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[Cooking Thread] Burning questions and searing remarks

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Posts

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Either I'm a messy cook or you have a gigantic griddle. Putting all that shit on a double-burner-sized griddle would end up with food all over the place.

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Also that's a nice way to cut herbs, but a better way is to use kitchen scissors/shears. Faster and no bruising

    Xaquin
  • RiusRius Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Either I'm a messy cook or you have a gigantic griddle. Putting all that shit on a double-burner-sized griddle would end up with food all over the place.

    Yeah, it's an electric one, not a stovetop one, so it's pretty big.

  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Also that's a nice way to cut herbs, but a better way is to use kitchen scissors/shears. Faster and no bruising

    If I'm not using a knife for anything else, I'll do the basil rollup with kitchen scissors since it still helps keep the smaller leaves from flying around and lets you generally stack the leaves for fewer total cuts.. Not sure I'd be able to fit in a bunch of cilantro or parsley into the scissors though and even with the basil I'm pretty sure I'm faster with the knife. The scissors are just easier to clean and don't require as much care compared not entirely stainless steel knives.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular


    Gordon Ramsay offers tips on how to cook on a budget. You just need some lamb, prawns, and saffron.

    Also, you all have leftover risotto in the fridge, right?

    DoodmannRiusdispatch.oTOGSolidMugsleyTNTrooperA Dabble Of TheloniusknitdanFryLoisLaneJulius
  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    So I had a bunch of vacation I suddenly had to burn up at the end of 2017 due to a change in policies at work. I figured it would be a good time to go through recently ordered cookbooks. On the savory side, this meant I looked through Heston Blumenthal at Home and Ad Hoc at Home. This proved less fruitful than I thought it would because 1) Ad Hoc at Home is really geared towards cooking for families and get togethers on weekends, not so much bachelors and 2) a lot of the recipes in both use a lot of vegetables and seafood that are just not in season until spring. But the grocery store that I'll take the time to drive to weekly because it has the best seafood and meat selection and low priced produce and pantry staples is still able to get some fresh fish during the winter and both books had something of note for white fish.

    Hence I took the parsley persillade cod from Thomas Keller and combined it with the mustard, caper, and pickle vinaigrette from Heston Blumenthal and served that with some purple potatoes.

    Is34

    The herbed coating adds some much needed texture and crunch to skinless fish. But the real star for me was the vinaigrette. It's proven to be an extremely flexible sauce that pairs with white fish, pork, and vegetables plus it's a lot faster to whip up than my usual pan sauces. There were multiple versions in the books as well so I've taken to adjusting them based on what I'm serving and what I have on hand. If I'm doing seafood, I'll use capers plus a bit of the caper brine but otherwise omit them. The pickles were sometimes a bit much but I can still get that flavor plus reduce vinegar use by using pickle brining liquid from the jar. And while dijon mustard is the traditional one, I can mix that with some whole grain mustard I had sitting in the fridge for years for a bolder flavor or some of the mustard packets from take out orders that had just been taking up space. Plus it all whisks together in under a minute.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
    Movitz
  • MovitzMovitz Registered User regular
    edited January 19
    I just bought a metric tonne of different Indian spices at an asian store. Half of them says "do not consume uncooked", which strikes me as a bit strange. Is the hygiene that bad when harvesting/drying them? I've never seen it on the same spices when I buy them at my local store.

    Movitz on
  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Gordon Ramsay offers tips on how to cook on a budget. You just need some lamb, prawns, and saffron.

    Also, you all have leftover risotto in the fridge, right?

    Ah, one of the pitfalls of cooking guides from other countries: What's common in one part of the world may not be common in another.

    The lamb used was a "lamb steak," a chunk of the leg sliced thin and around here sells for about the same price as sirloin and other less esteemed cuts of beef so that one is still pretty inexpensive.

