsizidebowenElvenshaeThe Zombie PenguinDisruptedCapitalistCornucopiist
  • templewulftemplewulf The Team Chump USARegistered User regular
    LaCabra wrote: »

    The twitch as it flops back up is great! Is that procedural, or did you just give it a generalized leg animation and a rotation?

    Twitch.tv/FiercePunchStudios | PSN | Steam | Discord | SFV CFN: templewulf
    RoyceSraphim
  • LaCabraLaCabra Registered User regular
    It's playing its drown animation, which is just panicked kicking of the legs, blended with physics. I interp the physics out while interping his transform back to normal and then he stops kickin'.

    Blog | Impromptu Games | twitter | patreon

    totally buy my video game InFlux on Steam or Humble Store or GOG or Amazon!
    templewulfRoyceSraphimKoopahTroopahdipuc4lifebowenElvenshaeDisruptedCapitalist
  • RoyceSraphimRoyceSraphim Registered User regular
    Ive been waiting weeks to post this!

    Coutless musicians started off playing smoke on the water or mary had a little lamb by ear or from sheet music. Start with what you know and go from there.

    templewulfKashaar
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    would you guys say Unreal is at least as simple to use as Unity? Trying to prototype something but finding the Unity asset store to be a little lacking

    I've heard that Unreal has tons of AAA-quality assets for free. Is this true? Not sure if it's worth it though if Unreal is that much harder to use.

    My favorite feature of Unity is the NavMesh, and hoping Unreal has something similar

  • KhavallKhavall British ColumbiaRegistered User regular
    Jasconius wrote: »
    would you guys say Unreal is at least as simple to use as Unity? Trying to prototype something but finding the Unity asset store to be a little lacking

    I've heard that Unreal has tons of AAA-quality assets for free. Is this true? Not sure if it's worth it though if Unreal is that much harder to use.

    My favorite feature of Unity is the NavMesh, and hoping Unreal has something similar

    Unreal is probably about the same in terms of ease of use.

    However, Unreal is way harder to learn. Unity does really great work with tutorializing the engine for people starting from scratch in a way that Unreal can be a little tough to initially get.

    KoopahTroopahtemplewulf
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    edited January 2
    So this year for fun I’m going to make a shmup, you know, a shoot and dodge game, most often with spaceships.

    I’ve been really into them on and off over the years, but as it’s a niche genre it’s inevitable that each iteration becomes more extreme. These games tend to get called “bullet hells” for that reason.

    With that in mind I want to make the “Kirby” or perhaps “Journey” of vertical shmups—a beginner’s game that anyone can beat.

    Though I’ve got a little story and art style in mind, I want to focus on the game mechanics first. Here’s the idea:

    The player can become red, yellow or blue, and fire bullets the same colour they currently are.
    Enemies are red, yellow or blue (no switching for them), and likewise fire bullets of the same colour.
    The player isn’t harmed by bullets of the same colour, but neither is the enemy.
    The player has to swap between colours to absorb potential harm, and swap back to either other colour to do damage.

    Last thing, nearly all of these game have the player only able to shoot vertically up the screen; some would say it’s the main point. It means you have to position the ship in the right place, right time, every time, for maximum points at least. However, I was thinking of allowing the player a full 360 degrees with a turning gun. This will make the game overall a lot easier, but I can picture situations where you have some enemies appear behind you, so you’ve got to dodge a little before you’ve brought the gun around.

    Thoughts?

    Endless_Serpents on
  • RoyceSraphimRoyceSraphim Registered User regular
    So this year for fun I’m going to make a shmup, you know, a shoot and dodge game, most often with spaceships.

    I’ve been really into them on and off over the years, but as it’s a niche genre it’s inevitable that each iteration becomes more extreme. These games tend to get called “bullet hells” for that reason.

    With that in mind I want to make the “Kirby” or perhaps “Journey” of vertical shmups—a beginner’s game that anyone can beat.

    Though I’ve got a little story and art style in mind, I want to focus on the game mechanics first. Here’s the idea:

    The player can become red, yellow or blue, and fire bullets the same colour they currently are.
    Enemies are red, yellow or blue (no switching for them), and likewise fire bullets of the same colour.
    The player isn’t harmed by bullets of the same colour, but neither is the enemy.
    The player has to swap between colours to absorb potential harm, and swap back to either other colour to do damage.

    Last thing, nearly all of these game have the player only able to shoot vertically up the screen; some would say it’s the main point. It means you have to position the ship in the right place, right time, every time, for maximum points at least. However, I was thinking of allowing the player a full 360 degrees with a turning gun. This will make the game overall a lot easier, but I can picture situations where you have some enemies appear behind you, so you’ve got to dodge a little before you’ve brought the gun around.

    Thoughts?

