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Right to Repair

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Posts

  • AridholAridhol Registered User regular
    HamHamJ wrote: »
    Heffling wrote: »
    HamHamJ wrote: »
    I would put hardware mounting screws designed to break when used more than once in the same category as fragile ribbon cables designed to break when the computer case is cracked open.

    As per the article the accurate statement is that they are designed to break before the thread in the hole. Which is a sensible design decision.

    A sensible design is to have a screw or bolt fail prior to the part it is being screwed or bolted into. A nonsensical design is to have a screw or bolt designed to fail after a single use.

    Citation that it is designed to fail after a single use and not just shoddy enough that there is a good chance of it failing after a single use?


    Distinction without a difference.
    Someone engineered it.

    "Good chance it fails" is intentional engineering.

    jungleroomxCaedwyrjmcdonaldElvenshaebowenMan in the Mistschrishallett83LoisLaneHefflingIncenjucarDevoutlyApatheticMayabirdEncMartini_Philosopher
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Spicy Rudolph Registered User regular
    As a species we have a lot of information on how much it takes to break shit.

    We have kits to determine how hard things are via scratch resistance. We have tables of torque strength and mathematical equations that allow us to know how thick metals of certain compositions have to be before they lose their strength at certain forces.

    In short, we know beforehand the general strength of materials used in different applications. We know because we have over a century of testing. This is not arcane nor esoteric knowledge, it's basic engineering.

    There is zero convincing me that neither the company that made that shoddy mount NOR Apple, who put their seal of approval on said mounting system, had no idea that using cheap screws in a load bearing application would not have very good chances to break like this.

    So when, as is quoted, that the screws are designed to break a certain way, it's been designed with their lack of strength in mind.

    Make. Time.
    mRahmaniCaedwyrjmcdonaldElvenshaebowenMan in the Mistschrishallett83LoisLaneHefflingMayabirdBlackDragon480Smrtnikshryke
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Spicy Rudolph Registered User regular
    redx wrote: »
    HamHamJ wrote: »
    Heffling wrote: »
    HamHamJ wrote: »
    I would put hardware mounting screws designed to break when used more than once in the same category as fragile ribbon cables designed to break when the computer case is cracked open.

    As per the article the accurate statement is that they are designed to break before the thread in the hole. Which is a sensible design decision.

    A sensible design is to have a screw or bolt fail prior to the part it is being screwed or bolted into. A nonsensical design is to have a screw or bolt designed to fail after a single use.

    Citation that it is designed to fail after a single use and not just shoddy enough that there is a good chance of it failing after a single use?

    Practical difference being?

    If it supports a tend of anti-consumer actions, or if it supports a trend of shoddy design and usage low quality materials.

    Considering the cost, I repeat my question.

    If it was as dirt cheap as the materials used, then we have something!

    But the VESA mounting cost about as much as your typical VESA stuff, more even, and yet...

    Make. Time.
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited January 8
    As a species we have a lot of information on how much it takes to break shit.

    We have kits to determine how hard things are via scratch resistance. We have tables of torque strength and mathematical equations that allow us to know how thick metals of certain compositions have to be before they lose their strength at certain forces.

    In short, we know beforehand the general strength of materials used in different applications. We know because we have over a century of testing. This is not arcane nor esoteric knowledge, it's basic engineering.

    There is zero convincing me that neither the company that made that shoddy mount NOR Apple, who put their seal of approval on said mounting system, had no idea that using cheap screws in a load bearing application would not have very good chances to break like this.

    So when, as is quoted, that the screws are designed to break a certain way, it's been designed with their lack of strength in mind.

    The worst part is we're talking the difference between something like $0.001 and $0.0008 for the price difference between a low end steel screw and a zinc one probably. It's hard to find zinc screws because no one really makes them. There are zinc coated steel and aluminium though.

    Granted that doesn't look like a lot but when you make hundreds of thousands of these that's a middle class salary in savings.

    bowen on
    Ladies.
    Man in the Mistsjungleroomx
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Spicy Rudolph Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    As a species we have a lot of information on how much it takes to break shit.

    We have kits to determine how hard things are via scratch resistance. We have tables of torque strength and mathematical equations that allow us to know how thick metals of certain compositions have to be before they lose their strength at certain forces.

