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Homeowner/House Thread: It's going to cost more than you expect

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  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Cog wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    wood foundation

    huh never seen that before

    It feels like it puts some kind of shorter expiration date on the house than concrete would. And termites would be utterly devastating instead of just possibly crippling.

    Looks like pressure treated lumber, so it's "bug resistant"

    Ladies.
  • N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    A wood foundation on the ground or is it a raised foundation?

  • So It GoesSo It Goes We keep moving...Registered User, Moderator mod
    The phrase "wood foundation" makes me extremely nervous

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  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    N1tSt4lker wrote: »
    A wood foundation on the ground or is it a raised foundation?

    It's what's called a "permanent wood foundation" - basically posts are put on concrete footers, then a stud wall is built out and sheathed in pressure treated lumber with moisture barriers in and out.

    As for why this was done, I'd bet it was because a) it was cheaper than a poured foundation, b) this area is actually seismically active, and c) we're north enough that some of the more destructive breeds of insect aren't here.

    The big thing is that this may give the bank pause, and require evaluation by a structural engineer.

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  • SkeithSkeith Registered User regular
    How does a wood foundation weather quakes better? The flexibility of the wood allows for some amount of movement rather than stress fractures, or...?

    mts wrote: »
    heres how i see it being a total win situation for you
    1. stay with your wife while she dog sits. this wins husband points since she knows its out of your comfort zone
    2. have sex all over her friends house so that the next time you see her friend look at you condescendingly, you can wink back knowing you did the freaky deaky where she eats her cheerios.
    Gabriel_Pitt
  • evilmrhenryevilmrhenry Registered User regular
    N1tSt4lker wrote: »
    A wood foundation on the ground or is it a raised foundation?

    It's what's called a "permanent wood foundation" - basically posts are put on concrete footers, then a stud wall is built out and sheathed in pressure treated lumber with moisture barriers in and out.

    As for why this was done, I'd bet it was because a) it was cheaper than a poured foundation, b) this area is actually seismically active, and c) we're north enough that some of the more destructive breeds of insect aren't here.

    The big thing is that this may give the bank pause, and require evaluation by a structural engineer.

    After a quick Google, it looks reasonable; it's not a ticking time bomb or anything as long as it was installed correctly. (Make sure the grade looks good though, and there's no flooding issues in the area.) The real downside is going to be selling it; the phrase "wood foundation" will scare off buyers. Expect to get a lower price than a similar house with a concrete foundation. (Which should be reflected in your offer.) Also, if you need repairs, there will probably be only 1 company in the area that actually knows how to make those repairs.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Skeith wrote: »
    How does a wood foundation weather quakes better? The flexibility of the wood allows for some amount of movement rather than stress fractures, or...?

    Essentially: "Why spend lots of money with concrete if it might get destroyed in 15-20 years anyways?"

    Ladies.
    Sorce
  • navgoosenavgoose Registered User regular
    I'm grumpy that the cheap $20 shoplights I bought at Costco are ONLY plug in installation. Considering the time of year it may talke less time to install an outlet on each current one rather than wait in line to return them.

    Maybe crack one open and see If I cant force it into wired servitude.

  • evilmrhenryevilmrhenry Registered User regular
    edited December 6
    navgoose wrote: »
    I'm grumpy that the cheap $20 shoplights I bought at Costco are ONLY plug in installation. Considering the time of year it may talke less time to install an outlet on each current one rather than wait in line to return them.

    Maybe crack one open and see If I cant force it into wired servitude.

    120v is 120v. Cut the cord, match the wires, and it'll work. (This is assuming it's not converting to internal voltage with a AC adapter or something.)
    I think an outlet setup would be more professional, though.

    EDIT: actually, I bet there are code issues here. You might get in trouble for hardwiring a light fixture that's designed to be plugged in, or you might get in trouble for adding an outlet to a lighting circuit, so look this stuff up.

    evilmrhenry on
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  • navgoosenavgoose Registered User regular
    I spent three dollars on some wood dowels and then used logs/twigs/scrap around the house to shamelessly rip off some art designs I saw over the weekend:

    Spoiler secular Xmas themes:
    jzblsqzwckie.jpg

    d2kbqxaasgnv.jpg

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  • minor incidentminor incident Helen Keller to the bullshit Registered User regular
    Your birchdeer is awesome.

