The image size limit has been raised to 1mb! Anything larger than that should be linked to. This is a HARD limit, please do not abuse it.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

[Roleplaying Games] FFG's Genesys System Out! PDFs on DriveThruRPG!

1414244464751

Posts

  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    The thing to remember about organized play is that there's almost always enough people to start and independent game, and they all clearly have room in their schedule for it. Yet this rarely happens. For a reason.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
    JacobkoshDevoutlyApatheticSleepArdentOatsBrodyElvenshaedresdenphileArcanisTheImpotentMatevThe Hanged ManRainfall
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    Brody wrote: »
    @That DND Podcast guys -> Is the Dresden Files game ever going to go up where we can listen to it?

    Yes, but I think there's still a fair bit of Star to go up first.

    I do believe you are just about to heal angry.

    Oatsjdarksun
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    Brody wrote: »
    @That DND Podcast guys -> Is the Dresden Files game ever going to go up where we can listen to it?

    Yes, but I think there's still a fair bit of Star to go up first.

    I do believe you are just about to heal angry.

    I saw that we're on the planet of murder mystery gladiators, yeah.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    Yes, I just listened to the opening and we're about to engage in 3 simultaneous combats across the span of the galaxy because when we split the party we do not fuck around.

    Also @jdarksun episode numbering is made even more hilarious by @N1tSt4lker voice overing to correct it.

    OptimusZedOatsArdentN1tSt4lkerTheRoadVirusjdarksun
  • ArdentArdent Registered User regular
    Oh man I totally realized that is going to forever be a thing and that's great.

    Steam ID | Origin ID: ArdentX | Uplay ID: theardent | Battle.net: Ardent#11476
    webguy20
  • Grunt's GhostsGrunt's Ghosts Registered User regular
    As much shit as we talk about people of certain groups, I will never live down my only experience with a Rifts player who wanted to bring his guy with laser eyes, rocket launcher kneecaps, and shotgun wielding cyborg elfman into my 4E game and threw a fit like a two year old when I said no.

    FuselageSleepDarkPrimusSteelhawkBrodydresdenphileMrAnthropyJacobkoshMatevRhesus PositiveInfidel
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Spells were defined in terms of cubic meters of earth turned to mud, or air filled with a fireball spell, or whatever.

    Just to nitpick an example, but volumetric fireballs was a 2E and earlier thing. 3E changed it up to cause fireballs to expand like movement (a spread effect rather than a radius effect), rather than require you to calculate the volume of the cave in which you tossed it (a rule which was, almost always, completely ignored except for when it would screw over players in "hilarious"* ways).

    * Sometimes hilarious, sometimes not.

    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
    The Disappearance of Inigo Sharpe: Tomas à Dunsanin
  • admanbadmanb the bored genie Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Tomanta wrote: »
    I actively like Pathfinder. I've had fun games with friends. I tried Pathfinder Society twice and it was awful. Not every player, mind you. Some I'd be fine playing with again. But the others, noooope.

    I recognize that organized play fills a need but for any game I've tried it, it always kind of feels like the soup kitchen of roleplaying to me. I'm glad I have enough regular real groups to keep me busy.
    A soup kitchen RPG volunteer group sounds like an AMAZING idea... volunteer GMs manning various GM screens, various murder-hobos lining up to get their dice, handing out little pamphlets of related literature...

    We could operate out of a local church or something! :D

    But one time this gray-haired old black guy gets really excited. "Oh, man! Dungeons and Dragons! I used to play that! I had me a talking sword!" And he proceeded to excitedly tell us the story of his guy from like, thirty years ago. I could only make out about every fifth word, but it was enough to tell that he knew his shit.

    Oh this reminds me of a rad story.

    My girlfriend and I were on a cruise with another couple and I brought Fiasco. We decided to play in a public area because the seating in our rooms wasn't great*. I tried to sit us down away from most of the activity both for the sake of social anxiety and to avoid confusing anyone listening in to our absurdist wild west drama, but naturally right after we settle in this big middle-aged black guy and his wife sit down next to us.

