Better get a babysitter cause we've got two tickets to the [GUN] show...

15051525355

Posts

  • ErlkönigErlkönig Registered User regular
    Erlkönig wrote: »
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Thank you all for your advice. I have a one on one training class scheduled with an instructor at a local range for next week. They explained that this class provides a certificate which is needed to get a permit...isn't what the government website says, but I didn't argue.

    That's moot anyway because as you all guessed, with government facilities shut down I can't get a permit to purchase anyway.

    Hopefully this class with instructor recommendation will give me the confidence to buy a non-permitted gun for home defense.

    Out of curiosity, I took a look at MN's state laws (I developed in interest in state criminal codes as a side interest from when I first bought a pocket knife long before I touched a gun). Since the state uses a list of models and makers, there are some semi-automatic rifles that don't need permits. It looks like Ruger's Mini 14 is exempt (not a huge surprise if the state based their law on the expired federal law from the 90s. Ruger was involved in the crafting of and lobbying for that legislation and made sure they came out better than their competitors) which is a 5.56 mm rifle.

    The M14 (not the same platform as the Mini 14 though the Mini 14 kind of looks like a smaller version of the M14) also seems exempt. It's originally a 7.62 mm assault rifle that the US military used before the M16 (the first military version of the AR-15) so it's clunkier and has the downsides I mentioned previously. It's another public domain design so multiple makers produce semi-automatic version of them but they're generally more expensive than 5.56 mm guns.

    Some pistol caliber semi-automatic carbines may be legal without a permit as well. I don't see them explicitly listed but I can see a politician or lawyer thinking "well since some pistol caliber carbines are made from the AR-15 platform they must all be illegal."

    And while we've discussed pump action shotguns, there are also semi-automatic shotguns made which won't have short stroking worries. They're not as easy to reload as the options above but they are there.

    The last thing I'll toss in is that lever action rifles look legal as well. .30-30 caliber lever action rifles are the quintessential deer rifle for people in rural Appalachia looking for meat. .357 lever action rifles/carbines are also a popular caliber and .357 is a popular defensive handgun caliber. The former might be a bit overkill but having something that can be used to harvest game does have its appeal. The latter will have cheaper ammo. While the latter would also be more prevalent in suburban and urban areas, I'm not sure the same is true of rural areas. I suppose .45 LC/Long Colt lever action rifles are also an option but I still mostly associate it with people doing cowboy LARPing at target shooting events. Reloading this things are more convoluted due to the tube magazines. Basically the bullet by bullet reload some guns in Red Dead Redemption have. But they have been proven to work against hostile humans.

    As I mentioned above: Panzer Arms BP-12

    The only issue I've run into during the break-in period has been the occasional stovepipe.

    EDIT - the reloading is pretty dang easy with it: eject magazine, insert new magazine, either pull/release the charging handle or press the slide release.

    How is storing fully loaded magazines with that? Box magazines messing with shells over a period of time has been an issue with other semi-auto box mag shotguns.

    Haven't had a problem with it (yet). Been about a year since I bought it, so it hasn't exactly been holding a full load for too long. I also haven't picked up spare magazines yet, but it's been on my to-do list.

    | Origin/R*SC: Ein7919 | Battle.net: Erlkonig#1448 | XBL: Lexicanum | Steam: Der Erlkönig (the umlaut is important) |
  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    I thought about mentioning a lever action in .357 but generally the cost is prohibitive to get in.

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
    NSDFRandDoc
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Saying you want a semi-auto only MP5 willingly is like saying you want to drive a Lamborghini during NYC rush hour traffic.

    I'd rather be driving an Aventador than a Corolla in traffic, yes.

    I have absolutely no use for a full-auto weapon of any kind. Hell, I have to NEED for any kind of ballistic weapon, I just enjoy shooting, and I think I'd prefer to plink silhouettes at ~150m with an MP5 in 9mm than a .22 anything. I know the ammo costs more but the MP5 is so iconic.

