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Right to Repair

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Posts

  • TheSmackerTheSmacker Registered User regular
    Sorry if it's already been posted, but this counterfeiting claim ties into another legal case Apple has going:

    He may mention that in the above video, I haven't gotten a chance to watch it yet. It is bullshit of the highest order.

    3DS: 1006-0138-4662
  • jothkijothki Registered User regular
    DarkPrimus wrote: »
    Planned obsolescence is a practice that is pretty much indefensible.
    Forced obsolescence goes beyond, and becomes abhorrent.

    Forced obsolescence is a perfectly fair practice if you pick an exact date in advance and keep your customers well informed about it. A lot of high-end software works like that.

    Also, rentals sort of fit that description as well. You get a product, it works for a set period of time, then it "breaks".

    Smrtnik
  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    jothki wrote: »
    DarkPrimus wrote: »
    Planned obsolescence is a practice that is pretty much indefensible.
    Forced obsolescence goes beyond, and becomes abhorrent.

    Forced obsolescence is a perfectly fair practice if you pick an exact date in advance and keep your customers well informed about it. A lot of high-end software works like that.

    Also, rentals sort of fit that description as well. You get a product, it works for a set period of time, then it "breaks".

    Nah.
    The only reason to stop supporting software is if the underlying engine needs to be reworked before everything can be done significantly better.
    Unless that case can be made, then there's no reason to not just keep adding new versions to the existing product.
    Aside getting everyone to buy everything again.

    And rental is not forced obscelescence, it's a subscription model.
    I would prefer more subscription models encouraging further development of existing things, than purchases encouraging the further development of 'new' things.

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  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    Rentals aren't forced obsolescence. The item still exists and functions after your rental period is over.

    wpyz0Y5.png
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    Quid
  • RedTideRedTide Registered User regular
    DarkPrimus wrote: »
    Rentals aren't forced obsolescence. The item still exists and functions after your rental period is over.

    Unless it was Divx, which even as a preteen when I first read about it seemed like a guaranteed failure.

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  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    RedTide wrote: »
    DarkPrimus wrote: »
    Rentals aren't forced obsolescence. The item still exists and functions after your rental period is over.

    Unless it was Divx, which even as a preteen when I first read about it seemed like a guaranteed failure.

    That was an example of planned/forced obsolescence. It's not a rental in how we think of it. It was basically how we get temporary digital rentals now, only with a physical product and a physical player dedicated solely to the rentals, which, yeah, that's why it didn't take off.

    wpyz0Y5.png
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  • XaviarXaviar Registered User regular
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/xw9bwd/1201-exemptions-right-to-repair

    tl;dr - Hacking DRM for repair purposes is officially OK.

    Unfortunately it seems like this is being declared a "landmark victory" for Right to Repair. It isn't. It just means companies will step up encryption on the DRM, and tie it into more aspects of the device to make cracking the DRM harder or "not worth it."

    The actual victory would be a tearing down of the actual current state of DRM.

    Gnome-InterruptusMan in the MistsMegaMekdestroyah87MrVyngaardYoutubeLord_AsmodeusMoridin889
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    My vacuum died this morning, I took some of it apart once to fix the foot peddle...what do you think my chances are of being able to fix this?

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    Depends on what died. A loose or broken wire? Pretty good, they're easy to replace. A switch or the motor? Less good, depending on how old it is, if the part is still made. You'd need a multimeter for the electrical stuff, to check continuity between parts so you can figure out what killed it.

    nibXTE7.png
    Shadowfire
  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    My vacuum died this morning, I took some of it apart once to fix the foot peddle...what do you think my chances are of being able to fix this?

    I've fixed my Dyson 3 times

    each time it just required cleaning and reassembling. Not sure what's broken on yours

    AridholDoodmanndispatch.o
  • The WolfmanThe Wolfman Registered User regular
    I had a vacuum start to spark like crazy, followed by the telltale smell of acrid smoke.

    I just assumed it was past the point of no return. Nothing really comes back after you smell that smell.

    "The sausage of Green Earth explodes with flavor like the cannon of culinary delight."
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  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    I had a vacuum start to spark like crazy, followed by the telltale smell of acrid smoke.

    I just assumed it was past the point of no return. Nothing really comes back after you smell that smell.

    That's because all the magic smoke is let out.

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  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    I had a vacuum start to spark like crazy, followed by the telltale smell of acrid smoke.

    I just assumed it was past the point of no return. Nothing really comes back after you smell that smell.