    So I explain Fiasco, starting with the usual introduction of the Coen brothers movies it's designed to emulate and then going into the mechanics and setup. We pause before cracking open the playset so people can take bathroom breaks and the guy leans over and says something along the lines of, "Sorry to interrupt, but this game you're playing sounds awesome. I love all of the movies you mentioned and I used to play D&D in school." He proceeds to tell us that back in high school he hung out with all the nerds and would act as their protector against bullies.

    Our game continues and they leave about halfway through (thanking us for the free entertainment on their way out) and are replaced almost immediately by a pair of older white ladies. They finish eating and as they stand up one of them politely interrupts us and says, "You guys sound like you're having so much fun -- what's the name of this game?"

    Then my Snidely Whiplash character got his hidden base blown up by a cannon, but re-united with his ex-wife for a happy ending.

    *because we wanted to buy booze

    FuselageSteelhawkdresdenphiledestroyah87RingoJacobkoshTheRoadVirusMatevRhesus PositiveInfidelThe Hanged ManMcKid
  • Grunt's GhostsGrunt's Ghosts Registered User regular
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Spells were defined in terms of cubic meters of earth turned to mud, or air filled with a fireball spell, or whatever.

    Just to nitpick an example, but volumetric fireballs was a 2E and earlier thing. 3E changed it up to cause fireballs to expand like movement (a spread effect rather than a radius effect), rather than require you to calculate the volume of the cave in which you tossed it (a rule which was, almost always, completely ignored except for when it would screw over players in "hilarious"* ways).

    * Sometimes hilarious, sometimes not.

    I don't remember having to do calculus to play DnD...

  • FuselageFuselage Bantha Three ValhallaRegistered User regular
    D&D 6e: Elves and Equations. You can only spell cast or fight as hard as you can math out the situation.

    Many people turn to Charisma and diplomacy checks as their new saviors...

  • SleepSleep Registered User regular
    edited December 5
    Fuselage wrote: »
    D&D 6e: Elves and Equations. You can only spell cast or fight as hard as you can math out the situation.

    Many people turn to Charisma and diplomacy checks as their new saviors...

    .... this isn't the worst idea for trying to use a game to teach math to the young. Using the completion of equations as the resolution mechanic... might be a bit too unforgiving.

    Like they go to make an attack vs the skeleton, you pull up the next randomized flash card and it is 9x7. If they give you the answer 63, they hit!.

    Doing this with calculus would be hilarious

    Sleep on
    ElvenshaeRingoFuselage
  • BrodyBrody Cabot CoveRegistered User regular
    In college one of my friends tried to get a little too into the simulationy aspects of RP in his homebrew system, which also included a class that could manipulate time/space. I deleted his Mary-Sue with a black hole, and the simulation elements were scaled way back.

    destroyah87ElvenshaeitalianranmaJacobkoshToxMatevsullijo
  • ArdentArdent Registered User regular
    Volumetric fireballs were the "are you smart enough to play a wizard?" test, really.

    Steam ID | Origin ID: ArdentX | Uplay ID: theardent | Battle.net: Ardent#11476
    ElvenshaeInfidel
  • BrodyBrody Cabot CoveRegistered User regular
    Sleep wrote: »
    Fuselage wrote: »
    D&D 6e: Elves and Equations. You can only spell cast or fight as hard as you can math out the situation.

    Many people turn to Charisma and diplomacy checks as their new saviors...

    .... this isn't the worst idea for trying to use a game to teach math to the young. Using the completion of equations as the resolution mechanic... might be a bit too unforgiving.

    Like they go to make an attack vs the skeleton, you pull up the next randomized flash card and it is 9x7. If they give you the answer 63, they hit!.

    Doing this with calculus would be hilarious

    4e is just one long algebra problem.

  • SleepSleep Registered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    Sleep wrote: »
    Fuselage wrote: »
    D&D 6e: Elves and Equations. You can only spell cast or fight as hard as you can math out the situation.

    Many people turn to Charisma and diplomacy checks as their new saviors...

    .... this isn't the worst idea for trying to use a game to teach math to the young. Using the completion of equations as the resolution mechanic... might be a bit too unforgiving.

    Like they go to make an attack vs the skeleton, you pull up the next randomized flash card and it is 9x7. If they give you the answer 63, they hit!.

    Doing this with calculus would be hilarious

    4e is just one long algebra problem.