    Prawns are probably a lot cheaper in the UK given the whole island nation thing kind of how like shrimp is a lot cheaper the closer you get to the Gulf of Mexico. You wouldn't put it with grits down south if it wasn't cheap.

    Saffron's a weird one. It's not cheap, but unless you're doing a lot of Indian or Middle Eastern cooking you probably have a good amount sitting around since so little gets used at a time and then you forget about it for months. But I imagine being a lot closer to Spain makes Spanish saffron a lot less expensive in the UK. That said, it can be had for a good price in the US. I buy mine from a Persian grocery store run by the same family who runs a Persian restaurant next door. It's something you have to ask for at the register and they're either selling some of their surplus that doesn't get used by the restaurant or they smuggle it out of Iran during family trips or both because I can't think of any other way they sell it for under a fifth of the usual price.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
    GrisloshrykeJulius
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Movitz wrote: »
    I just bought a metric tonne of different Indian spices at an asian store. Half of them says "do not consume uncooked", which strikes me as a bit strange. Is the hygiene that bad when harvesting/drying them? I've never seen it on the same spices when I buy them at my local store.

    Never seen that either. I mean most spices I wouldn't consume uncooked, but I cant think of any that one should be prevented from doing so. Which spices?

  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    In the continuing ramen adventures...

    e0ffeybl.jpg

    This ended up being more "hangover" oriented but that's what I had to work with.

    Green onions, egg drop post boil, sliced pickles, monterey jack, sriracha

    jungleroomxXaquinVishNubAbsoluteZerowanderingLoisLane
  • MovitzMovitz Registered User regular
    edited January 22
    V1m wrote: »
    Movitz wrote: »
    I just bought a metric tonne of different Indian spices at an asian store. Half of them says "do not consume uncooked", which strikes me as a bit strange. Is the hygiene that bad when harvesting/drying them? I've never seen it on the same spices when I buy them at my local store.

    Never seen that either. I mean most spices I wouldn't consume uncooked, but I cant think of any that one should be prevented from doing so. Which spices?

    Mostly standard ones. Kashmiri chilli powder, coriander seeds, cumin seeds, black cardamom etc. I just found it a bit odd. The guy at the check-out just mumbled something about it beeing "not good for health uncooked".

    Movitz on
  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Movitz wrote: »
    V1m wrote: »
    Movitz wrote: »
    I just bought a metric tonne of different Indian spices at an asian store. Half of them says "do not consume uncooked", which strikes me as a bit strange. Is the hygiene that bad when harvesting/drying them? I've never seen it on the same spices when I buy them at my local store.

    Never seen that either. I mean most spices I wouldn't consume uncooked, but I cant think of any that one should be prevented from doing so. Which spices?

    Mostly standard ones. Kashmiri chilli powder, coriander seeds, cumin seeds, black cardamom etc. I just found it a bit odd. The guy at the check-out just mumbled something about it beeing "not good for health uncooked".

    Could easily be the guy just saying something off the cuff or traditional beliefs from back in Asia as it could be a legitimate concern. But yeah, I wouldn't use any of those in uncooked applications anyway.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Movitz wrote: »
    V1m wrote: »
    Movitz wrote: »
    I just bought a metric tonne of different Indian spices at an asian store. Half of them says "do not consume uncooked", which strikes me as a bit strange. Is the hygiene that bad when harvesting/drying them? I've never seen it on the same spices when I buy them at my local store.

    Never seen that either. I mean most spices I wouldn't consume uncooked, but I cant think of any that one should be prevented from doing so. Which spices?

    Mostly standard ones. Kashmiri chilli powder, coriander seeds, cumin seeds, black cardamom etc. I just found it a bit odd. The guy at the check-out just mumbled something about it beeing "not good for health uncooked".

    I mean eating spoonfuls of raw kashmiri chili probably isn't "good for health" but yeah I think you'll be OK just using them normally.

