Better get a babysitter cause we've got two tickets to the [GUN] show...

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  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    I own 3 WW2 era rifles.

    Basically, they cant compete with modern guns. They days of finding kar98ks in a barrel for 200 bucks each are done.

    What you do get is a very nice piece of history that is fun to shoot.

    Whether that is a trade off you want to make is up to you.

    I can post more once I get on my pc when off work.

    Yea I love shooting My mosin. Drillin' kegs at 200 yards or hitting a watermelon with it is super fun, but it is heavy, long and a beast to fire. Its a great range toy and for $100 I'm super happy with my purchase, but I wouldn't have paid much more for it.

    My AR-15 is MUCH more functional as an actual weapon with a purpose. I live in the country, so it's a great varmit rifle, I can hunt with it if I need to and it is a good self defense weapon. Plus it's super easy to carry when I'm hiking the property or riding an ATV.

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  • Gabriel_PittGabriel_Pitt (effective against the Irish) Registered User regular
    It still lets me add it to the cart (didn't actually try and check out). Tempting, if I had $550 burning a hole in my pocket, but once I was able to bust the corrosion loose holding those nuts in place on that cabinet I was asking about way back when, and put new locks on the door, it does everything I need it to.

    Just doesn't look as cool as something that's got a big old three-prong bolt retractor on the front though.


    I mean, they're insured, there's nothing that would really bother me in terms of loss from theft or fire (and frankly I'd have bigger fish to fry at that point), i just want all that shit in a (locked, steel) box.

    A Security Cabinet would be fine for my purposes but for the fact that they're too small.

    That's the whole reason I went with a cabinet because my only goal was organizing all that stuff stacked in a closest and my collection is small enough to fit just fine. Also, a full cabinet discourages me from further purchases, since there are no spaces begging to be filled. :biggrin:
    What you do get is a very nice piece of history that is fun to shoot.
    That's what's in it for me. The only gun I own that's younger than me is a Glock 17 (which I bought because I like old guns, but man, it sure is fun to fire something modern) and my oldest just passed it's centennial (a Colt 1903 my gg-uncle bought for personal protection in the later years of the Mexican revolution). What's clicking in my brain is that everything I have has a story to it, whereas anything I buy new is a boring blank slate (and man, I really do not want to be doing things that attaches interesting to my guns. XD)

  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    I just got back from the range and sighted in my AR-10. I got the upper second-hand. With the installed brake and adjustable gas block, it's super soft-shooting. I was going to replace the aggressive brake with a Dead Air muzzle brake so I could put a suppressor on there, but now I may hold off.

    I also took my Savage bolt .22, which remains my favorite rifle to shoot.

    I think I'm done on firearms purchases for the foreseeable future. A better long-range scope for the AR-10 may be on the menu, but I think my plan is to save up some cash and buy some land in the more rural parts of my state.

    webguy20SummaryJudgmentDavid Walgas
  • JusticeforPlutoJusticeforPluto Registered User regular

    Dead LegendDavid WalgasDocDonovan PuppyfuckerLabelMortal Skyamateurhour
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    Kadoken wrote: »
    Hey I kind of want to get into guns for fun and personal protection (looking for a shotgun and thinking of a Mossberg 500 for that purpose). Do WW2 weapons just suck compared to modern ones and should I avoid them even though I've fired a PPSH and a Thompson so many times in vidya that I want to try them in real life?

    Well, I mean

    As far as the PPSH and Thompson - they certainly don't suck but they're only making reproductions and they're not going to be machine guns. If it's really a bucket list thing for you there's a couple ranges if you ever make it out to Las Vegas that will rent you the fully automatic real deal. You can, however, order any number of surplus bolt-action rifles if that's your thing though, which are cheap and historically interesting and go bang. I wouldn't really hunt with them (though you 100% can) or do any serious kind of target shooting for accuracy.

    A Mossberg 500 is pretty much the gold standard for pump-action shotguns and will do nicely for fun and protection, like you mentioned. You can put an 18.5" barrel on it for your home, you can shoot clays with it, you can do birding or small game, it'll pretty much do whatever you want based on what kind of barrel and what kind of shells you have. No worries about buying used if that's an option.

    Get a version with a proper stock - the pistol grip or other similar ones are kind of dumb range toys.