    The joke being that almost all complex games require a baseline ability to do algebra.

    italianranmaMatevRhesus Positive
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    I used d&d to teach math to math-phobic high schoolers. It's was pretty effective.

    I'm also sort of peripherally aware that this is a thing teachers have tried with mostly good results in places where they could swing it without administration coming down hard on them.

    I mean, I wouldn't be overstating the point to say that RPGs taught me algebra the first time around.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
    SleepElvenshaeTheRoadVirus
  • BrodyBrody Cabot CoveRegistered User regular
    I'm really hoping when my daughter is old enough, I can get her excited for APQFASOAHS, and by extension the whole world of RPG's.

    Endless_Serpents
  • SleepSleep Registered User regular
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    I used d&d to teach math to math-phobic high schoolers. It's was pretty effective.

    I'm also sort of peripherally aware that this is a thing teachers have tried with mostly good results in places where they could swing it without administration coming down hard on them.

    I mean, I wouldn't be overstating the point to say that RPGs taught me algebra the first time around.

    magic the gathering, played under threat of detention at a catholic middle school for me. I legitimately never understood why people had a problem comprehending variables as a concept... fireball does x damage where x is equal to the amount of mana paid to cast it -1... how is this news guys?

    ElvenshaeFuselage
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Spells were defined in terms of cubic meters of earth turned to mud, or air filled with a fireball spell, or whatever.

    Just to nitpick an example, but volumetric fireballs was a 2E and earlier thing. 3E changed it up to cause fireballs to expand like movement (a spread effect rather than a radius effect), rather than require you to calculate the volume of the cave in which you tossed it (a rule which was, almost always, completely ignored except for when it would screw over players in "hilarious"* ways).

    * Sometimes hilarious, sometimes not.

    I don't remember having to do calculus to play DnD...
    Like I said, “almost always completely ignored.”

    And I literally almost used “calculus” in my initial post. :D

    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
    The Disappearance of Inigo Sharpe: Tomas à Dunsanin
  • ToxTox I kill threads Punch DimensionRegistered User regular
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Spells were defined in terms of cubic meters of earth turned to mud, or air filled with a fireball spell, or whatever.

    Just to nitpick an example, but volumetric fireballs was a 2E and earlier thing. 3E changed it up to cause fireballs to expand like movement (a spread effect rather than a radius effect), rather than require you to calculate the volume of the cave in which you tossed it (a rule which was, almost always, completely ignored except for when it would screw over players in "hilarious"* ways).

    * Sometimes hilarious, sometimes not.

    In AD&D I tried to Call Lightning in a cave.

    Do not try to Call Lightning in a cave.

    (it was actually funny as hell but in-game it was very much a Whoops moment.)

    Wishlists! General | Gaming | Comics | Dilige, et quod vis fac
    Elvenshae
  • ZomroZomro Registered User regular
    Got my copy of Genesys yesterday. I dig what I'm seeing so far, and I'm excited to start using the guidelines and toolkits to create my world.

    I have a rough idea of the plot, and I know I'm going to run a fantasy game, but I'm figuring out what to do as far as races and availability of magic. However, I absolutely want to stat out gunpowder weapons, like flintlock pistols and muskets. My idea being that a cooperation of humans, gnomes and dwarves led to the discovery of firearms.

    jdarksunElvenshaeKadokenSteelhawkBrody
  • KadokenKadoken I'm an adult Registered User regular
    Everything is better with guns. Especially early ones in fantasy settings.

    Elvenshae
  • SteelhawkSteelhawk Registered User regular
    If you delve into the Iron Kingdoms/Warmachine fluff they have a great comingling of science and just-a-little bit of magic/alchemy in the invention of their firearms.

    I am stealing inspired quite liberally by IK and also Eberron for my own homebrew "floating islands" type setting that I am cooking up.

  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    A fantasy firearm concept that I've always liked is the idea that the different species/cultures developed the same kind of idea in parallel, but using their own means. So maybe humans have the chemical explosive version that we're familiar with, but elves have guns that use magically enchanted powder and dwarves have runes carved into their barrels that bind earth spirits that magnetically propel steel balls instead.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
    SteelhawkjdarksunKen OJacobkoshSleepDevoutlyApatheticRhesus PositiveElvenshaeBrodyThe Hanged ManRingoArdentTheRoadVirus
  • SteelhawkSteelhawk Registered User regular
    edited December 6
    I'm kind of doing that with how each race has generating the power of flight in my campaign.