    TimFijiForar
  • Mortal SkyMortal Sky queer punk hedge witchRegistered User regular
    Honestly, the MP5 is brilliant to handle and is far less harsh on the end user than any direct-blowback PCC

    there are other buffered/delayed 9mm carbines available of course, but there is absolutely a valid use case for a semi-auto MP5 if you have the means

    Docchrishallett83BlackDragon480
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    If you'd like a delayed blowback 9mm PCC, you have a few other options. Both the MPX and CMMG Banshee have better ergonomics than the MP5, and while I can't speak to the shooting experience, the soon-available Stribog A3 has an MSRP of under $1000.

    I love my Scorpion, but if I had to do it again today I'd get something delayed.

  • ErlkönigErlkönig Registered User regular
    And if you've got more money than sense (or maybe you just like how it looks?), there's always the Kriss Vector carbines. Although, personally, I find the elongated barrel kinda silly looking.

    | Origin/R*SC: Ein7919 | Battle.net: Erlkonig#1448 | XBL: Lexicanum | Steam: Der Erlkönig (the umlaut is important) |
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Erlkönig wrote: »
    And if you've got more money than sense (or maybe you just like how it looks?), there's always the Kriss Vector carbines. Although, personally, I find the elongated barrel kinda silly looking.

    The new rage is using the shorter barrel with a pistol brace.

    I also suspect that's the next thing that's going to be cracked down on, though. Most of the braces are clearly designed to be used as stocks.

  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    In preparation for my initial class next Monday does anyone have any materials or sources tosl study beforehand so I don't look like a complete imbecile?

    I've got the four rules of firearms safety memorized.

    I also have zero ego about all of this. I don't have any experience with guns so I've got no problem asking questions and clarifications.

    I am in the business of saving lives.
  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    In preparation for my initial class next Monday does anyone have any materials or sources tosl study beforehand so I don't look like a complete imbecile?

    I've got the four rules of firearms safety memorized.

    I also have zero ego about all of this. I don't have any experience with guns so I've got no problem asking questions and clarifications.



    I’m pretty sure I’ve watched 90% of his videos over the years.

    If I was going to recommend another YouTube guy, it would be Paul Harrell. Maybe check out “Paul’s Top 5 Handguns for Beginners” and “Paul’s Top 5 Rifles and Shotguns”.

    Full disclosure: I really enjoy both Hickok45 and Paul Harrell as good presenters of information AND entertainment. I find myself agreeing with what they put out 9 out of 10 times. And that 1 thing I don’t necessarily agree with could be minor and a non-issue! But they have a way of presenting things that I find refreshing in an “industry” of highly opinionated and over the top dudes trying to make money by videoing themselves talking about firearms or shooting firearms.

    I will end it with Paul’s disclaimer: my experiences and education differ from yours and you be the judge. For example, Paul didn’t really think much of the Ruger PC Carbine, but I love mine. And that’s okay!

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
    NSDFRand
  • NSDFRandNSDFRand FloridaRegistered User regular
    edited March 25
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    In preparation for my initial class next Monday does anyone have any materials or sources tosl study beforehand so I don't look like a complete imbecile?

    I've got the four rules of firearms safety memorized.

    I also have zero ego about all of this. I don't have any experience with guns so I've got no problem asking questions and clarifications.

    The best thing you can do is ask questions about anything you don't understand with the instructor. I second Paul Harrell as a recommendation but it's likely his background and experience will differ a lot from from your instructor based on his age, the same with Clint Smith who I would also recommend. He is probably a bit abrasive for newcomers but he is as honest as possible with people because he has absolutely been there and done that in Vietnam, as a LEO, and as an instructor. Something to keep in mind, and it's not bad at all, is that there's going to be a difference in training and shooting methods along generational lines. So you may see them shoot differently than you would be taught in person by a younger instructor, but that doesn't mean either they or the younger instructor are wrong. One of the most prominent examples of that would be shooting stances (though there is a hierarchy of things to worry about and good stance quickly goes to the bottom depending on if you're on a one way or two way range) where you will see older guys in the Colonel Cooper/Gun Site tradition or older veterans doing Weaver or modified Weaver and younger guys with training going straight to isosceles because we learned with IBAs and plate carriers on.

