[Fitness and Weight Management]: It's a lifestyle

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  • NaphtaliNaphtali Null Registered User regular
    @initiatefailure fitness boxing is that intense, huh? How do you rate it compared to RingFit, if you've tried that as well?

    B.net: Naphtali#1830 | Steam | Nintendo ID: Naphtali | PSN: EI-Naphtali | Wish List
  • ShadowhopeShadowhope Baa. Registered User regular
    Cycling is a thing that I’ve regressed at.

    From 2007 or so until the end of 2013, I cycled to work almost every day from March to November. It was about 8k either way, and I’d typically take a detour of another 4k or so in the afternoon to go to the local business park to buy food. And then I’d be on the bike again on the weekend. I was doing about 100k a week, more or less. I stopped cycling when I got laid off from that job, and my commute went from 8k across a trail with minimal opportunities to be hit by cars to being 25k with travel along one of the busiest arteries in the city. I did that commute a few times, but mostly gave up on it.

    When the weather was warmer, I had started to commit to doing 10k running/22k cycling on alternate days, but with the trail covered in snow and no desire to be on the road that’s stopped. One of my goals last year had been do cycle 100k in a day; the most that I ever got to was 40k. Also, when I tried to go fast, I found that despite being in better cardiovascular condition by far than I was seven years ago, I was still about thirty seconds slower for 8k than I used to be.

    I have an exercise bike in the basement now, so I keep meaning to put in more time on that to help build strength/stamina for being out on the trail, but I keep not doing nearly so much as I plan.

    Stay at home every morning from the health department warning, take the 8:15 in to the kitchen
  • initiatefailureinitiatefailure Registered User regular
    edited January 13
    I thinks it's slightly suspect in the "teaching you form" aspects but that might be filled out more in the basic training section I haven't really checked that. It's a very ddr-ified experience so as the difficulty and length ramp up I imagine it's pretty close to a guided fitness class but with scoring.

    I think ring fit has a better variety workout and it's a much more adventure gamified experience built around it so if you're looking for a game experience to keep you going it's more interesting. Boxing is basically a virtual personal trainer.

    Also I know ring fit has the silent running mode but boxing is way easier on apartment floor living

    initiatefailure on
    I Do Design | I PSN- Subtle_Ties | 3DS: 3840-5210-2008 (Subtle)
  • JuggernutJuggernut Registered User regular
    Finally got a new digital scale and weighed in at 213 lbs this AM, which is about exactly where I thought I was. If I can get back down to 210 in the next few weeks while maintaining my current muscle mass I'll be on the right track I think.

    Which probably means no more booze.

    I just... I need a minute.

    ShadowhopeKyougu
  • NaphtaliNaphtali Null Registered User regular
    I thinks it's slightly suspect in the "teaching you form" aspects but that might be filled out more in the basic training section I haven't really checked that. It's a very ddr-ified experience so as the difficulty and length ramp up I imagine it's pretty close to a guided fitness class but with scoring.

    I think ring fit has a better variety workout and it's a much more adventure gamified experience built around it so if you're looking for a game experience to keep you going it's more interesting. Boxing is basically a virtual personal trainer.

    Also I know ring fit has the silent running mode but boxing is way easier on apartment floor living

    Yeah, I very much liked the variety stuff in Ring Fit, but I wasn't super impressed with it as a cardio outlet (I mean, you can absolutely get wrecked doing it, but I was using it as a substitution for running/biking in which I found it a bit less than satisfactory there). Seems like the fitness boxing is a better go for that if that's what you're looking for then.

    B.net: Naphtali#1830 | Steam | Nintendo ID: Naphtali | PSN: EI-Naphtali | Wish List
  • initiatefailureinitiatefailure Registered User regular
    Yeah, hitting a heavy bag was already my favorite cardio, so shadowboxing to a digital trainers hype voice and bouncy music isn't half bad. Plus it told me after the first day that it estimated my fitness age at 10 years older so now I have a grudge to settle.

    I Do Design | I PSN- Subtle_Ties | 3DS: 3840-5210-2008 (Subtle)
  • UsagiUsagi Nah Registered User regular
    Ashaman42 wrote: »
    Peen wrote: »
    If @Ashaman42 is still around I think they're one of the distance riders.
    Usagi wrote: »
    Do we have any long-distance cyclers in the thread?

    Questions of better judgement aside, I've set myself a summer goal of getting my century ride/100km. Last summer I was consistently doing 150+km a week, but maxxed out at about 40km in a single go, so this will definitely be a reach.