    Elves have graceful winged sailing ships that coast on the winds. My reclusive and mysterious Dwarves who hide the in their "Last Mountain" sail the skies via their merchant Gnome client-race with Ogre client-race army and use Elemental powered airships a la Eberron. Hobgoblins (the most powerful race in my setting simply by the virtue of having the most arable land) use armored dirigibles and steam powered engines to lord their power over others. Humans, of course, use a mish-mash of all these various methods.

    Edit: Also, that way I can steal concept art from all over the internet to hand my players as visual aids. :)

    Steelhawk on
    Ken OElvenshaeBrodyRingoFuselageTheRoadVirus
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Steelhawk wrote: »
    Edit: Also, that way I can steal concept art from all over the internet to hand my players as visual aids. :)

    Never underestimate this advantage.

    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
    The Disappearance of Inigo Sharpe: Tomas à Dunsanin
    SleepSteelhawk
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    A fantasy firearm concept that I've always liked is the idea that the different species/cultures developed the same kind of idea in parallel, but using their own means. So maybe humans have the chemical explosive version that we're familiar with, but elves have guns that use magically enchanted powder and dwarves have runes carved into their barrels that bind earth spirits that magnetically propel steel balls instead.

    Yea, I've always liked the idea that adamantine or something can be made to have insanely high spring constants and so dwarves have "rifles" that are really just spring powered pellet launchers. It can be pretty reasonable to make them basically muzzle loading muskets in game effect while feeling super dwarfy.

    ElvenshaeSleepjdarksunOptimusZedThe Hanged ManTheRoadVirusMatev
  • jdarksunjdarksun Scion of Chaos Registered User regular
    I'm taking notes on how to incorporate gunpowder in the game we're starting... uh, tomorrow! Geeze.
    Brody wrote: »
    @That DND Podcast guys -> Is the Dresden Files game ever going to go up where we can listen to it?
    @Brody I'll check to see how many eps we have left of Star Wars.

    OptimusZedTheRoadVirus
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    John Harper is the designer if Blades in the Dark;


    Nerds, start your engines

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
    InfideljdarksunElvenshaeMrAnthropyDevoutlyApatheticOne Thousand CablesadmanbFuselageJacobkoshwebguy20ArdentTheRoadVirusRhesus Positive
  • MrAnthropyMrAnthropy Court Mathemagician From BeyondRegistered User regular
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    John Harper is the designer if Blades in the Dark;


    Nerds, start your engines

    Time to add Knights of the Cross-Trade (PCs as thieves guild in Sigil) to the rpg bucket list...

    "Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows." -- George Orwell
    "The only real politics I knew was that if a guy liked Hitler, I’d beat the stuffing out of him and that would be it." -- Jack Kirby
    I am a noise maker: And They Have A Plan
    JacobkoshElvenshaeInfidel
  • FuselageFuselage Bantha Three ValhallaRegistered User regular
    Zomro wrote: »
    Got my copy of Genesys yesterday. I dig what I'm seeing so far, and I'm excited to start using the guidelines and toolkits to create my world.

    I have a rough idea of the plot, and I know I'm going to run a fantasy game, but I'm figuring out what to do as far as races and availability of magic. However, I absolutely want to stat out gunpowder weapons, like flintlock pistols and muskets. My idea being that a cooperation of humans, gnomes and dwarves led to the discovery of firearms.

    While not the same creative load people want for originality, Warcraft Genesys could very quickly get made with more than a few people willing to help.

  • webguy20webguy20 Registered User regular
    Damn i really want to get blades in the darkness to the table.

    Steam ID: Webguy20
    Origin ID: Discgolfer27
    Untappd ID: Discgolfer1981
  • The Hanged ManThe Hanged Man Once I ate a pizza so big, they gave me a prize. Then I threw up and they took it back.Registered User regular
    edited December 6
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    A fantasy firearm concept that I've always liked is the idea that the different species/cultures developed the same kind of idea in parallel, but using their own means. So maybe humans have the chemical explosive version that we're familiar with, but elves have guns that use magically enchanted powder and dwarves have runes carved into their barrels that bind earth spirits that magnetically propel steel balls instead.

