As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/

[Fire Emblem] The Strategy RPGs at their finest!

18586878890

Posts

  • WotanAnubisWotanAnubis Registered User regular
    Warlock82 wrote: »
    It looks like it to me from the trailer. That is clearly post-time skip Dimitri without an eye patch, potentially working with Edelgard? So it kind of looks like this might be more of a "Revelations" kind of route for the story where all three sides work together against some common enemy. ...

    I don't know if it means anything, but it's kind of interesting that in the cutscenes Dimitri has Areadbhar and Claude has Failnaught, but Edelgard doesn't have Aymr.

    Aymr isn't a proper relic. It's a new one created by the Slitherers. So...

    NaphtaliAndy Joe
  • Warlock82Warlock82 Never pet a burning dog Registered User regular
    It could also just be a different axe equipped, like in the first FE Warriors where you'd get a bunch of different weapons. Though that would be a weird oversight for the trailer when you gave the other two lords their weapons

    Switch: 2143-7130-1359 | 3DS: 4983-4927-6699 | Steam: warlock82 | PSN: Warlock2282
  • The WolfmanThe Wolfman Registered User regular
    I'm just kind of confused as to whether this is a completely new story involving the same characters, or a retelling of the original with a potential new ending? Or are they busting out the ol' multiverse theory again? This doesn't look like a sequel. I ended up putting the game down probably 2-3 chapters before the end, but I still remember enough obvious story beats that are clearly not being represented here. It's all kinds of weird. What on earth is the general story here?

    "The sausage of Green Earth explodes with flavor like the cannon of culinary delight."
    PSN: TheWolfman64 3DS/Pokemon Y: 0774-4614-4065/NNID: the_wolfman64
  • Shenl742Shenl742 Registered User regular
    edited February 10
    I'm just kind of confused as to whether this is a completely new story involving the same characters, or a retelling of the original with a potential new ending? Or are they busting out the ol' multiverse theory again? This doesn't look like a sequel. I ended up putting the game down probably 2-3 chapters before the end, but I still remember enough obvious story beats that are clearly not being represented here. It's all kinds of weird. What on earth is the general story here?

    Musou games like to put what if scenarios in their games a lot. So chances are it's that.

    Shenl742 on
    FC: 1907-8030-1478
    Shadowfire
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Yeah, the Zelda one had some time travel stuff that messed with all sorts of stuff and was great for it.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • silence1186silence1186 Character shields down! As a wingmanRegistered User regular
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

  • AspectVoidAspectVoid Registered User regular
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    PSN|AspectVoid
    Warlock82TamerBillGennenalyse RuebenAnteCantelope
  • DragkoniasDragkonias Registered User regular
    edited February 10
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    It's fine every now and then but I don't care for it becoming the default mode of storytelling(not saying it is).

    Usually cause in games that kind of stuff gets edgy and overblown very quickly(Think Walking Dead)

    Like there has to be a thematic reason for it and not just melodramatic for the sake of being melodramatic.

    Also this isn't a criticism of Three Houses as I enjoyed the game I just would prefer something a bit lighter next.

    Dragkonias on
  • AspectVoidAspectVoid Registered User regular
    I mean, I totally accept that I am the odd man out here. I'm that one guy who never resets if someone dies in a Fire Emblem game. For me, the series has always been about bitter losses and continuing on, so Three Houses story was all right in my feels.

    PSN|AspectVoid
    Stormwatcher
  • DragkoniasDragkonias Registered User regular
    edited February 10
    I mean gameplay wise sure but storywise they're usually awesome dragon slaying adventures with your bros(where someone may die but it was the Jagen you didn't use anyway).

    Dragkonias on
  • silence1186silence1186 Character shields down! As a wingmanRegistered User regular
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    Yeah I guess we're just going to never see eye to eye on this, so I will as respectfully as possible reject this in the strongest possible terms. Mostly this is a philosophical difference, since I reject reality since it's joyless and look to fiction as the only place happy endings are possible. I also don't grok how ensuring some people can't be happy with the ending is necessary for you to be moved by a tragic ending, but I accept your saying that it's true for you.

