As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/

Stockholm and Copenhagen for New Year's

HeraldSHeraldS Registered User regular
My girlfriend and I are celebrating New Year's in Copenhagen, but are flying into Stockholm a few days beforehand and plan to make our way south via train. We could use some advice on a few subjects:

1) Travel- we're planning on taking a train down to Malmo before we head on to Copenhagen. What's the best way to do this? Is there a Scandinavian equivalent of the Amtrak/ light rail/ subway combo to get to New York City from the surrounding areas?
2) Sightseeing- we'll likely have one day each in Stockholm, Malmo, and Copenhagen. What should we make an effort to see?
3) Lodging- any recommendations on places to stay in the above cities? Not opposed to hostels, but would prefer to avoid sharing a room with strangers.
4) Cold weather gear- we're coming from Colorado, so we won't be wholly unprepared, but what sort of things are we going to want to have with us to deal with the weather up there? Layers, brands, materials, etc.
5) Money- is it better to use cash or credit? We've got a card with no international transaction fees fwiw. Sweden and Denmark both have their own currencies, correct? Anything else we should know here?
6) Other- scams to watch out for, customs to be aware of, helpful phrases or other things to know?

Thanks in advance.

Posts

  • EchoEcho Moderator mod
    edited December 2017
    Some hasty answers on a few of the points:

    Travel: it's probably very hard to get train tickets right now, a lot of Swedes go to/from Stockholm for Christmas/New Year. For local travel in Stockholm, you can get an SL card at an SL Center for 24 hours, it's valid for both subway/buses.

    I'm guessing you'll arrive at Arlanda airport - you can take either the Arlanda Express (20 minutes) or a flight coach (40-60 minutes) to get into the city. The express is more expensive though.

    Weather: we're actually having really warm weather right now (subject to change of course), but lately it's been enough with typical autumn clothes.

    Money: Yeah, it's 98% card payment here, will probably do just fine with a credit card.

    Echo on
    Echo wrote: »
    Let they who have not posted about their balls in the wrong thread cast the first stone.
  • MorranMorran Registered User regular
    Sightseeing in Stockholm: depends, of course, on what you are interested in. But here are some suggestions:

    Vasamuseum. Old battleship which sank 1638, lifted from the bottom of the ocean and now centerpiece of the museum. http://www.vasamuseet.se

    Photographic museum: exhibitions with contemporary photography, http://fotografiska.eu/en/

    http://hallwylskamuseet.se/en

    Loding: what is your budget?

    Weather: be at least prepared for rain. Winters can be cold, but sometimes very wet.

  • MorranMorran Registered User regular
    Further: make sure to check ticket availability and opening hours for everything you want to see/visit/travel with. Swedish Christmas holiday is december 24-26, and some places might close up until after New year.

    Payment: mastercard and visa will cover you at 99.9% of the shops. A popular alternative is "swish", a mobile app for payment. Might be difficult for you to set up from abroad though.

  • MorranMorran Registered User regular
    Phrase-wise (Swedish):
    "God jul": merry Christmas. Use until December 25.
    "God fortsättning": approximately happy holidays. Use until beginning of January.
    "Gott nytt år": happy new year

    I'm living just outside Stockholm, feel free to ask more specific questions in the thread or drop me a pm.

    Hope you will enjoy your visit!

  • BlindZenDriverBlindZenDriver Registered User regular
    1) There certainly are trains you can use. Here is a link to a travel connection finder which I use all the time:
    https://rejseplanen.dk/webapp/index.html?language=en_EN
    It is a tool that when used for traveling inside Denmark will find you the best connections from, literally, front door to door and it will combine trains, metro, buses and walking as needed. It can also be used for European to Danish destinations and vice versa - I'm not sure about Malmö but since it is on the from Stockholm to Copenhagen you're going Malmö should be a stop on the way and getting from Malmö to Copenhagen is easy.

    2) Loads to see in Copenhagen as in Stockholm. There was a thread on Copenhagen in the forum just days ago, do check that out - also for other tips on Copenhagen and much of it also goes for Stockholm.
    Now on Copenhagen on New Years eve - be warned that getting a Taxi can be like impossible as the demand is so high and also best avoid the square in front of city hall('Rådhuspladsen') as some people do go overboard with their fireworks and it can get pretty crazy. Also best avoid Nørrebro which is the area to the east of the center past the lakes, it is not that there are like criminals all over or anything like that only that sometimes things get out of hand.

