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[Cooking Thread] Burning questions and searing remarks

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Posts

  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    I honestly don't understand the purpose of cast iron pan pizza. The function of cast iron is to hold onto heat, but that works to your disadvantage if the pan isn't hot to start with.

  • AtheraalAtheraal Registered User regular
    Well, that'd be why you generally start with a hot pan.

    OS7cMrU.gifmCdVpud.gifrUjW0QU.gifpAvatar_8513.gif
    AbsoluteZeroBanzai5150DaenrisTychoCelchuuu
  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    edited January 22
    Eddy wrote: »
    @arch mind sharing your pad see yew recipe? (not your beta zoodle recipe therein)

    Oh! Yeah, so here's what I did

    Freeze and then thaw a block of extra firm tofu.
    Drain very well, cut into small cubes, coat with a tablespoon or so of cornstarch and two tablespoons of a vegan hoisin sauce (I used Soy Vey brand).

    Bake at 400 for 20 minutes, flipping once.

    Meanwhile, soak wide rice noodles for 30 minutes and then boil them for 2 (boiling might not be necessary depending on the texture you want and brand of noodles)

    Once noodles are softened and tofu is cooked, make the sauce and get ready. For a rather substantial bowl I used

    4 tablespoons soy sauce
    2 tablespoons Hoisin
    Chili paste to taste (I used 3 tablespoons)

    Pan steam some broccoli florets (add a bit of water into a skillet, add the broccoli and cover for three minutes or so on medium high heat)
    Add the tofu and a bit of hoisin and steam for another minute or so

    Then, add the noodles, add the sauce, toss together and turn the heat up a bit so that the sauce cooks down and you get a little bit of sear on the noodles

    It would probably work better in a wok but I dont have one!

    It was very easy if you dont spend an hour trying to make the noodles from scratch....

    @Eddy

    Arch on
    ChanusEddyCauldVishNub
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    I honestly don't understand the purpose of cast iron pan pizza. The function of cast iron is to hold onto heat, but that works to your disadvantage if the pan isn't hot to start with.

    The cast iron is 500 degrees by the time the dough goes in. Gets you a golden and delicious crispy crust.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
    Daenris
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    I honestly don't understand the purpose of cast iron pan pizza. The function of cast iron is to hold onto heat, but that works to your disadvantage if the pan isn't hot to start with.

    I think it's because the pan will still heat faster then the pizza itself and so still transfer lots of heat to the dough.
    Atheraal wrote: »
    Well, that'd be why you generally start with a hot pan.

    Many recipes don't. The no-knead ones most notably, but even the most of the kneaded ones are generally rested in the pan to relax the gluten.

  • LoisLaneLoisLane Registered User regular
    Can I have some stir fry recipes? Preferably ones that use oyster sauce and fish sauce. I impulse bought them.

  • kilnbornkilnborn Registered User regular
    LoisLane wrote: »
    Can I have some stir fry recipes? Preferably ones that use oyster sauce and fish sauce. I impulse bought them.

    Oyster sauce and fish sauce make an excellent combo, along with some soy sauce (equal parts all 3). It's a common go-to sauce for me.

    Anyhow, stir-fries. Here's how it was explained to me many, many, many years ago:

    The are 5 things a stir-fry needs:

    1. The ingredients.
    For cooking for myself, my default amount of meat is 1 and 1/2 of a chicken thigh. This is around 5 ounces, and I want a rough equal (in volume) of veggies. Carrot, green beans, bok choy, asparagas, bell pepper, etc. Mushrooms! Baby corn!

    For any other meats, I just figure on 4-6 ounces. Shrimp, pork shoulder/butt, sirloin tip/ball tip/rump steak is what I roll with, along with chicken thighs.

    2. The marinade.
    My go to marinade for the meat is 2 teaspoons of soy sauce, about 1/2 teaspoon of toasted sesame oil and a tablespoon of cornstarch. I get in there and rub that into the meat. If I were to cook chicken breasts, I'd go with an egg white, 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt, 2 teaspoons of rice wine and a tablespoon of cornstarch.