    In short, we know beforehand the general strength of materials used in different applications. We know because we have over a century of testing. This is not arcane nor esoteric knowledge, it's basic engineering.

    There is zero convincing me that neither the company that made that shoddy mount NOR Apple, who put their seal of approval on said mounting system, had no idea that using cheap screws in a load bearing application would not have very good chances to break like this.

    So when, as is quoted, that the screws are designed to break a certain way, it's been designed with their lack of strength in mind.

    The worst part is we're talking the difference between something like $0.001 and $0.0008 for the price difference between a low end steel screw and a zinc one probably. It's hard to find zinc screws because no one really makes them. There are zinc coated steel and aluminium though.

    Granted that doesn't look like a lot but when you make hundreds of thousands of these that's a middle class salary in savings.

    Which, for a company worth 1 trillion with annual profits in the billions/ten of billions, it really isn't a whole lot.

    Make. Time.
    chrishallett83bowenElvenshaeHefflingMan in the MistsOrcaMayabird
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    edited January 8
    Just speaking Occam's Razor for a second.

    You are a company that generates roughly 10-11 thousand dollars a second. Do you purposefully choose a shitty screw to save a shaved penny so that across the entire run of a high end, low volume niche product's niche accessory as to save maybe half a second's worth of revenue across the life of the product... or did you use what was already in your supply chain out of convenience and fuck up, and will probably replace the material in the screws (if they haven't already; this happened 8ish months ago and there hasn't been an ongoing story around this).

    Neither are a particularly good look, but one is significantly, SIGNIFICANTLY more likely than the other.

    syndalis on
    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
    OneAngryPossum
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    syndalis wrote: »
    Just speaking Occam's Razor for a second.

    You are a company that generates roughly 10-11 thousand dollars a second. Do you purposefully choose a shitty screw to save a shaved penny so that across the entire run of a high end, low volume niche product's niche accessory as to save maybe half a second's worth of revenue across the life of the product... or did you use what was already in your supply chain out of convenience and fuck up, and will probably replace the material in the screws (if they haven't already; this happened 8ish months ago and there hasn't been an ongoing story around this).

    Neither are a particularly good look, but one is significantly, SIGNIFICANTLY more likely than the other.

    Yes? Why is that so hard for you to believe?

    That is absolutely a calculus these large companies do. Also one they do: "how many people will return them once it breaks after they remove the screw the first time?"

    Ladies.
    ElvenshaejmcdonaldDronus86DaenrisfurlionBlackDragon480Smrtnik
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    I mean maybe they did that.

    But I bet you their supply lines also had non shit screws too.

    Ladies.
    Gnome-Interruptus
  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    Are you talking about VESA size screws made of pure zinc?

    PSN: Honkalot
    chrishallett83
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    bowen wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    Just speaking Occam's Razor for a second.

    You are a company that generates roughly 10-11 thousand dollars a second. Do you purposefully choose a shitty screw to save a shaved penny so that across the entire run of a high end, low volume niche product's niche accessory as to save maybe half a second's worth of revenue across the life of the product... or did you use what was already in your supply chain out of convenience and fuck up, and will probably replace the material in the screws (if they haven't already; this happened 8ish months ago and there hasn't been an ongoing story around this).

    Neither are a particularly good look, but one is significantly, SIGNIFICANTLY more likely than the other.

    Yes? Why is that so hard for you to believe?

    That is absolutely a calculus these large companies do. Also one they do: "how many people will return them once it breaks after they remove the screw the first time?"

    Because it absolutely doesn't make sense against the margin of the product. This is a niche accessory for a low volume, high margin "prestige" device. And the screw they went with ultimately ruined a multi thousand dollar device that they had to replace.

    If they sell a few hundred thousand iMac Pros I will be flabbergasted, so there isn't a massive cost savings to consider here. Them doing this as a money driver with awareness that this would break and fuck over the consumer actively is just a level of stupid cynicism that doesn't align with reality.

    Like I said, also a bad look... they had zinc, they use zinc on screws in other devices they make, so they used zinc for the accessory as a result and it turns out that was a bad choice.