    Depends on exactly what's burning. In electronics, it usually means the either plastic in the circuit board (that's all she wrote), or something important soldered to it (the skills and tools to fix this are beyond the value of actually doing so). Most vacuums have little to no actual electronic components, very good chance there's a bad wire causing a short and insulation was burning. That's fixable with cheap tools and the level of electrical knowledge it takes to wire a light switch. My vacuum has had most of its internal wiring replaced with stripped extension cords because this happened to it.

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Hevach wrote: »
    I had a vacuum start to spark like crazy, followed by the telltale smell of acrid smoke.

    I just assumed it was past the point of no return. Nothing really comes back after you smell that smell.

    Depends on exactly what's burning. In electronics, it usually means the either plastic in the circuit board (that's all she wrote), or something important soldered to it (the skills and tools to fix this are beyond the value of actually doing so). Most vacuums have little to no actual electronic components, very good chance there's a bad wire causing a short and insulation was burning. That's fixable with cheap tools and the level of electrical knowledge it takes to wire a light switch. My vacuum has had most of its internal wiring replaced with stripped extension cords because this happened to it.

    The biggest issue with either the wiring or the circuit boards is often getting at them. Lots of things today you basically have to break the plastic and such to get at the part you need to fix.

    JazzMan in the MistsElvenshaeMoridin889
  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    edited October 2018
    shryke wrote: »
    Hevach wrote: »
    I had a vacuum start to spark like crazy, followed by the telltale smell of acrid smoke.

    I just assumed it was past the point of no return. Nothing really comes back after you smell that smell.

    Depends on exactly what's burning. In electronics, it usually means the either plastic in the circuit board (that's all she wrote), or something important soldered to it (the skills and tools to fix this are beyond the value of actually doing so). Most vacuums have little to no actual electronic components, very good chance there's a bad wire causing a short and insulation was burning. That's fixable with cheap tools and the level of electrical knowledge it takes to wire a light switch. My vacuum has had most of its internal wiring replaced with stripped extension cords because this happened to it.

    The biggest issue with either the wiring or the circuit boards is often getting at them. Lots of things today you basically have to break the plastic and such to get at the part you need to fix.

    That's one of the biggest reasons I taught myself how to use one of these. You can do the same thing cheap and dirty with a soldering iron and the plastic welding rods, but you usually ruin the soldering iron in the process.

    Hevach on
    Kruite
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    I had a vacuum start to spark like crazy, followed by the telltale smell of acrid smoke.

    I just assumed it was past the point of no return. Nothing really comes back after you smell that smell.

    That's because all the magic smoke is let out.

    Ah, you just need a replacement smoke kit!

    Smokekit2.jpg

    Doodmannmatt has a problemL Ron HowardjungleroomxJazzShadowfiremRahmaniLabelGnome-InterruptusHappylilElfCouscousredxElvenshaewebguy20chrono_travellerForarNobeardThawmusLord_AsmodeusRickRude
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    A couple weeks ago, our waffle iron stopped heating on one side. It was a few years old, it replaced a previous waffle iron that the plastic temp knob broke off of. No big deal I thought, I'll just open it up, probably a loose wire, maybe the element, easy enough to fix. An hour, several broken plastic clips, and infuriatingly impossible to open sealed plastic seams later, it went into the trash. Vowing to never buy another modern junk waffle iron, onto eBay I went, and found a late 40s-early 50s era Kenmore. Plugged it in, worked like a champ, but it smoked a ton, likely from something having been spilled into the bottom of it.

    Two nuts and the bottom was off. Two more nuts and the wiring was off the element. One screw and the element was out. Two more screws and the bottom grid was free. 5 minutes, tops. The top grid is held in by one screw and a pin.

    4ske6ql8d7ue.jpg

    Yep, something spilled into it. Soak in some soap and some steel wool and it'll be clean. No insulation to speak of, of course, so I picked up some ceramic cloth insulation meant for forges and kilns for $10. It'll be back together, insulated, and making waffles by Monday.

    nibXTE7.png
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  • never dienever die Registered User regular
    Louis Rossmann, perpetual thorn in Apple's side and definitely not an Apple authorized repair center, has had 20 Apple laptop batteries seized by CBP, due to Apple's claims that they're counterfeit.



    These are batteries for Apple products they will no longer repair, nor will they sell the batteries to anyone, their authorized repair centers included. Rossmann sourced 20 of them that had been removed from existing laptops and imported them. They were seized, coincidentally of course, just after the CBC report on Apple's ludicrous pricing for repairs.