    3. The seasonings.
    In this context, these are your aromatics. Green onion, garlic, ginger, dried or fresh chilis, etc. You can add them to some hot oil and fry until golden brown, then remove, or you can mince it up a add it when you're cooking your meat. My go-to is 2-3 green onions, a garlic clove and 2-3 hot dried red chili peppers. I toss them into the hot wok, give it a quick mix around, then add the meat.

    4. The sauce.
    I make all of my sauces the same way: 3 units of salty stuff, 1-3 units of sugar, and optional extra stuff. The main unit for when I'm cooking for just myself is the half tablespoon. When cooking for 2, the tablespoon.

    3 units of soy sauce, oyster sauce, fish sauce, doubanjian (fermented broad bean and chili paste), gouchujang, miso, black bean paste, etc.

    1 unit of sugar gets you a savory sauce with almost no sweetness, but elevates the whole thing. 2 units is a lightly sweetened stir-fry, and 3 units is pretty sweet.

    For vinegar, 1 unit gets you a little tang. 1 unit of rice vinegar to 2 units of sugar is great. 2 units of vinegar to 3 of sugar is a full on sweet-and-sour sauce.

    Rice wine I'll add 1-2 units, depending on what I want. Or I leave it out.

    If you want a saucier sauce, you can add chicken broth, or mushroom soaking water, or a little mildly hopped beer. You might need a cornstarch slurry if you add this. My normal amount of broth is equal to how much total liquid I used to make the sauce. So if I went with 3 units of soy sauce/fish sauce, 1 unit of vinegar and 1 unit of rice wine, I'd go with 5 units of broth.

    5. The garnish.
    An un-garnished stir-fry is an unfinished stir-fry! Fresh herbs, like cilantro or basil, fried basil leaves, toasted (or fried) peanuts, cashews or almonds, etc. If nothing else, give your dish a few drops of toasted sesame oil after plating up.


    I cook my veggies first, take them out, give the aromatics a quick (10 second fry), then cook my meat, add the veggies back in, add the sauce. Let the sauce come to a boil, then see if you need to thicken it. You've got cornstarch coating your meat, so some of that will thicken your sauce and if you don't add any broth, will be enough. Toss to make sure everything is coated, garnish, and plate up.

    ChanusLoisLaneVishNubCampyCormacAbsoluteZeroRear Admiral Choco
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    I don't know how you could stretch pizza crust into a 500f pan without sustaining 3rd degree burns.

    camo_sig.png
    V1mRear Admiral ChocoNightDragonCelestialBadger
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    That_Guy wrote: »
    I don't know how you could stretch pizza crust into a 500f pan without sustaining 3rd degree burns.

    Release dough from a significant height.

  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    That_Guy wrote: »
    I don't know how you could stretch pizza crust into a 500f pan without sustaining 3rd degree burns.

    Very carefully. What I do is stretch it to a circle the same size as the pan first, then drop it in. Still gotta reach in there and make quick adjustments though once it's in the pan. There's probably a safe way to do it involving gloves of some sort, but I like to live dangerously.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
    Banzai5150
  • TarantioTarantio Registered User regular
    Hypothetically, I suppose you could flip over a pot with diameter a little smaller than the pan's, flour it, stretch the dough over that, put the hot pan top side down on the dough, invert the whole thing, and take away the pot. Might require scraping. Might not work at all.

    It's probably more risky than the simpler methods, but if everything goes to plan you use mitts to handle anything hot.

    This was a silly idea.

    "Arguing with anonymous strangers on the Internet is a sucker's game because they almost always turn out to be -- or to be indistinguishable from -- self-righteous sixteen-year-olds possessing infinite amounts of free time."
    Neal Stephenson
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    At some point it feels like it would be easier to get a pizza steel

  • ChanusChanus Sugoi! ^_____^Registered User regular
    the serious eats, i think it was, skillet pizza had you proof it in the pan and i don't think you then took the dough out and then added back when it was hot

    you kind of get a bit of detroit style with it, which is pretty much the easiest way i've seen to do that style of pizza, and is completely different from what you would do on a stone or steel

    it comes out really nice

    it does seem entirely impractical and gimmicky to try and make a pizza in cast iron and mimic how you would make pizza on a stone

    **Winner Softest and Most Comfy Hugs Award Summer 2018**

    Blueberrywerewlf on the Sony Anime Games Box | BluberryWerewlf on the BroBone
    shryke
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    edited January 25
    Edit: Nevermind. Misread that post.