    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Spicy Rudolph Registered User regular
    syndalis wrote: »
    Just speaking Occam's Razor for a second.

    You are a company that generates roughly 10-11 thousand dollars a second. Do you purposefully choose a shitty screw to save a shaved penny so that across the entire run of a high end, low volume niche product's niche accessory as to save maybe half a second's worth of revenue across the life of the product... or did you use what was already in your supply chain out of convenience and fuck up, and will probably replace the material in the screws (if they haven't already; this happened 8ish months ago and there hasn't been an ongoing story around this).

    Neither are a particularly good look, but one is significantly, SIGNIFICANTLY more likely than the other.

    Neither.

    You license out the part to the lowest bidder, collect a royalty off each sold by sticking your logo on the item, then when things go tits up you refuse warranty work because it's not an Apple product.

    Because that's what actually happened. They only replaced anything because after quite literally months they found out they were dealing with someone with tens of thousands of YouTube subscribers and were looking at a PR nightmare.

    Make. Time.
    redxElvenshaeHefflingIncenjucarMan in the MistsjmcdonaldGennenalyse RuebenKruiteGnome-InterruptusDronus86AridholfurlionBlackDragon480Smrtnikshryke
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Spicy Rudolph Registered User regular
    edited January 8
    Honk wrote: »
    Are you talking about VESA size screws made of pure zinc?

    No.

    Extremely tiny zinc screws going on a proprietary plate design to mount the VESA bracket on the iMac.

    jungleroomx on
    Make. Time.
    Honk
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    edited January 8
    syndalis wrote: »
    Just speaking Occam's Razor for a second.

    You are a company that generates roughly 10-11 thousand dollars a second. Do you purposefully choose a shitty screw to save a shaved penny so that across the entire run of a high end, low volume niche product's niche accessory as to save maybe half a second's worth of revenue across the life of the product... or did you use what was already in your supply chain out of convenience and fuck up, and will probably replace the material in the screws (if they haven't already; this happened 8ish months ago and there hasn't been an ongoing story around this).

    Neither are a particularly good look, but one is significantly, SIGNIFICANTLY more likely than the other.

    Neither.

    You license out the part to the lowest bidder, collect a royalty off each sold by sticking your logo on the item, then when things go tits up you refuse warranty work because it's not an Apple product.

    Because that's what actually happened. They only replaced anything because after quite literally months they found out they were dealing with someone with tens of thousands of YouTube subscribers and were looking at a PR nightmare.

    Who was it licensed to? how do you know it was lowest bidder? How in any way are you sure that "this is what actually happened?" - also, they did support it, just not over the phone because it is a VESA mount; there is precious little a phone support person is going to do in that situation aside from sending you to apple support in person or shipping it off.

    As an aside, I had no idea this thing even happened and I follow a lot of news int his space. I did a little googling since this is being painted as such a big deal and found one youtube video (the one mentioned in the linked article), one review from that person on Apple's product page, another review mentioning the soft screws both from may 2018, and then a few positive reviews, including one where the end user explicitly mentioned the screws seemed fine and it was manufactured in october of 2018.

    There are 7-8 reviews in total across the entire internet, including user reviews, of this product, because it is so amazingly ridiculously low volume and generally intended only for their currently highest end computer when people want to wall/arm mount it... which for iMac users is actually very rare.

    So again... Apple fucks up, used a bad material for part of the design, quietly revises the design... and this is a big deal because?

    syndalis on
    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    syndalis wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    Just speaking Occam's Razor for a second.

    You are a company that generates roughly 10-11 thousand dollars a second. Do you purposefully choose a shitty screw to save a shaved penny so that across the entire run of a high end, low volume niche product's niche accessory as to save maybe half a second's worth of revenue across the life of the product... or did you use what was already in your supply chain out of convenience and fuck up, and will probably replace the material in the screws (if they haven't already; this happened 8ish months ago and there hasn't been an ongoing story around this).

    Neither are a particularly good look, but one is significantly, SIGNIFICANTLY more likely than the other.

    Neither.

    You license out the part to the lowest bidder, collect a royalty off each sold by sticking your logo on the item, then when things go tits up you refuse warranty work because it's not an Apple product.

