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Archery is fun! Kate>Clint

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  • TallahasseerielTallahasseeriel Registered User regular
    edited September 2017
    webguy20 wrote: »
    Uriel wrote: »
    My step brother owns a compound bow.

    He said something about going to let me try it out sometime.

    Apparently his has a really hefty pull weight though.

    Being able to draw the bow and let it down smoothly would not be something I would want to learn with a high draw weight.

    For compound the first time out for an average uninjured man i would recommend 50/60 lb bow to learn the basics safely.

    There is a fair amount to learn to draw a bow back correctly, and let it back down without firing. A person doesn't want to figure that out while shaking and struggling with the equipment.

    We might have to go to the local archery shop and just rent me one with a lower draw weight then.

    They have a range and classes too.

    Tallahasseeriel on
  • Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Uriel wrote: »
    My step brother owns a compound bow.

    He said something about going to let me try it out sometime.

    Apparently his has a really hefty pull weight though.

    The whole point of compounds is that the further you pull them back the less effort it takes. Most modern compounds have a "let off" of around 60-70 percent, so a compound with a 70 pound draw weight and a 60% let off only requires the same holding strength as a 28 pound recurve. Then when you release the string, the cam action increasing the force delivered to the arrow results in extremely high velocities, which is why >300ft/s is not a big deal for a quality modern compound shooting carbon fibre arrows.

    TallahasseerielbowenDouglasDanger
  • Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Also, if you use correct form then your bow arm is pretty much locked out solid and your drawing arm is mostly using your lats and biceps to draw the string, so high draw weights aren't really a big deal, because both those muscle groups are quite powerful even if they're not particularly developed.

  • TallahasseerielTallahasseeriel Registered User regular
    Oh neat.

    I'll have to look into it sometime next month then.

    Maybe sometime around my birthday him and I will go to the local archery range and give it a try. I'll have to rent safety gear anyway I'm sure.

  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Uriel wrote: »
    webguy20 wrote: »
    Uriel wrote: »
    My step brother owns a compound bow.

    He said something about going to let me try it out sometime.

    Apparently his has a really hefty pull weight though.

    Being able to draw the bow and let it down smoothly would not be something I would want to learn with a high draw weight.

    For compound the first time out for an average uninjured man i would recommend 50/60 lb bow to learn the basics safely.

    There is a fair amount to learn to draw a bow back correctly, and let it back down without firing. A person doesn't want to figure that out while shaking and struggling with the equipment.

    We might have to go to the local archery shop and just rent me one with a lower draw weight then.

    They have a range and classes too.

    Most places will just let you use a bow free of charge if you're a newbie trying out bows to see what feels right.

    Call ahead to a shop with a range and find out when they're normally slow and go rent some range time and let them know you need training. A good shop will be more than glad to teach someone the basics, especially if there is a potential sale on the line.

    most important rule for drawing a bow is you should be able to draw the bow back smoothly while pointed at the target, not at the ground or sky. Either of those two are very dangerous practices to learn.

    The range I used to go to had a few arrows stuck in the ceiling from it. They made a rule about it and started kicking people out for improperly drawing bows back.

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    Tallahasseeriel
  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    Yeah, I would definitely suggest learning the basic form on a lower weight, if possible

    I'm a scrawny person, so 70 pounds with arms, shoulders and back is a bit much for me

    Tallahasseerielwebguy20
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Yeah, I would definitely suggest learning the basic form on a lower weight, if possible

    I'm a scrawny person, so 70 pounds with arms, shoulders and back is a bit much for me

    And you have to hold your whole draw weight! Us compound folks got it easy. We just have to pull it pack, then we can luxuriate in only having to hold back around 15lbs.

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  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    30 lbs is still probably a lot of draw weight for a beginner anyways.

    Sure an average adult male should be able to handle 45-50 lbs on a recurve, but unless you've done it a lot you're going to struggle (also it'll be hard to string the bow).

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    a5bhywscdfrj.png

    7gtGq9S.jpg

    these toys are quite a bit of fun and surprisingly powerful/accurate

    they can actually be a little bit too powerful for indoor archery tag, given that they can smash windows/lightbulbs/monitors





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  • SorceSorce Not ThereRegistered User regular
    And remember, Ollie Queen has a 100lb. draw weight (in the comics).

    sig.gif
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Sorce wrote: »
    And remember, Ollie Queen has a 100lb. draw weight (in the comics).

    Are they superhuman? (I don't follow comics). I've shot a 100lb compound and they are a fucker to draw, and they beat you up pretty good. They're pretty much for shooting rhinos and elephants. I know some folks who have used them for moose, but an 80lb bow will get the job done.