    Separately, though I didn't make it through all the routes, from what I saw the tragedy was forced and it was avoidable, but the writers chose to go that direction regardless.

  • AspectVoidAspectVoid Registered User regular
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    Yeah I guess we're just going to never see eye to eye on this, so I will as respectfully as possible reject this in the strongest possible terms. Mostly this is a philosophical difference, since I reject reality since it's joyless and look to fiction as the only place happy endings are possible. I also don't grok how ensuring some people can't be happy with the ending is necessary for you to be moved by a tragic ending, but I accept your saying that it's true for you.

    Separately, though I didn't make it through all the routes, from what I saw the tragedy was forced and it was avoidable, but the writers chose to go that direction regardless.

    Could you explain to me what you see in it being avoidable? I can't see any way to avoid the war and deaths because of the people involved. I've completed Black Eagle, Golden Dear, and 3/4th of Blue Lion, and the leaders of the factions are so entrenched in their ways by the time the player gets involved, its already a run away train that will not stop. I am open to being convinced otherwise, but I just don't see it with this story for these characters.

    PSN|AspectVoid
  • NaphtaliNaphtali Hazy + Flow SeaRegistered User regular
    Full game spoilers
    There was always going to be a war at some point, despite the faction leaders actions due to the machinations of those behind the Adrestian Empire (Those who slither in the dark)

    Steam | Nintendo ID: Naphtali | Wish List
    LockedOnTarget
  • silence1186silence1186 Character shields down! As a wingmanRegistered User regular
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    Yeah I guess we're just going to never see eye to eye on this, so I will as respectfully as possible reject this in the strongest possible terms. Mostly this is a philosophical difference, since I reject reality since it's joyless and look to fiction as the only place happy endings are possible. I also don't grok how ensuring some people can't be happy with the ending is necessary for you to be moved by a tragic ending, but I accept your saying that it's true for you.

    Separately, though I didn't make it through all the routes, from what I saw the tragedy was forced and it was avoidable, but the writers chose to go that direction regardless.

    Could you explain to me what you see in it being avoidable? I can't see any way to avoid the war and deaths because of the people involved. I've completed Black Eagle, Golden Dear, and 3/4th of Blue Lion, and the leaders of the factions are so entrenched in their ways by the time the player gets involved, its already a run away train that will not stop. I am open to being convinced otherwise, but I just don't see it with this story for these characters.

    I'm going to have to think about this, since it's been 2 years since I've thought about this game or specific details of the story.

    Super broadly though:
    Basically Black Eagles/Silver Snow, but when Edelgard asks Byleth for help, Byleth convinces Edelgard not to leave.

  • ButtersButters A glass of some milks Registered User regular
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    Yeah I guess we're just going to never see eye to eye on this, so I will as respectfully as possible reject this in the strongest possible terms. Mostly this is a philosophical difference, since I reject reality since it's joyless and look to fiction as the only place happy endings are possible. I also don't grok how ensuring some people can't be happy with the ending is necessary for you to be moved by a tragic ending, but I accept your saying that it's true for you.

    Separately, though I didn't make it through all the routes, from what I saw the tragedy was forced and it was avoidable, but the writers chose to go that direction regardless.

    Could you explain to me what you see in it being avoidable? I can't see any way to avoid the war and deaths because of the people involved. I've completed Black Eagle, Golden Dear, and 3/4th of Blue Lion, and the leaders of the factions are so entrenched in their ways by the time the player gets involved, its already a run away train that will not stop. I am open to being convinced otherwise, but I just don't see it with this story for these characters.

    I'm going to have to think about this, since it's been 2 years since I've thought about this game or specific details of the story.

    Super broadly though:
    Basically Black Eagles/Silver Snow, but when Edelgard asks Byleth for help, Byleth convinces Edelgard not to leave.

    I imagine that path still
    leads to a bunch of well-meaning characters from the other houses getting trampled to death in your path to the end.

    PSN: idontworkhere582 | CFN: idontworkhere | Steam: lordbutters | Amazon Wishlist
  • PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    Butters wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    Yeah I guess we're just going to never see eye to eye on this, so I will as respectfully as possible reject this in the strongest possible terms. Mostly this is a philosophical difference, since I reject reality since it's joyless and look to fiction as the only place happy endings are possible. I also don't grok how ensuring some people can't be happy with the ending is necessary for you to be moved by a tragic ending, but I accept your saying that it's true for you.

