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[Cooking Thread] Burning questions and searing remarks

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Posts

  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    spool32 wrote: »
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    I'll be honest, I don't even use chili powder or cayenne for chili anymore. I just mix in a small can of chipotles in adobo and a big heaping tablespoon of [black] mole paste, and those two things alone make a chili leagues better than any powdered seasoning ever did.
    seems like that would make the chili a LOT sweeter and imo weird. Mole has chocolate and cinnamon in it!

    It doesn't. Neither chocolate nor cinnamon are sweet in the least. Granted, they are often paired with sugar for sweet dishes, but by themselves neither is sweet at all. In fact both are actually more bitter than sweet in their constituent forms. Beyond that, both the cocoa and cinnamon flavors are usually very faint in mole itself, mole is primarily a mixture of different chili peppers. That's what I'm using it here for, as a quick and dirty way to get the flavor profiles from many different chili peppers (ancho, guajillo, pasilla, oxacan negro) into the chili.

    Though this could also be affected by the quality of mole that you have available in your neck of the woods. In Chicago we have a large hispanic population, so we get actual imports from Oaxaca rather than the ubiquitous Dona Maria (which isn't bad, just not as good).

    That said, chocolate (dark) and cinnamon are amazing in savory dishes. Cinnamon is a primary flavor in a lot of savory Moroccan cuisine, and is delicious!

    shrykeDaenrisKetar
  • daveNYCdaveNYC Why universe hate Waspinator? Registered User regular
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    spool32 wrote: »
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    I'll be honest, I don't even use chili powder or cayenne for chili anymore. I just mix in a small can of chipotles in adobo and a big heaping tablespoon of [black] mole paste, and those two things alone make a chili leagues better than any powdered seasoning ever did.
    seems like that would make the chili a LOT sweeter and imo weird. Mole has chocolate and cinnamon in it!

    It doesn't. Neither chocolate nor cinnamon are sweet in the least. Granted, they are often paired with sugar for sweet dishes, but by themselves neither is sweet at all. In fact both are actually more bitter than sweet in their constituent forms. Beyond that, both the cocoa and cinnamon flavors are usually very faint in mole itself, mole is primarily a mixture of different chili peppers. That's what I'm using it here for, as a quick and dirty way to get the flavor profiles from many different chili peppers (ancho, guajillo, pasilla, oxacan negro) into the chili.

    Though this could also be affected by the quality of mole that you have available in your neck of the woods. In Chicago we have a large hispanic population, so we get actual imports from Oaxaca rather than the ubiquitous Dona Maria (which isn't bad, just not as good).

    That said, chocolate (dark) and cinnamon are amazing in savory dishes. Cinnamon is a primary flavor in a lot of savory Moroccan cuisine, and is delicious!

    I'll second the chocolate thing. Get yourself a big old lump of high quality unsweetened dark chocolate and throw it in the chili. A cinnamon stick stuck in there like a bay leaf is good too.

    V1m
  • ChanusChanus Sugoi! ^_____^Registered User regular
    i put cinnamon in my chili on the reg

    **Winner Softest and Most Comfy Hugs Award Summer 2018**

    Blueberrywerewlf on the Sony Anime Games Box | BluberryWerewlf on the BroBone
  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    spool32 wrote: »
    The cayenne was brand new, as was the "chili powder" blend I used.

    I used the same spice blend 2 weeks ago with notably different results!

    It could be as simple as individual variation between packages, unless you're saying it was the same package both times.

    Steam = VishnuOwnz
    Dota2 = Glitchmo
  • StraygatsbyStraygatsby Registered User regular
    Chanus wrote: »
    i put cinnamon in my chili on the reg

    seconded. I religiously use 2 different dried chilis, paprika, cumin, and cinnamon, then grind all that shit up into a sinister paste to start the base of any meat only chili I make.

    Chanus
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Neither chocolate nor cinnamon are sweet, though. In fact chocolate especially is pretty bitter.

  • spool32spool32 Contrary Library Registered User regular
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    spool32 wrote: »
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    I'll be honest, I don't even use chili powder or cayenne for chili anymore. I just mix in a small can of chipotles in adobo and a big heaping tablespoon of [black] mole paste, and those two things alone make a chili leagues better than any powdered seasoning ever did.
    seems like that would make the chili a LOT sweeter and imo weird. Mole has chocolate and cinnamon in it!

    It doesn't. Neither chocolate nor cinnamon are sweet in the least. Granted, they are often paired with sugar for sweet dishes, but by themselves neither is sweet at all. In fact both are actually more bitter than sweet in their constituent forms. Beyond that, both the cocoa and cinnamon flavors are usually very faint in mole itself, mole is primarily a mixture of different chili peppers. That's what I'm using it here for, as a quick and dirty way to get the flavor profiles from many different chili peppers (ancho, guajillo, pasilla, oxacan negro) into the chili.