    Because that's what actually happened. They only replaced anything because after quite literally months they found out they were dealing with someone with tens of thousands of YouTube subscribers and were looking at a PR nightmare.

    Who was it licensed to? how do you know it was lowest bidder? How in any way are you sure that "this is what actually happened?" - also, they did support it, just not over the phone because it is a VESA mount; there is precious little a phone support person is going to do in that situation aside from sending you to apple support in person or shipping it off.

    As an aside, I had no idea this thing even happened and I follow a lot of news int his space. I did a little googling since this is being painted as such a big deal and found one youtube video (the one mentioned in the linked article), one review from that person on Apple's product page, another review mentioning the soft screws both from may 2018, and then a few positive reviews, including one where the end user explicitly mentioned the screws seemed fine and it was manufactured in october of 2018.

    There are 7-8 reviews in total across the entire internet, including user reviews, of this product, because it is so amazingly ridiculously low volume and generally intended only for their currently highest end computer when people want to wall/arm mount it... which for iMac users is actually very rare.

    So again... Apple fucks up, used a bad material for part of the design, quietly revises the design... and this is a big deal because?

    Because Apple are one of the world's leading innovators in fucking over their customers.

    HefflingMan in the MistsMayabirdGnome-InterruptusBlackDragon480shryke
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Spicy Rudolph Registered User regular
    edited January 8
    syndalis wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    Just speaking Occam's Razor for a second.

    You are a company that generates roughly 10-11 thousand dollars a second. Do you purposefully choose a shitty screw to save a shaved penny so that across the entire run of a high end, low volume niche product's niche accessory as to save maybe half a second's worth of revenue across the life of the product... or did you use what was already in your supply chain out of convenience and fuck up, and will probably replace the material in the screws (if they haven't already; this happened 8ish months ago and there hasn't been an ongoing story around this).

    Neither are a particularly good look, but one is significantly, SIGNIFICANTLY more likely than the other.

    Neither.

    You license out the part to the lowest bidder, collect a royalty off each sold by sticking your logo on the item, then when things go tits up you refuse warranty work because it's not an Apple product.

    Because that's what actually happened. They only replaced anything because after quite literally months they found out they were dealing with someone with tens of thousands of YouTube subscribers and were looking at a PR nightmare.

    Who was it licensed to? how do you know it was lowest bidder? How in any way are you sure that "this is what actually happened?" - also, they did support it, just not over the phone because it is a VESA mount; there is precious little a phone support person is going to do in that situation aside from sending you to apple support in person or shipping it off.

    As an aside, I had no idea this thing even happened and I follow a lot of news int his space. I did a little googling since this is being painted as such a big deal and found one youtube video (the one mentioned in the linked article), one review from that person on Apple's product page, another review mentioning the soft screws both from may 2018, and then a few positive reviews, including one where the end user explicitly mentioned the screws seemed fine and it was manufactured in october of 2018.

    There are 7-8 reviews in total across the entire internet, including user reviews, of this product, because it is so amazingly ridiculously low volume and generally intended only for their currently highest end computer when people want to wall/arm mount it... which for iMac users is actually very rare.

    So again... Apple fucks up, used a bad material for part of the design, quietly revises the design... and this is a big deal because?

    For a $5000 machine and a fucking $80 VESA adapter I would expect actual quality control.

    I'm sorry any company who can shove the equivalent of a 2011 desktop into a form factor the size of the iPhone/Galaxy/Pixel doesn't get to use the "whoopsy didn't know THAT would happen" defense when it comes to basic structural engineering.

    jungleroomx on
    Make. Time.
    ElvenshaeHefflingMan in the MistsPolaritieBlackDragon480shryke
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Spicy Rudolph Registered User regular
    Please keep in mind, other people.... VESA adapters for literally everyone else are about $30 at the high end.

    Make. Time.
  • OneAngryPossumOneAngryPossum Registered User regular
    Wouldn’t the right to repair intersection on this be if Apple somehow prevented you from using alternative screws to the ones provided? It seems fairly simple to find steel alternatives and bypass this issue.

    It’s standard Apple tax nonsense, for sure, but am I missing something inherent to the design that prevents customers fixing it themselves?