    That's how guns work in my main homebrew setting, which is post-industrial fantasy currently undergoing a rapid build-up in military tech comparable to the early days of WW1.
    Humans make guns the same way they do on Earth, partially because there's been an influx of inter-dimensional refugees from Earth to influence technology. Humans also have the strongest tradition of academic wizardry, so they're the most likely to experiment with weird enchanted firearms, but there are some practicality concerns that have prevented any of these from becoming widespread. (Some humans are weird and have diverged pretty far from earth-comparable tech. See under Beastfolk, below.)

    Dwarves have never been big on ranged weapons, what with living underground in narrow winding tunnels, but when they make them they don't half-ass it. Dwarven Guns operate by the same mechanical principles as Human Guns, but each one is a bespoke masterwork tailored to the specific needs and eccentricities of the wielder. Dwarven Guns are extremely sturdy and reliable, and rarely malfunction. If you see something that looks like a mass-produced Dwarven Gun, it's probably a Human or Goblin knock-off.

    Goblins were tasked by the gods to be the guardians of the border to the underworld, and feel an uncomfortably intimate bond to all implements of death. They are able to rapidly acquire proficiency with any and all weapons regardless of source, even weapons whose esoteric nature should technically place them outside of the Goblin's capabilities. When they make their own guns, they tend to employ particularly murderous ghosts bound into the mechanism to deliver projectiles via Poltergeist effects rather than chemical propellants. They also have a gift for taking harmless-seeming objects and improvising a weapon whose operation makes no damn sense from a rational analysis of the materials used.

    Giants mostly don't bother with material tools, as their life cycle eventually causes them to become too large to survive in the physical world, at which point they retreat to the Realm of Dreams. When a Young Giant uses guns, it's usually a modification of a human one intended for vehicle mounting, or crafted similarly to those used by the legendary human Paladins of Mojatar, who wear strength-assisting magitech armor. When an Old Giant uses guns, it's a psionic manifestation of Dream Realm stuff suited to the aesthetics of that Giant's mindscape, and frankly obeys whatever physical parameters the Giant can impose locally through sheer strength of will.

    Elves are tied most closely to the Astral Heights, the realm of Fate. Their elegant needle guns eject projectiles with a burst of opposed-element magic charge that's not dissimilar to an electromagnetic pulse. They are designed without a single thought being given to accuracy, as the needle is told before firing who it is Destined to strike. Complex ricocheting trick shots are common, as are Elves firing casually into dense crowds or at foes in close combat with their allies. Since they require Fate Magic to operate, if an Elf is disarmed by an opponent their weapon is nearly useless in nearly any other hands. Goblins obviously can compensate, as can Wizards who have studied the Element of Light, which governs prophecy and the future.

    Golems, as machines possessed of life force, have learned to infuse part of their essence into other machines and temporarily animate them. This is wasteful and strenuous though, and the range isn't great, so mostly they use Human crafted weapons unless circumstances leave them no option but to send a piece of their soul to guide a bullet to an enemy's heart. A Golem wishing to empower a projectile is more likely to make something like a throwing axe or javelin that will come back to them. Many of the oldest generation of Golems, built as instruments of war before the viral spread of sentience through their ranks, incorporate conventional firearms directly into their bodies.

    Beastfolk have few unified traditions, since that's a catch-all title for such a diverse bunch of creatures. The one link between them all is that their ultimate origin was an empire of human alchemists who used flesh-sculpting potions to make various slave-races for different tasks. It isn't unheard of for Beastfolk who escape to free lands to do so with stolen alchemical secrets, some of which include constructing organic weapon systems - giant grubs that excrete bullet-like pellets at high speeds, or poisoned needle throwing plants. Many of these potions actually grow organic weapons directly into the body of the wielder, but the Beastfolk are extremely nervous about anything that might further destabilize their forms, and disinclined to share any of their hard-won secrets with non-Beastfolk even if they have no urge to use those secrets themselves. Of the thirteen greater beastfolk tribes, the proud Suvarna raven-folk are the least likely by far to integrate weapons into their flesh, while the barely-sentient Troll pig-folk are the most cavalier about it.