    AbsoluteZero on
    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    Got my hands on some ground wild boar. To celebrate today being something like 90 degrees warmer than it was a few days ago, I'm busting out the grill to make wild boargers. Gonna throw some pecan and cherry wood in to get some smoke on em. Planning to garnish with sweet hot mustard, a little mayo, and red onion.

    The packaging it came in says they also carry osterich. I wonder how that is?

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
    XaquinMugsleyNightDragon
  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    The packaging it came in says they also carry osterich. I wonder how that is?

    Probably more earthy and grounded than most other fowl.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
    MugsleyVishNub
  • kilnbornkilnborn Registered User regular
    Got my hands on some ground wild boar. To celebrate today being something like 90 degrees warmer than it was a few days ago, I'm busting out the grill to make wild boargers. Gonna throw some pecan and cherry wood in to get some smoke on em. Planning to garnish with sweet hot mustard, a little mayo, and red onion.

    The packaging it came in says they also carry osterich. I wonder how that is?

    I've had osterich quite a lot. It's very, very, very, very lean dark meat. You've got like 2 1/2 seconds between undercooked and overcooked and bone dry.

    It tastes fine if you manage to cook it to that perfect medium, though it's going to be dry no matter what, so you'll want a rich fatty sauce.

    AbsoluteZeroCauld
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    I've been making homemade hummus lately and it's kind of absurd how much you get out of a half pound of dried garbanzo beans. This round I ended up making my own tahini too as I was just about out and trader Joe's didn't have any in stock.

    Been using this recipe and just kicking up the garlic a ton.
    https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2016/03/israeli-style-extra-smooth-hummus-recipe.html

    AbsoluteZeroEd Gruberman
  • bloodyroarxxbloodyroarxx Registered User regular
    edited February 3
    Nevermind

    bloodyroarxx on
    Yeah man, I tell ya what, man, that dang ol' internet, man, you just go in on there and point and click, talk about w-w-dot-w-com, mean you got the naked chicks on there, man, just go click, click, click, click, click, it's real easy, man.
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    How do you handle the shells for the garbanzo beans? Just keep blending?

  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    I've got a good blender so I just puree it for like 2 minutes and it turns out super smooth.

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Curious: I've had roasted chicken peas /garbanzo that are seasoned with curry powder. Do you think there'd be enough moisture left if you did a partial roast, or roasted half? Do you think there would be any change in flavor?

  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    The packaging it came in says they also carry osterich. I wonder how that is?

    Probably more earthy and grounded than most other fowl.

    It’s extremely lean. I think more like turkey than anything else.

    I had emu once, but there was so much soy sauce in the marinade that I couldn’t tell you what it tasted like.

    Steam = VishnuOwnz
    Dota2 = Glitchmo
    AbsoluteZero
  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    I've never had roasted garbanzos before but I'd imagine if you keep them decently soft it'd work. May not get quite as smooth as the simmered ones though. I'd be worried that anything gained from the roast might have problems standing up to the tahini.

    You might be able to achieve something similar through seasoning the tahini sauce itself. I put cumin in mine and I could easily see other seasonings working well there.

  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    I uh

    am making air fryer collard green chips with everything bagel seasoning on top

    This is weird

    MugsleyCarpy
  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    Gonna put this here too so I can find it again.

    8hujpxabgp4l.jpeg

    I was sort of inspired by the Salvadoran place we went for lunch, so this is sort of striped bass a la plancha.

    Salt/cumin/pepper/paprika/garlic dusted then pan fried for about two minutes a side. Over some seasoned rice and topped with pico de Gallo. Salad is a bagged avocado ranch thing that was actually pretty good.