    Separately, though I didn't make it through all the routes, from what I saw the tragedy was forced and it was avoidable, but the writers chose to go that direction regardless.

    Could you explain to me what you see in it being avoidable? I can't see any way to avoid the war and deaths because of the people involved. I've completed Black Eagle, Golden Dear, and 3/4th of Blue Lion, and the leaders of the factions are so entrenched in their ways by the time the player gets involved, its already a run away train that will not stop. I am open to being convinced otherwise, but I just don't see it with this story for these characters.

    I'm going to have to think about this, since it's been 2 years since I've thought about this game or specific details of the story.

    Super broadly though:
    Basically Black Eagles/Silver Snow, but when Edelgard asks Byleth for help, Byleth convinces Edelgard not to leave.

    I imagine that path still
    leads to a bunch of well-meaning characters from the other houses getting trampled to death in your path to the end.

    Regarding deaths on various routes:
    There's very few people you can't save in each route. Like Claude can always be spared, for instance. All the students you can recruit, of course. Etc.

    Steam: Polaritie
    3DS: 0473-8507-2652
    Switch: SW-5185-4991-5118
    PSN: AbEntropy
  • LockedOnTargetLockedOnTarget Registered User regular
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    While I more or less agree with you I do think they already kind of undermined things a bit by having an actual mwahahaha evil faction being responsible for most of the bad stuff.

  • LockedOnTargetLockedOnTarget Registered User regular
    The thing about the "they should have just talked" idea is
    At the beginning of the game Edelgard has no reason to believe Dimitri or Claude would ever agree to getting rid of Fodlan's power structures. She doesn't remember her childhood so Dimitri is nearly a stranger to her now, and he's the guy from the Kingdom, the place most invested in the church, crests, and nobility. Claude plays his cards close to his chest and outwardly projects himself as a scheming scoundrel, giving no hints as to his desire for reform. He comes across as shady, initially. I can absolutely see how from Edelgard's point of view, she would have written them both off as just more nobles that benefit from the status quo who will fight to keep it, exposing her plans to them would be a massive risk. There's also the simple fact that there's a good chance they wouldn't actually work with her even if she did go to them. Dimitri doesn't believe the power systems should be eliminated to begin with, he just thinks they need reform. Edelgard would not accept that compromise. Claude is a maybe, but his ending doesn't end with the abolishment of those power structures, either.

    It doesn't help that Edelgard has been traumatized to the point where she has an incredibly hard time believing that anyone would fight with her. The noble families that were supposed to guide and protect her betrayed her family, got her siblings killed, and subjected her to a ridiculous amounts of torture. The Empire has also been infiltrated by spooky evil dudes and if her own people can't be trusted, then can leaders of the other nations be? There's a reason why byleth choosing to side with her moves her so much, and has a real effect on her character path. The mere idea that anyone else besides Hubert would choose to believe in her is almost unfathomable to her.

    Really, the only way I can see the "just talk" situation working out is if someone had like, magic time powers or something and the knowledge of everything about everyone involved and they could somehow go back and confront them all.

    Can't think of anyone who could do that, though.

    WotanAnubisStormwatcherShadowfireLordSolarMachariusAndy JoeButters
  • WotanAnubisWotanAnubis Registered User regular
    edited February 11
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    Yeah I guess we're just going to never see eye to eye on this, so I will as respectfully as possible reject this in the strongest possible terms. Mostly this is a philosophical difference, since I reject reality since it's joyless and look to fiction as the only place happy endings are possible. I also don't grok how ensuring some people can't be happy with the ending is necessary for you to be moved by a tragic ending, but I accept your saying that it's true for you.

    Separately, though I didn't make it through all the routes, from what I saw the tragedy was forced and it was avoidable, but the writers chose to go that direction regardless.

    Could you explain to me what you see in it being avoidable? I can't see any way to avoid the war and deaths because of the people involved. I've completed Black Eagle, Golden Dear, and 3/4th of Blue Lion, and the leaders of the factions are so entrenched in their ways by the time the player gets involved, its already a run away train that will not stop. I am open to being convinced otherwise, but I just don't see it with this story for these characters.