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  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Your birchdeer is awesome.

    It needs an arrow sticking out of it, for effect.

    navgoose wrote: »
    I'm grumpy that the cheap $20 shoplights I bought at Costco are ONLY plug in installation. Considering the time of year it may talke less time to install an outlet on each current one rather than wait in line to return them.

    Maybe crack one open and see If I cant force it into wired servitude.

    120v is 120v. Cut the cord, match the wires, and it'll work. (This is assuming it's not converting to internal voltage with a AC adapter or something.)
    I think an outlet setup would be more professional, though.

    EDIT: actually, I bet there are code issues here. You might get in trouble for hardwiring a light fixture that's designed to be plugged in, or you might get in trouble for adding an outlet to a lighting circuit, so look this stuff up.

    Code is code. Last I remember, this would work as long as you're splicing inside a junction box and not just taping the everloving shit out of a few wirenuts. But, yes, at least talk to an electrician.

    CommunistCow
  • The WolfmanThe Wolfman Registered User regular
    That sort of begs a question I've always had. Isn't the whole "code" thing just for registered contractors and the like? Meaning you the regular amature homeowner can do whatever you like, under the assumption that it's on you if something happens? The only time it'll be a problem is during insurance claims and/or proper selling of the house. Otherwise people in suits won't suddenly appear at your door because that toilet isn't the proper distance from the wall or anything.

    Though in this specific case, you're dealing with electricity, so yeah, better safe than sorry.

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  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Sure, you can essentially do what you want but if anyone finds out you'll get fined and possibly have claims denied.

    Ladies.
  • DaimarDaimar A Million Feet Tall of Awesome Registered User regular
    Not building to code also destroys your home value if it is discovered in an inspection when you try to sell.

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  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    I mean...

    I would recommend doing it to at least code regardless.

    I think the issue is kind of being hinted at of: "should I pull a permit when it's my own home and I know what I'm doing and going to do at least minimum code?"

    The answer is: yes you should, but any homeowner can tell you that that is often times not what actually happens when you live in the home longer than a year and start poking around at things.

    Ladies.
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Bad example: I have two steps leading from my garage into the house. Based on code, I need a handrailing. There has never been a handrail there and I don't intend to install one.

    If someone asks me to put one in during inspection, I will probably put it in. If we replace the steps for whatever reason, I will probably add a handrail.

  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    edited December 7
    Building codes are in general the same as tax codes. You are always required to follow the ones for the jurisdiction you live in. And like the IRS, the local government spends very little effort enforcing those rules. For the most part it only comes up when someone reports someone else they want to dick over.

    The only difference between working in the house you live in and a commercial property is that you don't have to be licensed to do the work (provided you do not intend to sell/rent it within the next 1-2 years).

    As an example of how stupid this can be (requirements for oregon):
    Permits are not required for:
    • Removing and replacing broken or damaged electrical outlets like for like only. However, permits are required to install, upgrade or change outlets for decorative purposes. If a GFCI protected outlet is required by code, a permit is required.
    • Removing and replacing broken or damaged light fixtures like for like only. However, permits are required to install, upgrade or change outlets for decorative purposes.
    • Removing and replacing broken or damaged light switches like for like only. However, permits are required to install, upgrade or change outlets for decorative purposes.
    • Replacing approved fuses or defective breakers like for like only.
    • Replacing an existing garbage disposal, dishwasher, electric tank water heater, or similar appliance of 30 amps or less.
    • Installing low-voltage wiring for garage door openers.
    • Installing phone outlets or CATV (Community Access TV) however, wire must be listed type wire.

    So you can apparently replace a 25 amp hard wired water heater no problem, but installing in-the-wall speaker wire or upgrading a light fixture needs a permit plus inspections.

