Club PA 2.0 has arrived! If you'd like to access some extra PA content and help support the forums, check it out at patreon.com/ClubPA
The image size limit has been raised to 1mb! Anything larger than that should be linked to. This is a HARD limit, please do not abuse it.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

The [Movies] Thread: Pre-Summer Blockbuster Blockbuster Season

1899092949598

Posts

  • Redcoat-13Redcoat-13 Registered User regular
    Korror wrote: »
    Help me movie thread!

    I got roped into agreeing to choosing a movie and giving a short introduction for a classic film group I'm part of. I thought I would show a western as that's a genre that we haven't covered yet (previous movies were: Rear Window, Singing in the Rain, Bringing up Baby) but I don't know what to show. I want to show an older western (30s-40s) so I can eventually show a spaghetti western and people can see how things changed in 20-30 years. Problem is that I don't know that many older westerns and my favorite (High Noon) has already been vetoed on the account of too many people having seen it already.

    I'm looking for something that's both good and influential, ideally from the 30s-40s. I was thinking Stagecoach ('39) as it's one of the first John Wayne movies but I'm open to other suggestions.

    3:10 to Yuma? It was released in 1957, but maybe that's too late. Same with The Searchers?

    I would strongly recommend Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch as a latter day Western; it has one of my favourite set pieces with regards to a train robbery. I don't think it is as well known as some other westerns (Once Upon a Time in the West, The Dollar trilogy, etc..), and it's always enjoyable seeing people's reactions watching it for the first time.

    PSN Fleety2009
    Korror
  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    Wild Bunch is kind of like Deliverance most people probably know how it ends, but never watched the movie, much like they know deliverance has a male on male rape, but don't actually know what the movie is about beyond that.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    Damn fine banjo playing, obviously.

    webp-net-resizeimage.jpg
    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
    SorceKanaCommander Zoomshryke
  • PsychoLarry1PsychoLarry1 Registered User regular
    The Duke of Burgundy does its damnedest to capture the tone and texture of a 1970s European art film, and for the most part nails it. It's a little too crisp, but it's gorgeous and tells a really compelling story with a very limited scope.

    The basic story is an examination of a Dom/Sub relationship, the power dynamics at play, and the strains it creates. The movie is actually very PG-13, and it's almost totally uninterested in the sexual aspect of the couple. It's beautiful and has a lot to say without being salacious or exploitative and I really enjoyed it.

    Then the film hits the 3rd act and devolves into a mass of art student dreck. It's long periods of intensely slow motion shots, followed by rapid fire disorienting imagery that lasts far too long, all set to hypnotic and annoying high pitched sounds. There's some very basic weird dream imagery that doesn't earn the agonizing pace it moves at, and the movie doesn't end so much as it just dissipates. If there was any coherence in the end, I missed it as I tried my best to stay awake.

  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    Have you seen Berberian Sound Studio, the director's previous film? I found The Duke of Burgundy fairly consistent and didn't have your impression of a very different third act, but BSS definitely turns into something very different in the last third, and while I found the change intriguing at first, it also ended up diminishing my impression of the whole film - I liked what I thought they were aiming for, but the film didn't bring this new direction to a satisfying ending for me. I have to rewatch it, though, and I'm looking forward to whatever Strickland does next.

    webp-net-resizeimage.jpg
    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
    Dark Raven X
  • NobeardNobeard North Carolina: Failed StateRegistered User regular
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    cj iwakura wrote: »
    Atomika wrote: »
    Basically, TFA was the detergent they used to wipe the stank off of the Star Wars name after those shit-ass PT films.

    Yeah, I see it very similar. I've said before that TFA is basically a proof-of-concept pitch to the fanbase at large to show Star Wars is in the right hands.

    Rogue One felt like the right hands. TFA felt like the wrong ones.

    Rogue One pays homage to the PT and the OT without trying to copy it wholesale. TFA likes to pretend the prequels never happened and just copies the OT, upping the ante every so often with the occasional wink wink/nudge nudge.

    I just rewatched Rogue One yesterday. With the rose tint of OMG NEW STAR WARS MOVIE ON IMAX removed, I found it to be half of a humdrum experience with a few cool fights, stapled to an hour of amazing sci fi war footage.

    It definitely felt like a movie from the guy who gave us Godzilla '14.

    I mean, it was never bad. But it was slow to start, not all of the character beats were compelling, and I didn't feel much during
    roughly half of the character deaths at the end.