    3) There are some nice Hostels in Copenhagen, but I have no personal experience with them. There are also lots of Hotels to choose from including some which are pretty expensive. My main suggestion is to look for something with a view over the city as that is pretty amazing for New Years eve with all the fireworks, that will mean it won't be cheap but it will be worth it and it may not be that expensive either. Use one of those Hotel search sites, but instead of booking through that site check out if the Hotel of you liking is cheaper to book directly(many are).

    4) Around Christmas end new years most often it will be just around freezing. There is sometimes a little snow, but more likely there is rain so be prepared for wet and cold rather than just cold.

    5) You're right on the currency thing - both countries have Kroner but they aren't the same(this btw. goes for Norway also).
    The way to go is credit cards for sure even for like small things like a drink or a paper. Make sure to know your PIN codes. Also I think you need ones that are like VISA or Mastercard to be sure they work all over, but I am no expert on that.

    6) In general it is very safe here, but unfortunately we are seeing scams with criminals from mostly Eastern Europe and Chile. There is a small risk of pocket theft, luggage theft and there has also been some scams where criminals pretended to be Police and demand to check tourists cash for counterfeit money (I think those criminals targeted Chinese tourists which often come with a lot of cash for shopping).


    Bones heal, glory is forever.
  • RichardTauberRichardTauber Kvlt Registered User regular
    Don't forget to visit Stockholms finest burgerjoint Flippin' burgers

  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    edited December 2017
    HeraldS wrote: »
    My girlfriend and I are celebrating New Year's in Copenhagen, but are flying into Stockholm a few days beforehand and plan to make our way south via train. We could use some advice on a few subjects:

    1) Travel- we're planning on taking a train down to Malmo before we head on to Copenhagen. What's the best way to do this? Is there a Scandinavian equivalent of the Amtrak/ light rail/ subway combo to get to New York City from the surrounding areas?
    2) Sightseeing- we'll likely have one day each in Stockholm, Malmo, and Copenhagen. What should we make an effort to see?
    3) Lodging- any recommendations on places to stay in the above cities? Not opposed to hostels, but would prefer to avoid sharing a room with strangers.
    4) Cold weather gear- we're coming from Colorado, so we won't be wholly unprepared, but what sort of things are we going to want to have with us to deal with the weather up there? Layers, brands, materials, etc.
    5) Money- is it better to use cash or credit? We've got a card with no international transaction fees fwiw. Sweden and Denmark both have their own currencies, correct? Anything else we should know here?
    6) Other- scams to watch out for, customs to be aware of, helpful phrases or other things to know?

    Thanks in advance.

    1. SJ is the national railway company. Down in Malmö you'll have to deal with Skånetrafiken, which is a downside. But visit their servicecenter at the main trainstation and buy a 24-hour ticket (which costs about 9$) and travel as much as you would like in Malmö.
    2. Unlike Stockholm or Copenhagen Malmö isn't exactly a cultural mecca (being more of a shopping city for the surrounding area). However, if you're interested in visiting museums, then a visit to Malmöhus Castle is definitely worth it. In close proximity you can find the Malmö natural museum, the Museum of Technology and Seafaring (including a genuine WWII submarine, not suitable for those with claustrophobia, and in general one of the best industrial history exhibitions in Sweden) and the Malmöhus Art museum.
    Copenhagen is an entirely different thing. But if you're in Copenhagen on the 31st you kinda to visit the Tivoli Gardens. There are quite a few other places to visit (though many of them, like the art museum Louisiana, will be closed since it's so close to New Years). If you have any special intrests though I can be more specific.
    3. Hotels depend on budget and preferences. All hotels are clean, but since its Sweden atmosphere can be decidedly lacking. The dealbreaker is generally breakfast (which vary between "delicious" and "uninspired". My three recommendations would be Savoy (~105$), Scandic Triangle (~110$) or Comfort Hotel (~85$). The Comfort is cosmopolitan and the breakfast is scandinavian ecologic breakfast buffet, but the beds can be slightly less comfortable than the alternatives. Savoy serves a more oldschool breakfast buffet if you enjoy scrambled eggs and sausages (but also includes fresh berries etc). Scandic Triangle is The Comfort on steroids (scandinavian ecologic) and the choice if you have any food allergies.
    4. Since you're from Colorado you're used to cold, but you're not used to "Winds coming in from the north sea" type of cold. "Euro-ski" winter-clothing and downjackets isn't going to cut it. If the wind comes in from the wrong direction you'll have to be prepared for temperatures that aren't exactly cold (like +5C to -15C. Equivalent to 5-40F) but will cut you to the fucking bone if you're not wearing something that protects you from the wind (-5 C wet cold is like -25 C dry cold). Something for the ears, something for the hands (good gloves if you're cold resistant, mitts if you're not), jeans+longjohns (since you'll shift between outdoors and indoors it can't be too cumbersome). For the torso you'll need to prepare for full tripple-layer principle. Sweatabsorbing/evaporating inner layer, warming middle-layer and an outer layer that stops the wind. A wool scarf if you don't have a jacket that covers the neck (and preferably the chin). Don't be fooled by the temperature gauge.
    5. VISA or Mastercard. Card+Pin is king. In sweden you pay with card+pin for ridiculously low amounts (anything above equivalent 50$, frequently down to 5$ equivalents). Some places (like on public transportation) don't even accept cash.
    6. a. Almost everyone speaks english. b. Queueing is a developed artform (as soon as there is a line for anything...if there isn't room to develop an orderly queue there will be a relatively informal one, with a slight advantage towards the elderly, the disabled and the obviously pregnant). With extreme exceptions we don't start fights about it, but if you get a "Ursäkta mig, jag stog faktiskt före" ("Excuse me, I was actually before you") you know that inside they're boiling with anger. Any changes in the queueing due to displayed obvious stress, heavy loads or one of the previously mentioned conditions is communicated by short and restrained hand-gestures and nods. c. The image of the uneducated american tourist exists. If you're ever asked about politics politely decline commenting (in Sweden this WILL work. In Denmark it will most likely work, but they're a lot more forward in Denmark and might press).