    If you wanted to do more with clays or skeet shooting, the Mossberg 930 is semi-automatic.
    @Kadoken

    If we're maximizing fun, I'd go with a double barrel over a pump.

    A: Poonk! > Ka-chack!
    B: Reloading semi-auto shotguns starts to feel like a chore, relatively speaking.
    C: A boomstick compliments any outfit. You can show up dressed as the Doom marine, Ashley Williams, or wearing a three piece suit, a silly English hat, and thigh-high riding boots.




  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    webguy20 wrote: »
    I own 3 WW2 era rifles.

    Basically, they cant compete with modern guns. They days of finding kar98ks in a barrel for 200 bucks each are done.

    What you do get is a very nice piece of history that is fun to shoot.

    Whether that is a trade off you want to make is up to you.

    I can post more once I get on my pc when off work.

    Yea I love shooting My mosin. Drillin' kegs at 200 yards or hitting a watermelon with it is super fun,

    Could you elaborate on 'Kegs'? What I'm picturing sounds quite fun, but also very impractical.

  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    The only downside to OU’s or SxS shotguns if you’re using them for bird hunting and the birds are flying thick and heavy you don’t get that third shell.

    Or, if you’re shooting awful like me, need that third shot.

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    The only downside to OU’s or SxS shotguns if you’re using them for bird hunting and the birds are flying thick and heavy you don’t get that third shell.

    Or, if you’re shooting awful like me, need that third shot.

    True, I'm just assuming shotgun-fun == clay, because getting from here to where game birds are is not my cup of tea.

  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    webguy20 wrote: »
    I own 3 WW2 era rifles.

    Basically, they cant compete with modern guns. They days of finding kar98ks in a barrel for 200 bucks each are done.

    What you do get is a very nice piece of history that is fun to shoot.

    Whether that is a trade off you want to make is up to you.

    I can post more once I get on my pc when off work.

    Yea I love shooting My mosin. Drillin' kegs at 200 yards or hitting a watermelon with it is super fun,

    Could you elaborate on 'Kegs'? What I'm picturing sounds quite fun, but also very impractical.

    Ive picked up a few old beer kegs from the local breweries. Fill em up with water for the first few shots. Even after that they pretty much have to be cut in half before they’ll collapse.

    Steam ID: Webguy20
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    ArbitraryDescriptor
  • JusticeforPlutoJusticeforPluto Registered User regular
    edited September 10
    So I promised my thoughts on getting into collecting WW2 era firearms, and realized I never got around to to. So, Surplus or C&R (Curio and Relic, a legal definitional bestowed upon older guns) guns.

    The short version is that you will pay more or something heavier, less accurate, that may not work, may be in poor condition, may have issues finding replacement parts for and may have issues finding ammo for.

    I'll break down each point the best I can.

    First two are easy. The steel and wood construction of yesteryear weights a lot. For accuracy, its going to be a combination of a better understanding of how to build gun (stuff like free floated barrels and higher quality parts), poor sights/optics (sure, you can bubba a modern red dot on a Mosin, but that's a sin), and general wear and tear the rifles suffered.

    That last part ties into part 2. Most places don't test what they sell. Just like buying any other form of resale, you can get a lemon. Wer'e talking about stuff made of metal, with lots of little parts that were given to 18 year old kids to fight a war with. Through out all the decades, parts can go missing and get broken.

    Some of these guns were also not cared for well outside of service. A company called Royal Tiger Imports recently bought in a bunch of guns from Ethiopia. Being one of the few nations to resist European colonization in Africa with no industrial base at the time, they took what ever they could get their hands on. Some were given to them by the Russians (who wanted to support their fellow Orthodox Christians), some captured from the Italians, some bought during the Antebellum or given as Cold War aid. Lots of cool stuff. However, they sat in warehouses for decades. You can picture what years of African heat did to them, they have a lot of rust.

    Certain guns are not safe to shoot. As the Second World War ended Germany and Japan really cut corners to give them men something. These "Last Ditch" rifles could be perfectly safe to shoot (just crude looking), or could explode. Sometimes rifles meant to fire blanks get sold as the real deal. In Europe, it common to drill holes in guns to deactivate them (US laws on how to deavtivate guns are different), and every now and then on of these firearms modified to never shoot again will end up on the market without people noticing. I also know of an Italian gun that they re-chambered into a new caliber to get rifles to the troops in WW1, only for it to turn our the old design they converted could not handle modern pressures. If you buy and old gun, get it inspected by someone who knows their stuff before shooting it.