    This is one of my big problems with this whole mess is companies want it both ways. They want to be able to declare that they will no longer support a product, but then also have a fit when someone tries to fix products that they no longer support. Like fine, if you want to declare that this product your make 5-7 years ago (as a random time grab) is too much effort to keep up with for mechanical parts or firmware or what have you, okay. But you shouldn't then be able to go after people for working on ways to keep that product working cause the company has already washed their hands of it. You told me that you no longer supported it, its essentially dead to you. Why should you have the right to tell me what I can and can't do with your unsupported product?

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  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Anyone could cure it with blindness There were moments where I thought I could beRegistered User regular
    never die wrote: »
    Louis Rossmann, perpetual thorn in Apple's side and definitely not an Apple authorized repair center, has had 20 Apple laptop batteries seized by CBP, due to Apple's claims that they're counterfeit.



    These are batteries for Apple products they will no longer repair, nor will they sell the batteries to anyone, their authorized repair centers included. Rossmann sourced 20 of them that had been removed from existing laptops and imported them. They were seized, coincidentally of course, just after the CBC report on Apple's ludicrous pricing for repairs.

    This is one of my big problems with this whole mess is companies want it both ways. They want to be able to declare that they will no longer support a product, but then also have a fit when someone tries to fix products that they no longer support. Like fine, if you want to declare that this product your make 5-7 years ago (as a random time grab) is too much effort to keep up with for mechanical parts or firmware or what have you, okay. But you shouldn't then be able to go after people for working on ways to keep that product working cause the company has already washed their hands of it. You told me that you no longer supported it, its essentially dead to you. Why should you have the right to tell me what I can and can't do with your unsupported product?

    Because any extension of life for that unsupported product means more time where you don't buy one of their currently supported ones.

    Oh wait that's just the reason. What right do they have? They're obeying the powers vested in them by US consumerism gawbless.

    Make. Time.
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  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    Companies will make more money if you have to give them money every few years, instead of giving them money once and then maintaining the product yourself for decades.

    wpyz0Y5.png
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    Smrtnik
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Anyone could cure it with blindness There were moments where I thought I could beRegistered User regular
    DarkPrimus wrote: »
    Companies will make more money if you have to give them money every few years, instead of giving them money once and then maintaining the product yourself for decades.

    Plus charge them ridiculous, extortion-level fees for repairs you purposely gimp.

    Make. Time.
  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    The problem is that Apple's design standards are slipping, resulting in products failing due to poor design, and the Geniuses at the apple stores are not trained, equipped, or even expected to put the time and effort into properly diagnosing fail conditions.

    This is going to result in people being told their non-functional apple products are not covered under warantee and having to pay for new parts/machines when they don't have to.

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
    PhillishereYoutube
  • LoisLaneLoisLane Registered User regular
    The problem is that Apple's design standards are slipping, resulting in products failing due to poor design, and the Geniuses at the apple stores are not trained, equipped, or even expected to put the time and effort into properly diagnosing fail conditions.

    This is going to result in people being told their non-functional apple products are not covered under warantee and having to pay for new parts/machines when they don't have to.


    Yep. I got my moms 6s and the back camera went out on me. 60 something dollars for an hour repair. I would rather just put up with it for the next five years than fix it.

  • PhillisherePhillishere Registered User regular
    The problem is that Apple's design standards are slipping, resulting in products failing due to poor design, and the Geniuses at the apple stores are not trained, equipped, or even expected to put the time and effort into properly diagnosing fail conditions.

    This is going to result in people being told their non-functional apple products are not covered under warantee and having to pay for new parts/machines when they don't have to.


    Software and hardware standards are failing. I got my first Apple product in 1990, and I have used them almost exclusively since except for a brief fling with a rocking Sony Vaio. My current laptop is a one-year old Macbook Pro, and it is in multiple ways the worst product I have owned from them. It really feels like the company is in a spiral where they keep trying new things, but all of those innovations turn out to be downgrades from the work of their predecessors.

  • never dienever die Registered User regular
    edited December 2018
    never die wrote: »
    Louis Rossmann, perpetual thorn in Apple's side and definitely not an Apple authorized repair center, has had 20 Apple laptop batteries seized by CBP, due to Apple's claims that they're counterfeit.



    These are batteries for Apple products they will no longer repair, nor will they sell the batteries to anyone, their authorized repair centers included. Rossmann sourced 20 of them that had been removed from existing laptops and imported them. They were seized, coincidentally of course, just after the CBC report on Apple's ludicrous pricing for repairs.