    Alshendan are a race of weird nightmarish spider-locusts left over from a universe that died before this one was born. But unlike other void-refugees, they're friendly. Sort of. They have a strictly voluntary relationship with concepts like space and distance, and have thus never felt the need to develop ranged weapons. Sometimes they gift other races with one of their larvae as a symbiotic implant, which makes the "lucky" host able to manifest space-warping conduits that make it look like they're punching a dude from fifty feet away.

    Shenen are the other race of dead universe survivors, maybe the same race as the Alshendan but manifest differently as big acidic leech-dragons. They're the hostile ones. They reproduce by stealing and transforming mortal bodies, and use whatever tech their host was familiar with, until their transformation progresses enough that they don't have the right size/shape of limbs to use the item, or else they've started dripping enough void-acid to just ruin whatever they touch.

    The Hanged Man on
    TUMBLR: canstthoudrawoutleviathan.tumblr.com (tabletop RPG anecdotes & art)
    TWITTER: @DesertLeviathan, PSN: LeviathanAscends, 3DS FRIEND CODE: 1590-4800-2407
    Udt7kZy.png
    KadokenElvenshaeRingo
  • webguy20webguy20 Registered User regular
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    A fantasy firearm concept that I've always liked is the idea that the different species/cultures developed the same kind of idea in parallel, but using their own means. So maybe humans have the chemical explosive version that we're familiar with, but elves have guns that use magically enchanted powder and dwarves have runes carved into their barrels that bind earth spirits that magnetically propel steel balls instead.

    That's how guns work in my main homebrew setting, which is post-industrial fantasy currently undergoing a rapid build-up in military tech comparable to the early days of WW1.
    Humans make guns the same way they do on Earth, partially because there's been an influx of inter-dimensional refugees from Earth to influence technology. Humans also have the strongest tradition of academic wizardry, so they're the most likely to experiment with weird enchanted firearms, but there are some practicality concerns that have prevented any of these from becoming widespread. (Some humans are weird and have diverged pretty far from earth-comparable tech. See under Beastfolk, below.)

    Dwarves have never been big on ranged weapons, what with living underground in narrow winding tunnels, but when they make them they don't half-ass it. Dwarven Guns operate by the same mechanical principles as Human Guns, but each one is a bespoke masterwork tailored to the specific needs and eccentricities of the wielder. Dwarven Guns are extremely sturdy and reliable, and rarely malfunction. If you see something that looks like a mass-produced Dwarven Gun, it's probably a Human or Goblin knock-off.

    Goblins were tasked by the gods to be the guardians of the border to the underworld, and feel an uncomfortably intimate bond to all implements of death. They are able to rapidly acquire proficiency with any and all weapons regardless of source, even weapons whose esoteric nature should technically place them outside of the Goblin's capabilities. When they make their own guns, they tend to employ particularly murderous ghosts bound into the mechanism to deliver projectiles via Poltergeist effects rather than chemical propellants. They also have a gift for taking harmless-seeming objects and improvising a weapon whose operation makes no damn sense from a rational analysis of the materials used.

    Giants mostly don't bother with material tools, as their life cycle eventually causes them to become too large to survive in the physical world, at which point they retreat to the Realm of Dreams. When a Young Giant uses guns, it's usually a modification of a human one intended for vehicle mounting, or crafted similarly to those used by the legendary human Paladins of Mojatar, who wear strength-assisting magitech armor. When an Old Giant uses guns, it's a psionic manifestation of Dream Realm stuff suited to the aesthetics of that Giant's mindscape, and frankly obeys whatever physical parameters the Giant can impose locally through sheer strength of will.

    Elves are tied most closely to the Astral Heights, the realm of Fate. Their elegant needle guns eject projectiles with a burst of opposed-element magic charge that's not dissimilar to an electromagnetic pulse. They are designed without a single thought being given to accuracy, as the needle is told before firing who it is Destined to strike. Complex ricocheting trick shots are common, as are Elves firing casually into dense crowds or at foes in close combat with their allies. Since they require Fate Magic to operate, if an Elf is disarmed by an opponent their weapon is nearly useless in nearly any other hands. Goblins obviously can compensate, as can Wizards who have studied the Element of Light, which governs prophecy and the future.