  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    This was on the front page of Serious Eats today, and deserves to be in the new Cooking thread. For everyone who has, or has just recently, gotten an InstantPot or other pressure cooker, you need to check these out. I've made about half of them myself, and they all turn out pretty great.

    http://www.seriouseats.com/2017/03/pressure-cooker-recipes.html#comments-229920

  • HenroidHenroid Radio Demon Internet HellRegistered User regular
    Speaking of Gordon Ramsay, he occasionally comments on peoples' food / photos sent to him. Someone mentioned they were making a pizza, and Gordon gave the correct answer and has thus closed the door on this matter.

    Centrism is just the cowardly way to be a bigot w/o being explicit about it.
    American politics isn't 4D chess, it's just if you give a shit about other people or not.
    bowenSteel AngelRedTideXaquinknitdanshrykeTOGSolidLoisLane
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    edited February 6
    Tonight's ramen was a true mad dog affair. Leftovers that basically ended up being Philly cheese steak but with chicken, cheddar cheese and some parsley. The parsley was a mistake...I also should have added an egg.

    cju0HRXl.jpg

    Doodmann on
  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    Any favorite venison recipes? I have round steak and ground.

    Backup plans are sausage and I have a stew I've made before with venison that's pretty good, but it could be any red meat in there and it would be the same. So anything that highlights venison a little more?

    Steam = VishnuOwnz
    Dota2 = Glitchmo
  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    VishNub wrote: »
    Any favorite venison recipes? I have round steak and ground.

    Backup plans are sausage and I have a stew I've made before with venison that's pretty good, but it could be any red meat in there and it would be the same. So anything that highlights venison a little more?

    Red meat tends to be somewhat interchangeable in terms of cooking methods and pretty much anything that works with beef works with other red meat. I imagine that similar to lamb you can get away with flavors that would overpower beef when cooking venison.

    Looking at one of my references, a lot of chefs like complementing venison with juniper berries, pears, and apples which you normally wouldn't with beef. I imagine this applies more so if the venison was harvested when those plants were bearing fruit.

    A chasseur sauce would also be a traditional complement. Some people are saying a cumberland sauce also works well.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
  • Vic_HazardVic_Hazard Registered User regular
    Does anyone know of a good app to compile your recipes complete with pictures so you'll remember it well? Most apps I find that have simple recipe building functions are also essentially social media, so I'm beaming any little thing I make around the world.

    Doodmann
  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    I gave up on finding one and just write them down in notepad on my computer

    no pictures though

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    @Steel Angel (and everyone else)

    Personally I've been getting a lot of my recipes lately from Ricardo, a well-known Québec chef. His recipes range from really simple to rather involved, but are uniformly delicious. They're sorted by categories, and I can testify that the "30 minutes or less" category is a life-saver for weeknight dinners. One word of advice though: for his baking recipes, cut the sugar content by half. The guy must have a US-Army weapons-grade sweet tooth, to use the amount of sugar he does.

    English-version website:
    https://www.ricardocuisine.com/en

    I mean, he is Quebecois....

    BlackDragon480
  • AtheraalAtheraal Registered User regular
    So doodmann and henroid's posts up there plus my half empty pantry got me to try something

    Spicy ramen with slices of pineapple.

    You can't stop me. Nobody can.

    (It's tasty, but not as tasty as the time I put mango in)

    OS7cMrU.gifmCdVpud.gifrUjW0QU.gifpAvatar_8513.gif
    Doodmann
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Atheraal wrote: »
    So doodmann and henroid's posts up there plus my half empty pantry got me to try something

    Spicy ramen with slices of pineapple.

    You can't stop me. Nobody can.

    (It's tasty, but not as tasty as the time I put mango in)

    Broil the pineapple first until you get some char. Sprinkle with a little salt and cayenne (and if you have some, a squeeze of lime juice).

    PS doing this with the pineapple, along with not heaping mounds of the stuff on in the first place, is how pineapple on pizza can actually work.