    And because it's the PNW and raining it's the bike trainer for me for the next few months (grroooooaaaan)!

    Usagi

    It me!

    Well, I used to be a long distance rider anyway, haven't done anything particularly long in a couple years for one reason and another. Apologies in advance if anything is a bit stating the obvious.

    General rule of thumb for long rides is if you can do half the target in reasonable comfort then you should be fine doing the full thing though you might ache a bit (possibly a lot) by the end.
    When I was doing 100km+ rides with any frequency a lot of my preparation was commuting by bike which at the time was ~25km each way. I wasn't doing that every day so probably similar to your 150km a week.

    Your first couple times, and maybe even every time if you don't do then that often a 100k is going to leave your bum, and possibly wrists/shoulders/neck a bit sore by the end. Basically anything that irritates on a shorter ride will only get worse on a longer ride. It's not all doom and gloom though. It does get better as you get stronger/ride more.

    There are things you can do to help though:
    • Ride more - I can tell when I do a longer ride after a spell off the bike. My bum etc hurt. They're just not used to it. With a build up of preparation rides your body does get used to it and toughen up.
    • Make sure your saddle suits you - this is very much a person to person thing, one saddle that someone raves about is an instrument of torture to the next rider. A general rule of thumb (rule of bum!) is that whilst a thickly padded saddle looks more comfortable it's often not the case in reality. They're fine for shorter rides but on a longer ride rather than supporting your sit bones the padding mushes up into the softer regions and starts putting pressure on blood vessels and nerves.
    • Similarly I find padded gloves help but different people prefer padding in different places.
    • Core strength helps - the stronger your core is the less weight you put on your hands/wrists and the easier it is hold your head up without getting a sore neck.
    • Mudguards - I know you don't like riding in the raining but full length mudguards make a hell of a difference, and keep the bike cleaner. But yeah a steady spray of gritty grotty water spraying up your back can lead to a horrible grinding paste in your shorts.
    • Move around/stretch - try not to stay in one steady position the entire time you're riding, get out of the saddle every once in a while and a) let some air and blood flow around down "there" and b) move your hands around from time to time on the bars, if you have flat bars then barends are good for another position and dropbars naturally have several positions. There are some leg/back/arm stretches that you can do when riding especially if you can ride one handed happily. If not there's a lot to be said for getting off every 20km or so and doing a few stretches. You may be stopping for the next part anyway.
    • Fooooooood! And water I guess. Some people can happily do 100km+ with a bottle of water and half a banana. Especially when trained. I certainly can't. The main mistake people make is waiting till they're starting to flag before eating. At that point it's probably too late as it takes time to digest and when your body starts getting stressed it can divert blood away from your gut and the food just sits there. Similarly they end up drinking once they're dehydrated rather than preemptively. For me I've found a good solid breakfast and a couple mugs of tea before I set off work well and then I eat and drink little and often. If you can eat on the go great but if you need to stop every once in a while then better to do so than not eat. And as I said above you can do a few stretches at the same time. Some people prefer real food and other use energy gels. It's really a case of trying things out and seeing what works for you. The main rule is don't try something completely new on the day of your big ride, try things out in training rides. Some people find certain foods irritate their stomach and you don't want that when the long ride was otherwise going well.
    • Suncream and lipbalm are always a good plan even on a hazy day. It's easy to sunburn on a bike because the airflow can mask burning until you stop.

    This all assumes that your bike fits you. I keep meaning to get a proper bike fit done but a) money and b) just as I decided to spend the money COVID happened. Stems and handlebars can be changed to adjust reach and even different length cranks can help if needed. But that's a whole other story.

    Regarding the comfort of the trainer. I find the exercise bike far worse than a real bike. Partly that's because it has a different saddle but mostly it's that I don't move around as much unless I concentrate on doing so and that it's a constant steady slog. In real life you have hills that you can coast down and get a breather and maybe a bumpy sections of road that gets you up out of the saddle.

    Ok, that turned into a big wall o' text. For all that I've blathered on the other thing to do is not overthink it. If you can do 150km+ weeks and 40km in a go you're well on the way to doing 100km in one hit.

    Yessss, thank you for this! Some of it I got down but some of it is new, I appreciate it!

    I did spring for a fitting when I bought my bike and that made a huge difference in comfort from previous bike, but it may be time to change my saddle (it just occurred to me that it's 3 years old and I know they wear out with use woooops).