    Though this could also be affected by the quality of mole that you have available in your neck of the woods. In Chicago we have a large hispanic population, so we get actual imports from Oaxaca rather than the ubiquitous Dona Maria (which isn't bad, just not as good).

    That said, chocolate (dark) and cinnamon are amazing in savory dishes. Cinnamon is a primary flavor in a lot of savory Moroccan cuisine, and is delicious!

    This mexisplaining tho :)

    (23 years in Central TX!)

    Mole always struck me as more cloyingly sweet/spicy/bitter, not pure chili spice + bitter, but this might have a lot to do with my lack of smell.

  • spool32spool32 Contrary Library Registered User regular
    VishNub wrote: »
    spool32 wrote: »
    The cayenne was brand new, as was the "chili powder" blend I used.

    I used the same spice blend 2 weeks ago with notably different results!

    It could be as simple as individual variation between packages, unless you're saying it was the same package both times.

    same everything both times, except that:

    finely diced white instead of large chopped green onion
    normal crushed tomatoes instead of fire-roasted
    93% lean beef instead of 85%.

    It's a mystery!!

  • spool32spool32 Contrary Library Registered User regular
    I gotta give this adobo / mole chili a run, I'm dead fuckin curious now :)

    Simpsonia
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    How many of you live in Cincinnati?!?!???? GTFO cinnamon

    (I am contractually obligated as a Steelers fan)

    ChanusKamiro
  • kilnbornkilnborn Registered User regular
    spool32 wrote: »
    VishNub wrote: »
    spool32 wrote: »
    The cayenne was brand new, as was the "chili powder" blend I used.

    I used the same spice blend 2 weeks ago with notably different results!

    It could be as simple as individual variation between packages, unless you're saying it was the same package both times.

    same everything both times, except that:

    finely diced white instead of large chopped green onion
    normal crushed tomatoes instead of fire-roasted
    93% lean beef instead of 85%.

    It's a mystery!!

    The fat content of the beef screams at me. Capsaicin is highly fat soluble and the leaner beef is going to leave more of it available to be perceived as heat.

    V1mBlackDragon480VishNubSimpsonia
  • ChanusChanus Sugoi! ^_____^Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    How many of you live in Cincinnati?!?!???? GTFO cinnamon

    (I am contractually obligated as a Steelers fan)

    i’m gonna be honest chili on spaghetti is pretty good

    i am not from cincinnati though

    **Winner Softest and Most Comfy Hugs Award Summer 2018**

    Blueberrywerewlf on the Sony Anime Games Box | BluberryWerewlf on the BroBone
    lonelyahava
  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    edited November 30
    spool32 wrote: »
    I gotta give this adobo / mole chili a run, I'm dead fuckin curious now :)

    So this might be heresy to you, since it involves beans, but it's really just a quick and dirty variation of a classic Texas red (with beans to flesh it out), but here's my recipe.

    3lbs beef chuck well browned, then cut into 2"x2" cubes (alternatively can use pork shoulder as well)
    1 extra large onion diced
    1x28oz can crushed tomatoes
    1lb dried black beans
    1x can chipotles in adobo
    2x tbsp black mole paste
    3xcups water
    salt+pepper to taste

    It's pretty simple, brown the beef 3 min per side at high heat, then cut into cubes (get better browning this way rather than crowding a pan with pre-cut cubes). Add onions to deglaze and pull up fond. Add everything else into pressure cooker (optional: use immersion blender to mix up chipotles with water or tomatoes before adding). Seal up and cook for 1 hr at high pressure. Alternatively can be done in a slow cooker or on the stove just over 6+ hours if you're not in a hurry.

    I do think the quality of the mole is going to play a fair bit of this here. I use the mole that's the consistency of a black, thick, gummy paste, not the ones that come in jars. Kinda like this: https://www.amazon.com/Mole-Negro-Oaxaca-Black-Juquilita/dp/B01HUC9S7Q

    Edit: it's basically just this recipe fleshed out with beans and when I'm too lazy to make a proper chili paste: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/01/pressure-cooker-chile-con-carne-texas-red-chili-recipe.html

    Simpsonia on
    spool32
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular


    This entire video seems like a lawsuit waiting to happen...

  • ChanusChanus Sugoi! ^_____^Registered User regular
    i have been tempted to throw my rice cooker in the shed and make black garlic now that i have the instant pot

    just not sure i won’t end up burning down my shed

    **Winner Softest and Most Comfy Hugs Award Summer 2018**

    Blueberrywerewlf on the Sony Anime Games Box | BluberryWerewlf on the BroBone
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular


    This entire video seems like a lawsuit waiting to happen...