    Fiendishrabbit on
    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
  • PLAPLA The process.Registered User regular
    Eat dumb, red sausages in Denmark. They're called red sausages. "Røde pølser". The roads are ruled by feral bicyclists.

    FiendishrabbitEchocaligynefobSiska
  • SiskaSiska Shorty Registered User regular
    edited December 2017
    Here's some typical Swedish Eats. Regular, ordinary Swedish commercial dining. Nothing fancy:

    Kebab Pizza or Kebab Rulle. There are pizza restaurants everywhere and they all have these. Pizzas do NOT come pre sliced (unless you ask) http://caliswede.blogspot.com/2011/12/swedish-pizza.html
    Tunnbrödsrulle. Mashed potatoes and hotdog (some places also offer meatballs or thin sliced beef version) wrapped in thin flatbread. Mostly found in outdoorsy fast food, kiosks and street vendor type places. http://www.umgasmagazine.com/tunnbrodsrulle-swedish-hot-dog/

    Also you must FIKA. I never really got into it myself, despite being born there, but the whole country stops for it. https://www.thekitchn.com/what-in-the-world-is-fika-an-intro-to-the-swedish-coffee-break-the-art-of-fika-219297
    PLA wrote: »
    Eat dumb, red sausages in Denmark. They're called red sausages. "Røde pølser". The roads are ruled by feral bicyclists.

    Yes, these are the most Danish thing I would always eat when visiting Denmark.

    Siska on
  • PLAPLA The process.Registered User regular
    Some older people still use face-lotions to deal with the cold.

  • BlindZenDriverBlindZenDriver Registered User regular
    Just curious so I hope it is okay to ask. How was it going to Sweden and Denmark for the New Year?
    HeraldS wrote: »
    My girlfriend and I are celebrating New Year's in Copenhagen, but are flying into Stockholm a few days beforehand and plan to make our way south via train. We could use some advice on a few subjects:

    <SNIP>

    Just curious so I hope it is okay to ask. How was it going to Sweden and Denmark for the New Year?

    Bones heal, glory is forever.
  • HeraldSHeraldS Registered User regular
    It was pretty great. Walking around the old town in Stockholm was amazing. And the party in Copenhagen was killer. Everyone was very friendly and we had no major issues w/ transportation or anything. I highly recommend it.

    Lind
  • BlindZenDriverBlindZenDriver Registered User regular
    HeraldS wrote: »
    It was pretty great. Walking around the old town in Stockholm was amazing. And the party in Copenhagen was killer. Everyone was very friendly and we had no major issues w/ transportation or anything. I highly recommend it.

    Cool. Glad to hear that.

    Thx for reporting back. Often these threads lack a conclusion.

    Bones heal, glory is forever.
    Fiendishrabbit
  • HeraldSHeraldS Registered User regular
    My pleasure. Thanks for all the help guys!

This discussion has been closed.