    Steam = VishnuOwnz
    Dota2 = Glitchmo
    Chanus
  • SoggybiscuitSoggybiscuit At the edge of spacetime lies a path with no end.Registered User regular
    Hmm.. Not sure if these were necessary, but they do what they say they do on the label, and it has been an eventful week at my house:

    Pipe Cleaners (Pumpkin spice muffins)

    Dry Stuff
    50g whole milled flax seed
    50g whole flax seed
    60g oatmeal flour
    180g whole wheat flour
    1.5 tsp baking powder
    ~1 tsp kosher salt (start w/half, depends on brand)
    2 tsp Pumpkin Spice seasoning (see below, this is what I used)

    Wet Stuff
    1/2 cup dark maple syrup (the real stuff only, please)
    2 eggs
    100g coconut oil
    2 Tbsp sugar, for creaming coconut oil
    1 cup pureed pumpkin
    1/4 yogurt
    Milk

    Pumpkin Spice (Optional)
    1 tsp whole peppercorns
    3 4-in cinnamon sticks
    1 tsp fresh grated nutmeg
    1 tsp whole allspice
    1 tsp whole clove
    1/2 tsp whole decorticated cardamom

    Heat your oven to 375 degrees. Grease a muffin tin or alternatively use muffin paper cups.

    In a large bowl, mix the dry ingredients together well, reserving 1/2 of the salt for later if needed.

    In a spice grinder, mix the whole spices (except for the nutmeg) and grind until a fine powder has formed. Add the nutmeg and blend to mix again. Reserve in a cool dark place.

    Cream the coconut oil and sugar together well until the coconut oil is light and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing until well incorporated and an emulsion has formed. Add the yogurt, maple syrup, and pumpkin puree and mix.

    Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and fold together. Take care and mix well, but lumps are OKAY and do not need to be completely beat out.

    Spoon enough batter to fill the muffin cups nearly to top; 12 takes about 18-20 minutes in my oven. Check with a toothpick when nearing completion.



    Steam - Synthetic Violence | XBOX Live - Cannonfuse | PSN - CastleBravo | Twitch - SoggybiscuitPA
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    A discussion earlier this week:

    Mrs Hedgie: It's sad we can't stay at work for lunch - they made lasagna.
    Hedgie: Well, I can make lasagna this weekend.

    And so begins getting up at 6 am to make lasagna mostly from scratch. To start, making the red sauce, which needs a good 4-8 hour simmer. This involved minced garlic and Italian herbs being sautee'd, before introducing one large onion. Once everything was nice and fragrant, several cans of San Marzano tomatoes were dumped in and let to simmer while I made meatballs. 2 pounds of ground chuck, 2 eggs, Worcestershire sauce, a bit of A1, and Italian breadcrumbs along with salt, pepper, and other seasonings got mixed, then formed into balls that got baked for half an hour, along with some sweet Italian sausage. Then all the meat went for a dip in the sauce after further seasoning, and left on low heat for several hours, skimming oil off the sauce occasionally.

    Once it came time to make the lasagna itself, the meat was extracted, and a quick batch of bechamel was made, before assembly in the order of pasta, red sauce, ricotta, bechamel, mozzarella, repeat. Top with red sauce and mozzarella, and bake at 375 degrees for 45 minutes, then rest for 30. Serve with the meat on the side and enjoy how decadent half a day in the kitchen can be.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    AbsoluteZeroChanusjoshgotroV1msee317Xaquindispatch.oCaptain InertiaDoodmann
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Listen

    I'll marry you for some of that

    Xaquin
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Well I feel inadequate.

    Boxed noodles
    Jar sauce
    Hamburger
    Ricotta

    Captain InertiaAbsoluteZeroCauld
  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    There are some pretty good Crockpot lasagna recipes that probably don't come out as well as half a day in the kitchen, but they're pretty okay. My mom used to make a vegetarian one growing up and I'm pretty sure I saw one on an old episode of Good Eats. Has anyone tried one they can recommend? I now desire noodlecheesenoodleproteincheesetomato.

  • JavenJaven Registered User regular
    I probably wouldn't do an entire lasagna in a pot, but you can do a really good red sauce in a pressure cooker in an hour.

  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    So this is where I have to say I Can Lasagna, And So Can You. Honestly, the process isn't nearly as bad as you might think - once the red sauce is assembled, it can go on autopilot for the most part until you're ready to put the lasagna together. For the sauces, I worked off of the recipes that Andrew Rea laid out in the following video for red sauce and bechamel:



    So, let's get started.