    Doodmann
  • AtheraalAtheraal Registered User regular
    The citrus, salt and cayenne sprinkle is one of my favourite moves, it's practically msg with how it pops when you take a bite.

    OS7cMrU.gifmCdVpud.gifrUjW0QU.gifpAvatar_8513.gif
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    kitchen sink ramen is my favorite food.

  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    Vic_Hazard wrote: »
    Does anyone know of a good app to compile your recipes complete with pictures so you'll remember it well? Most apps I find that have simple recipe building functions are also essentially social media, so I'm beaming any little thing I make around the world.

    I use evernote to keep track of my recipes

    you can use I think two devices for free (?) so I can browse for recipes on the computer and then bring them up on my phone when I'm in the kitchen

    I'm not sure if you can save pictures to it or not though

  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    Vic_Hazard wrote: »
    Does anyone know of a good app to compile your recipes complete with pictures so you'll remember it well? Most apps I find that have simple recipe building functions are also essentially social media, so I'm beaming any little thing I make around the world.

    would yummly work? It was the thing we found that stalled me and my friend who were planning to put a recipe book / suggestion app together.

  • ShivahnShivahn Unaware of her barrel shifter privilege Eastern coastal temptressRegistered User regular
    I use Pepperplate. No social media. Auto-import of the big sites. Options to multiply ingredients for larger batches. It's pretty dope.

    DoodmannGiggles_Funsworth
  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    kitchen sink ramen is my favorite food.

    It can be a good way to use up food odds and ends.

    I came down with a cold late last week and the Superbowl watchers cleaned out the supply of celery and carrots at the grocery store Sunday so I've been using the (somewhat weak) chicken stock I made with instant ramen in place of a more traditional chicken soup.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    VishNub wrote: »
    Any favorite venison recipes? I have round steak and ground.

    Backup plans are sausage and I have a stew I've made before with venison that's pretty good, but it could be any red meat in there and it would be the same. So anything that highlights venison a little more?

    Red meat tends to be somewhat interchangeable in terms of cooking methods and pretty much anything that works with beef works with other red meat. I imagine that similar to lamb you can get away with flavors that would overpower beef when cooking venison.

    Looking at one of my references, a lot of chefs like complementing venison with juniper berries, pears, and apples which you normally wouldn't with beef. I imagine this applies more so if the venison was harvested when those plants were bearing fruit.

    A chasseur sauce would also be a traditional complement. Some people are saying a cumberland sauce also works well.

    Well, I sort of followed your advice and kind of tied the steak up into a roast, then did a red wine reduction/pan sauce. It was pretty OK. I overcooked the venison a bit -- it went from raw to well in like five minutes -- but the pairing worked.

    Steam = VishnuOwnz
    Dota2 = Glitchmo
  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    VishNub wrote: »
    VishNub wrote: »
    Any favorite venison recipes? I have round steak and ground.

    Backup plans are sausage and I have a stew I've made before with venison that's pretty good, but it could be any red meat in there and it would be the same. So anything that highlights venison a little more?

    Red meat tends to be somewhat interchangeable in terms of cooking methods and pretty much anything that works with beef works with other red meat. I imagine that similar to lamb you can get away with flavors that would overpower beef when cooking venison.

    Looking at one of my references, a lot of chefs like complementing venison with juniper berries, pears, and apples which you normally wouldn't with beef. I imagine this applies more so if the venison was harvested when those plants were bearing fruit.

    A chasseur sauce would also be a traditional complement. Some people are saying a cumberland sauce also works well.

    Well, I sort of followed your advice and kind of tied the steak up into a roast, then did a red wine reduction/pan sauce. It was pretty OK. I overcooked the venison a bit -- it went from raw to well in like five minutes -- but the pairing worked.

    I'm guessing the lower fat content might affect the way it cooks compared to fattier commercially raised meat.