    My Egyptian schmup gave me some insight

    Before i hit the wall

    Anyway, movement speed is going to be beastly to figure out what feels right for your framerate and style. Once you move onto animation, this will get worse.

    Prototype movement and speeds with simple polygons. Figure out a range of speeds

    Are the levels going to be the camera sliding along one level or a small level with a scrolling background and enemies flying in in order?

    On death, do you restart level or start halfway through?

    How will powerups work? Lives? Health?

    Endless_Serpents
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    I’m currently thinking it’d be a single screen with the landscape scrolling beneath and enemies and obstacles arriving in a set pattern.

    I’m thinking one hit kills the player.

    However, for lives I’m thinking each death takes X amount from your score. You can’t fail the level, it’s just a matter of if you finish the level with any points.

    Plus I reckon you have X minutes to beat the boss before it just leaves.

    So for a kid they can just play, but if you’re into it you can do a no death, boss beaten run of every level.

    I haven’t really thought of any power ups as of yet. Assuming I get a working game out I’d want to be able to flawlessly complete a level without it, then sprinkle some in.

  • SpawnbrokerSpawnbroker Registered User regular
    edited January 2
    Messing around in Unity has taught me that game development is way harder than it seems. Even trying to get a prototype up and running is a slog of endless tutorials for a newbie like me.

    And I'm a programmer by trade, I can't even imagine the barrier for someone who hasn't coded before.

    Spawnbroker on
    Battle.net: Spawnbroker#1471
    Steam: Spawnbroker
    Final Fantasy XIV: Spawn Broken
    RoyceSraphimMvrckMarty81CampyDisruptedCapitalist
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited January 2
    Messing around in Unity has taught me that game development is way harder than it seems. Even trying to get a prototype up and running is a slog of endless tutorials for a newbie like me.

    And I'm a programmer by trade, I can't even imagine the barrier for someone who hasn't coded before.

    The issue, ultimately, is these tools are designed for people who already make games.

    Another issue is the popularity of youtube as a platform means everyone thinks they can make ad revenue... so good tutorials tend to be a slog instead of several really concise web tutorials that are much easier to use as reference materials (especially when you come back to it after a few weeks of break).

    Unreal, for instance, has a long history as a game engine and most companies had their own build chains set up for it and how to plug into it. It's not really meant for hobbyist programmers (or those of us who work in fields that aren't heavy with physics, animating skeletons, and linear programming). But the popularity of unity has made unreal adapt to it. Their blueprint stuff is actually kind of amazing. I actually am leaning more towards their engine as it just seems better overall... but amateurs beware, you can make some real shit products that are optimized like a wet butthole with it if you're not careful (ark, pubg).

    bowen on
    Ladies.
    templewulf
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    Oh yeah, it’s gonna suck getting started.

    Since I’m still mentally in the period where people gave away their tiny proof of project games for free, I’ll be doing just that.

  • SpawnbrokerSpawnbroker Registered User regular
    I think my game idea would be better off prototyped as a board game, actually...

    Battle.net: Spawnbroker#1471
    Steam: Spawnbroker
    Final Fantasy XIV: Spawn Broken
  • KhavallKhavall British ColumbiaRegistered User regular
    I think my game idea would be better off prototyped as a board game, actually...

    This is super good practice anyways. It won't always transfer over 1:1 (e.g. if the core gameplay loop involves aiming and shooting it can be pretty difficult to prototype as a board game), but it's really good for defining a lot of the important parts of the game. New XCOM was basically prototyped by Sid Meier and Jake Kaufmann trading back board games until they reached a point of complexity and completeness where they agreed to start programming something.

    Board games allow you to really rapidly run through a bunch of iterations to make sure that your core loop a: works, and b: is fun before you start getting lost in having to code it, even if you're comfortable in a development environment.

    bowenIncenjucarIzzimachElvenshae
  • SpawnbrokerSpawnbroker Registered User regular
    Khavall wrote: »
    I think my game idea would be better off prototyped as a board game, actually...

    This is super good practice anyways. It won't always transfer over 1:1 (e.g. if the core gameplay loop involves aiming and shooting it can be pretty difficult to prototype as a board game), but it's really good for defining a lot of the important parts of the game. New XCOM was basically prototyped by Sid Meier and Jake Kaufmann trading back board games until they reached a point of complexity and completeness where they agreed to start programming something.

    Board games allow you to really rapidly run through a bunch of iterations to make sure that your core loop a: works, and b: is fun before you start getting lost in having to code it, even if you're comfortable in a development environment.

    Yeah, I know that Firaxis games is famous for developing this way, and the type of game I'm looking at making (turn-based strategy) kind of lends itself to that anyways. Thanks!