    And I guess one of the things I never realized about long rides is that people take breaks, because of course they do lmao

    ShadowhopetynicLost Salient
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    laughing my ass off (this bike saddle it is important to take breaks guys stay healthy) indeed

  • UsagiUsagi Nah Registered User regular
    Oh trust me, at about 22km on the trainer I wish I could laugh my ass off :P

  • NaphtaliNaphtali Null Registered User regular
    I'm still working on laughing the gut off, no joy yet though. :rotate:

    B.net: Naphtali#1830 | Steam | Nintendo ID: Naphtali | PSN: EI-Naphtali | Wish List
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    Usagi wrote: »
    Oh trust me, at about 22km on the trainer I wish I could laugh my ass off :P

    I have nothing but respect for you cardio smashing types,it amazes me. I just can't keep up with the exercise regime long enough to see concrete improvements. But I do think if I got a bike I'd enjoy it more, just need to find cardio that I actually don't hate doing!

  • IcemopperIcemopper Registered User regular
    Usagi wrote: »
    Ashaman42 wrote: »
    Peen wrote: »
    If @Ashaman42 is still around I think they're one of the distance riders.
    Usagi wrote: »
    Do we have any long-distance cyclers in the thread?

    Questions of better judgement aside, I've set myself a summer goal of getting my century ride/100km. Last summer I was consistently doing 150+km a week, but maxxed out at about 40km in a single go, so this will definitely be a reach.

    And because it's the PNW and raining it's the bike trainer for me for the next few months (grroooooaaaan)!

    Usagi

    It me!

    Well, I used to be a long distance rider anyway, haven't done anything particularly long in a couple years for one reason and another. Apologies in advance if anything is a bit stating the obvious.

    General rule of thumb for long rides is if you can do half the target in reasonable comfort then you should be fine doing the full thing though you might ache a bit (possibly a lot) by the end.
    When I was doing 100km+ rides with any frequency a lot of my preparation was commuting by bike which at the time was ~25km each way. I wasn't doing that every day so probably similar to your 150km a week.

    Your first couple times, and maybe even every time if you don't do then that often a 100k is going to leave your bum, and possibly wrists/shoulders/neck a bit sore by the end. Basically anything that irritates on a shorter ride will only get worse on a longer ride. It's not all doom and gloom though. It does get better as you get stronger/ride more.

    There are things you can do to help though:
    • Ride more - I can tell when I do a longer ride after a spell off the bike. My bum etc hurt. They're just not used to it. With a build up of preparation rides your body does get used to it and toughen up.
    • Make sure your saddle suits you - this is very much a person to person thing, one saddle that someone raves about is an instrument of torture to the next rider. A general rule of thumb (rule of bum!) is that whilst a thickly padded saddle looks more comfortable it's often not the case in reality. They're fine for shorter rides but on a longer ride rather than supporting your sit bones the padding mushes up into the softer regions and starts putting pressure on blood vessels and nerves.
    • Similarly I find padded gloves help but different people prefer padding in different places.
    • Core strength helps - the stronger your core is the less weight you put on your hands/wrists and the easier it is hold your head up without getting a sore neck.
    • Mudguards - I know you don't like riding in the raining but full length mudguards make a hell of a difference, and keep the bike cleaner. But yeah a steady spray of gritty grotty water spraying up your back can lead to a horrible grinding paste in your shorts.
    • Move around/stretch - try not to stay in one steady position the entire time you're riding, get out of the saddle every once in a while and a) let some air and blood flow around down "there" and b) move your hands around from time to time on the bars, if you have flat bars then barends are good for another position and dropbars naturally have several positions. There are some leg/back/arm stretches that you can do when riding especially if you can ride one handed happily. If not there's a lot to be said for getting off every 20km or so and doing a few stretches. You may be stopping for the next part anyway.
    • Fooooooood! And water I guess. Some people can happily do 100km+ with a bottle of water and half a banana. Especially when trained. I certainly can't. The main mistake people make is waiting till they're starting to flag before eating. At that point it's probably too late as it takes time to digest and when your body starts getting stressed it can divert blood away from your gut and the food just sits there. Similarly they end up drinking once they're dehydrated rather than preemptively. For me I've found a good solid breakfast and a couple mugs of tea before I set off work well and then I eat and drink little and often. If you can eat on the go great but if you need to stop every once in a while then better to do so than not eat. And as I said above you can do a few stretches at the same time. Some people prefer real food and other use energy gels. It's really a case of trying things out and seeing what works for you. The main rule is don't try something completely new on the day of your big ride, try things out in training rides. Some people find certain foods irritate their stomach and you don't want that when the long ride was otherwise going well.
    • Suncream and lipbalm are always a good plan even on a hazy day. It's easy to sunburn on a bike because the airflow can mask burning until you stop.