    Why?

  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »


    This entire video seems like a lawsuit waiting to happen...

    Why?

    Garlic in a warm vacuum sealed environment for several weeks in a device that clearly wasn't designed for this level of precise temperature control.

    It seems like a how-to manual for creating botulism.

    MaguanoV1mBlackDragon480AbsoluteZero
  • ChanusChanus Sugoi! ^_____^Registered User regular
    that aside i want a gabby in my kitchen to catch the pasta and generally say adorable things while we cook together

    **Winner Softest and Most Comfy Hugs Award Summer 2018**

    Blueberrywerewlf on the Sony Anime Games Box | BluberryWerewlf on the BroBone
  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »

    This entire video seems like a lawsuit waiting to happen...

    Why?

    Garlic in a warm vacuum sealed environment for several weeks in a device that clearly wasn't designed for this level of precise temperature control.

    It seems like a how-to manual for creating botulism.

    The risks of foodborn botulism are vastly overstated. Over the last 5 years or so, the CDC has only accounted for about an average of 20-30 or so confirmed cases of foodborn botulism per year. Hell, in one of the bigger years, 2015, there was one large outbreak from a bad batch of potato salad, and it looks like another major offender is rotten seal products.
    CDC-chart-2015-botulism-cases.jpg

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    why are so many people eating seal

    Ladies.
  • CormacCormac Registered User regular
    Fair bit of Unknown on there too. Definitely not eating whatever that is.

    Signature3.jpg
    Steam: Gridlynk | PSN: Gridlynk | Destiny: Gridlynk | Battlefield 1: Gridlynk
    Chanus
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    why are so many people eating seal

    It's an Inuit delicacy.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
  • ChanusChanus Sugoi! ^_____^Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    why are so many people eating seal

    we're never gonna survive unless we get a little crazy

    **Winner Softest and Most Comfy Hugs Award Summer 2018**

    Blueberrywerewlf on the Sony Anime Games Box | BluberryWerewlf on the BroBone
    jungleroomxMaguanobowenMugsleyLoisLaneRedTidetynicknitdanlonelyahava
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Wash your clothes Till the creek turn redRegistered User regular
    Chanus wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    why are so many people eating seal

    we're never gonna survive unless we get a little crazy

    ilu chanus

    Make. Time.
    Chanusbowen
  • SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    why are so many people eating seal

    It's an Inuit delicacy.

    Not even a delicacy. It's a staple of living.

    steam_sig.png
    tynic
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »

    This entire video seems like a lawsuit waiting to happen...

    Why?

    Garlic in a warm vacuum sealed environment for several weeks in a device that clearly wasn't designed for this level of precise temperature control.

    It seems like a how-to manual for creating botulism.

    The risks of foodborn botulism are vastly overstated. Over the last 5 years or so, the CDC has only accounted for about an average of 20-30 or so confirmed cases of foodborn botulism per year. Hell, in one of the bigger years, 2015, there was one large outbreak from a bad batch of potato salad, and it looks like another major offender is rotten seal products.
    CDC-chart-2015-botulism-cases.jpg

    Botulism is rare because it requires a very specific set of conditions. You would need to expose the food to an airless, low acid environment and hold it at a relatively low temperature. It grows best between 86 - 104 F. Sous vide cooking creates an airless environment, but the food is usually held at a temperature that's too warm for botulism to grow. The spores are usually found in underground plants.

    The problem with the recipe is that it checks off the two most important boxes (underground plants and airless environment). Technically, 130 degrees would be warm enough to keep botulism in check. The problem is that dehydrators aren't sous vide machines. They weren't designed to maintain a precise temperature for long periods of time. And they definitely weren't designed for cooking food in vacuum packages, since that defeats the entire point. And all it takes is for the temperature to drop for a few hours to put everyone at risk.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    why are so many people eating seal

    It's an Inuit delicacy.

    I'm more surprised that the CDC gives a shit with the government's history of shitting on natives.

    Ladies.
  • knitdanknitdan Registered User regular
    Hey good food thread

    Mom gave me a bottle of camelina oil. It’s supposed to be good for high heat and pretty healthy as far as oils go.

    Anyone use the stuff? It has an odor not dissimilar to fresh broccoli

    Fuck Firearm Fetishism
    86 45
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    knitdan wrote: »
    Hey good food thread

    Mom gave me a bottle of camelina oil. It’s supposed to be good for high heat and pretty healthy as far as oils go.

    Anyone use the stuff? It has an odor not dissimilar to fresh broccoli

    Is it made from actual camels?

    LoisLaneCarpy
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »

    This entire video seems like a lawsuit waiting to happen...

    Why?