    This is one of my big problems with this whole mess is companies want it both ways. They want to be able to declare that they will no longer support a product, but then also have a fit when someone tries to fix products that they no longer support. Like fine, if you want to declare that this product your make 5-7 years ago (as a random time grab) is too much effort to keep up with for mechanical parts or firmware or what have you, okay. But you shouldn't then be able to go after people for working on ways to keep that product working cause the company has already washed their hands of it. You told me that you no longer supported it, its essentially dead to you. Why should you have the right to tell me what I can and can't do with your unsupported product?

    Because any extension of life for that unsupported product means more time where you don't buy one of their currently supported ones.

    Oh wait that's just the reason. What right do they have? They're obeying the powers vested in them by US consumerism gawbless.

    I mean yeah, I get that. Im just saying it’s BS, and I would support legislation that protected consumers from being able to modify, repair, etc. without lawsuits from the companies.

    Edit: like I would understand stuff like people not being able to take software and sell it or stuff like that, or use it to make a new product, but being able to repair or tinker with it on their own should at the very least be respected. Though forcing companies to support something or allow it to go into public domain after so many years of being unsporrted would probably be beneficial for society as a whole as well.

    never die on
    jungleroomxGnome-Interruptus
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Anyone could cure it with blindness There were moments where I thought I could beRegistered User regular
    never die wrote: »
    never die wrote: »
    Louis Rossmann, perpetual thorn in Apple's side and definitely not an Apple authorized repair center, has had 20 Apple laptop batteries seized by CBP, due to Apple's claims that they're counterfeit.



    These are batteries for Apple products they will no longer repair, nor will they sell the batteries to anyone, their authorized repair centers included. Rossmann sourced 20 of them that had been removed from existing laptops and imported them. They were seized, coincidentally of course, just after the CBC report on Apple's ludicrous pricing for repairs.

    This is one of my big problems with this whole mess is companies want it both ways. They want to be able to declare that they will no longer support a product, but then also have a fit when someone tries to fix products that they no longer support. Like fine, if you want to declare that this product your make 5-7 years ago (as a random time grab) is too much effort to keep up with for mechanical parts or firmware or what have you, okay. But you shouldn't then be able to go after people for working on ways to keep that product working cause the company has already washed their hands of it. You told me that you no longer supported it, its essentially dead to you. Why should you have the right to tell me what I can and can't do with your unsupported product?

    Because any extension of life for that unsupported product means more time where you don't buy one of their currently supported ones.

    Oh wait that's just the reason. What right do they have? They're obeying the powers vested in them by US consumerism gawbless.

    I mean yeah, I get that. Im just saying it’s BS, and I would support legislation that protected consumers from being able to modify, repair, etc. without lawsuits from the companies.

    Edit: like I would understand stuff like people not being able to take software and sell it or stuff like that, or use it to make a new product, but being able to repair or tinker with it on their own should at the very least be respected. Though forcing companies to support something or allow it to go into public domain after so many years of being unsporrted would probably be beneficial for society as a whole as well.

    I would even settle for the minute you no longer provide support for a device, you no longer have legal standing on which to "protect" it, insofar as to be able to confiscate repair parts or what have you.

    A lot of companies are making it difficult to self-repair, but Apple seems far and away the worst instance of it.

    Make. Time.
    never dieGnome-InterruptusHefflingchrishallett83JazzbowenCouscousElvenshaethatassemblyguyLord_AsmodeusMvrckMoridin889
  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/zmd9a5/tim-cook-to-investors-people-bought-fewer-new-iphones-because-they-repaired-their-old-ones
    “While macroeconomic challenges in some markets were a key contributor to this trend [of lower iPhone sales], we believe there are other factors broadly impacting our iPhone performance, including consumers adapting to a world with fewer carrier subsidies, US dollar strength-related price increases, and some customers taking advantage of significantly reduced pricing for iPhone battery replacements,” Cook wrote, also citing fewer sales than expected in markets like China.
    Apple is openly admitting they think easier repairs hurt iPhone sales.

    chrishallett83Man in the MistsShadowfirethatassemblyguydispatch.oHefflingMvrck
  • SoggybiscuitSoggybiscuit At the edge of spacetime lies a path with no end.Registered User regular
    Couscous wrote: »
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/zmd9a5/tim-cook-to-investors-people-bought-fewer-new-iphones-because-they-repaired-their-old-ones
    “While macroeconomic challenges in some markets were a key contributor to this trend [of lower iPhone sales], we believe there are other factors broadly impacting our iPhone performance, including consumers adapting to a world with fewer carrier subsidies, US dollar strength-related price increases, and some customers taking advantage of significantly reduced pricing for iPhone battery replacements,” Cook wrote, also citing fewer sales than expected in markets like China.
    Apple is openly admitting they think easier repairs hurt iPhone sales.