    This all assumes that your bike fits you. I keep meaning to get a proper bike fit done but a) money and b) just as I decided to spend the money COVID happened. Stems and handlebars can be changed to adjust reach and even different length cranks can help if needed. But that's a whole other story.

    Regarding the comfort of the trainer. I find the exercise bike far worse than a real bike. Partly that's because it has a different saddle but mostly it's that I don't move around as much unless I concentrate on doing so and that it's a constant steady slog. In real life you have hills that you can coast down and get a breather and maybe a bumpy sections of road that gets you up out of the saddle.

    Ok, that turned into a big wall o' text. For all that I've blathered on the other thing to do is not overthink it. If you can do 150km+ weeks and 40km in a go you're well on the way to doing 100km in one hit.

    Yessss, thank you for this! Some of it I got down but some of it is new, I appreciate it!

    I did spring for a fitting when I bought my bike and that made a huge difference in comfort from previous bike, but it may be time to change my saddle (it just occurred to me that it's 3 years old and I know they wear out with use woooops).

    And I guess one of the things I never realized about long rides is that people take breaks, because of course they do lmao

    Absolutely on longer rides I take breaks unless it is for some reason more competitive, which I never really did those rides. Anything above 2 hours I will absolutely get off the bike, hopefully find a toilet, and have a nice snack and change out water bottles. If you're route-planning, gas stations are very helpful, but it usually helps to make a purchase there like a sports drink so it doesn't look like you're just there for the toilet (which I am).

    Usagitynic
  • ShadowhopeShadowhope Baa. Registered User regular
    Solar wrote: »
    Usagi wrote: »
    Oh trust me, at about 22km on the trainer I wish I could laugh my ass off :P

    I have nothing but respect for you cardio smashing types,it amazes me. I just can't keep up with the exercise regime long enough to see concrete improvements. But I do think if I got a bike I'd enjoy it more, just need to find cardio that I actually don't hate doing!

    For me, running is a little like grinding in an MMO. It’s boring, but it’s a satisfying kind of boring, and I grind out achievements by doing it. I mostly just spend my time thinking about random crap while I run. It’s sort of meditative almost.

    For me, biking is the sort of thing that I need to give myself a reason to do. I can get my groceries by putting saddle bags on my bike or just wearing a backpack. And if multiple trips are needed, so much the better. I was able to commute to work for a few years by just incorporating cycling as the easiest way to get there. But getting on the bike and cycling somewhere for an hour is a lot harder to do, I can’t find the motivation. Last winter, I had some success with the exercise bike by putting a tablet on it and watching TV. I think that I’ll try to get back to doing that.

    Stay at home every morning from the health department warning, take the 8:15 in to the kitchen
    EncDesserted
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion Pronouns: He, Him, HisRegistered User regular
    Shadowhope wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    Usagi wrote: »
    Oh trust me, at about 22km on the trainer I wish I could laugh my ass off :P

    I have nothing but respect for you cardio smashing types,it amazes me. I just can't keep up with the exercise regime long enough to see concrete improvements. But I do think if I got a bike I'd enjoy it more, just need to find cardio that I actually don't hate doing!

    For me, running is a little like grinding in an MMO. It’s boring, but it’s a satisfying kind of boring, and I grind out achievements by doing it. I mostly just spend my time thinking about random crap while I run. It’s sort of meditative almost.

    For me, biking is the sort of thing that I need to give myself a reason to do. I can get my groceries by putting saddle bags on my bike or just wearing a backpack. And if multiple trips are needed, so much the better. I was able to commute to work for a few years by just incorporating cycling as the easiest way to get there. But getting on the bike and cycling somewhere for an hour is a lot harder to do, I can’t find the motivation. Last winter, I had some success with the exercise bike by putting a tablet on it and watching TV. I think that I’ll try to get back to doing that.

    Yeah, re: running as a meditative thing - I got a soundtrack and use that time to think of what I'm gonna run in my weekly D&D game, usually. For me the best run is the run you aren't aware you are doing, you're just in that runner's high moving and thinking about something else.

    Naphtalitynic
  • JuggernutJuggernut Registered User regular
    I don't mind running outside but I absolutely cannot do treadmills for more than like, 5 minutes.

    I'm not really a good runner either. If I push it too hard or far I can fuck up my hip pretty quick so I tend to do it very rarely and never more than a brisk jog.