    The Ppsh and Thompson were mention in the thread. Something to not, both of these guns were open bolt designs. The ATF ruled that open bolt guns were machine guns due to the ease it takes to convert one to fire full auto. As such, if you want one of those you either have to get a machine gun for the price of a new car, or go with something some converted to fire from a closed bolt. Changing how the gun fires is a big deal, and and easily be messed up and cause a nice machine to be a pile of junk.



    You will sometimes see modern reproductions of old stuff, or new production made out of old parts. Just because it shares a name does not guarantee it is of the same quality as the old versions. Look up reviews and do some reading, don't assume these old-new production guns are fine.

    Special note, you can occasionally find stocks of new production MP40s and Ppsh-43s being sold for cheap. They were switched to closed bolt, with adds problems, and had the stocks removed to legally make them pistols. Probably a fun toy if the work, but the lack of a stock means they will never be practical.

    https://atlanticfirearms.com/products/gsg-mp40-9mm-pistol

    Cosmetics. One of my guns looks like it came off the factory line, probably cause it did. It was a bolt action rifle built after WW2, so it was probably made and then shelved right away as the nation adopted a semi-auto rifle. The others have gouges and dents in the stock and on the metal. I don't mind, it gives it character. But you have to accept that if you want an old gun.

    There is also issues with replacement parts. There are some companies that will make some modern stuff, but generally you might have a hard time finding a part you need, especially with a rarer gun.

    Like mentioned earlier, a generation grew up on WW2 games, movies, shows and with the big 100 and 75th anniversary of the First and Second World Wars that recently happened the demand is up. The days of them being seen a cheap junk surplus is gone. However, the supply is also down. Lots of nations already sold off or got rid of what they had stored long ago. There have also been big pushes to cut down on the sale of weapons. The UK is going to replace their L96 sniper rifles. This is the granddaddy of the Arctic Warfare series, including the Arctic Warfare Magnum. They are very good rifles and are iconic due to their use in games such as Counter Strike, and between their low number and history would probably fetch a nice price. But, they are instead going to be chopped up and dropped in the North Sea. Lots of stuff like that is happening as well.

    Ammo is another thing. Pre-WW2 it was common for nations to build their own rifles with their own ammo. Sometimes this was done buy building something from the ground up (like my Swiss K31 in 7.5x55, a gun and a bullet made only in Switzerland) or buy buying the rights to an existing gun (like my Swedish Mauser, where Sweden bought the rights to make Mauser rifles but changed the bullet used from 7.92x57 to 6.5x55). No, post war the UK and US realized how much this made logistics a hassle, so their was a big drive to standardize ammo used between the two nations. This would carry over to NATO. Thus, a lot of the bullets used in WW2 guns were no longer being made on a large scale. Surplus ammo is running out as well, same issue as the guns. Now, if you are lucky your gun will be in a somewhat popular caliber that is still made commercially. However, you pay a lot more for the ammo. 7.5x55 and 7.52x51 NATO are pretty similar ballistically, however the NATO rounds will usually be .20 cents per round cheaper for bullets of similar quality. It can add up quickly. You could also run into an issue where the gun shoots ammo that is just not available at all. I was eye balling a Dutch Mannlicher, but the ammo they used is just not made any more. If I bought one I wanted to shoot it I would have to make my own bullets out of existing bullets and casings. Not worth it IMO.

    Remember that Italian conversion I mention earlier? The same thing can happen with modern ammo and old guns. They were built to withstand a certain pressure, but modern loads can often be tailored to modern guns. There is a risk in using modern commercial .30-06 in a M1 Garand. If you intend to do that, you need to get a new gas plug I think that will vent the excess pressure.