    Battle.net: Spawnbroker#1471
    Steam: Spawnbroker
    Final Fantasy XIV: Spawn Broken
  • templewulftemplewulf The Team Chump USARegistered User regular
    edited January 3
    Ugh, I'm losing my mind with Unity here. Can anyone take a look at an Animation Recording Mode question? You would make my year.
    The Animation recording mode: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/animeditor-AnimatingAGameObject.html

    It appears to group recorded changes by type, meaning all changes to BoxCollider2D components are stored together in a single keyframe. So if I adjust multiple colliders for a complex hitbox, it just applies all of those transformations to the first BoxCollider2D component on the object.

    I thought "a-ha! I'll outsmart your limitations by using a PolygonCollider2D that can capture complex hitbox shapes in a single component!" But I can't make the recording mode record any data from the PolygonCollider2D outline!

    My Animation recording mode question(s):
    • Can I manipulate multiple colliders through the Animation keyframe system?
    • If not, can I manipulate a PolygonCollider2D shape through the Animation keyframe system?
    • Can I subclass a collider and add the ability to be manipulated through the Animation system?
    • Is there a smarter way to do this?

    templewulf on
    Twitch.tv/FiercePunchStudios | PSN | Steam | Discord | SFV CFN: templewulf
  • LilnoobsLilnoobs Alpha Queue Registered User regular
    Why do you want such collision precision during animation in a 2d game?

    Typically, I separate the renderer and collider components. Collider on the parent GO, renderer on some child. If it's animated I even go a child deeper, so parent -> empty child -> renderer. In this way, I'm pretty sure things can be animated independently, not 100%, but like, 94%.

    dipuc4life
  • agoajagoaj Now is the time of my revengeRegistered User regular
    templewulf wrote: »
    Ugh, I'm losing my mind with Unity here. Can anyone take a look at an Animation Recording Mode question? You would make my year.
    The Animation recording mode: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/animeditor-AnimatingAGameObject.html

    It appears to group recorded changes by type, meaning all changes to BoxCollider2D components are stored together in a single keyframe. So if I adjust multiple colliders for a complex hitbox, it just applies all of those transformations to the first BoxCollider2D component on the object.

    I thought "a-ha! I'll outsmart your limitations by using a PolygonCollider2D that can capture complex hitbox shapes in a single component!" But I can't make the recording mode record any data from the PolygonCollider2D outline!

    My Animation recording mode question(s):
    • Can I manipulate multiple colliders through the Animation keyframe system?
    • If not, can I manipulate a PolygonCollider2D shape through the Animation keyframe system?
    • Can I subclass a collider and add the ability to be manipulated through the Animation system?
    • Is there a smarter way to do this?

    Yes, you can adjust infinite colliders, but only 1 per gameobject. The animation data references fields by "name/of/objects"-NameOfComponentType-"NameOfProperty"
    It cannot multiple of the same component on one object. You could make each collider a child object and it would work. PolygonCollider2D uses an array of points, and the animator does not support arrays.
    You can't subclass a collider because it's a sealed type. You can make your own component that has several point variables that you can animate. That component would then on LateUpdate(Runs after animation) change the points on a Polygon Collider or manage several box collider components on the object.

    qnu0EMk.png
    KoopahTroopah
  • templewulftemplewulf The Team Chump USARegistered User regular
    agoaj wrote: »
    templewulf wrote: »
    Ugh, I'm losing my mind with Unity here. Can anyone take a look at an Animation Recording Mode question? You would make my year.
    The Animation recording mode: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/animeditor-AnimatingAGameObject.html

    It appears to group recorded changes by type, meaning all changes to BoxCollider2D components are stored together in a single keyframe. So if I adjust multiple colliders for a complex hitbox, it just applies all of those transformations to the first BoxCollider2D component on the object.

    I thought "a-ha! I'll outsmart your limitations by using a PolygonCollider2D that can capture complex hitbox shapes in a single component!" But I can't make the recording mode record any data from the PolygonCollider2D outline!

    My Animation recording mode question(s):
    • Can I manipulate multiple colliders through the Animation keyframe system?
    • If not, can I manipulate a PolygonCollider2D shape through the Animation keyframe system?
    • Can I subclass a collider and add the ability to be manipulated through the Animation system?
    • Is there a smarter way to do this?

    Yes, you can adjust infinite colliders, but only 1 per gameobject. The animation data references fields by "name/of/objects"-NameOfComponentType-"NameOfProperty"
    It cannot multiple of the same component on one object. You could make each collider a child object and it would work. PolygonCollider2D uses an array of points, and the animator does not support arrays.
    You can't subclass a collider because it's a sealed type. You can make your own component that has several point variables that you can animate. That component would then on LateUpdate(Runs after animation) change the points on a Polygon Collider or manage several box collider components on the object.

    Thanks for the answers!

    I ended up making children game objects with one collider each and a monobehaviour that dispatches collision events back to the main character. I also got it to color each collider differently based on type.