    Jebus314 on
    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    It's code around here that you need to have those pain in the ass vacuum breakers on your outdoor water spigots with the little set screw that breaks off so you can't just easily remove the damn things. They spray water everywhere and I hate them so goddamn much. First thing I did was go out with a hacksaw and cut those fuckers off. Now I don't wind up taking a bath every time I want to use a garden hose. And nobody in black suits have busted down my door over the code violation. I would follow the ones that keep you from getting killed or destroying your house at the very least, and make sure everything is up to code again before you sell the place.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • Phoenix-DPhoenix-D Registered User regular
    It's code around here that you need to have those pain in the ass vacuum breakers on your outdoor water spigots with the little set screw that breaks off so you can't just easily remove the damn things. They spray water everywhere and I hate them so goddamn much. First thing I did was go out with a hacksaw and cut those fuckers off. Now I don't wind up taking a bath every time I want to use a garden hose. And nobody in black suits have busted down my door over the code violation. I would follow the ones that keep you from getting killed or destroying your house at the very least, and make sure everything is up to code again before you sell the place.

    That one is to prevent backflow from whatever shit water your hose might be in from being syphoned into the water supply..

    LaOs
  • navgoosenavgoose Registered User regular
    Yeah codes usually derive from a safety protocol or sometimes from durability concern (often still tangential to safety).

    Violating code isn't the same as breaking the law. But selling something or a service as code compliant when it isn't can be against the law.

    Elvenshae
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    I can definitely tell you a lot of the modern work in the house I bought was not up to code, which is fun. Because you know someone cut corners and there's probably something dangerous somewhere.

    Ladies.
    ElvenshaeL Ron HowardFairchild
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular

    Dryer guy came. "Let's see if your exhaust duct just needs cleaning."
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  • minor incidentminor incident Helen Keller to the bullshit Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Dryer guy came. "Let's see if your exhaust duct just needs cleaning."

    Kinky.

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  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Dryer guy came. "Let's see if your exhaust duct just needs cleaning."
    ioer3ucy8ulx.jpg
    4vmdin3xt0tg.jpg

    Is that a collar stay?

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  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    (sigh)

    I really like this house, and there was no major signs of problems with it from the inspection. But everything I've been reading about the foundation has been mixed, and the person the realtor recommended for a second opinion I haven't been able to reach.

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  • AimAim Registered User regular
    Thought experiment/ question for your agent- if you needed to, would you be able to pour in a typical foundation in place?

  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    I bought one of those dryer duct cleaning kits when I moved into my place. I rigged up my air duster with the stopper and ran the brush wand through, connected to my power drill.. I ended up going at it from both sides since the wand wasn't long enough. Man did a lot of crap come out of there. I don't think it had been cleaned since the place was built in 2010.

    camo_sig.png
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    Aim wrote: »
    Thought experiment/ question for your agent- if you needed to, would you be able to pour in a typical foundation in place?

    I believe so, though it would be painfully expensive.

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    bowen
  • AimAim Registered User regular
    Aim wrote: »
    Thought experiment/ question for your agent- if you needed to, would you be able to pour in a typical foundation in place?

    I believe so, though it would be painfully expensive.

    Yeah, that's probably your worst case scenario.

  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    (sigh)

    I really like this house, and there was no major signs of problems with it from the inspection. But everything I've been reading about the foundation has been mixed, and the person the realtor recommended for a second opinion I haven't been able to reach.

    @AngelHedgie When I was looking for a house everything I read suggested not using inspectors your realtor provides. The idea being that the realtor has a vested interest in getting you in a house as quick as possible and will find inspectors that will help them with that. I would try and find an inspector yourself.

    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
    Elvenshae
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    (sigh)

    I really like this house, and there was no major signs of problems with it from the inspection. But everything I've been reading about the foundation has been mixed, and the person the realtor recommended for a second opinion I haven't been able to reach.

    AngelHedgie When I was looking for a house everything I read suggested not using inspectors your realtor provides. The idea being that the realtor has a vested interest in getting you in a house as quick as possible and will find inspectors that will help them with that. I would try and find an inspector yourself.

    I found the initial inspector I used on my own. (Part of the problem here is that the community is so small, everyone in these sorts of fields knows everyone else.) The idea with the second inspection is more to reassure over the foundation.

    Beyond the foundation (and from what I've read and seen, there's nothing indicating it was installed wrong or failing), the biggest issue are some code violations with the master attic (and some can't be dealt with till spring, since they involve the roof.)

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  • JeanJean Soon to be papa bear Gatineau, QuébecRegistered User regular
    Aim wrote: »
    Thought experiment/ question for your agent- if you needed to, would you be able to pour in a typical foundation in place?