    I honestly expect Apple to start spot welding iPhones and iPads together now.

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  • rhylithrhylith Registered User regular
    Couscous wrote: »
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/zmd9a5/tim-cook-to-investors-people-bought-fewer-new-iphones-because-they-repaired-their-old-ones
    “While macroeconomic challenges in some markets were a key contributor to this trend [of lower iPhone sales], we believe there are other factors broadly impacting our iPhone performance, including consumers adapting to a world with fewer carrier subsidies, US dollar strength-related price increases, and some customers taking advantage of significantly reduced pricing for iPhone battery replacements,” Cook wrote, also citing fewer sales than expected in markets like China.
    Apple is openly admitting they think easier repairs hurt iPhone sales.

    Weird how the repairs used to be easier but they still sold more phones until now.

    Couldn’t have anything to do with the fact that recent phones have only been marginal improvements at increasingly more ridiculous prices and people don’t think it’s worth it to replace.

    Rhylith - <Shambler Milk> Horde Chogall
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  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    rhylith wrote: »
    Couscous wrote: »
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/zmd9a5/tim-cook-to-investors-people-bought-fewer-new-iphones-because-they-repaired-their-old-ones
    “While macroeconomic challenges in some markets were a key contributor to this trend [of lower iPhone sales], we believe there are other factors broadly impacting our iPhone performance, including consumers adapting to a world with fewer carrier subsidies, US dollar strength-related price increases, and some customers taking advantage of significantly reduced pricing for iPhone battery replacements,” Cook wrote, also citing fewer sales than expected in markets like China.
    Apple is openly admitting they think easier repairs hurt iPhone sales.

    Weird how the repairs used to be easier but they still sold more phones until now.

    Couldn’t have anything to do with the fact that recent phones have only been marginal improvements at increasingly more ridiculous prices and people don’t think it’s worth it to replace.

    Apple: So clearly the solution is to force them to upgrade through forced obsolescence!

    KruiteGnome-InterruptusDarkPrimusHefflingLoisLane
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    The day my 6s becomes obsolete is the day I just stop using Apple. I genuinely prefer iOS to Android but not enough to get gouged nearly a grand for a phone that will be less functional for my purposes.

    TicaldfjamHappylilElfAtheraaldispatch.oEncLoisLaneSyngyne
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Anyone could cure it with blindness There were moments where I thought I could beRegistered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    The day my 6s becomes obsolete is the day I just stop using Apple. I genuinely prefer iOS to Android but not enough to get gouged nearly a grand for a phone that will be less functional for my purposes.

    Obviously in this instance it is your purposes that are wrong, not the iPhone!

    Make. Time.
  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    The day my 6s becomes obsolete is the day I just stop using Apple. I genuinely prefer iOS to Android but not enough to get gouged nearly a grand for a phone that will be less functional for my purposes.

    I've been kicking along Galaxy S4's since I got my first one. There's plenty of brand new ones, unopened, still in the world and the biggest problem is those unused batteries are aging out of their shelf life now.

    I'm really hoping one of the fully open-source phone attempts will actually get enough of a community to become viable, since then I can switch to just buying those as they get cheaper and cheaper...

    Dizzy D
  • daveNYCdaveNYC Why universe hate Waspinator? Registered User regular
    Couscous wrote: »
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/zmd9a5/tim-cook-to-investors-people-bought-fewer-new-iphones-because-they-repaired-their-old-ones
    “While macroeconomic challenges in some markets were a key contributor to this trend [of lower iPhone sales], we believe there are other factors broadly impacting our iPhone performance, including consumers adapting to a world with fewer carrier subsidies, US dollar strength-related price increases, and some customers taking advantage of significantly reduced pricing for iPhone battery replacements,” Cook wrote, also citing fewer sales than expected in markets like China.
    Apple is openly admitting they think easier repairs hurt iPhone sales.

    I honestly expect Apple to start spot welding iPhones and iPads together now.

    It's not just Apple. My Pixel's battery is crap and the YouTube battery replacement video I watched involved 15 minutes of using a heat gun and various small prying tools with the warning from the guy that you'll probably break your screen doing this just to get the case open.