    Ideally, I want an arbitrary number of colliders, but I just made enough objects to cover all the cases for now and disable the ones I don't need on a given animation.

    I'm excited to connect everything and get to actual design work!

    Twitch.tv/FiercePunchStudios | PSN | Steam | Discord | SFV CFN: templewulf
  • templewulftemplewulf The Team Chump USARegistered User regular
    Lilnoobs wrote: »
    Why do you want such collision precision during animation in a 2d game?

    Typically, I separate the renderer and collider components. Collider on the parent GO, renderer on some child. If it's animated I even go a child deeper, so parent -> empty child -> renderer. In this way, I'm pretty sure things can be animated independently, not 100%, but like, 94%.

    Because it's typical for action games to have long move lists with different hit boxes and hurt boxes on each move. As one of the primary ways to distinguishing between multiple moves for mechanical value, it's important for them to be both precise and easily adjustable by a designer.

    Twitch.tv/FiercePunchStudios | PSN | Steam | Discord | SFV CFN: templewulf
    KoopahTroopah
  • RoyceSraphimRoyceSraphim Registered User regular
    templewulf wrote: »
    Lilnoobs wrote: »
    Why do you want such collision precision during animation in a 2d game?

    Typically, I separate the renderer and collider components. Collider on the parent GO, renderer on some child. If it's animated I even go a child deeper, so parent -> empty child -> renderer. In this way, I'm pretty sure things can be animated independently, not 100%, but like, 94%.

    Because it's typical for action games to have long move lists with different hit boxes and hurt boxes on each move. As one of the primary ways to distinguishing between multiple moves for mechanical value, it's important for them to be both precise and easily adjustable by a designer.

    Huh, thats neat. I was just daydreaming a muso game and that helps.

    KoopahTroopahtemplewulfElvenshae
  • templewulftemplewulf The Team Chump USARegistered User regular
    templewulf wrote: »
    Lilnoobs wrote: »
    Why do you want such collision precision during animation in a 2d game?

    Typically, I separate the renderer and collider components. Collider on the parent GO, renderer on some child. If it's animated I even go a child deeper, so parent -> empty child -> renderer. In this way, I'm pretty sure things can be animated independently, not 100%, but like, 94%.

    Because it's typical for action games to have long move lists with different hit boxes and hurt boxes on each move. As one of the primary ways to distinguishing between multiple moves for mechanical value, it's important for them to be both precise and easily adjustable by a designer.

    Huh, thats neat. I was just daydreaming a muso game and that helps.

    Like a Dynasty Warriors kind of thing? That's ambitious!

    I'm glad my research was useful to somebody. I was considering putting it together into a YouTube video. Do you think that would be valuable?

    Twitch.tv/FiercePunchStudios | PSN | Steam | Discord | SFV CFN: templewulf
  • KoopahTroopahKoopahTroopah The koopas, the troopas. Philadelphia, PARegistered User regular
    templewulf wrote: »
    templewulf wrote: »
    Lilnoobs wrote: »
    Why do you want such collision precision during animation in a 2d game?

    Typically, I separate the renderer and collider components. Collider on the parent GO, renderer on some child. If it's animated I even go a child deeper, so parent -> empty child -> renderer. In this way, I'm pretty sure things can be animated independently, not 100%, but like, 94%.

    Because it's typical for action games to have long move lists with different hit boxes and hurt boxes on each move. As one of the primary ways to distinguishing between multiple moves for mechanical value, it's important for them to be both precise and easily adjustable by a designer.

    Huh, thats neat. I was just daydreaming a muso game and that helps.

    Like a Dynasty Warriors kind of thing? That's ambitious!

    I'm glad my research was useful to somebody. I was considering putting it together into a YouTube video. Do you think that would be valuable?

    There's always value in teaching something that you learned yourself to others. I approve of it, I search YouTube a lot for game dev tips and tuts.

    ?username=KoopahTroopah&theme=light

    Steam - Battle.net - Koopah089 - PSN/Xbox - 1639-6388-9968/KoopahTroopah - Switch
  • LilnoobsLilnoobs Alpha Queue Registered User regular
    templewulf wrote: »
    Lilnoobs wrote: »
    Why do you want such collision precision during animation in a 2d game?

    Typically, I separate the renderer and collider components. Collider on the parent GO, renderer on some child. If it's animated I even go a child deeper, so parent -> empty child -> renderer. In this way, I'm pretty sure things can be animated independently, not 100%, but like, 94%.

    Because it's typical for action games to have long move lists with different hit boxes and hurt boxes on each move. As one of the primary ways to distinguishing between multiple moves for mechanical value, it's important for them to be both precise and easily adjustable by a designer.

    I imagined the case might be for a fighter, but didn't know for sure. The system would be overkill for something like an action platformer or top down action adventure.

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