    NSDFRand on
    The 2nd Amendment is unarguably one of the most liberal, liberating and radical statements ever made in human history.
  • OneAngryPossumOneAngryPossum Registered User regular
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    In preparation for my initial class next Monday does anyone have any materials or sources tosl study beforehand so I don't look like a complete imbecile?

    I've got the four rules of firearms safety memorized.

    I also have zero ego about all of this. I don't have any experience with guns so I've got no problem asking questions and clarifications.

    Not to step on anybody’s toes here, but I believe that investing the time, energy, and money you’re planning for gun ownership into securing your home with additional locks, stronger doors, or other security features will probably net you more actual safety than you’ll have as an inexperienced gun owner.

    For some actual tips aimed at beginners (about as far as I ever went, to be clear):

    At first, every gun will kick more than you expect. Held poorly or loosely, a pistol can hit you in the face. Shotguns are heavy and kick like hell, so maintaining your aim can be difficult.

    A lot of the basic mechanical actions of using a firearm require greater force than you will probably anticipate, and executing them safely while under pressure can be stressful. That includes loading a magazine and pulling a slide back (oversimplifying, but opening the chamber to eject a round either to clear the gun for safety or because of a loading malfunction). As said above, pump-action shotguns are also more difficult than you expect. If you’re not practiced, your hands will likely sweat, making it worse.

    I probably don’t have to say it, but social pressure can be weird, so: if you have sweaty hands or are struggling to perform some task in a way that affects your ability to do so safely, step back a minute, then try again.

    It’s a small thing, but I’d suggest getting some dummy rounds and a magazine to practice loading (since you can do so safely and before you own a gun). It’ll give some familiarity and comfort ahead of time.

    Personal note: I grew up in a house with guns, and my parents attempted to secure them. I knew where they were and how to access them all before third grade, without their knowledge. Nothing came of it, thank God, but it’s a significant factor in why I won’t have a gun in my home - kids have more time than you and know your house better too. It’s not a risk I’m willing to take to feel more secure.

    NSDFRandForarDavid WalgasBlackDragon480
  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    NSDFRand wrote: »
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    In preparation for my initial class next Monday does anyone have any materials or sources tosl study beforehand so I don't look like a complete imbecile?

    I've got the four rules of firearms safety memorized.

    I also have zero ego about all of this. I don't have any experience with guns so I've got no problem asking questions and clarifications.

    The best thing you can do is ask questions about anything you don't understand with the instructor. I second Paul Harrell as a recommendation but it's likely his background and experience will differ a lot from from your instructor based on his age, the same with Clint Smith who I would also recommend. He is probably a bit abrasive for newcomers but he is as honest as possible with people because he has absolutely been there and done that in Vietnam, as a LEO, and as an instructor. Something to keep in mind, and it's not bad at all, is that there's going to be a difference in training and shooting methods along generational lines. So you may see them shoot differently than you would be taught in person by a younger instructor, but that doesn't mean either they or the younger instructor are wrong. One of the most prominent examples of that would be shooting stances (though there is a hierarchy of things to worry about and good stance quickly goes to the bottom depending on if you're on a one way or two way range) where you will see older guys in the Colonel Cooper/Gun Site tradition or older veterans doing Weaver or modified Weaver and younger guys with training going straight to isosceles because we learned with IBAs and plate carriers on.

    I've also seen older instructors teach isosceles stance to classes probably because they've learned it's simpler to explain than Weaver in a limited amount of time though they did talk about Weaver and its origins. But the stances have more similarities than differences and picking up the others is pretty easy. I adjusted an isosceles stance to a modified Weaver before ever learning the latter was a thing just because it felt better for me.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
    NSDFRand
  • NSDFRandNSDFRand FloridaRegistered User regular
    NSDFRand wrote: »
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    In preparation for my initial class next Monday does anyone have any materials or sources tosl study beforehand so I don't look like a complete imbecile?