    But goddamm, did shit blow up good. Like, if Gareth Edwards was just made Chief Director of All the Star Wars Combat Scenes Ever, I would be okay with that.

    Get Gareth Edwards to do the action and Joss Whedon to do the writing and whatever movie they make will end all wars and bring peace on earth, I'm certain of it.

    I'm not saying we are going to have an autocratic dystopia, but things keep happening that look like they come from an autocratic dystopia.
    ElJeffeN1tSt4lker
  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    edited April 2017
    Hard pass on Whedon writing. James Gunn is the gold standard for me in that regard.

    At least as far as space opera things in the modern era.

    Preacher on
    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
    Johnny Chopsocky
  • NobeardNobeard North Carolina: Failed StateRegistered User regular
    edited April 2017
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    I believe that Michael Bay is very good at doing what he does.

    I've said before that I would very much like to see what Michael Bay would do with a Kaiju film. His fetishization of violence and the military would make for a helluva giant monster movie.

    Nobeard on
    I'm not saying we are going to have an autocratic dystopia, but things keep happening that look like they come from an autocratic dystopia.
    Gvzbgul
  • ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    I dunno. I think Whedon eats Gunn's lunch when it comes to directing an ensemble. GotG was hilarious and fun, but it was a far cry from Peak Whedon, and not as good at the pathos as Avengers was.

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
    Gnome-InterruptusKetarnonoffensiveBrainiac 8FencingsaxshrykeSatanIsMyMotor
  • urahonkyurahonky Dayton, OHRegistered User regular
    Nobeard wrote: »
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    I believe that Michael Bay is very good at doing what he does.

    I've said before that I would very much like to see what Michael Bay would do with a Kaiju film. His fetishization of violence and the military would make for a helluva giant monster movie.

    He'd spend 90% of the movie focusing on the humans and not the kaiju.

    TheBlackWindBolthornEtiowsaEriktheVikingGamerRhesus PositiveRedTideRhalloTonny
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx And I said, hol up Registered User regular
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    I dunno. I think Whedon eats Gunn's lunch when it comes to directing an ensemble. GotG was hilarious and fun, but it was a far cry from Peak Whedon, and not as good at the pathos as Avengers was.

    Theoretical/Past Whedon, yes.

    Current/AoU Whedon? Hah, newp.

    Make. Time.
    AlphaRomeroSorce
  • FroThulhuFroThulhu Registered User regular
    Michael Bay is an asshole who makes movies that are also actually, somehow, assholes

    But he is, yes, extremely good at making those assy movies. Like, very, very good.

    I hate to say it, but he's a good director. He's just really, really good at making complete fuckface movies.

    Nova_C wrote: »
    "I'm arresting you for failing to check yourself. You have the right to wreck yourself."
  • NobeardNobeard North Carolina: Failed StateRegistered User regular
    Awww, man. I though Bay was all empty headed splosion, not
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    I dunno. I think Whedon eats Gunn's lunch when it comes to directing an ensemble. GotG was hilarious and fun, but it was a far cry from Peak Whedon, and not as good at the pathos as Avengers was.

    Theoretical/Past Whedon, yes.

    Current/AoU Whedon? Hah, newp.

    Not even Whedon likes AoU Whedon, though: cinemablend.com/new/Joss-Whedon-Admits-Making-Avengers-Age-Ultron-Broke-Him-71430.html. Get Joss working on something he's exited about and not beholden to MARVEL for and I think we'll see a return to form.

    I'm not saying we are going to have an autocratic dystopia, but things keep happening that look like they come from an autocratic dystopia.
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx And I said, hol up Registered User regular
    Nobeard wrote: »
    Awww, man. I though Bay was all empty headed splosion, not
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    I dunno. I think Whedon eats Gunn's lunch when it comes to directing an ensemble. GotG was hilarious and fun, but it was a far cry from Peak Whedon, and not as good at the pathos as Avengers was.

    Theoretical/Past Whedon, yes.

    Current/AoU Whedon? Hah, newp.

    Not even Whedon likes AoU Whedon, though: cinemablend.com/new/Joss-Whedon-Admits-Making-Avengers-Age-Ultron-Broke-Him-71430.html. Get Joss working on something he's exited about and not beholden to MARVEL for and I think we'll see a return to form.

    Yeah.

    Now he's beholden to DC, which considering their current track record should work out so much better.