    Sometimes you will see a gun rechambered to a more common caliber. This can cause issues. One, it kills the value. Like any collectible, there is valve in it being as original as possible. But it can mean that the Arisaka you bought can how actually be shot regularly, so its a trade off. The bigger issue is the same thing as the open to closed bolt change. It can cause a good weapon to become a jam prone, slam fire machine. Century Arms imported a much of MAS 49/56 rifles and changed them from 7.5x54 to 7.62x51 NATO, and the poor job they did ruined a lot of them. This was a big company (mind you one with a terrible reputation), but if they can mess it up you can picture how easy it is for some gunsmith unknown gunsmith to do the same, or even worse.

    For price, this is like any other collecting. The rarer and more significant it was, the more it goes for. My M48A Mauser was just under 600 bucks. It is almost identical to the kar98k, in looks, weight, performance and ammo used. However, the kar98k will go for double. Why? Cause you probably never heard of the M48A until now. It was made after WW2 and probably never saw combat. People want sometime with a connection to history, and knowing your gun saw action in the war can really raise the price. For me, the M48A was cool enough. (Plus I dont want to collect Nazi stuff, personally).

    So, lots of down sides. So, why buy one?

    Well, one odd quirk of our legal system is that is much easier to get a C&R license than a full gun license. So you can have these guns shipped right to you. For me its to much paper work, I still use a Federal Firearms License to handle to shipping.

    Other than that, there are 3 main reasons I see people get guns: Self Defense, Sporting, and Collecting.

    Self Defense is a no go. Don't trust your life to a 80 year old machine. Get something new if you really want a self defense weapon. Modern guns will be better in every way. Not that I'd want to be on the business end of a 1911 made in 1911, there's just no reason to get one for that role. Newer stuff will fill the role better.

    Sporting. This used to be a popular reason to get a surplus gun. They were cheaper than the new stuff. Not anymore. Sure, you could take a deer with a Lee-Enfield. It might even be fun. But just know you are giving your self a handicap compared to new stuff, and with dangerous game I'd give the same advice as self defense.

    Special note: it was common to buy a surplus gun and modify it to be a better hunting fire. Chopping off extra weight, adding a scope mount. Some people get the idea that they can buy a modified gun like this and restore them. Usually this is a bad idea, and any money saved will be lost hunting down rare parts. They didn't make a lot of extra stocks for these rifles, for instance, and thats usually one of the first modified parts. Maybe you don't care the rifle isn't 100% original, or maybe you like the look of the modified gun. Then sure, you can get a C&R rifle for a big discount.

    So, that leaves me with the only reason to get old stuff, collecting. Honestly, I love the aesthetic of these old rifles. None of my guns saw action in WW2, and it doesn't matter to me. They were in service at the time in neutral nations, so its cool to picture some solider standing on the boarder looking into occupied Europe wondering if the Germans would come for his nation next. Get an old gun if you are inserted in a era and want a part of it. The World Wars and the Wild West are the popular ones here in the US, but there are countless other reasons to collect. Sometimes a gun didn't see use in battle, but changed the industry. Perhaps the first effort of a designer or company that would come do dominate the market. Maybe it was a total flop, but in the most interesting way. If you have an interest in guns and history, collecting them can be really fun. Oh, and sometimes you get to go shoot them at the range I guess.

    JusticeforPluto on
    MarshmallowDead LegendDavid WalgasKadokenGiantGeek2020Mortal SkyThegreatcow
  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    Rationing 9mm sucks but got to do some plinking with the .22’s and my carry yesterday.

    Am looking into heading to a match next weekend!

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks The Myth, the Legend, the Bowman, the Shambler FuckerRegistered User regular
    Rationing 9mm sucks but got to do some plinking with the .22’s and my carry yesterday.

    Am looking into heading to a match next weekend!

    I'm tempted to find someone locally who will trade some of my 556/223 (which I have a bunch of) for some of their 9mm (which I am very low on), but I don't want to get shot in an alley somewhere or end up getting a box of Bubba's Pissin' Hot Handloads that are going to made my gun explode.

    I wish my stash wasn't so one-sided, I kinda like shooting my pistols more than my rifle.

    gRAhjXV.gif
  • Special KSpecial K Registered User regular
    a box of Bubba's Pissin' Hot Handloads that are going to made my gun explode.

    Come now, we'll hear no slander against Bubba. He does good work.

    Me: Bubba, your ammo doesn't cycle my gun properly!
    Bubba: You're limp wristing it.
    Me: Kinda hard not to when firing the first round broke my carpal bones ...