    I've got the four rules of firearms safety memorized.

    I also have zero ego about all of this. I don't have any experience with guns so I've got no problem asking questions and clarifications.

    The best thing you can do is ask questions about anything you don't understand with the instructor. I second Paul Harrell as a recommendation but it's likely his background and experience will differ a lot from from your instructor based on his age, the same with Clint Smith who I would also recommend. He is probably a bit abrasive for newcomers but he is as honest as possible with people because he has absolutely been there and done that in Vietnam, as a LEO, and as an instructor. Something to keep in mind, and it's not bad at all, is that there's going to be a difference in training and shooting methods along generational lines. So you may see them shoot differently than you would be taught in person by a younger instructor, but that doesn't mean either they or the younger instructor are wrong. One of the most prominent examples of that would be shooting stances (though there is a hierarchy of things to worry about and good stance quickly goes to the bottom depending on if you're on a one way or two way range) where you will see older guys in the Colonel Cooper/Gun Site tradition or older veterans doing Weaver or modified Weaver and younger guys with training going straight to isosceles because we learned with IBAs and plate carriers on.

    I've also seen older instructors teach isosceles stance to classes probably because they've learned it's simpler to explain than Weaver in a limited amount of time though they did talk about Weaver and its origins. But the stances have more similarities than differences and picking up the others is pretty easy. I adjusted an isosceles stance to a modified Weaver before ever learning the latter was a thing just because it felt better for me.

    Certainly there are older guys who teach isosceles even if they tend to fall back into old habits. Or there are even some old guys who reupped after 9/11 and went from training with a match rifle and load bearing harness to training and fighting with IBAs and M4s. There's quite a bit of overlap. When I went in during the GWOT, TRADOC still had a lot of people wearing flak vests and I learned military shooting, both basic and advanced rifle marksmanship, with the M16A2 (the aforementioned match rifle) before I ever handled an A4 or an M4 while wearing the old LBV-88.

    The 2nd Amendment is unarguably one of the most liberal, liberating and radical statements ever made in human history.
  • NSDFRandNSDFRand FloridaRegistered User regular
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    In preparation for my initial class next Monday does anyone have any materials or sources tosl study beforehand so I don't look like a complete imbecile?

    I've got the four rules of firearms safety memorized.

    I also have zero ego about all of this. I don't have any experience with guns so I've got no problem asking questions and clarifications.

    Not to step on anybody’s toes here, but I believe that investing the time, energy, and money you’re planning for gun ownership into securing your home with additional locks, stronger doors, or other security features will probably net you more actual safety than you’ll have as an inexperienced gun owner.

    For some actual tips aimed at beginners (about as far as I ever went, to be clear):

    At first, every gun will kick more than you expect. Held poorly or loosely, a pistol can hit you in the face. Shotguns are heavy and kick like hell, so maintaining your aim can be difficult.

    A lot of the basic mechanical actions of using a firearm require greater force than you will probably anticipate, and executing them safely while under pressure can be stressful. That includes loading a magazine and pulling a slide back (oversimplifying, but opening the chamber to eject a round either to clear the gun for safety or because of a loading malfunction). As said above, pump-action shotguns are also more difficult than you expect. If you’re not practiced, your hands will likely sweat, making it worse.

    I probably don’t have to say it, but social pressure can be weird, so: if you have sweaty hands or are struggling to perform some task in a way that affects your ability to do so safely, step back a minute, then try again.

    It’s a small thing, but I’d suggest getting some dummy rounds and a magazine to practice loading (since you can do so safely and before you own a gun). It’ll give some familiarity and comfort ahead of time.

    Personal note: I grew up in a house with guns, and my parents attempted to secure them. I knew where they were and how to access them all before third grade, without their knowledge. Nothing came of it, thank God, but it’s a significant factor in why I won’t have a gun in my home - kids have more time than you and know your house better too. It’s not a risk I’m willing to take to feel more secure.

    This is also a good thing to consider. Buying and training with a firearm isn't mutually exclusive with hardening your home. If you have limited funds and have to choose, there are advantages to a budget firearm, especially if you're a renter. But if you can do both, or you are more comfortable with hardening your house, there's no reason not to.