    Make. Time.
    PreachernonoffensiveKristmas KthulhuCommander Zoom
  • NobeardNobeard North Carolina: Failed StateRegistered User regular
    Huzzah whata? I don't follow entertainment news much. What is Whedon doing for DC?

    I'm not saying we are going to have an autocratic dystopia, but things keep happening that look like they come from an autocratic dystopia.
  • BobbleBobble Registered User regular
    Nobeard wrote: »
    Huzzah whata? I don't follow entertainment news much. What is Whedon doing for DC?

    Batgirl, I believe.

    And I think Joss just had too many other chefs in his kitchen on Ultron. He was juggling a lot of requirements for that movie that didn't do him favors.

    shoeboxjeddyFencingsaxwandering
  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    edited April 2017
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    I dunno. I think Whedon eats Gunn's lunch when it comes to directing an ensemble. GotG was hilarious and fun, but it was a far cry from Peak Whedon, and not as good at the pathos as Avengers was.

    Disagree entirely.

    And things like Slither shows Gunn's sense of humor is just more my style than Whedon. And I think would work better in Star Wars than Whedon since he feels more contemporary in humor than Gunn.

    Preacher on
    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
    Johnny Chopsocky
  • DracomicronDracomicron Registered User regular
    Bobble wrote: »
    Nobeard wrote: »
    Huzzah whata? I don't follow entertainment news much. What is Whedon doing for DC?

    Batgirl, I believe.

    And I think Joss just had too many other chefs in his kitchen on Ultron. He was juggling a lot of requirements for that movie that didn't do him favors.

    "Too many chefs in the kitchen."

    "Now working for DC."

    Oh dear.

    Gary Gygax wrote:
    ''The secret we should never let the gamemasters know is that they don't need any rules.''
    jungleroomxRchanenwandering
  • NobeardNobeard North Carolina: Failed StateRegistered User regular
    Bobble wrote: »
    Nobeard wrote: »
    Huzzah whata? I don't follow entertainment news much. What is Whedon doing for DC?

    Batgirl, I believe.

    And I think Joss just had too many other chefs in his kitchen on Ultron. He was juggling a lot of requirements for that movie that didn't do him favors.

    And thus DC has their first must-see for Nobeard.

    I'm not saying we are going to have an autocratic dystopia, but things keep happening that look like they come from an autocratic dystopia.
  • KingofMadCowsKingofMadCows Registered User regular
    I think the Whedon Batgirl movie is far from guaranteed. Don't forget that Wonder Woman's first director left over creative differences. Affleck isn't directing Batman anymore despite saying that he was going to do it like a week before he dropped out. Flash has had like two different directors drop out already.

    Also, Whedon is not great with visuals. James Gunn is able to get better looking shots and have more interesting things going on in each scene than Whedon.

    Preacher
  • PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    On the plus though if the star wars was poor, it wouldn't be Whedon's fault.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    Http:// pleasepaypreacher.net
    jungleroomx
  • AtomikaAtomika Brought to you by Technicolor™ Registered User regular
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    Atomika wrote: »
    I put Office Christmas Party on my year-end Best Of list


    :cool:

    Best of what?

    I thought it much better written and developed than a silly party comedy had any right to be. It introduced a dozen archetypal characters and did just about the opposite of what any other movie would do with them.

  • Commander ZoomCommander Zoom Registered User regular
    "Every character sounds just like Joss Whedon talks" is not, to my mind, a significant improvement over Lucas' infamously crappy dialogue.
    I mean, maybe if you haven't heard Joss Whedon's character voice - singular - for the last twenty years.

    steam_sig.png
    Steam, Warframe: Megajoule
    PreacherhonovereAbsoluteZero
  • cj iwakuracj iwakura The Rhythm Regent Chantry of NightmaresRegistered User regular
    Korror wrote: »
    Help me movie thread!

    I got roped into agreeing to choosing a movie and giving a short introduction for a classic film group I'm part of. I thought I would show a western as that's a genre that we haven't covered yet (previous movies were: Rear Window, Singing in the Rain, Bringing up Baby) but I don't know what to show. I want to show an older western (30s-40s) so I can eventually show a spaghetti western and people can see how things changed in 20-30 years. Problem is that I don't know that many older westerns and my favorite (High Noon) has already been vetoed on the account of too many people having seen it already.

    I'm looking for something that's both good and influential, ideally from the 30s-40s. I was thinking Stagecoach ('39) as it's one of the first John Wayne movies but I'm open to other suggestions.