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  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    edited September 2017
    There's dudes on Instagram who shoot 100 pound recurves and longbows

    English longbows back in the Agincourt/Crecy era were around 100 pounds, I think

    There's also a technique with releasing almost instantly after you hit your anchor point, which is what I'm hoping to do eventually

    You aim a sightless bow as you draw it, ideally

    DouglasDanger on
  • Munkus BeaverMunkus Beaver You don't have to attend every argument you are invited to. Philosophy: Stoicism. Politics: Democratic SocialistRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    webguy20 wrote: »
    Sorce wrote: »
    And remember, Ollie Queen has a 100lb. draw weight (in the comics).

    Are they superhuman? (I don't follow comics). I've shot a 100lb compound and they are a fucker to draw, and they beat you up pretty good. They're pretty much for shooting rhinos and elephants. I know some folks who have used them for moose, but an 80lb bow will get the job done.

    Hawkeye's is 250 lbs.

    Humor can be dissected as a frog can, but dies in the process.
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    edited September 2017
    There's dudes on Instagram who shoot 100 pound recurves and longbows

    English longbows back in the Agincourt/Crecy era were around 100 pounds, I think

    There's also a technique with releasing almost instantly after you hit your anchor point, which is what I'm hoping to do eventually

    You aim a sightless bow as you draw it, ideally

    My buddy who does Olympic recurve has a clicker on his bow, so yea, he gets to about 90% draw, aims, and pulls back and right at the same place every time the clicker goes off (its set on the arrow) and he releases. He has gotten pretty good at aiming quickly.

    250lbs is insane! Do they ever say what its made of in the comics, like vibranium or something? I fucking love the crazy shit in comics.

    webguy20 on
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  • BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    Does olympic level archery have restrictions on the bow types and technology that you can use?

  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    edited September 2017
    Brolo wrote: »
    Does olympic level archery have restrictions on the bow types and technology that you can use?

    Yes, specifically you have to use a recurve bow, but those bows are at the height of recurve technology. I'm fairly sure there are some restrictions on arrows, limb material and possibly riser material as well. I wouldn't be surprised anyways.

    I found this handy graphic of an olympic style bow!

    bow-anatomy.jpg

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  • PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    Just popped in this thread because I saw the word "Clint" on my phone as a different word that starts with a C and ends in nt. I might be the only one, though.

  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    edited October 2017
    I saw a bow at a yardsale and got it for $5

    yr1mbi3bjcht.jpg

    bq8gt7hlwhcd.jpg

    r0bqx9453i4g.jpg

    Kids should love it!

    Is the string supposed to look like this?

    p6i7a5141na3.jpg

    edit: apparently it was made in 1968

    Xaquin on
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  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    That's great

    You need a new string

    Are there any archery shops around you?

    That's actually a pretty heavy draw weight

    48 pounds at 28 inches

    My bow is 45 at 28

    I'm a scrawny adult, lots of people suggest adults starting at 35 pounds

    A heavy draw weight can create bad habits if you don't have your form all figured out

  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    That's great

    You need a new string

    Are there any archery shops around you?

    That's actually a pretty heavy draw weight

    48 pounds at 28 inches

    My bow is 45 at 28

    I'm a scrawny adult, lots of people suggest adults starting at 35 pounds

    A heavy draw weight can create bad habits if you don't have your form all figured out

    I know literally nothing about archery except $5 is apparently my price point for sport entry. There is a hunting shop nearby, I guess I could hit it sometime!

  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    apparently, they only sell gun stuff

    so what kind of string do I buy? Or should I track down a shop and take the bow there to make sure it doesn't have some hidden flaw that will snap the bow and put an arrow in my foot?

  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Xaquin wrote: »
    apparently, they only sell gun stuff

    so what kind of string do I buy? Or should I track down a shop and take the bow there to make sure it doesn't have some hidden flaw that will snap the bow and put an arrow in my foot?

    Take it to a shop that is knowledgeable about recurves. A bow that old could have cracks or other damage you wouldn't know how to look for. You don't want a bow to explode at full draw. It at best is scary as shit and worst you get seriously injured/blinded.

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  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    Yeah, definitely take it to a shop

    Even a shop that focuses on compound will know a person

    Google your location and archery

    Xaquin
  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    oh hey, I guess there's an archery shop less than 15 minutes from my house!

    webguy20chromdomDouglasDangerRhesus PositiveSorceMortal Sky
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Back when I worked at a bow manufacturer you could hear a bow blow up all the way across the factory floor. Super loud. 99% were from someone loading it into a press incorrectly and over compressing a limb.