    The 2nd Amendment is unarguably one of the most liberal, liberating and radical statements ever made in human history.
    OneAngryPossumSteel Angel
  • Gabriel_PittGabriel_Pitt (effective against the Irish) Registered User regular
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    In preparation for my initial class next Monday does anyone have any materials or sources tosl study beforehand so I don't look like a complete imbecile?

    I've got the four rules of firearms safety memorized.

    I also have zero ego about all of this. I don't have any experience with guns so I've got no problem asking questions and clarifications.

    Which is really how you accomplish what you're asking about. The way you look like an imbecile is to be like a women encountered in a CCW class who showed very little interest in actually learning anything, and when the topic was appropriate use of firearms and when it was permissable to use lethal force, was fixated on 'messing with my dogs' as being a legitimate reason for using her gun.

    You could practically hear the eye rolls as the instructor tried to set her straight.

    NSDFRand
  • OneAngryPossumOneAngryPossum Registered User regular
    NSDFRand wrote: »
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    In preparation for my initial class next Monday does anyone have any materials or sources tosl study beforehand so I don't look like a complete imbecile?

    I've got the four rules of firearms safety memorized.

    I also have zero ego about all of this. I don't have any experience with guns so I've got no problem asking questions and clarifications.

    Not to step on anybody’s toes here, but I believe that investing the time, energy, and money you’re planning for gun ownership into securing your home with additional locks, stronger doors, or other security features will probably net you more actual safety than you’ll have as an inexperienced gun owner.

    For some actual tips aimed at beginners (about as far as I ever went, to be clear):

    At first, every gun will kick more than you expect. Held poorly or loosely, a pistol can hit you in the face. Shotguns are heavy and kick like hell, so maintaining your aim can be difficult.

    A lot of the basic mechanical actions of using a firearm require greater force than you will probably anticipate, and executing them safely while under pressure can be stressful. That includes loading a magazine and pulling a slide back (oversimplifying, but opening the chamber to eject a round either to clear the gun for safety or because of a loading malfunction). As said above, pump-action shotguns are also more difficult than you expect. If you’re not practiced, your hands will likely sweat, making it worse.

    I probably don’t have to say it, but social pressure can be weird, so: if you have sweaty hands or are struggling to perform some task in a way that affects your ability to do so safely, step back a minute, then try again.

    It’s a small thing, but I’d suggest getting some dummy rounds and a magazine to practice loading (since you can do so safely and before you own a gun). It’ll give some familiarity and comfort ahead of time.

    Personal note: I grew up in a house with guns, and my parents attempted to secure them. I knew where they were and how to access them all before third grade, without their knowledge. Nothing came of it, thank God, but it’s a significant factor in why I won’t have a gun in my home - kids have more time than you and know your house better too. It’s not a risk I’m willing to take to feel more secure.

    This is also a good thing to consider. Buying and training with a firearm isn't mutually exclusive with hardening your home. If you have limited funds and have to choose, there are advantages to a budget firearm, especially if you're a renter. But if you can do both, or you are more comfortable with hardening your house, there's no reason not to.

    I’d also just generally recommend a gun safety class no matter where you ultimately fall. It’s good knowledge and demystifies the experience.

    NSDFRandDavid WalgasshorttiminSteel AngelGiantGeek2020Thegreatcowwebguy20LabelBlackDragon480
  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks The Myth, the Legend, the Bowman, the Shambler FuckerRegistered User regular
    I’d also just generally recommend a gun safety class no matter where you ultimately fall. It’s good knowledge and demystifies the experience.

    Anecdotes, anecdotes, but I have a friend who is fairly anti-gun, and I had the opportunity to show her mine. After learning the rules, handling it for a while, and cycling some snapcaps through she said it didn't feel "scary" to her anymore. Didn't change her stance at all, but it was something. I think "demystifies" is the perfect word to describe it.

    gRAhjXV.gif
    NSDFRandwebguy20OneAngryPossum
  • Giggles_FunsworthGiggles_Funsworth Paranoiac Bay Area SprawlRegistered User regular
    Where y'all buying target ammo online these days? I've got enough hollows but I could use some more range ammo in 9mm, .40, and 5.56.