    Desserted
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion Pronouns: He, Him, HisRegistered User regular
    Last year, when I had a gym membership, I tried a treadmill for the first time. I hated it. But after a month I came to appreciate some of the benefits. You can measure out the work done a bit better than with a run outside, and if you have a little screen it can help pass the time a bit. I ran really early in the morning and the only shows that one could watch with the setup were really news or HGTV, so I ended up running a 5k daily on the treadmill while listening to my running music mix and watching house flippers. It was strange. But you do get used to it.

    That said, when you go from treadmill to running in the street again, hoo boy. The shinsplints are terrible because your body is not ready for the range of motion of not running on a perfectly even surface.

  • initiatefailureinitiatefailure Registered User regular
    i honestly haven't seriously ran since 8th grade. i've tried to add it to routines or attempts to work out since then with very little success. it's weird. like running in a game was always fine and great. but running to run beat up my knees and put me in stiches much quicker than a soccer or basketball game ever did.

    I really like biking in the abstract. i spent my childhood strapped to a bike. i've tried doing it as a primary activity since moving to the city and it will be great in spurts and then chained to my building fence for months. it's possible the pandemic was a big part of that and i no longer work a bikeable job.

    I think that's why i'm getting more into the fitness boxing game. it connects to an activity i enjoyed doing on my own before, and is very easy for me to keep up on my own, in my apartment

    I Do Design | I PSN- Subtle_Ties | 3DS: 3840-5210-2008 (Subtle)
  • Ashaman42Ashaman42 Registered User regular
    Usagi wrote: »

    Yessss, thank you for this! Some of it I got down but some of it is new, I appreciate it!

    I did spring for a fitting when I bought my bike and that made a huge difference in comfort from previous bike, but it may be time to change my saddle (it just occurred to me that it's 3 years old and I know they wear out with use woooops).

    And I guess one of the things I never realized about long rides is that people take breaks, because of course they do lmao

    Eehhh, padded ones can break down internally a bit and the covering on some saddles can wear a bit but I wouldn't say saddles in general wear out. A faulty or super light weight saddle that's used a lot might have a rail break but they tend to crack before they go so the occasional once over should flag that up.

    A different saddle might be better for your particular derriere but I wouldn't change a saddle that has no obvious problems just because you've had it a few years. I mean if it looks fine but it has become less comfortable with no other changes it might be worth a look.

    My oldest saddle is about 14 years old and apart from a scuffed corner where I dropped the bike onto a concrete block it's about the same as when I got it. And it had a good seven years of pretty high mileage before I changed the main bike to a different once because it was more comfy.

    Icemoppertynic
  • UsagiUsagi Nah Registered User regular
    Solar wrote: »
    Usagi wrote: »
    Oh trust me, at about 22km on the trainer I wish I could laugh my ass off :P

    I have nothing but respect for you cardio smashing types,it amazes me. I just can't keep up with the exercise regime long enough to see concrete improvements. But I do think if I got a bike I'd enjoy it more, just need to find cardio that I actually don't hate doing!

    I find it helps to be frustrated/angry about something and then just cruise through while you process them feels

    So of course I'm forcing myself to watch the Star Wars prequels and let me tell you every time Jar Jar or whingey adolescent Anakin come on screen my RPMs go zooooom

    Solar
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Treadmills end up hurting my knees because I always end up close to the front and chopping my stride. I can never keep a natural running motion.

    I like running, especially in lockdown, because it's about the only time I can listen to podcasts and get some space from the kids.

    For meal prep if you like salads they're pretty easy to prep 4 or 5 in advance. Back when I was doing them regularly for lunch I could easily make 5 in the same amount of time it would take to do 1.5 if I was doing them individually. Toss them in a tupperware and then dress them with some balsamic vinegar right before eating.

    Also ice cubes work great for reheating rice. Toss a couple cubes on top, cover them, then heat for like 2 minutes and your rice should be damn close to pot fresh.

    EncKyougu
  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    I prefer running on the ground, but the town I live in is not at all friendly to pedestrians and there's not a good gym around, much less that I would be comfortable at one now

    So

    Home treadmill it is

    It's not my favorite thing in the world, but I'm trying to use it as training and view it that way

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
  • DessertedDesserted Dessert desertRegistered User regular
    I used to get really cranky running on a treadmill, which may have been partially due to the company at the time?

    Still hate them, but they have become more tolerable. Although with covid going right now I'd happily run on a treadmill since the idea of running where people might be stresses me out.

  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    edited January 13
    I think that it's probably something where you think of other stuff once you get to a certain point

    The only thing I think about when I go running is "I fucking hate this" but I have always suspected I maybe need to go slower

    Like for several months last year I was running three times a week and pushing myself, and I got down to like 25 minutes for 5k and it was hell from start to finish. Think the last time I tried 5k it was like, 27 minutes? But I also found it really hard to vary my pace? I dunno. Maybe I should try running again.