    I'm going to have to think about this, since it's been 2 years since I've thought about this game or specific details of the story.

    Super broadly though:
    Basically Black Eagles/Silver Snow, but when Edelgard asks Byleth for help, Byleth convinces Edelgard not to leave.
    I don't think that's going to happen. Unless Byleth also somehow manages to get Rhea to abdicate her power and admit publicly that the tenets of the faith of Seiros were a lie.

    And then Byleth would have to convince Dimitri that while, yes, Lord Arundel, the Imperial Regent, is likely the man behind the death of his father, Arundel is actually a spooky mole person and not actually an Imperial noble. So Dimitri has no reason to demand the Adrestian Empire hand over an incredibly powerful and influential member of its aristocracy for execution.

    And then Byleth would have to convince Claude to abandon his plans to conquer Fodlan and put a leader friendly to Almyra on its throne in order to shore up his chances of being named the next heir to the Almyran throne.

    If all that happens... Well, the war is probably still going to happen, because the Imperial nobility and the Slitherers really want it to, but at least none of the main characters are going to die.

    WotanAnubis on
    StormwatcherGnizmoButters
  • PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    The thing about the "they should have just talked" idea is
    At the beginning of the game Edelgard has no reason to believe Dimitri or Claude would ever agree to getting rid of Fodlan's power structures. She doesn't remember her childhood so Dimitri is nearly a stranger to her now, and he's the guy from the Kingdom, the place most invested in the church, crests, and nobility. Claude plays his cards close to his chest and outwardly projects himself as a scheming scoundrel, giving no hints as to his desire for reform. He comes across as shady, initially. I can absolutely see how from Edelgard's point of view, she would have written them both off as just more nobles that benefit from the status quo who will fight to keep it, exposing her plans to them would be a massive risk. There's also the simple fact that there's a good chance they wouldn't actually work with her even if she did go to them. Dimitri doesn't believe the power systems should be eliminated to begin with, he just thinks they need reform. Edelgard would not accept that compromise. Claude is a maybe, but his ending doesn't end with the abolishment of those power structures, either.

    It doesn't help that Edelgard has been traumatized to the point where she has an incredibly hard time believing that anyone would fight with her. The noble families that were supposed to guide and protect her betrayed her family, got her siblings killed, and subjected her to a ridiculous amounts of torture. The Empire has also been infiltrated by spooky evil dudes and if her own people can't be trusted, then can leaders of the other nations be? There's a reason why byleth choosing to side with her moves her so much, and has a real effect on her character path. The mere idea that anyone else besides Hubert would choose to believe in her is almost unfathomable to her.

    Really, the only way I can see the "just talk" situation working out is if someone had like, magic time powers or something and the knowledge of everything about everyone involved and they could somehow go back and confront them all.

    Can't think of anyone who could do that, though.
    I've seen the idea put forward that NG+ is in fact Byleth trying for a better outcome with their time bullshit. Almost definitely not what the game intends, but it's an interesting thought. And would have been a good way to do a "true ending" route - if you go through all the endings in a NG+ chain and Byleth has enough information to get everyone to sit down and talk.

    Steam: Polaritie
    3DS: 0473-8507-2652
    Switch: SW-5185-4991-5118
    PSN: AbEntropy
    silence1186
  • AspectVoidAspectVoid Registered User regular
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    Yeah I guess we're just going to never see eye to eye on this, so I will as respectfully as possible reject this in the strongest possible terms. Mostly this is a philosophical difference, since I reject reality since it's joyless and look to fiction as the only place happy endings are possible. I also don't grok how ensuring some people can't be happy with the ending is necessary for you to be moved by a tragic ending, but I accept your saying that it's true for you.

    Separately, though I didn't make it through all the routes, from what I saw the tragedy was forced and it was avoidable, but the writers chose to go that direction regardless.

    Could you explain to me what you see in it being avoidable? I can't see any way to avoid the war and deaths because of the people involved. I've completed Black Eagle, Golden Dear, and 3/4th of Blue Lion, and the leaders of the factions are so entrenched in their ways by the time the player gets involved, its already a run away train that will not stop. I am open to being convinced otherwise, but I just don't see it with this story for these characters.