    The Red Sauce

    Ingredients:
    • 4 cans San Marzano tomatoes
    • 1/2 small jar minced garlic (about 1 1/2 tablespoons or so)
    • 1 large yellow/sweet onion
    • 2 sprigs fresh basil
    • 1/2 tube/can tomato paste (I'd recommend the tube for this application)
    • Seasonings to taste
    • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil

    To start off, in the stockpot, we put in enough olive oil to cover the bottom in a thin coat, then get it heated to where it's shimmering. While it's heating, dice the onion finely, and set aside. Once the oil is hot, put in the garlic, and let it saute until aromatic. At this point, you'll want to add any seasonings other than salt or pepper (I went with an Italian blend I had on hand.) Let that get aromatic as well, then add the onion and saute until translucent and beginning to caramelize. Add the tomato paste, and incorporate, then add the tomatoes, using your spoon to crush them against the wall of the stockpot. Toss in the basil, then let simmer on low heat for an hour, with the lid slightly cracked to let moisture escape. This needs to sit for an hour, so it's time to turn to...

    The Meatballs

    Ingredients:
    • 2 pounds ground chuck
    • 2 large eggs
    • ~1-2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    • A-1 steak sauce to taste
    • ~1/2 cup Italian seasoned breadcrumbs
    • Seasonings (Italian blend, salt, pepper) to taste

    In a large bowl, mix the above ingredients together by hand until they form a paste about the consistency of Play-Doh. (If too wet, add breadcrumbs, if too dry, add more of the liquid ingredients.) Form into balls about an inch in diameter, and place in an oven safe vessel. Put into a 350 degree oven and bake for 30 minutes, just enough to hold their shape in the sauce.

    Also, you'll want to give a package of sweet Italian sausage a quick run through the microwave (8-10 minutes should be good). We're not looking to fully cook, but to just get the casing browned - the meatballs and sausage are going to be in the equivalent of a tomato sous vide for the next few hours, so that will do the cooking for us.

    At this point, we're ready to finish the sauce. Go in, and pull out the spent basil, and then add salt and pepper to taste. Once seasoned properly, add the meatballs and sausage in, set the heat low, and let simmer for 4-6 hours.

    Okay, Why The Meatball Jacuzzi?

    Well, as Andrew points out in the video above, a red sauce needs fat to come together. This is because you need something to counterbalance the acidity of the tomatoes, which can be done with either fat or sugar (which is what most jar sauces use.) As my mother taught me, one way to add the fat as well as further flavor is to cook your meat in the sauce, which works when you're doing a low simmer. That said, you will need to remove the oils on the surface every couple of hours - use a ladle to remove the oils to a measuring cup, then let settle and then decant the oil off the top, then return the remaining sauce to the pot. But other than that, the sauce can be left to just simmer to deliciousness. Once we're ready to begin assembling the lasagna, we need to make...

    The Bechamel

    Ingredients:
    • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
    • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    • ~1 1/2 cups milk
    • 1/2 cup mozzarella cheese (sliced/shredded, optional)

    One of the "mother sauces", bechamel is actually really easy to make. Start by melting the butter in a pan, then when fully liquid, add the flour and stir until you have a blond roux form. Once formed, slowly introduce milk while stirring until a white sauce without any lumps is formed. I added a half cup of mozzarella to thicken the sauce further and add additional flavor.

    Now, we are ready for...

    The Lasagna

    Ingredients:
    • One package oven ready lasagna noodles
    • 4 1/2 cups mozzarella cheese
    • 1 large container ricotta cheese
    • The Red Sauce (see above)
    • The Bechamel (see above)

    Fish out the meatballs and sausage from the sauce and put aside, and give a good stir to fully incorporate. Then in your baking vessel, lay down a layer of sauce as a base. Then, starting from there, we build each layer as such:
    • Noodles, overlapping slightly
    • Red Sauce, forming a base
    • Ricotta, laid out in small spoonfuls over the surface
    • Bechamel spooned out over the top
    • Mozzarella to cover

    Repeat until you are at the top of your vessel. Then lay down a final layer of noodles, Red Sauce, and mozzarella to form the top crust. Place in a 375 degree oven for 45 minutes, then remove and let rest for what will be an excruciatingly long 30 minutes. Once allowed to rest, serve with the meatballs and sausage on the side, and enjoy your hard work.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    Chanus
  • tbloxhamtbloxham Registered User regular
    So this is where I have to say I Can Lasagna, And So Can You. Honestly, the process isn't nearly as bad as you might think - once the red sauce is assembled, it can go on autopilot for the most part until you're ready to put the lasagna together. For the sauces, I worked off of the recipes that Andrew Rea laid out in the following video for red sauce and bechamel:



    So, let's get started.