    XaquinLoisLane
  • ViskodViskod Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    The day my 6s becomes obsolete is the day I just stop using Apple. I genuinely prefer iOS to Android but not enough to get gouged nearly a grand for a phone that will be less functional for my purposes.

    This was touched on in the economy thread but I think the same.

    I’ve had a 6s since they came out and only upgraded because AT&T kept bugging me about the “free” upgrade on my account that I wasn’t using.

    I don’t see any reason to upgrade from my 6s, especially if it means losing my headphone jack.

    Artereis wrote: »
    It's not your fault, Viskod. 1 out of every 10 people just happens to be a monster.
    PhillishereKruiteQuidLoisLaneTicaldfjam
  • BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    daveNYC wrote: »
    It's not just Apple. My Pixel's battery is crap and the YouTube battery replacement video I watched involved 15 minutes of using a heat gun and various small prying tools with the warning from the guy that you'll probably break your screen doing this just to get the case open.
    The "case" in this case is you separating the display (thin and no reinforcement along the edges) from the rest of the body. The iFixit guide for it has you using one of their heating tools (iOpener, but you can use a heat gun as well) to loosen the adhesive enough to get an opening pick in there, but you really can't pull up much on it without possibly breaking the screen before you cut the adhesive (just enough to slip the pick in there). Oh, and you can't insert the picks too deep (about 1.5mm) or you'll also damage the display :rotate:

    I'm looking at doing the battery replacement myself on my Pixel XL. I miss the days of removable batteries.

    Rollers are red, chargers are blue....omae wa mou shindeiru
  • KarlKarl Registered User regular
    Are there any brands that don't make it impossible to repair phones without sending it back to the manufacturer?

    YOU'RE ALL BABIES.
    SO MUCH POTENTIAL TO WASTE.
    Koshian wrote: »
    JOKE'S ON YOU
    MY POTENTIAL IS ALREADY WASTED
  • daveNYCdaveNYC Why universe hate Waspinator? Registered User regular
    Barrakketh wrote: »
    daveNYC wrote: »
    It's not just Apple. My Pixel's battery is crap and the YouTube battery replacement video I watched involved 15 minutes of using a heat gun and various small prying tools with the warning from the guy that you'll probably break your screen doing this just to get the case open.
    The "case" in this case is you separating the display (thin and no reinforcement along the edges) from the rest of the body. The iFixit guide for it has you using one of their heating tools (iOpener, but you can use a heat gun as well) to loosen the adhesive enough to get an opening pick in there, but you really can't pull up much on it without possibly breaking the screen before you cut the adhesive (just enough to slip the pick in there). Oh, and you can't insert the picks too deep (about 1.5mm) or you'll also damage the display :rotate:

    I'm looking at doing the battery replacement myself on my Pixel XL. I miss the days of removable batteries.

    Yeah, there's no 'case' per se. Not like older phones that had obviously chunky plastic bits that were designed to be removed. It's a metal back with the glass glued on the front. You're basically having to disassemble the thing relatively violently to get inside. Having the battery conk out was annoying enough back when phones were $200 every two years with your plan's upgrade. Now that that pricing has been tossed and the flagship phones are going for whatever they can get away with it's just stupid.

    $800+ bucks for something that loses a lot of its functionality in two years seems like it should be an unsustainable business model. Hopefully.

    QuidDoodmannMan in the Mistsdispatch.oPhillishereElvenshaeBarrakkethJazzGnome-InterruptusHefflingCouscousLord_Asmodeuschrishallett83Gennenalyse RuebenEncMoridin889LoisLane
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    daveNYC wrote: »
    $800+ bucks for something that loses a lot of its functionality in two years seems like it should be an unsustainable business model. Hopefully.

    Let me tell you about my Samsung dryer that wasn't getting hot enough after 3 years and the $800 it took to replace it.

  • redxredx I(x)=2(x)+1 whole numbersRegistered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    daveNYC wrote: »
    $800+ bucks for something that loses a lot of its functionality in two years seems like it should be an unsustainable business model. Hopefully.

    Let me tell you about my Samsung dryer that wasn't getting hot enough after 3 years and the $800 it took to replace it.

    People give Samsung so much crap. Oh, this Samsung dryer doesn't get hot enough, and this Samsung phablet gets too hot. Got damn Goldilocks consumers are impossible to please.

    This machine kills threads.
    SmrtnikshrykeShadowfirewanderingMugsleyJebus314CampyiTunesIsEvilElvenshaeGennenalyse RuebenJuliusMarty81Moridin889LoisLaneThawmusTicaldfjam
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