  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    I’m mostly impressed there are pure zinc screws. I’ve eaten zinc.

    PSN: Honkalot
    MugsleyElvenshaeDronus86
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Spicy Rudolph Registered User regular
    edited January 8
    Wouldn’t the right to repair intersection on this be if Apple somehow prevented you from using alternative screws to the ones provided? It seems fairly simple to find steel alternatives and bypass this issue.

    It’s standard Apple tax nonsense, for sure, but am I missing something inherent to the design that prevents customers fixing it themselves?

    Completely voiding the warranty I'd assume? Non-standardized screw threads would be my other guess. It's not like they haven't used custom screws before.

    The guy already said Apples service system was telling the Genius bar it was accidental damage and not covered.

    jungleroomx on
    Make. Time.
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Honk wrote: »
    I’m mostly impressed there are pure zinc screws. I’ve eaten zinc.

    they're not pure zinc afaik, but it's probably a really shitty zinc coated brass screw

    Ladies.
    Honk
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Spicy Rudolph Registered User regular
    Honk wrote: »
    I’m mostly impressed there are pure zinc screws. I’ve eaten zinc.

    I'm impressed you've eaten zinc!

    Wait was it like, zinc oxide?

    Make. Time.
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Spicy Rudolph Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    Honk wrote: »
    I’m mostly impressed there are pure zinc screws. I’ve eaten zinc.

    they're not pure zinc afaik, but it's probably a really shitty zinc coated brass screw

    If I pay $80 for a VESA adapter that shit better be a titanium alloy that also doubles as a clean linen air freshener and triples as a laundry folder.

    Make. Time.
  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    Honk wrote: »
    I’m mostly impressed there are pure zinc screws. I’ve eaten zinc.

    I'm impressed you've eaten zinc!

    Wait was it like, zinc oxide?

    I can’t say exactly but like zinc pills, someone somewhere claims they get you out of a cold quicker and then you pay $20 for a bottle because why not.

    PSN: Honkalot
    OneAngryPossum
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    Honk wrote: »
    I’m mostly impressed there are pure zinc screws. I’ve eaten zinc.

    they're not pure zinc afaik, but it's probably a really shitty zinc coated brass screw

    If I pay $80 for a VESA adapter that shit better be a titanium alloy that also doubles as a clean linen air freshener and triples as a laundry folder.

    Yeah anyone who's put up a door hinge knows just how shitty brass screws can get. And that's construction quality ones.

    Imagine the small ones used in PC building being tossed up to hold a 15-30 lb monitor to a mount instead.

    I think the sheer strength of brass is 1/3 that of even the shittiest quality steel on things like #8 screws.

    Ladies.
    Shadowfire
  • HefflingHeffling No Pic EverRegistered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    As a species we have a lot of information on how much it takes to break shit.

    We have kits to determine how hard things are via scratch resistance. We have tables of torque strength and mathematical equations that allow us to know how thick metals of certain compositions have to be before they lose their strength at certain forces.

    In short, we know beforehand the general strength of materials used in different applications. We know because we have over a century of testing. This is not arcane nor esoteric knowledge, it's basic engineering.

    There is zero convincing me that neither the company that made that shoddy mount NOR Apple, who put their seal of approval on said mounting system, had no idea that using cheap screws in a load bearing application would not have very good chances to break like this.

    So when, as is quoted, that the screws are designed to break a certain way, it's been designed with their lack of strength in mind.

    The worst part is we're talking the difference between something like $0.001 and $0.0008 for the price difference between a low end steel screw and a zinc one probably. It's hard to find zinc screws because no one really makes them. There are zinc coated steel and aluminium though.

    Granted that doesn't look like a lot but when you make hundreds of thousands of these that's a middle class salary in savings.

    $100,000 * (0.001 - 0.0008) = $100,000 * (0.0002) = $200. And while I think the costs are off by an order of two magnitudes (so $20,000), it's still a trivial amount compared to the profits. As an engineer, the worst part to me is that using a non-standard screw material like this took the conscious decision of at least one other engineer and should have undergone a review process before being approved.