    My Darling Clementine, the original Tombstone.

    vWGemDJ.png
    Rchanen
  • ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    "Every character sounds just like Joss Whedon talks" is not, to my mind, a significant improvement over Lucas' infamously crappy dialogue.
    I mean, maybe if you haven't heard Joss Whedon's character voice - singular - for the last twenty years.

    I mean, yeah, Whedon has a distinctive voice. So does Tarantino. I like that voice, so I dont mind.

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
    RchanenshoeboxjeddyAstaerethAridholEtiowsaKanaHarry DresdenshrykeDizzy DMalReynoldsMikey CTSGnome-InterruptuswanderingRhalloTonnyN1tSt4lker
  • Commander ZoomCommander Zoom Registered User regular
    I liked it too! I was a fan of Buffy, and Firefly, and sometimes Angel.
    But he's only got the one act. And when you've seen it two or three or half a dozen times...
    :(

    steam_sig.png
    Steam, Warframe: Megajoule
    honovere
  • shoeboxjeddyshoeboxjeddy Registered User regular
    Whedon's characters aren't all the same. That's a vast over simplification. Banner, Widow, and Ultron sound nothing alike from AoU, just picking three at random.

    ThirithKanaHarry Dresdenshryke
  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    Preacher wrote: »
    Hard pass on Whedon writing. James Gunn is the gold standard for me in that regard.

    At least as far as space opera things in the modern era.

    I kinda want women to be doing stuff in my Star Wars.

    torchlight-sig-80.jpg
    KetarMortiousHarry Dresdenhonovereorangeus
  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    Whedon's characters aren't all the same. That's a vast over simplification. Banner, Widow, and Ultron sound nothing alike from AoU, just picking three at random.
    He does sometimes rely too much on his shtik and gets carried away with his cleverness, and at those times I find it difficult to read/hear his characters as anything other than "Whedon being Whedon", but IMO those are exceptions. Yes, he has a signature style, but much like you said, Giles doesn't sound like Willow doesn't sound like Anya etc. I liked Guardians of the Galaxy a lot, and I'm looking forward to the second film, but I also felt that the characters and especially the relationships and dynamics between them came across as pretty generic. Generic conflict followed by a generic alliance of convenience followed by generic begrudging friendship. The individual lines were fun and the actors enjoyable to watch, but for me there's so much less to the characters and how they interact that comes across as *specific* to these characters, and that's something where I found Age of Ultron more convincing.

    webp-net-resizeimage.jpg
    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
    ElJeffeshrykeAtlas in Chainskime
  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    I liked it too! I was a fan of Buffy, and Firefly, and sometimes Angel.
    But he's only got the one act. And when you've seen it two or three or half a dozen times...
    :(

    His acts are quite distinct, what you're referring to is style. There's few creators who don't have a distinct voice.

  • honoverehonovere Registered User regular
    later Whedon dialogue is mostly either quips or clumsy/awkward/stilted.

    Yes I get it, Natasha, you've got red in your fucking ledger.

    Solar
  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    honovere wrote: »
    later Whedon dialogue is mostly either quips or clumsy/awkward/stilted.

    Yes I get it, Natasha, you've got red in your fucking ledger.

    Aside from that I found Avengers dialogue ok. You can definitely tell Hawkeye from Thor.

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Bobble wrote: »
    Nobeard wrote: »
    Huzzah whata? I don't follow entertainment news much. What is Whedon doing for DC?

    Batgirl, I believe.

    And I think Joss just had too many other chefs in his kitchen on Ultron. He was juggling a lot of requirements for that movie that didn't do him favors.

    AoU is so clearly chopped to shit in the editing room that I can't believe there wasn't some reach-around from the higher ups to keep the movie below a certain run-time and god knows what else.

    Harry DresdenSolar
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Thirith wrote: »
    Whedon's characters aren't all the same. That's a vast over simplification. Banner, Widow, and Ultron sound nothing alike from AoU, just picking three at random.
    He does sometimes rely too much on his shtik and gets carried away with his cleverness, and at those times I find it difficult to read/hear his characters as anything other than "Whedon being Whedon", but IMO those are exceptions. Yes, he has a signature style, but much like you said, Giles doesn't sound like Willow doesn't sound like Anya etc. I liked Guardians of the Galaxy a lot, and I'm looking forward to the second film, but I also felt that the characters and especially the relationships and dynamics between them came across as pretty generic. Generic conflict followed by a generic alliance of convenience followed by generic begrudging friendship. The individual lines were fun and the actors enjoyable to watch, but for me there's so much less to the characters and how they interact that comes across as *specific* to these characters, and that's something where I found Age of Ultron more convincing.