    The Red Sauce

    Ingredients:
    • 4 cans San Marzano tomatoes
    • 1/2 small jar minced garlic (about 1 1/2 tablespoons or so)
    • 1 large yellow/sweet onion
    • 2 sprigs fresh basil
    • 1/2 tube/can tomato paste (I'd recommend the tube for this application)
    • Seasonings to taste
    • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil

    To start off, in the stockpot, we put in enough olive oil to cover the bottom in a thin coat, then get it heated to where it's shimmering. While it's heating, dice the onion finely, and set aside. Once the oil is hot, put in the garlic, and let it saute until aromatic. At this point, you'll want to add any seasonings other than salt or pepper (I went with an Italian blend I had on hand.) Let that get aromatic as well, then add the onion and saute until translucent and beginning to caramelize. Add the tomato paste, and incorporate, then add the tomatoes, using your spoon to crush them against the wall of the stockpot. Toss in the basil, then let simmer on low heat for an hour, with the lid slightly cracked to let moisture escape. This needs to sit for an hour, so it's time to turn to...

    The Meatballs

    Ingredients:
    • 2 pounds ground chuck
    • 2 large eggs
    • ~1-2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    • A-1 steak sauce to taste
    • ~1/2 cup Italian seasoned breadcrumbs
    • Seasonings (Italian blend, salt, pepper) to taste

    In a large bowl, mix the above ingredients together by hand until they form a paste about the consistency of Play-Doh. (If too wet, add breadcrumbs, if too dry, add more of the liquid ingredients.) Form into balls about an inch in diameter, and place in an oven safe vessel. Put into a 350 degree oven and bake for 30 minutes, just enough to hold their shape in the sauce.

    Also, you'll want to give a package of sweet Italian sausage a quick run through the microwave (8-10 minutes should be good). We're not looking to fully cook, but to just get the casing browned - the meatballs and sausage are going to be in the equivalent of a tomato sous vide for the next few hours, so that will do the cooking for us.

    At this point, we're ready to finish the sauce. Go in, and pull out the spent basil, and then add salt and pepper to taste. Once seasoned properly, add the meatballs and sausage in, set the heat low, and let simmer for 4-6 hours.

    Okay, Why The Meatball Jacuzzi?

    Well, as Andrew points out in the video above, a red sauce needs fat to come together. This is because you need something to counterbalance the acidity of the tomatoes, which can be done with either fat or sugar (which is what most jar sauces use.) As my mother taught me, one way to add the fat as well as further flavor is to cook your meat in the sauce, which works when you're doing a low simmer. That said, you will need to remove the oils on the surface every couple of hours - use a ladle to remove the oils to a measuring cup, then let settle and then decant the oil off the top, then return the remaining sauce to the pot. But other than that, the sauce can be left to just simmer to deliciousness. Once we're ready to begin assembling the lasagna, we need to make...

    The Bechamel

    Ingredients:
    • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
    • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    • ~1 1/2 cups milk
    • 1/2 cup mozzarella cheese (sliced/shredded, optional)

    One of the "mother sauces", bechamel is actually really easy to make. Start by melting the butter in a pan, then when fully liquid, add the flour and stir until you have a blond roux form. Once formed, slowly introduce milk while stirring until a white sauce without any lumps is formed. I added a half cup of mozzarella to thicken the sauce further and add additional flavor.

    Now, we are ready for...