    Oh, and it occurred to me that a ragout would be a good use of the ground meat. Wild boar ragout works really well so I imagine venison would too. Sausages sound intriguing too but you'd need to add in animal fat when working with such a lean meat to get the right texture.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
  • m!ttensm!ttens Registered User regular
    I'm currently going through a kitchen renovation so that means I have no access to a stove or oven (and our fridge is sitting in the middle of the living room) so my dining room had been set up as a makeshift kitchen. Mrs. m!ttens and I have some frozen soup her mom made for us but that isn't going to last forever and I'm already getting tired of soup. So my request to you wonderful people is what delicious recipes can you share that only makes use of a microwave, toaster, electric griddle, rice cooker, or slow cooker, and preferably does not involve too much in the way of cleanup?

  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    VishNub wrote: »
    VishNub wrote: »
    Any favorite venison recipes? I have round steak and ground.

    Backup plans are sausage and I have a stew I've made before with venison that's pretty good, but it could be any red meat in there and it would be the same. So anything that highlights venison a little more?

    Red meat tends to be somewhat interchangeable in terms of cooking methods and pretty much anything that works with beef works with other red meat. I imagine that similar to lamb you can get away with flavors that would overpower beef when cooking venison.

    Looking at one of my references, a lot of chefs like complementing venison with juniper berries, pears, and apples which you normally wouldn't with beef. I imagine this applies more so if the venison was harvested when those plants were bearing fruit.

    A chasseur sauce would also be a traditional complement. Some people are saying a cumberland sauce also works well.

    Well, I sort of followed your advice and kind of tied the steak up into a roast, then did a red wine reduction/pan sauce. It was pretty OK. I overcooked the venison a bit -- it went from raw to well in like five minutes -- but the pairing worked.

    I'm guessing the lower fat content might affect the way it cooks compared to fattier commercially raised meat.

    Oh, and it occurred to me that a ragout would be a good use of the ground meat. Wild boar ragout works really well so I imagine venison would too. Sausages sound intriguing too but you'd need to add in animal fat when working with such a lean meat to get the right texture.

    +1 for ragout. My family are big hunters so I usually get a ton of free ground venison every fall. My go to is either venison chili or venison ragout (or ragu depending on what region I'm feeling). I really like making a ragu, as the accidity of tomatoes really pairs well with the gaminess of venison.

    BlackDragon480
  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    m!ttens wrote: »
    I'm currently going through a kitchen renovation so that means I have no access to a stove or oven (and our fridge is sitting in the middle of the living room) so my dining room had been set up as a makeshift kitchen. Mrs. m!ttens and I have some frozen soup her mom made for us but that isn't going to last forever and I'm already getting tired of soup. So my request to you wonderful people is what delicious recipes can you share that only makes use of a microwave, toaster, electric griddle, rice cooker, or slow cooker, and preferably does not involve too much in the way of cleanup?

    Is the toaster a popup type that only does bread or the type that has a fold down door so you can use it as a tiny oven?

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
  • m!ttensm!ttens Registered User regular
    m!ttens wrote: »
    I'm currently going through a kitchen renovation so that means I have no access to a stove or oven (and our fridge is sitting in the middle of the living room) so my dining room had been set up as a makeshift kitchen. Mrs. m!ttens and I have some frozen soup her mom made for us but that isn't going to last forever and I'm already getting tired of soup. So my request to you wonderful people is what delicious recipes can you share that only makes use of a microwave, toaster, electric griddle, rice cooker, or slow cooker, and preferably does not involve too much in the way of cleanup?

    Is the toaster a popup type that only does bread or the type that has a fold down door so you can use it as a tiny oven?

    It's a classic popup type that does bread (and bagels!), however I *think* a friend of ours may be able to loan us her toaster oven if that helps.