    I'm going to have to think about this, since it's been 2 years since I've thought about this game or specific details of the story.

    Super broadly though:
    Basically Black Eagles/Silver Snow, but when Edelgard asks Byleth for help, Byleth convinces Edelgard not to leave.
    I haven't done Silver Snow, so I can't say for sure, but having done Black Eagle, there is no chance in hell that Byleth would ever be able to convince Edelgard to stop. The Church and its doctrine are responsible (in her eyes) for about 80% of her suffering and the suffering of those around her. The only way she'd stop is if the Church was burned to the ground, which Rhea would never allow. Going the other way, Rhea is a zealot, and I can't see her reaction to Byleth trying to talk her down to be anything other than heresy, at which point she tries to murder Byleth, and you're just on the Black Eagle route then with all its murder.

    PSN|AspectVoid
    Stormwatcher
  • TalithTalith 変態という名の紳士 Miami, FLRegistered User regular
    Today's comic definitely resonates with how I felt while watching the direct.

    7244qyoka3pp.gif
    Acheron
  • EspantaPajaroEspantaPajaro Registered User regular
    edited February 13
    Well Nintendo confirmed the three hopes will have a new route. With the title being hope I imagine it will have the happy ending some wanted .

    Problem is the interview is in Japanese and we have to wait for an official English announcement to make sure the random guy translated it correctly.

    EspantaPajaro on
  • Shenl742Shenl742 Registered User regular
    edited February 13
    Some how I think they'll find someway to distance it from the main game, or make very clear that this is an alternate retelling.

    Shenl742 on
    FC: 1907-8030-1478
  • EspantaPajaroEspantaPajaro Registered User regular
    Shenl742 wrote: »
    Some how I think they'll find someway to distance it from the main game, or make very clear that this is an alternate retelling.

    To be fair since there is no “real” ending they are all what ifs.

  • Shenl742Shenl742 Registered User regular
    edited February 15
    Shenl742 wrote: »
    Some how I think they'll find someway to distance it from the main game, or make very clear that this is an alternate retelling.

    To be fair since there is no “real” ending they are all what ifs.

    True but the devs said they didn't want to have a Revelations style, "everyone bans together" scenario.

    But since this is a spinoff game in a different genre, and if the new route turns out to be due to some kind of threat that's very outside the context of the original game, that's enough distance for them to "get away with it" while still preserving the vision of the original game.

    I wouldn't be surprised if after beating the new route, some kind of space time collapse happens that negate it all. Or it all turns out to be someone else's vison. Which are things the Muso games have done this before.

    Sorry if I'm sounding cynical about this. Because I'm totally gonna play this game and I'm eager to see what kind of bonkers shit it they get up to in it.

    Shenl742 on
    FC: 1907-8030-1478
  • ButtersButters A glass of some milks Registered User regular
    edited February 15
    Polaritie wrote: »
    Butters wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    Yeah I guess we're just going to never see eye to eye on this, so I will as respectfully as possible reject this in the strongest possible terms. Mostly this is a philosophical difference, since I reject reality since it's joyless and look to fiction as the only place happy endings are possible. I also don't grok how ensuring some people can't be happy with the ending is necessary for you to be moved by a tragic ending, but I accept your saying that it's true for you.

    Separately, though I didn't make it through all the routes, from what I saw the tragedy was forced and it was avoidable, but the writers chose to go that direction regardless.

    Could you explain to me what you see in it being avoidable? I can't see any way to avoid the war and deaths because of the people involved. I've completed Black Eagle, Golden Dear, and 3/4th of Blue Lion, and the leaders of the factions are so entrenched in their ways by the time the player gets involved, its already a run away train that will not stop. I am open to being convinced otherwise, but I just don't see it with this story for these characters.

    I'm going to have to think about this, since it's been 2 years since I've thought about this game or specific details of the story.

    Super broadly though:
    Basically Black Eagles/Silver Snow, but when Edelgard asks Byleth for help, Byleth convinces Edelgard not to leave.