    Golems, as machines possessed of life force, have learned to infuse part of their essence into other machines and temporarily animate them. This is wasteful and strenuous though, and the range isn't great, so mostly they use Human crafted weapons unless circumstances leave them no option but to send a piece of their soul to guide a bullet to an enemy's heart. A Golem wishing to empower a projectile is more likely to make something like a throwing axe or javelin that will come back to them. Many of the oldest generation of Golems, built as instruments of war before the viral spread of sentience through their ranks, incorporate conventional firearms directly into their bodies.

    Beastfolk have few unified traditions, since that's a catch-all title for such a diverse bunch of creatures. The one link between them all is that their ultimate origin was an empire of human alchemists who used flesh-sculpting potions to make various slave-races for different tasks. It isn't unheard of for Beastfolk who escape to free lands to do so with stolen alchemical secrets, some of which include constructing organic weapon systems - giant grubs that excrete bullet-like pellets at high speeds, or poisoned needle throwing plants. Many of these potions actually grow organic weapons directly into the body of the wielder, but the Beastfolk are extremely nervous about anything that might further destabilize their forms, and disinclined to share any of their hard-won secrets with non-Beastfolk even if they have no urge to use those secrets themselves. Of the thirteen greater beastfolk tribes, the proud Suvarna raven-folk are the least likely by far to integrate weapons into their flesh, while the barely-sentient Troll pig-folk are the most cavalier about it.

    Alshendan are a race of weird nightmarish spider-locusts left over from a universe that died before this one was born. But unlike other void-refugees, they're friendly. Sort of. They have a strictly voluntary relationship with concepts like space and distance, and have thus never felt the need to develop ranged weapons. Sometimes they gift other races with one of their larvae as a symbiotic implant, which makes the "lucky" host able to manifest space-warping conduits that make it look like they're punching a dude from fifty feet away.

    Shenen are the other race of dead universe survivors, maybe the same race as the Alshendan but manifest differently as big acidic leech-dragons. They're the hostile ones. They reproduce by stealing and transforming mortal bodies, and use whatever tech their host was familiar with, until their transformation progresses enough that they don't have the right size/shape of limbs to use the item, or else they've started dripping enough void-acid to just ruin whatever they touch.

    Id like to subscribe to your newsletter

    Steam ID: Webguy20
    Origin ID: Discgolfer27
    Untappd ID: Discgolfer1981
    ElvenshaeRingoPMAversJacobyFuselage
  • KadokenKadoken I'm an adult Registered User regular
    Looking back at a homebrew adventure I wrote for my main group. Everyone in my main group had to take a hiatus because uni. Fuck this reads awful. I used to write everything like it's a script I would pretty much just read from the page, and because of that it's bloated to hell and awkward. Really happy I've had more experience with the gaming club group I made.

  • McKidMcKid Registered User regular
    My The Nightmares Underneath mini-campaign just ended last week and we are switching to Blades in the Dark in January, so the website launch is just perfect to link to my players and motivate them !

    webguy20
  • [Expletive deleted][Expletive deleted] The mediocre doctor NorwayRegistered User regular
    What's Blades in the Dark?

    Sic transit gloria mundi.
  • Alistair HuttonAlistair Hutton Dr EdinburghRegistered User regular
    What's Blades in the Dark?

    In the same way that Feng Shui is about making combat wicked awesome and not bogged down with unfun and Gumshoe is about making investigations wicked awesome and not bogged down with unfun Blades in the dark is about making Heists wicked awesome and not bogged down in unfun.

    I have a thoughtful and infrequently updated blog about games http://whatithinkaboutwhenithinkaboutgames.wordpress.com/

    I made a game, it has penguins in it. It's pay what you like on Gumroad.

    Currently Ebaying Nothing at all but I might do in the future.
  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    Stop talking about Blades in the Dark, I don't need another super cool game I'll never get to play and I'm trying not to get it... or Genesys... or the Dracula Dossier bundle...

    (BitD seems super rad. Keep talking about it)

  • BrodyBrody Cabot CoveRegistered User regular
    I could probably convince my friends to play BitD, as we all really enjoyed The Lies of Locke Lamora.

    Elvenshae
Sign In or Register to comment.