    The Lasagna

    Ingredients:
    • One package oven ready lasagna noodles
    • 4 1/2 cups mozzarella cheese
    • 1 large container ricotta cheese
    • The Red Sauce (see above)
    • The Bechamel (see above)

    Fish out the meatballs and sausage from the sauce and put aside, and give a good stir to fully incorporate. Then in your baking vessel, lay down a layer of sauce as a base. Then, starting from there, we build each layer as such:
    • Noodles, overlapping slightly
    • Red Sauce, forming a base
    • Ricotta, laid out in small spoonfuls over the surface
    • Bechamel spooned out over the top
    • Mozzarella to cover

    Repeat until you are at the top of your vessel. Then lay down a final layer of noodles, Red Sauce, and mozzarella to form the top crust. Place in a 375 degree oven for 45 minutes, then remove and let rest for what will be an excruciatingly long 30 minutes. Once allowed to rest, serve with the meatballs and sausage on the side, and enjoy your hard work.

    Why the additional meatball making step? I've never even heard of lasagna with meatballs, clearly it's a thing, as both your recipes have it. Are you just making meatballs to have fat? I've always just put ground beef or pork in the red sauce after Browning.

    Lasagna is easy though, very little active time and provided you simmer the tomato sauce for at least 2 hours will be delicious even if you add nothing else but salt, garlic, bechemel, cheese and noodles. Tomatoes develop so many flavors while cooking.

    "That is cool" - Abraham Lincoln
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    tbloxham wrote: »
    So this is where I have to say I Can Lasagna, And So Can You. Honestly, the process isn't nearly as bad as you might think - once the red sauce is assembled, it can go on autopilot for the most part until you're ready to put the lasagna together. For the sauces, I worked off of the recipes that Andrew Rea laid out in the following video for red sauce and bechamel:



    So, let's get started.

    The Red Sauce

    Ingredients:
    • 4 cans San Marzano tomatoes
    • 1/2 small jar minced garlic (about 1 1/2 tablespoons or so)
    • 1 large yellow/sweet onion
    • 2 sprigs fresh basil
    • 1/2 tube/can tomato paste (I'd recommend the tube for this application)
    • Seasonings to taste
    • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil

    To start off, in the stockpot, we put in enough olive oil to cover the bottom in a thin coat, then get it heated to where it's shimmering. While it's heating, dice the onion finely, and set aside. Once the oil is hot, put in the garlic, and let it saute until aromatic. At this point, you'll want to add any seasonings other than salt or pepper (I went with an Italian blend I had on hand.) Let that get aromatic as well, then add the onion and saute until translucent and beginning to caramelize. Add the tomato paste, and incorporate, then add the tomatoes, using your spoon to crush them against the wall of the stockpot. Toss in the basil, then let simmer on low heat for an hour, with the lid slightly cracked to let moisture escape. This needs to sit for an hour, so it's time to turn to...

    The Meatballs

    Ingredients:
    • 2 pounds ground chuck
    • 2 large eggs
    • ~1-2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    • A-1 steak sauce to taste
    • ~1/2 cup Italian seasoned breadcrumbs
    • Seasonings (Italian blend, salt, pepper) to taste

    In a large bowl, mix the above ingredients together by hand until they form a paste about the consistency of Play-Doh. (If too wet, add breadcrumbs, if too dry, add more of the liquid ingredients.) Form into balls about an inch in diameter, and place in an oven safe vessel. Put into a 350 degree oven and bake for 30 minutes, just enough to hold their shape in the sauce.

    Also, you'll want to give a package of sweet Italian sausage a quick run through the microwave (8-10 minutes should be good). We're not looking to fully cook, but to just get the casing browned - the meatballs and sausage are going to be in the equivalent of a tomato sous vide for the next few hours, so that will do the cooking for us.

    At this point, we're ready to finish the sauce. Go in, and pull out the spent basil, and then add salt and pepper to taste. Once seasoned properly, add the meatballs and sausage in, set the heat low, and let simmer for 4-6 hours.

    Okay, Why The Meatball Jacuzzi?