    Agreed on both counts.

    Whedon has a distinctive style, yes, but that doesn't mean his characters all sound the same. They just all exist within a specific mode of talking, as with say Tarantino.

    GOTG on the other hand is fun and quipy but suffers heavily from a complete lack of character and relationship development. It's super generic and although the dialogue can often be fun, so much of what happens in the movie is barely motivated or rushed or just assumed rather then established.

  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    Thirith wrote: »
    Whedon's characters aren't all the same. That's a vast over simplification. Banner, Widow, and Ultron sound nothing alike from AoU, just picking three at random.
    He does sometimes rely too much on his shtik and gets carried away with his cleverness, and at those times I find it difficult to read/hear his characters as anything other than "Whedon being Whedon", but IMO those are exceptions. Yes, he has a signature style, but much like you said, Giles doesn't sound like Willow doesn't sound like Anya etc. I liked Guardians of the Galaxy a lot, and I'm looking forward to the second film, but I also felt that the characters and especially the relationships and dynamics between them came across as pretty generic. Generic conflict followed by a generic alliance of convenience followed by generic begrudging friendship. The individual lines were fun and the actors enjoyable to watch, but for me there's so much less to the characters and how they interact that comes across as *specific* to these characters, and that's something where I found Age of Ultron more convincing.

    Agreed on both counts.

    Whedon has a distinctive style, yes, but that doesn't mean his characters all sound the same. They just all exist within a specific mode of talking, as with say Tarantino.

    GOTG on the other hand is fun and quipy but suffers heavily from a complete lack of character and relationship development. It's super generic and although the dialogue can often be fun, so much of what happens in the movie is barely motivated or rushed or just assumed rather then established.

    Here's hoping Mantis, Gamora and Nebula get more to do this time around.

  • KingofMadCowsKingofMadCows Registered User regular
    edited April 2017
    I think Whedon needs his old collaborators, like David Greenwalt and Tim Minear and Drew Goddard, to really shine. In fact, I think those guys are actually better writers than Whedon himself.

    As for best writers for modern space opera, I'd probably go with Ron Moore or Rockne O'Bannon.

    KingofMadCows on
    Commander Zoom
  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    I think Whedon needs his old collaborators, like David Greenwalt and Tim Minear and Drew Goddard, to really shine. In fact, I think those guys are actually better writers than Whedon himself.

    As for best writers for modern space opera, I'd probably go with Ron Moore or Rockne O'Bannon.

    O'Bannon. Defiance has all the strengths of new BSG with none of the weaknesses.

  • KingofMadCowsKingofMadCows Registered User regular
    I'm going to chalk a lot of BSG's problems to the Writers Guild strike, which happened during production of the last season of the show. Ron Moore also had some disputes with the Sci-Fi Channel and their unwillingness to make any commitments to renew the show until very late into each season. That also impacted other Sci-Fi shows.

    Right now, he's the showrunner of Outlander, which I haven't seen much of but has gotten extremely positive reviews and audience responses.

  • Harry DresdenHarry Dresden Registered User regular
    I'm going to chalk a lot of BSG's problems to the Writers Guild strike, which happened during production of the last season of the show. Ron Moore also had some disputes with the Sci-Fi Channel and their unwillingness to make any commitments to renew the show until very late into each season. That also impacted other Sci-Fi shows.

    Right now, he's the showrunner of Outlander, which I haven't seen much of but has gotten extremely positive reviews and audience responses.

    I'm not just talking about the last season.

    Moore is in fine form on Outlander, he's improved tremendously since BSG.

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    I'm going to chalk a lot of BSG's problems to the Writers Guild strike, which happened during production of the last season of the show. Ron Moore also had some disputes with the Sci-Fi Channel and their unwillingness to make any commitments to renew the show until very late into each season. That also impacted other Sci-Fi shows.

    Right now, he's the showrunner of Outlander, which I haven't seen much of but has gotten extremely positive reviews and audience responses.

    BSG's problems extend well beyond that. You just had to listen to him talking about making the show while the show was running. The fundamental issue is he's not a guy who likes to make or stick to a plan and likes to leap on random inspirations he's had. And all that with little regard for tying everything back together at the end of the day.

    Harry Dresden
This discussion has been closed.