  • ErlkönigErlkönig Registered User regular
    Where y'all buying target ammo online these days? I've got enough hollows but I could use some more range ammo in 9mm, .40, and 5.56.

    Sadly, my normal seller isn't taking any new orders (I normally buy from SGAmmo). Before I bought from SGAmmo, I did use Cheaper Than Dirt, and it looks like they are still taking orders (but it also looks like all they've got left are revolver calibers).

    | Origin/R*SC: Ein7919 | Battle.net: Erlkonig#1448 | XBL: Lexicanum | Steam: Der Erlkönig (the umlaut is important) |
  • SummaryJudgmentSummaryJudgment Today we will paint a mountain that owes us nothing. Registered User regular
    Where y'all buying target ammo online these days? I've got enough hollows but I could use some more range ammo in 9mm, .40, and 5.56.

    AmmoSeek is still showing results, but it looks like LuckyGunner is down completely last I checked?

    tERiPJd.jpg
  • ThegreatcowThegreatcow Lord of All Bacons Washington State - It's Wet up here innit? Registered User regular
    LAX Ammo is still selling stuff, but it's backordered massively. They're reporting 7-10 day backlogs on processing orders.

  • Mortal SkyMortal Sky queer punk hedge witchRegistered User regular
    Sites are getting shipments in but they're selling in a matter of minutes, so it's just a matter of vigilance and knowing that prices are a gonna be a bit gouge-y on a few of those sites

  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    Cheaper Than Dirt is a scum bag company and they price gouging like mofos

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
    NSDFRandDocDavid Walgasshorttimin
  • NSDFRandNSDFRand FloridaRegistered User regular
    Cheaper Than Dirt is a scum bag company and they price gouging like mofos

    Same as it ever was. CTD is a garbage company. After the last time they did this IIRC their retail locations started closing down.

    The 2nd Amendment is unarguably one of the most liberal, liberating and radical statements ever made in human history.
    Dead Legendshorttimin
  • ErlkönigErlkönig Registered User regular
    edited March 26
    Cheaper Than Dirt is a scum bag company and they price gouging like mofos

    All of this is why I switched over to SGAmmo.

    Erlkönig on
    | Origin/R*SC: Ein7919 | Battle.net: Erlkonig#1448 | XBL: Lexicanum | Steam: Der Erlkönig (the umlaut is important) |
    NSDFRand
  • Gabriel_PittGabriel_Pitt (effective against the Irish) Registered User regular
    Where y'all buying target ammo online these days? I've got enough hollows but I could use some more range ammo in 9mm, .40, and 5.56.

    For the next short while, unless you're buddy enough with your local dealer to have them set aside a box or two for you when it comes in, I'd say getting any ammo is going to be a hit or miss prospect and come totally down to luck.

    NSDFRand
  • NSDFRandNSDFRand FloridaRegistered User regular
    Where I live there's an FFL that is relatively out of the way in a part of the unincorporated county where many people don't normally drive through. They are sold out of most of their long gun inventory but still have a lot of handguns left. They put a limit of two boxes of any one cartridge per person per day, but they had plenty of remanufactured, steel case, and defensive 9mm. I prefer to go to them or my regular FFL to get ammo if I don't order it online.

    The 2nd Amendment is unarguably one of the most liberal, liberating and radical statements ever made in human history.
  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks The Myth, the Legend, the Bowman, the Shambler FuckerRegistered User regular
    A friend of mine was making an order last week and asked me if I wanted to go in on it, so I spent $90 and got 500 rounds of 9mm. We made the order just in time.

    gRAhjXV.gif
  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    That’s a decently fair price for 500 rounds

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
    NSDFRandmrpaku
  • David WalgasDavid Walgas Registered User regular
    I usually go through SGammo or ammoseek. The former isn’t taking orders and the latter isn’t accurate right now.