    Well, as Andrew points out in the video above, a red sauce needs fat to come together. This is because you need something to counterbalance the acidity of the tomatoes, which can be done with either fat or sugar (which is what most jar sauces use.) As my mother taught me, one way to add the fat as well as further flavor is to cook your meat in the sauce, which works when you're doing a low simmer. That said, you will need to remove the oils on the surface every couple of hours - use a ladle to remove the oils to a measuring cup, then let settle and then decant the oil off the top, then return the remaining sauce to the pot. But other than that, the sauce can be left to just simmer to deliciousness. Once we're ready to begin assembling the lasagna, we need to make...

    The Bechamel

    Ingredients:
    • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
    • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    • ~1 1/2 cups milk
    • 1/2 cup mozzarella cheese (sliced/shredded, optional)

    One of the "mother sauces", bechamel is actually really easy to make. Start by melting the butter in a pan, then when fully liquid, add the flour and stir until you have a blond roux form. Once formed, slowly introduce milk while stirring until a white sauce without any lumps is formed. I added a half cup of mozzarella to thicken the sauce further and add additional flavor.

    Now, we are ready for...

    The Lasagna

    Ingredients:
    • One package oven ready lasagna noodles
    • 4 1/2 cups mozzarella cheese
    • 1 large container ricotta cheese
    • The Red Sauce (see above)
    • The Bechamel (see above)

    Fish out the meatballs and sausage from the sauce and put aside, and give a good stir to fully incorporate. Then in your baking vessel, lay down a layer of sauce as a base. Then, starting from there, we build each layer as such:
    • Noodles, overlapping slightly
    • Red Sauce, forming a base
    • Ricotta, laid out in small spoonfuls over the surface
    • Bechamel spooned out over the top
    • Mozzarella to cover

    Repeat until you are at the top of your vessel. Then lay down a final layer of noodles, Red Sauce, and mozzarella to form the top crust. Place in a 375 degree oven for 45 minutes, then remove and let rest for what will be an excruciatingly long 30 minutes. Once allowed to rest, serve with the meatballs and sausage on the side, and enjoy your hard work.

    Why the additional meatball making step? I've never even heard of lasagna with meatballs, clearly it's a thing, as both your recipes have it. Are you just making meatballs to have fat? I've always just put ground beef or pork in the red sauce after Browning.

    Lasagna is easy though, very little active time and provided you simmer the tomato sauce for at least 2 hours will be delicious even if you add nothing else but salt, garlic, bechemel, cheese and noodles. Tomatoes develop so many flavors while cooking.

    Because I like meatballs, and that's how my mother taught me to make the sauce.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    Don't simmer your red sauce, bake it in the oven.

    JavenSimpsonia
  • KetarKetar My autocomplete is a tad agressive today.Registered User regular
    Don't simmer your red sauce, bake it in the oven.

    I'm good doing it the way my Italian grandmother taught me to.

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Don't simmer your red sauce, bake it in the oven.

    Why?

    Captain Inertia
  • JavenJaven Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    Don't simmer your red sauce, bake it in the oven.

    Why?

    Caramelization, mostly. You want as much caramelization as possible to enhance the flavors, but that's not really possible while keeping something at a simmer, or even a boil, since sugars don't caramelize until 300 degrees or so. It's also why most vegetables are better in the oven that a wet method like boiling or steaming.

    This can also be achieved by just not stirring it as often as you might otherwise on the stovetop, but this is harder to control and see.

    It's also easier, since it requires less stirring in general, and allows you to better control the temperature.

    A thicker sauce (which is more easily achieved in the oven) is also better for lasagna specifically, since between the sauce and the cheese, there tends to be a lot of extra moisture that seeps out of the ingredients when you actually do get around to baking the entire dish, which you don't want. Baking the sauce separately first helps with that, by getting all the moisture out beforehand.

    SchrodingerXaquinDoodmann
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    Picnic pork was on sale today. I got a 5lb roast for just over $5. I started trying to cut nice neat slats in the skin before giving up and just stabbing at it with a knife to make holes. I sealed it up in a gallon sized zip top bag in a containment bowl with salt, sugar, oil, lemon juice, worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, a touch of liquid smoke, and a bunch of seasonings I think I'm going to slow roast it in the oven tomorrow or Tuesday. I'm thinking 250 until it temps at 140 than crank it up to 400 to crisp up the skin and bringing it up to around 150f internal.

    camo_sig.png
    XaquinChanusskippydumptruck
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