    I believe so, though it would be painfully expensive.

    well, you could try negotiating down the purchase price to relfect that. That wood fondation is going to be an issue with any potential buyer of this property. Seller has to be aware of that fact.

    "You won't destroy us, You won't destroy our democracy. We are a small but proud nation. No one can bomb us to silence. No one can scare us from being Norway. This evening and tonight, we'll take care of each other. That's what we do best when attacked'' - Jens Stoltenberg
  • JoolanderJoolander Registered User regular
    edited December 8
    Alright, so my water pressure is seriously low, like goddamn

    The city claims they are supplying 50 psi to my home

    I assume there is a pressure restriction valve or something on my property somewhere. What do I do to find it??

    Joolander on
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited December 8
    Joolander wrote: »
    Alright, so my water pressure is seriously low, like goddamn

    The city claims they are supplying 50 psi to my home

    I assume there is a pressure restriction valve or something on my property somewhere. What do I do to find it??

    It's either going to be at the water department shutoff, which would be an in-ground valve somewhere between your house and the street, usually covered by a round iron cap 5 inches or so in diameter, sometimes just dark iron in color but sometimes painted blue and likely labeled "water" or "water dept." or "water meter", or, if you know where the service actually comes into your house, there's likely a shutoff valve there too so you don't have to get the city to come out in the event you have to shut your water off for plumbing repairs, it would be before where the pipe splits off to go to the water heater.

    If the in-house valve is wide open, it takes a special tool to turn the city valve.

    matt has a problem on
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    Jebus314
  • PantsBPantsB Registered User regular
    edited December 8
    We are the proud new owners of a fenced back yard to help keep our younger dog from deciding to visit the neighbors every once in a while
    nfAArEl.png?1
    SQJ8VNe.png?1

    It wasn't cheap but it got done in just over two days of work. Black chainlink around two sides, white vinyl street side and one side we just linked up to our neighbor's existing wood fence.

    Now we just need to put some kind of lattice type thing below the porch so there isn't a gap, and possibly building stairs from that porch into the yard with a small swinging gate for the main entrance to the porch

    PantsB on
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  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    Phoenix-D wrote: »
    It's code around here that you need to have those pain in the ass vacuum breakers on your outdoor water spigots with the little set screw that breaks off so you can't just easily remove the damn things. They spray water everywhere and I hate them so goddamn much. First thing I did was go out with a hacksaw and cut those fuckers off. Now I don't wind up taking a bath every time I want to use a garden hose. And nobody in black suits have busted down my door over the code violation. I would follow the ones that keep you from getting killed or destroying your house at the very least, and make sure everything is up to code again before you sell the place.

    That one is to prevent backflow from whatever shit water your hose might be in from being syphoned into the water supply..

    I know what it's for and I don't leave the hose submerged in a pool of feces.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
    MugsleyElvenshae
  • Dark_SideDark_Side Registered User regular
    edited December 9
    So when I bought my house last year, I left the yard essentially fallow, the flipper had tore it all up and there was a lot of bare soil, but I missed the good window to re-seed. I figured I'd just let it go for a year, keep it mowed, and see what happens, so I'd have a better plan for next spring. The front yard ended up looking pretty ugly (ragweed took over late in the season and surprised me.) and I'm not super pumped about it, but it is what is.

    But now my wonderful neighbors have decided that they should be able to drive over my lawn and the sidewalk in front of my house to access the side of their lot and park their work truck. They've been doing it so much that they're tearing up the soil next to the sidewalk and it's bare dirt now, to the point I can see the new tire tracks every time they do it. And I'm getting pretty annoyed. I finally caught them in the act on thanksgiving and told them to stop, and I got a one week reprieve before I found new tire tracks. I'd been meaning to pull some small boulders out of the back yard and put them in the front, so I went ahead and did that to protect what's left of the top soil, but I half expect them to just go even farther into my yard. I don't want to call the cops for this, but I'm not seeing any other option. Hopefully they'll stop now and I can move on.

    Dark_Side on
  • Banzai5150Banzai5150 Registered User regular
    Caltrops!

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  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Get some hunting cameras so you have evidence. You may need to confront them about it to get them to stop. Or, just half-bury some old nails in the dirt and it should stop relatively quick

    SorceElvenshae
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