    Garlic in a warm vacuum sealed environment for several weeks in a device that clearly wasn't designed for this level of precise temperature control.

    It seems like a how-to manual for creating botulism.

    The risks of foodborn botulism are vastly overstated. Over the last 5 years or so, the CDC has only accounted for about an average of 20-30 or so confirmed cases of foodborn botulism per year. Hell, in one of the bigger years, 2015, there was one large outbreak from a bad batch of potato salad, and it looks like another major offender is rotten seal products.
    CDC-chart-2015-botulism-cases.jpg

    Botulism is rare because it requires a very specific set of conditions. You would need to expose the food to an airless, low acid environment and hold it at a relatively low temperature. It grows best between 86 - 104 F. Sous vide cooking creates an airless environment, but the food is usually held at a temperature that's too warm for botulism to grow. The spores are usually found in underground plants.

    The problem with the recipe is that it checks off the two most important boxes (underground plants and airless environment). Technically, 130 degrees would be warm enough to keep botulism in check. The problem is that dehydrators aren't sous vide machines. They weren't designed to maintain a precise temperature for long periods of time. And they definitely weren't designed for cooking food in vacuum packages, since that defeats the entire point. And all it takes is for the temperature to drop for a few hours to put everyone at risk.

    Yeah hell no. That's not a if, that's a when. Don't fuck around with botulism, boys and girls.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    spool32 wrote: »
    I gotta give this adobo / mole chili a run, I'm dead fuckin curious now :)

    So this might be heresy to you, since it involves beans, but it's really just a quick and dirty variation of a classic Texas red (with beans to flesh it out), but here's my recipe.

    3lbs beef chuck well browned, then cut into 2"x2" cubes (alternatively can use pork shoulder as well)
    1 extra large onion diced
    1x28oz can crushed tomatoes
    1lb dried black beans
    1x can chipotles in adobo
    2x tbsp black mole paste
    3xcups water
    salt+pepper to taste

    It's pretty simple, brown the beef 3 min per side at high heat, then cut into cubes (get better browning this way rather than crowding a pan with pre-cut cubes). Add onions to deglaze and pull up fond. Add everything else into pressure cooker (optional: use immersion blender to mix up chipotles with water or tomatoes before adding). Seal up and cook for 1 hr at high pressure. Alternatively can be done in a slow cooker or on the stove just over 6+ hours if you're not in a hurry.

    I do think the quality of the mole is going to play a fair bit of this here. I use the mole that's the consistency of a black, thick, gummy paste, not the ones that come in jars. Kinda like this: https://www.amazon.com/Mole-Negro-Oaxaca-Black-Juquilita/dp/B01HUC9S7Q

    Edit: it's basically just this recipe fleshed out with beans and when I'm too lazy to make a proper chili paste: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/01/pressure-cooker-chile-con-carne-texas-red-chili-recipe.html

    I made that Serious Eats recipe last weekend and it digging delicious. I'd never had a tomato-less chili before that dish. I wish I would have had some masa harina around though, it was real thin even after letting it simmer for about 30 minutes post cook. I ended up thickening it a little with some arrowroot but I didn't have enough of the flour to get it as thick as I'd like.

  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Anyone got a chimichurri recipe they recommend? I know it's a flexible thing that I'd want to tweak based on what I'm serving with but I could use a good place to start for just beef.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
  • ChanusChanus Sugoi! ^_____^Registered User regular
    Anyone got a chimichurri recipe they recommend? I know it's a flexible thing that I'd want to tweak based on what I'm serving with but I could use a good place to start for just beef.

    i’ve always been a fan of keeping it simple

    just parsley, olive oil, red wine vinegar, garlic, something spicy

    i’ll switch it up and use chipotle or ancho or just red pepper flakes depending on how i feel

    i did 2/3 parsley and 1/3 cilantro once instead of all parsley and it worked pretty well

    **Winner Softest and Most Comfy Hugs Award Summer 2018**

    Blueberrywerewlf on the Sony Anime Games Box | BluberryWerewlf on the BroBone
    tynicDoodmann
  • daveNYCdaveNYC Why universe hate Waspinator? Registered User regular
    Chanus wrote: »
    Anyone got a chimichurri recipe they recommend? I know it's a flexible thing that I'd want to tweak based on what I'm serving with but I could use a good place to start for just beef.

    i’ve always been a fan of keeping it simple

    just parsley, olive oil, red wine vinegar, garlic, something spicy

    i’ll switch it up and use chipotle or ancho or just red pepper flakes depending on how i feel

    i did 2/3 parsley and 1/3 cilantro once instead of all parsley and it worked pretty well

    Some red onion or shallots (depending on what level of bite you want) never hurts either. The recipe I use has a mix of cilantro and parsley.

    Chanus
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