    If a movement doesn't have someone that can sit down opposite those in a position of power and strike a deal, how can that movement achieve success?
    bowenMugsleyBlackDragon480shryke
  • HefflingHeffling No Pic EverRegistered User regular
    Honk wrote: »
    I’m mostly impressed there are pure zinc screws. I’ve eaten zinc.

    You've probably eaten some iron and carbon before, but I don't recommend scaring down on a bag of galvanized nuts. They don't taste anything like almonds. Or so a friend tells me...

    If a movement doesn't have someone that can sit down opposite those in a position of power and strike a deal, how can that movement achieve success?
    Honk
  • RiemannLivesRiemannLives Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    Just speaking Occam's Razor for a second.

    You are a company that generates roughly 10-11 thousand dollars a second. Do you purposefully choose a shitty screw to save a shaved penny so that across the entire run of a high end, low volume niche product's niche accessory as to save maybe half a second's worth of revenue across the life of the product... or did you use what was already in your supply chain out of convenience and fuck up, and will probably replace the material in the screws (if they haven't already; this happened 8ish months ago and there hasn't been an ongoing story around this).

    Neither are a particularly good look, but one is significantly, SIGNIFICANTLY more likely than the other.

    Yes? Why is that so hard for you to believe?

    That is absolutely a calculus these large companies do. Also one they do: "how many people will return them once it breaks after they remove the screw the first time?"

    Agree. Especially since the "you" that syndalis conjectured in order to make a strawman argument there isn't the CEO but a manager who is probably at the level of running a group of ~50-100 people responsible for a single subsystem on a given product.

    bowenchrishallett83
  • HefflingHeffling No Pic EverRegistered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    Honk wrote: »
    I’m mostly impressed there are pure zinc screws. I’ve eaten zinc.

    they're not pure zinc afaik, but it's probably a really shitty zinc coated brass screw

    If I pay $80 for a VESA adapter that shit better be a titanium alloy that also doubles as a clean linen air freshener and triples as a laundry folder.

    Yeah anyone who's put up a door hinge knows just how shitty brass screws can get. And that's construction quality ones.

    Imagine the small ones used in PC building being tossed up to hold a 15-30 lb monitor to a mount instead.

    I think the sheer strength of brass is 1/3 that of even the shittiest quality steel on things like #8 screws.

    A typical threading brass such as C34000 with a 0S025 temper has a yield strength of 19.6 ksi versus something like grade 2 carbon steel, zinc plated, which will have around a 60 ksi yield. Stainless steels can actually have yield strengths as low as 20 ksi and are generally not a good fastener material (at least 300 series isn't).

    If a movement doesn't have someone that can sit down opposite those in a position of power and strike a deal, how can that movement achieve success?
    bowenDronus86
  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    Yes... But how much shear strength do M6 zinc plated screws have?
    ..
    Asking for a friend.

    Steam Community page: http://steamcommunity.com/id/discrider/
    Oh hey! A knife!
    Elvenshae
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    discrider wrote: »
    Yes... But how much shear strength do M6 zinc plated screws have?
    ..
    Asking for a friend.

    If they're steel and there's 4 of them and you bought them from home depot? Probably strong enough to hold several hundred lbs each before shearing. The reason I suspect these screws are brass is because brass is a very soft, malleable metal (depending on its composition). A zinc coated steel screw probably shouldn't break, but like heffling said there are really shitty steels in screws sometimes.

    Ladies.
    Shadowfire
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    There's also the "supplier cheaping out and pocketing the difference" that can happen, which is why you need good supplier qc and contract enforcement.

    bowenredxElvenshaedispatch.oMan in the MistsLoisLane
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Related: apparently the UK passed some sort of law about reducing/eliminating waste, that Right to Repair supporters are calling a win. It seems like a bit of a leap, to me, and doesn't necessarily pressure OEMs to make hardier/repairable items, just on its own.

  • evilbobevilbob Registered User regular
    Flex cable breaks from being bent around a sharp corner every time you open the laptop? Have to replace the entire screen.

    https://ifixit.org/blog/12903/

    DDLLLLDL - Bottom in November
    WWDWDWWWWDWWWWLDWWW - Premiers in April
    WW - Champions in May

    DarkPrimuschrishallett83
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