    I imagine that path still
    leads to a bunch of well-meaning characters from the other houses getting trampled to death in your path to the end.

    Regarding deaths on various routes:
    There's very few people you can't save in each route. Like Claude can always be spared, for instance. All the students you can recruit, of course. Etc.
    Um...you mean "any" of the students can be recruited, right? Because I can't see how you can get away with recruiting more than like two in a single campaign let alone all. Unless there is some strick I don't know about, you're going to end up slaughtering 6-8 students in all the other houses.

    I also only experienced once the opportunity to save an enemy student in battle. On my Black Eagle run, toward the end when faced against Claude's army I was given the option to save Lysithea upon defeating her. I did and was glad because she's a great character and from what I could tell the most powerful mage in the game by a country mile, but I don't know why it gave me that option.

    Butters on
    PSN: idontworkhere582 | CFN: idontworkhere | Steam: lordbutters | Amazon Wishlist
  • NaphtaliNaphtali Hazy + Flow SeaRegistered User regular
    Butters wrote: »
    Polaritie wrote: »
    Butters wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    Yeah I guess we're just going to never see eye to eye on this, so I will as respectfully as possible reject this in the strongest possible terms. Mostly this is a philosophical difference, since I reject reality since it's joyless and look to fiction as the only place happy endings are possible. I also don't grok how ensuring some people can't be happy with the ending is necessary for you to be moved by a tragic ending, but I accept your saying that it's true for you.

    Separately, though I didn't make it through all the routes, from what I saw the tragedy was forced and it was avoidable, but the writers chose to go that direction regardless.

    Could you explain to me what you see in it being avoidable? I can't see any way to avoid the war and deaths because of the people involved. I've completed Black Eagle, Golden Dear, and 3/4th of Blue Lion, and the leaders of the factions are so entrenched in their ways by the time the player gets involved, its already a run away train that will not stop. I am open to being convinced otherwise, but I just don't see it with this story for these characters.

    I'm going to have to think about this, since it's been 2 years since I've thought about this game or specific details of the story.

    Super broadly though:
    Basically Black Eagles/Silver Snow, but when Edelgard asks Byleth for help, Byleth convinces Edelgard not to leave.

    I imagine that path still
    leads to a bunch of well-meaning characters from the other houses getting trampled to death in your path to the end.

    Regarding deaths on various routes:
    There's very few people you can't save in each route. Like Claude can always be spared, for instance. All the students you can recruit, of course. Etc.
    Um...you mean "any" of the students can be recruited, right? Because I can't see how you can get away with recruiting more than like two in a single campaign let alone all. Unless there is some strick I don't know about, you're going to end up slaughtering 6-8 students in all the other houses.

    I also only experienced once the opportunity to save an enemy student in battle. On my Black Eagle run, toward the end when faced against Claude's army I was given the option to save Lysithea upon defeating her. I did and was glad because she's a great character and from what I could tell the most powerful mage in the game by a country mile, but I don't know why it gave me that option.

    regarding your spoiler, it's very easy to recruit students in NG+ cycles with reputation alone, or gift spam

    Steam | Nintendo ID: Naphtali | Wish List
    Andy Joe
  • PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    Butters wrote: »
    Polaritie wrote: »
    Butters wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    Yeah I guess we're just going to never see eye to eye on this, so I will as respectfully as possible reject this in the strongest possible terms. Mostly this is a philosophical difference, since I reject reality since it's joyless and look to fiction as the only place happy endings are possible. I also don't grok how ensuring some people can't be happy with the ending is necessary for you to be moved by a tragic ending, but I accept your saying that it's true for you.

    Separately, though I didn't make it through all the routes, from what I saw the tragedy was forced and it was avoidable, but the writers chose to go that direction regardless.

    Could you explain to me what you see in it being avoidable? I can't see any way to avoid the war and deaths because of the people involved. I've completed Black Eagle, Golden Dear, and 3/4th of Blue Lion, and the leaders of the factions are so entrenched in their ways by the time the player gets involved, its already a run away train that will not stop. I am open to being convinced otherwise, but I just don't see it with this story for these characters.

    I'm going to have to think about this, since it's been 2 years since I've thought about this game or specific details of the story.