    Solar on
  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    I love running, and even after doing it of and on for 10 years, still feels weird to type because I HATED running for most of my life.

    I think it's because a lot of us are conditioned to think of running as going fast and we push past what's not comfortable.

    If you find a good pace and a good route, running can be super enjoyable.

    And eventually I eventually started pushing myself to go faster or longer and that added a different aspect to it.

    I super miss races though. There's something really cool about running with a lot of people around you, and then going out with friends for a post run meal and often seeing random runners in the same restaurant.

    tynicIcemopperShadowhopeDouglasDanger
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    yeah I hate running if I'm trying to beat a time or push myself. I love it when I can just relax and let my brain wander and go at whatever pace hits naturally.
    I don't race, so for me running is mostly about goal distances and maintaining momentum.

    IcemopperEncgodmodeDouglasDanger
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    edited January 13
    I think I would really struggle to like

    Not time myself and want to see an improvement tbh. Like I dunno I just sort of end up that way. But then I strongly suspect that's because I am not very good at it, so I'd be like "I suck what is better, okay this is better, okay do that"

    Solar on
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    I hated running until the Corps, you had to run so often that there was no choice but to find something to like in it. Add long as it wasn't a PFT or a mock PFT since those had legit consequences for your performance.

    The best running course I've ever been around regularly was a base in Florida. A perfectly flat, straight 1.5 mile strip of sidewalk which gave a flat 3 mile out and back. Bonus points were the light poles evenly spaced every 300ish feet that meant you could do a nice warm up jog out and then finish with a killer interval run coming home

  • IcemopperIcemopper Registered User regular
    I also hated running for the longest time, but I've grown to love it a lot, especially trail running since I live on a mountain with lots of good trails. Podcasts and audiobooks are great for the long and flat runs, but as everyone else is saying, it's all about slowly progressing. I think I probably hated running until I realized I could run 8 miles, then more and more and more.

    DessertedKyougu
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion Pronouns: He, Him, HisRegistered User regular
    I time myself when I run, but I never, ever, check the time after I hit start until I hit stop at the end of my 5k route. Looking at the clock stresses me out something fierce, rather than just having the time be whatever it is when I finish.

    IcemopperCarpytynic
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Enc wrote: »
    I time myself when I run, but I never, ever, check the time after I hit start until I hit stop at the end of my 5k route. Looking at the clock stresses me out something fierce, rather than just having the time be whatever it is when I finish.

    That feeling where during the run you think you're going so slow and then you check your time at the end and realize you actually killed it.

    EncDouglasDanger
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 13
    Solar wrote: »
    I think I would really struggle to like

    Not time myself and want to see an improvement tbh. Like I dunno I just sort of end up that way. But then I strongly suspect that's because I am not very good at it, so I'd be like "I suck what is better, okay this is better, okay do that"

    nah some people are just built that way
    I'm anti-competitive by nature and will go out of my way to avoid tying myself to metrics, beyond "go roughly this distance" or "do this many reps"*. But if that's how you motivate yourself then it is what it is - you might have to find some other way of managing pace or making the process enjoyable.

    *
    This is mostly because playing with time/number manipulations become compulsive tics for me very easily, and it feeds back into obsessive behaviour, which in turn boosts my insomnia in a major way. (I've realised I need to stop checking my bank balance more than a couple of times a month for similar reasons.) On top of that, distance running is all about momentum, if you kick off too hard at the start, cause you feel good and want to 'beat your PB' or whatnot, it can really balls things up later.
    So I turn off all audio cues, pre-plan my route so don't have to look at my phone, and play either immersive podcasts or not-very-high-octane music, in order to push down that impulse to track stats. On long rides I usually keep my strava app on the map setting. It's a set of very active choices, but it's for fairly personal reasons that might not match other people's experience or best practices

    tynic on
    Lost Salient
  • godmodegodmode Southeast JapanRegistered User regular
    Carpy wrote: »
    I hated running until the Corps, you had to run so often that there was no choice but to find something to like in it. Add long as it wasn't a PFT or a mock PFT since those had legit consequences for your performance.