  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    Rationing 9mm sucks but got to do some plinking with the .22’s and my carry yesterday.

    Am looking into heading to a match next weekend!

    I'm tempted to find someone locally who will trade some of my 556/223 (which I have a bunch of) for some of their 9mm (which I am very low on), but I don't want to get shot in an alley somewhere or end up getting a box of Bubba's Pissin' Hot Handloads that are going to made my gun explode.

    I wish my stash wasn't so one-sided, I kinda like shooting my pistols more than my rifle.

    Honestly, I would just keep trying to buy locally at big stores if you have access to an Academy or Cabelas/Bass Pro nearby. I have had good luck stopping by the academy near me within a couple hours of opening to buy ammo if needed.

    Although the last few times I have bought ammo I have either given it to my father-in-law or brother-in-law, or to coworkers who haven’t been able to source it.

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
    Special K
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    If you’re in the PNW ive found Bimart to be fairly reliable in restocking ammo.

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  • David WalgasDavid Walgas Registered User regular
    Apparently Cabela's/Bass Pro restock around 7-8 pm PST each night, if you're fast on the draw you can still pick up 9mm and .223 for around pre-Corona prices.

  • Special KSpecial K Registered User regular
    Honestly, I would just keep trying to buy locally at big stores if you have access to an Academy or Cabelas/Bass Pro nearby. I have had good luck stopping by the academy near me within a couple hours of opening to buy ammo if needed.

    Same - it's worth asking the people in the store which days they typically get deliveries (I think it's Mon, Wed, Fri for the Academy closest to me).

  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    Shot an IDPA match today, first one ever. Haven’t shot in any kind of match since February, so took it slow today. Ended up placing just shy of top 1/2 of competition, but placed in top 1/4 for accuracy.

    Still not a bad way to spend a Saturday morning.

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
    webguy20GiantGeek2020David WalgasGvzbgulSmokeStacksJusticeforPlutoDocSummaryJudgmentThegreatcowamateurhour
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Shot an IDPA match today, first one ever. Haven’t shot in any kind of match since February, so took it slow today. Ended up placing just shy of top 1/2 of competition, but placed in top 1/4 for accuracy.

    Still not a bad way to spend a Saturday morning.

    I've never done a match, what was it like, and what guns did you use?

    Steam ID: Webguy20
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  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    webguy20 wrote: »
    Shot an IDPA match today, first one ever. Haven’t shot in any kind of match since February, so took it slow today. Ended up placing just shy of top 1/2 of competition, but placed in top 1/4 for accuracy.

    Still not a bad way to spend a Saturday morning.

    I've never done a match, what was it like, and what guns did you use?

    Pretty standard seemed like. 5 total stages. 18 rounds per stage. IDPA has funny scenarios to go with the stage dictating order of target engagement.

    Most targets get 2 rounds per, some get Mozambique’s. The club that ran it was really relaxed and everybody was really cool, which has been my experience at shooting GSSF and local range matches (my limited exposure). Some steel targets, mostly cardboard.

    I just shot with my 19 and used my inner/outer belt which I found out was not legal per rules but I could have remedied that with switching my pouches and holster to my normal belt and run it through belt loops. They were cool about it, I told them I didn’t really care if my results counted, just wanted to shoot and see how I did.

    Beats the hell out of standing at a static range and shooting paper with no movement.

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
    webguy20David Walgas
  • David WalgasDavid Walgas Registered User regular
    Where should I be looking or what should I be looking at for a bolt or lever .30-06 or 6.5 creedmoor?

    I hear Ruger American’s are good entry level bolt guns, but it’s all Greek to me.

  • SummaryJudgmentSummaryJudgment Today we will paint a mountain that owes us nothing. Registered User regular
    edited September 21
    Where should I be looking or what should I be looking at for a bolt or lever .30-06 or 6.5 creedmoor?

    I hear Ruger American’s are good entry level bolt guns, but it’s all Greek to me.

    I've heard Ruger American is solid and cheap, but not outstanding. Thompson Center Compass also in that category.