    Super broadly though:
    Basically Black Eagles/Silver Snow, but when Edelgard asks Byleth for help, Byleth convinces Edelgard not to leave.

    I imagine that path still
    leads to a bunch of well-meaning characters from the other houses getting trampled to death in your path to the end.

    Regarding deaths on various routes:
    There's very few people you can't save in each route. Like Claude can always be spared, for instance. All the students you can recruit, of course. Etc.
    Um...you mean "any" of the students can be recruited, right? Because I can't see how you can get away with recruiting more than like two in a single campaign let alone all. Unless there is some strick I don't know about, you're going to end up slaughtering 6-8 students in all the other houses.

    I also only experienced once the opportunity to save an enemy student in battle. On my Black Eagle run, toward the end when faced against Claude's army I was given the option to save Lysithea upon defeating her. I did and was glad because she's a great character and from what I could tell the most powerful mage in the game by a country mile, but I don't know why it gave me that option.
    I want to say many/most of the students you don't recruit can be spared depending on who lands the finishing blow. And recruiting everyone is entirely possible, especially on NG+.

    Steam: Polaritie
    3DS: 0473-8507-2652
    Switch: SW-5185-4991-5118
    PSN: AbEntropy
  • AspectVoidAspectVoid Registered User regular
    Polaritie wrote: »
    Butters wrote: »
    Polaritie wrote: »
    Butters wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    AspectVoid wrote: »
    I actually really, REALLY like that there is no "Everyone lives happily ever after" in Three Houses. Games can be sad and have endings where everyone doesn't win. I think it says something when that option is never on the table.

    There's multiple endings though, so I don't see how having both happy and bitter endings can't work for people who want those respective things.

    Unless the important thing isn't the presence of a bitter ending, but the absence of a happy one so people who want to be, can't.

    Yeah, I think that the absence of a happy ending is really important to what the game is saying. Or at least, what I read the game saying. I read that a key theme in the game is that life is messy, and that there are things that people find important that they won't compromise on, it leads to tragedy, and sometimes there's just no way to avoid that. All you can do is push on and live with the consequences. To me, that is a critical theme to the game, and something I adore about it. There are times in my life where that would have been so powerful and moving to me, and I really feel that having a happy ending would strip it of power.

    Yeah I guess we're just going to never see eye to eye on this, so I will as respectfully as possible reject this in the strongest possible terms. Mostly this is a philosophical difference, since I reject reality since it's joyless and look to fiction as the only place happy endings are possible. I also don't grok how ensuring some people can't be happy with the ending is necessary for you to be moved by a tragic ending, but I accept your saying that it's true for you.

    Separately, though I didn't make it through all the routes, from what I saw the tragedy was forced and it was avoidable, but the writers chose to go that direction regardless.

    Could you explain to me what you see in it being avoidable? I can't see any way to avoid the war and deaths because of the people involved. I've completed Black Eagle, Golden Dear, and 3/4th of Blue Lion, and the leaders of the factions are so entrenched in their ways by the time the player gets involved, its already a run away train that will not stop. I am open to being convinced otherwise, but I just don't see it with this story for these characters.

    I'm going to have to think about this, since it's been 2 years since I've thought about this game or specific details of the story.

    Super broadly though:
    Basically Black Eagles/Silver Snow, but when Edelgard asks Byleth for help, Byleth convinces Edelgard not to leave.

    I imagine that path still
    leads to a bunch of well-meaning characters from the other houses getting trampled to death in your path to the end.

    Regarding deaths on various routes:
    There's very few people you can't save in each route. Like Claude can always be spared, for instance. All the students you can recruit, of course. Etc.
    Um...you mean "any" of the students can be recruited, right? Because I can't see how you can get away with recruiting more than like two in a single campaign let alone all. Unless there is some strick I don't know about, you're going to end up slaughtering 6-8 students in all the other houses.

    I also only experienced once the opportunity to save an enemy student in battle. On my Black Eagle run, toward the end when faced against Claude's army I was given the option to save Lysithea upon defeating her. I did and was glad because she's a great character and from what I could tell the most powerful mage in the game by a country mile, but I don't know why it gave me that option.
    I want to say many/most of the students you don't recruit can be spared depending on who lands the finishing blow. And recruiting everyone is entirely possible, especially on NG+.
    Even on my first run of Three Houses, I recruited all but three or four students that could be recruited.