    The best running course I've ever been around regularly was a base in Florida. A perfectly flat, straight 1.5 mile strip of sidewalk which gave a flat 3 mile out and back. Bonus points were the light poles evenly spaced every 300ish feet that meant you could do a nice warm up jog out and then finish with a killer interval run coming home

    Hard disagree

    Banzai5150
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion Pronouns: He, Him, HisRegistered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    I think I would really struggle to like

    Not time myself and want to see an improvement tbh. Like I dunno I just sort of end up that way. But then I strongly suspect that's because I am not very good at it, so I'd be like "I suck what is better, okay this is better, okay do that"

    nah some people are just built that way
    I'm anti-competitive by nature and will go out of my way to avoid tying myself to metrics, beyond "go roughly this distance" or "do this many reps"*. But if that's how you motivate yourself then it is what it is - you might have to find some other way of managing pace or making the process enjoyable.

    *
    This is mostly because playing with time/number manipulations become compulsive tics for me very easily, and it feeds back into obsessive behaviour, which in turn boosts my insomnia in a major way. (I've realised I need to stop checking my bank balance more than a couple of times a month for similar reasons.) On top of that, distance running is all about momentum, if you kick off too hard at the start, cause you feel good and want to 'beat your PB' or whatnot, it can really balls things up later.
    So I turn off all audio cues, pre-plan my route so don't have to look at my phone, and play either immersive podcasts or not-very-high-octane music, in order to push down that impulse to track stats. On long rides I usually keep my strava app on the map setting. It's a set of very active choices, but it's for fairly personal reasons that might not match other people's experience or best practices

    Yeah, I'm not super competitive in most things, and in running and exercise moreso. But I do assessment for a living so I want to document everything daily. How many reps, sets, the weights used, the times to complete my runs, my morning weigh in, all of that. It's not really goal oriented, but data oriented for me. I'm seeing how i'm improving over time, and wanting to fill each calendar day in on my wall calendar with that information keeps me motivated somehow.

    DessertedCarpyShadowhope
  • Banzai5150Banzai5150 Registered User regular
    Carpy wrote: »
    I hated running until the Corps, you had to run so often that there was no choice but to find something to like in it. Add long as it wasn't a PFT or a mock PFT since those had legit consequences for your performance.

    The best running course I've ever been around regularly was a base in Florida. A perfectly flat, straight 1.5 mile strip of sidewalk which gave a flat 3 mile out and back. Bonus points were the light poles evenly spaced every 300ish feet that meant you could do a nice warm up jog out and then finish with a killer interval run coming home

    Fort Gordon Georgia had a 3 mile track that was in the middle of the place. If you then crossed a street you could add another 2 miles for a full 5 mile run. It was nice to not have to run 1/4 mile tracks or worse and see the same shit over and over. I hated running in the Army and I still hate it. But now that I’m fat and old, I can’t really run anyway as it makes everything hurt. Instead I either fast walk or punish my body on my bike.

    1258853.png
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    I think I would really struggle to like

    Not time myself and want to see an improvement tbh. Like I dunno I just sort of end up that way. But then I strongly suspect that's because I am not very good at it, so I'd be like "I suck what is better, okay this is better, okay do that"

    nah some people are just built that way
    I'm anti-competitive by nature and will go out of my way to avoid tying myself to metrics, beyond "go roughly this distance" or "do this many reps"*. But if that's how you motivate yourself then it is what it is - you might have to find some other way of managing pace or making the process enjoyable.

    *
    This is mostly because playing with time/number manipulations become compulsive tics for me very easily, and it feeds back into obsessive behaviour, which in turn boosts my insomnia in a major way. (I've realised I need to stop checking my bank balance more than a couple of times a month for similar reasons.) On top of that, distance running is all about momentum, if you kick off too hard at the start, cause you feel good and want to 'beat your PB' or whatnot, it can really balls things up later.
    So I turn off all audio cues, pre-plan my route so don't have to look at my phone, and play either immersive podcasts or not-very-high-octane music, in order to push down that impulse to track stats. On long rides I usually keep my strava app on the map setting. It's a set of very active choices, but it's for fairly personal reasons that might not match other people's experience or best practices

    I think that's really interesting. I've spent a long time telling myself I'm not competitive but I think it's fair to say I love to compete against myself. I can't do something physically without thinking okay how do we get to the next stage? So for me running would be like I can go this far this fast so I want to go further and faster.

    But probably that is actually not what I need. What I probably actually need would be a training plan, like an okay this is where you are and this is how you might reasonably improve after, say, eight weeks. But also I will be honest; running is not very interesting. It takes a long time and it is rather dull. So I'd also probably have to play silly games to make it interesting.

  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    I am SUPER competitive, but also a real good sport. Losing just provides the drive to do better.