    Four years ago, I purchased a Savage Axis II (get the II for the trigger) which is you're paying $325 (or $425 for a really decent Weaver 3-9, I have this combo in .223) for a 0.75 MOA barrel, excellent adjustable trigger, and receiver. They've saved money on the stock -- both perfectly shootable while at the same time something you should throw in the trash (it flexes really bad and it's not great shooting it from a bench). Problem is there's not really a lot of aftermarket stocks (Boyd's?) for it. No Magpul furniture or anything like that, unfortunately. Some of Savage's other models have a nice LOP-adjustable stock, some also have a nice adjustable comb, but then you're paying.

    EDIT: Apparently the Axis II has that Accustock standard now. Here's a package with a Vortex 3-9 on it for $500. This is the way to go, imo - again, it's a sub-MOA rifle. That is a TON of rifle for $500, if you wanted to hang different glass on top you could take it home and hit at 1000 yards. https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/savage-axis-ii-xp-fde-bolt-65mm-creedmoor-22-barrel-41-rds-vortex-crossfire-ii-3-9x40mm?a=2233406

    SummaryJudgment on
    Just catch a glance of what could have done this
    Something 'bout how he walks reminds you of someone
    You look and see a gun, a man with no face, a golden halo that could be the sun
    David Walgas
  • SummaryJudgmentSummaryJudgment Today we will paint a mountain that owes us nothing. Registered User regular
    https://oryxchassis.com/us/oryx-bolt-action-rifle-chassis.html

    This is kind of wild, $400 but honestly after slapping an Axis II into it you've got a really sweet bolt-action for less than you'd pay ($1k - $1500) for a target model from Savage, or a Ruger Precision Rifle or similar.

    Just catch a glance of what could have done this
    Something 'bout how he walks reminds you of someone
    You look and see a gun, a man with no face, a golden halo that could be the sun
    David Walgas
  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    Where should I be looking or what should I be looking at for a bolt or lever .30-06 or 6.5 creedmoor?

    I hear Ruger American’s are good entry level bolt guns, but it’s all Greek to me.

    What are you wanting to do with it?

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
  • David WalgasDavid Walgas Registered User regular
    Where should I be looking or what should I be looking at for a bolt or lever .30-06 or 6.5 creedmoor?

    I hear Ruger American’s are good entry level bolt guns, but it’s all Greek to me.

    What are you wanting to do with it?

    Long distance plinking mostly.

  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    Where should I be looking or what should I be looking at for a bolt or lever .30-06 or 6.5 creedmoor?

    I hear Ruger American’s are good entry level bolt guns, but it’s all Greek to me.

    What are you wanting to do with it?

    Long distance plinking mostly.

    Recent trends would say 6.5 then. Which is more than capable of taking down game also if you’re into hunting, but has its limits.

    The Ruger American is a decent enough bolt gun, I think Ruger has fixed their stock issues they were having (fore-end rubbing barrel doesn’t convey free floated accuracy). The bolt is nothing to write home about.

    I was looking into getting one in 6.5 creedmoor a few months ago and watched videos of a guy who put reliable hits at 1000 after he swapped the stock, which was cool.

    I’m personally a Ruger fan boy, but would also recommend looking into Tikka and Savage. I don’t know anybody who has used Bergara rifles but they are spoken highly of online.

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
    David Walgas
  • David WalgasDavid Walgas Registered User regular
    Thanks! That Savage Axis looks really nice, and my local gun store has one in stock in 6.5. It's a left handed version, but that just means the action is on the left side. Is that a problem for a right handed shooter? I'm coming from a AR heavy shooting background so that just sounds normal.

  • ErlkönigErlkönig Registered User regular
    Where should I be looking or what should I be looking at for a bolt or lever .30-06 or 6.5 creedmoor?

    I hear Ruger American’s are good entry level bolt guns, but it’s all Greek to me.

    What are you wanting to do with it?

    Long distance plinking mostly.

    Recent trends would say 6.5 then. Which is more than capable of taking down game also if you’re into hunting, but has its limits.

    The Ruger American is a decent enough bolt gun, I think Ruger has fixed their stock issues they were having (fore-end rubbing barrel doesn’t convey free floated accuracy). The bolt is nothing to write home about.

    I was looking into getting one in 6.5 creedmoor a few months ago and watched videos of a guy who put reliable hits at 1000 after he swapped the stock, which was cool.