    Also, considering a little hand press (small apartment) and getting into reloading. 5000 rounds would take it to the break even point which is well within a year or two of myself and a friend shooting. We’ve been going through 200-300 rounds a month each of 5.56. Wait or do it?

  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    I know very little about reloading and I’ve heard 5.56 / .223 is more onerous than other calibers. It wouldn’t hurt to try anyway.

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
    David Walgas
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    I've heard from multiple people that getting into reloading really increases the amount that you shoot, wiping out any hope of saving money.

    You do get to shoot more, though.

    SummaryJudgmentDavid Walgas
  • David WalgasDavid Walgas Registered User regular
    It would also be for .308 and 9mm but those are shot dramatically less. Maybe 50-100 rounds a month.

  • ErlkönigErlkönig Registered User regular
    I know very little about reloading and I’ve heard 5.56 / .223 is more onerous than other calibers. It wouldn’t hurt to try anyway.

    Well...unless you do it wrong.

    | Origin/R*SC: Ein7919 | Battle.net: Erlkonig#1448 | XBL: Lexicanum | Steam: Der Erlkönig (the umlaut is important) |
    Gvzbgul
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Lol go buy a rifle chambered for .700 Nitro Express, even with home reloading that shit can cost up to USD$30/round...

    Put a few dozen rounds downrange on a Saturday morning instead of paying your mortgage, why not?

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    Put a few dozen .700 nitro rounds downrange and you'll be buying yourself a new shoulder.

    It's a cheap cartridge honestly, you get a double rifle and you only need to buy two rounds. Because if you miss with both of those, the thing you've missed is already eating or trampling you alive.

    nibXTE7.png
    SummaryJudgmentSteel AngelGiantGeek2020David Walgaschrishallett83BlackDragon480
  • SummaryJudgmentSummaryJudgment Today we will paint a mountain that owes us nothing. Registered User regular
    Put a few dozen .700 nitro rounds downrange and you'll be buying yourself a new shoulder.

    It's a cheap cartridge honestly, you get a double rifle and you only need to buy two rounds. Because if you miss with both of those, the thing you've missed is already eating or trampling you alive.

    beat me to it, Matt

    "a couple dozen" .700s and you're up for sainthood

    tERiPJd.jpg
    GvzbgulGiantGeek2020matt has a problem
  • TurksonTurkson Near the mountains of ColoradoRegistered User regular
    Lol go buy a rifle chambered for .700 Nitro Express, even with home reloading that shit can cost up to USD$30/round...

    Put a few dozen rounds downrange on a Saturday morning instead of paying your mortgage, why not?

    I had never heard of this round and did a google search. The price became clear when I saw "Holland & Holland."

    oh h*ck
    GiantGeek2020chrishallett83BlackDragon480
  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    Having shot anywhere from 40-60 .45-70 shells in one sitting, my shoulder was bruised and uncomfortable.

    I am not a particularly recoil sensitive individual. I haven’t looked up the ballistic comparisons, but I don’t think I need to.

    On a different track, I had the unique pleasure of getting to view a video that popped up on my YouTube feed a couple days ago, about Paul Harrell and his improper revolver techniques. This morning, I spent an hour and five minutes watching the rebuttal to that video from Paul Harrell and I loved every second of it.

    I don’t agree with all of his conclusions on a small minority of his videos, but I have never felt that I wasted a second watching his videos.

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
    NSDFRandmatt has a problem
  • NSDFRandNSDFRand FloridaRegistered User regular
    edited March 27
    That video by GNM was disappointing. Especially because he engaged in the typical internet style of argumentation of exaggeration, argument from authority when you don't actually understand that authority, and attacking the character of the person you disagree, and dismissing their fairly well known credentials. I wouldn't think it would be a secret that Paul Harrell has, frankly, the qualifications that really matter compared to GNM's.

    NSDFRand on
    The 2nd Amendment is unarguably one of the most liberal, liberating and radical statements ever made in human history.
Sign In or Register to comment.