    Steam ID: Webguy20
    Origin ID: Discgolfer27
    Untappd ID: Discgolfer1981
    Solar
  • TayaTaya Registered User regular
    Naphtali wrote: »
    initiatefailure fitness boxing is that intense, huh? How do you rate it compared to RingFit, if you've tried that as well?

    I’ve done both and Ring Fit is more intense. Ring Fit has a bigger variety of exercises and you’re more likely to be gasping by the end.

    Fitness Boxing is a good workout especially in the beginning, but it’s a little easier.

    Ring Fit has more menuing and dialogue and since it’s physical only, you need to switch game cards and you have to put on the leg strap. Fitness Boxing you can buy digitally, it only uses the joycons, and once you start the daily exercises, you go until the end.

  • Lost SalientLost Salient blink twice if you'd like me to mercy kill youRegistered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    Solar wrote: »
    I think I would really struggle to like

    Not time myself and want to see an improvement tbh. Like I dunno I just sort of end up that way. But then I strongly suspect that's because I am not very good at it, so I'd be like "I suck what is better, okay this is better, okay do that"

    nah some people are just built that way
    I'm anti-competitive by nature and will go out of my way to avoid tying myself to metrics, beyond "go roughly this distance" or "do this many reps"*. But if that's how you motivate yourself then it is what it is - you might have to find some other way of managing pace or making the process enjoyable.

    *
    This is mostly because playing with time/number manipulations become compulsive tics for me very easily, and it feeds back into obsessive behaviour, which in turn boosts my insomnia in a major way. (I've realised I need to stop checking my bank balance more than a couple of times a month for similar reasons.) On top of that, distance running is all about momentum, if you kick off too hard at the start, cause you feel good and want to 'beat your PB' or whatnot, it can really balls things up later.
    So I turn off all audio cues, pre-plan my route so don't have to look at my phone, and play either immersive podcasts or not-very-high-octane music, in order to push down that impulse to track stats. On long rides I usually keep my strava app on the map setting. It's a set of very active choices, but it's for fairly personal reasons that might not match other people's experience or best practices

    Are... are you me?

    I struggle to ride with my best friends here because they're so metrics-focused and I deliberately shy away from benchmarking and metrics for exactly the same reason you do. "I'm interested" transforms into "I cannot think of anything except this ever."

    @Usagi seems like you've got a lot of advice already but if you want to hit me up for more long-distance cycling questions here or outside of the forums definitely do! I regularly do 70+ km rides on the weekends and obviously have done yearly touring before I got stuck on a tiny island for a year.

    Some quick reinforcements of other people's replies:
    • The advice Ashaman had about being able to easily and comfortably do half the distance is true and good - I would maybe push it though to say 2/3rds. If you're doing 70 km's at a go with no soreness or discomfort you will 100% be able to do a metric century also.
    • Just because your saddle isn't obviously worn out or old doesn't mean it's the best saddle and being super-padded in my opinion is NOT as beneficial as it seems, particularly if you're wearing padded shorts already (which I also recommend, haha). I just swapped my touring bike's saddle from a Selle Italia gel padded one to a Selle Anatomica leather saddle after using one of theirs on my road bike since summer. It is hands-down the most comfortable my butt has ever been.
    • DRINK WATER. EAT SNACK. I don't enjoy electrolyte tablets very much but Gu's powder packet flavors are okay and they really make a difference in your post-ride recovery. They also make energy stroopwafels? My friends love them. I don't generally FEEL hungry when I'm mid-ride but it turns out if I eat a snack once or twice, I am less of a heinous bitch at the end of the day? Apparently? Go figure.
    • You need to carry less stuff with you than you think.
    • Don't make any significant changes to your bike right before the big ride or you'll be sad.

    RUVCwyu.jpg
    "Sandra has a good solid anti-murderer vibe. My skin felt very secure and sufficiently attached to my body when I met her. Also my organs." HAIL SATAN
    UsagiIcemoppertynic
  • Lost SalientLost Salient blink twice if you'd like me to mercy kill youRegistered User regular
    edited January 14
    Oh hey also

    https://wtfbikexplorers.com/ is probably relevant to your interests

    E: Also if you CAN use it with your indoor trainer, Zwift makes indoor cycling fractionally less mind-numbingly dull (but it's still pretty fucking dull)

    Lost Salient on
    RUVCwyu.jpg
    "Sandra has a good solid anti-murderer vibe. My skin felt very secure and sufficiently attached to my body when I met her. Also my organs." HAIL SATAN
  • UsagiUsagi Nah Registered User regular
    I've been resisting the Zwift thing but if I can get a freebie trial I might give it a go! Thank you :)

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