    I’m personally a Ruger fan boy, but would also recommend looking into Tikka and Savage. I don’t know anybody who has used Bergara rifles but they are spoken highly of online.

    How are Sakos these days? Apparently, back in the day, my dad was debating between a Ruger and a Sako...and only went with Ruger because the Sako he was eying (and even bought rings for) wasn't in stock.

    | Origin/R*SC: Ein7919 | Battle.net: Erlkonig#1448 | XBL: Lexicanum | Steam: Der Erlkönig (the umlaut is important) |
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Don't get the left hand version of you're a righty. You'd have to move your left hand off the forend of stock to work the action and it'd be awkward.

    David Walgas
  • JusticeforPlutoJusticeforPluto Registered User regular
    I would imagine that would depend how you shoot. If shooting from a rest or bipod it could be an advantage. If shooting while on the move or standing, I think you'd have to un-shoulder the rifle, work the action and then re-shoulder the rifle.

    Usually you want your dominant hand to work the bolt.

    David Walgas
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Plus, I can keep my cheek weld on the left side of the rifle while working the action on the right side. I'd think that would be uncomfortable if it was all on the same side.

    JusticeforPluto
  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    I grew up shooting right handed rifles left handed.

    If it’s your non dominant hand and non dominant eye, get the rifle you know how to shoot.

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    Erlkönig wrote: »
    Where should I be looking or what should I be looking at for a bolt or lever .30-06 or 6.5 creedmoor?

    I hear Ruger American’s are good entry level bolt guns, but it’s all Greek to me.

    What are you wanting to do with it?

    Long distance plinking mostly.

    Recent trends would say 6.5 then. Which is more than capable of taking down game also if you’re into hunting, but has its limits.

    The Ruger American is a decent enough bolt gun, I think Ruger has fixed their stock issues they were having (fore-end rubbing barrel doesn’t convey free floated accuracy). The bolt is nothing to write home about.

    I was looking into getting one in 6.5 creedmoor a few months ago and watched videos of a guy who put reliable hits at 1000 after he swapped the stock, which was cool.

    I’m personally a Ruger fan boy, but would also recommend looking into Tikka and Savage. I don’t know anybody who has used Bergara rifles but they are spoken highly of online.

    How are Sakos these days? Apparently, back in the day, my dad was debating between a Ruger and a Sako...and only went with Ruger because the Sako he was eying (and even bought rings for) wasn't in stock.

    If I remember correctly, Sako’s are nicer Tikka’s. So I would expect them to be good!

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
    SummaryJudgment
  • amateurhouramateurhour One day I'll be professionalhour The woods somewhere in TennesseeRegistered User regular
    Y'all act like I haven't been advertising the Blunderbuss in a home defense situation since like two years ago.

    tsktsk.


    Arch wrote: »

    I never expected this burn from captain bushmeat
    DocDavid WalgasGiantGeek2020
  • JusticeforPlutoJusticeforPluto Registered User regular
    Get your rifle in 6.5 Swede. It's been the best 6.5 since 1891!

    Idk, I just really like the caliber.

    amateurhour
  • amateurhouramateurhour One day I'll be professionalhour The woods somewhere in TennesseeRegistered User regular
    Get your rifle in 6.5 Swede. It's been the best 6.5 since 1891!

    Idk, I just really like the caliber.

    I'm a fan of weird calibers

    I enjoyed my 35remington lever action, I've enjoyed shooting .577 Snyder, I've even on one occasion enjoyed but been terrified shooting a tiny ass saturday night special in .25 acp


    Arch wrote: »

    I never expected this burn from captain bushmeat
  • JusticeforPlutoJusticeforPluto Registered User regular
    It's not even that weird of a caliber. Apparently it's really popular in Europe.

  • David WalgasDavid Walgas Registered User regular
    Got it. Right handed so I don’t punch myself in the eye. Thanks folks, I’ll send pics when I pick it up

    DocSummaryJudgment
  • NoquarNoquar Registered User regular
    Well - picked up an OZ-9 Covert in FDE. It's been a LONG time since i've had a handgun. Should be interesting!

    Dead Legend
  • Dead LegendDead Legend Registered User regular
    Good luck not paying through the nose for 9mm if you can source it.

    diablo III - beardsnbeer#1508 Mechwarrior Online - Rusty Bock
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