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  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    Holy crap archery is expensive

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  • SorceSorce Not ThereRegistered User regular
    That's why Oliver Queen hunts corporate fatcats; he gets jealous they got to keep their money while his got drained by his hobby.

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    Xaquin
  • Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Xaquin wrote: »
    Holy crap archery is expensive

    Most archery ranges and stores have beginner packages where you get a complete bow, half a dozen arrows, stuff like a quiver and wristguard, and a target for a package deal of a couple of hundred dollars. See if you can talk your way into a deal like that MINUS the bow, because that's easily the big-dollar item in the package.

    When you're starting out there's no point whatsoever in buying the expensive lightweight carbon arrows in woodland camouflage that are like $35 each, what you want are the ultra cheap aluminium ones in bright neon colours to help you find them when you (inevitably) miss a target. When the arrows are $5 each you don't really give a fuck if you bend or lose one, because hell it was $5.

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  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    Yeah, I was looking at their prices and just string, a stringer, armguard, and leather shooting glove was $100

    That was without arrows and brass thingys on the string that I've never heard of before

  • Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    Xaquin wrote: »
    Yeah, I was looking at their prices and just string, a stringer, armguard, and leather shooting glove was $100

    That was without arrows and brass thingys on the string that I've never heard of before

    Those are called brass thingys

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  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    Xaquin wrote: »
    Yeah, I was looking at their prices and just string, a stringer, armguard, and leather shooting glove was $100

    That was without arrows and brass thingys on the string that I've never heard of before

    Think of the money you saved on the bow

    My bow was $300, I think, then I spent $150 on the first round of arrows and accessories, and I'm addicted or whatever, so I've probably spent another $300 since then

  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    edited October 2017
    Xaquin wrote: »
    Yeah, I was looking at their prices and just string, a stringer, armguard, and leather shooting glove was $100

    That was without arrows and brass thingys on the string that I've never heard of before

    Think of the money you saved on the bow

    My bow was $300, I think, then I spent $150 on the first round of arrows and accessories, and I'm addicted or whatever, so I've probably spent another $300 since then

    Thats about the starting price for a good compound package too.

    Also for compounds a good time to buy is right after hunting season (in the US). New bows are usually released leading up to or at the Archery Trade Association show in January, so private parties and pro-shops will usually want to get rid of their old stuff in preparation. Hunters especially LOVE to upgrade their bows every year, even when the gains are negligible, and you can pick up a high quality bow with low shots for a song as long as you're ok with a camo bow.

    Getting in with the local competition scene (indoor/outdoor/3d) can be another great place to score deals. I've been offered $1000 retail bows for $500 that are a year old because I was in that group and they knew I was a decent guy and not a jackass. A lot of archers are really into helping other archers succeed, and you can get some good deals that way. Just make sure to pay it forward when you upgrade later on.

    There is pretty much never a reason to buy a high end bow (of any kind) new, unless you absolutely have to have the latest and greatest, and there isn't really a reason to besides "oooh shiny!" which I won't lie, is a pretty strong draw.

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  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    I'm in the woods with my bow and arrows for deer archery season. It's raining, of course, but I'm very excited.

    Xaquin
  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    man has entered the forest.

  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2018
    Hey, so it's been an age, but I finally assembled an arrow, and figured out how my set-up works.

    My parents bought me a fletching jig for my birthday. I bought already nocked aluminium shafts, arrow wraps, fletchings, glue, and adhesive tape.

    I bought two colors of fletchings, blue and orange, the idea being to go with an orange wraps, two orange feathers and one blue.

    The orange wrap doesn't match the orange fletching, and that would drive me insane, so I went with a four fletchings at 90 degree style.

    I'm not sure if it will work with my bow set up, as I shoot off the shelf. I'll try it tonight or tomorrow morning.

    If it does, great, I'll go with orange wraps and blue fletchings. If it doesn't, I'll probably omit the wraps. They're a completely cosmetic thing, maybe they would make it easier to find an arrow that missed the target, maybe not.

    Anyway, it was fun, if a bit stressful, as I am a clumsy handed fool.



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  • PhantPhant Registered User regular
    Its been a long time since I had a good place to shoot, but those vanes look backwards to me.

  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    They look symmetrical to me, but I'm not sure. They're a new shape, called either parabolic, banana, or magnum, depending on the vendor.

  • PhantPhant Registered User regular
    They look symmetrical to me, but I'm not sure. They're a new shape, called either parabolic, banana, or magnum, depending on the vendor.

    ahh, that might be it, I'm used to vanes with the more fat, rounded back ends.

  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    I made a few more arrows, and went with the more traditional three fletching style.

    The fletchings seem to work ok.

    Fishmanchromdombowen
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