    As for why you are allowed to recruit Lysithea...
    Like Edelgard, Lysithea was experimented on by the same people to give her two crests. If you have those two spend time together, you can get the full story as they bond over it.

    PSN|AspectVoid
    Butters
  • EspantaPajaroEspantaPajaro Registered User regular
    edited February 22
    Feeling confident enough to restart my AM maddening run . I know I want to recruit lystheia ( sp?) and Leonie from golden deer since mage and archer are the big weak spots for blue lion early on . I could also use the ashen wolves as Happi is a good mage and yuri looks like he would make for a decent archer . I just really don’t want to kill golden deer characters. It makes no fucking sense why you even fight them that part infuriates me . Edlegard says some throw away line about chaos and Claude sends everyone to die and then is you friend a few weeks later. Hopefully now that I know the game better things go smoother , I didn’t get stuck but just felt I could do better . I get that writing multiple routes is really hard , I agree , but man it just seems like if you aren’t on their route every lord goes pants on head crazy.

    EspantaPajaro on
  • EspantaPajaroEspantaPajaro Registered User regular
    Happy to see the franchise wide tradition of getting amazing level ups when I’m going to die on the next turn and absolute garbage ones if I played it well and will win . Good to see some things never change.

  • ButtersButters A glass of some milks Registered User regular
    I mean, this a game about an officer's academy that specializes in preparing children for war. It makes sense that avoiding tragedy and chaos is really hard.

    PSN: idontworkhere582 | CFN: idontworkhere | Steam: lordbutters | Amazon Wishlist
  • EspantaPajaroEspantaPajaro Registered User regular
    On a happier note death knight part 2 done , this was the part that made me restart last time . Everyone is coming along nicely , Dmitry is a god king . Only thing I’m worried about is the paralogues , but that’s mostly just the ones that force you to start characters you don’t use surrounded by enemies .

  • EspantaPajaroEspantaPajaro Registered User regular
    I interrupt your amazing Saturday night to inform you that I hate in no particular order:

    1) pass thieves /assassins. The fact that they hit the back liners like trucks make it worse.
    2) side chapters that divide your armies , extra points if it just throws the weak characters in situations you can’t protect them from.
    3) same turn reinforcement of all flavors and kinds . Dmitry just got finished depopulating the entire species of Pegasus , I don’t know how I was supposed to do that chapter if I didn’t abuse Dmitry’s busted self.

  • Andy JoeAndy Joe The AdirondacksRegistered User regular
    New Three Hopes trailer:



    Was not expecting this setup.

    Believe we actually get a glimpse of Holst near the end there.

    XBL: Stealth Crane PSN: ajpet12 3DS: 1160-9999-5810 NNID: StealthCrane
    Pokemon Sword Name: Claíomh
    Trajan45WotanAnubisWarlock82
  • WotanAnubisWotanAnubis Registered User regular
    Andy Joe wrote: »
    New Three Hopes trailer:



    Was not expecting this setup.

    Believe we actually get a glimpse of Holst near the end there.

    OK, interesting. Sounds like some nonsense, but I do look forward to seeing more of mercenary Byleth. Also, Hubert's looking good. Or, well, evil.

    But... three diverging paths? I'd hoped this game would weld together some kind of Golden Path and put an end to the discourse. Though maybe it still will.

    silence1186
  • TamerBillTamerBill Registered User regular
    But... three diverging paths? I'd hoped this game would weld together some kind of Golden Path and put an end to the discourse.

    Yeah, and when are they going to release the director's cut of Rashomon that shows how it really happened?

    3DS Friend Code: 4828-4410-2451
    Gnizmo
  • EspantaPajaroEspantaPajaro Registered User regular
    I approve of bun Hilda .

    Andy Joe
  • Ken OKen O Registered User regular
    Honestly I can't believe how happy it made me just to see/hear Hilda again.

    http://www.fingmonkey.com/
    Comics, Games, Booze
    LordSolarMacharius
Sign In or Register to comment.