  • Casual EddyCasual Eddy Don't despair. Not even over the fact that you don't despair.Registered User regular
    @Steel Angel Milk Street https://www.177milkstreet.com/recipes/ and America's test kitchen https://www.americastestkitchen.com/ are both incredible cooking resources, but both are pay sites

    Elki wrote: »

    Casual Eddy: best poster 2014.
    tyrannus wrote: »
    Casual Eddy: best poster of 2015

    gotta update that stuff man
  • Casual EddyCasual Eddy Don't despair. Not even over the fact that you don't despair.Registered User regular
    I really miss having a good cheesemonger at our nearest grocery store. He always slice something off for your to try, and his recommendations were always on point. He gave me a smoked, aged cheddar to make a cheese omelet and some sort of soft sheep's milk cheese for pizza and both were incredible.

    Elki wrote: »

    Casual Eddy: best poster 2014.
    tyrannus wrote: »
    Casual Eddy: best poster of 2015

    gotta update that stuff man
    Mugsley
  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    m!ttens wrote: »
    m!ttens wrote: »
    I'm currently going through a kitchen renovation so that means I have no access to a stove or oven (and our fridge is sitting in the middle of the living room) so my dining room had been set up as a makeshift kitchen. Mrs. m!ttens and I have some frozen soup her mom made for us but that isn't going to last forever and I'm already getting tired of soup. So my request to you wonderful people is what delicious recipes can you share that only makes use of a microwave, toaster, electric griddle, rice cooker, or slow cooker, and preferably does not involve too much in the way of cleanup?

    Is the toaster a popup type that only does bread or the type that has a fold down door so you can use it as a tiny oven?

    It's a classic popup type that does bread (and bagels!), however I *think* a friend of ours may be able to loan us her toaster oven if that helps.

    There's a whole host of stew on rice type dishes that could be doable.

    Grilled cheese or quesadilla for the griddle. If you like breakfast for dinner, pancakes and their ilk.

    Steam = VishnuOwnz
    Dota2 = Glitchmo
    Giggles_FunsworthBlackDragon480
  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    edited February 7
    VishNub wrote: »
    m!ttens wrote: »
    m!ttens wrote: »
    I'm currently going through a kitchen renovation so that means I have no access to a stove or oven (and our fridge is sitting in the middle of the living room) so my dining room had been set up as a makeshift kitchen. Mrs. m!ttens and I have some frozen soup her mom made for us but that isn't going to last forever and I'm already getting tired of soup. So my request to you wonderful people is what delicious recipes can you share that only makes use of a microwave, toaster, electric griddle, rice cooker, or slow cooker, and preferably does not involve too much in the way of cleanup?

    Is the toaster a popup type that only does bread or the type that has a fold down door so you can use it as a tiny oven?

    It's a classic popup type that does bread (and bagels!), however I *think* a friend of ours may be able to loan us her toaster oven if that helps.

    There's a whole host of stew on rice type dishes that could be doable.

    Grilled cheese or quesadilla for the griddle. If you like breakfast for dinner, pancakes and their ilk.

    I've got an easy stroganoff that I do in my slow cooker, tends to turn out pretty well.
    My apologies to any actual chefs out there who may read this.
    Start with 2-3 pounds of beef, whatever's on sale (my last batch was with a couple London Broils that were on special for 30% off)
    If you're not starting with meat that's already been cut down to stew meat size, do that. I generally go with ~1" cubes or so.
    Toss the meat in a gallon bag with some beef broth, Worcestershire sauce, a bit of garlic and some seasoning salt (or whatever else you've got on hand, my spice cabinet is a sad lonely thing) and leave it in the fridge overnight.
    In the morning toss the meat in the crock-pot with a large can of cream of mushroom soup and set it on low.
    8-9 hours later, stir in a small tub of sour cream.

    Serve over rice or toast (or pretty much any kind of carb that you have on hand). Can also serve over green beans if you're reducing carbs, turns out pretty tasty (if you like green bean casserole).

    Cleanup is minimal, practically none if you use a slow cooker bag.
    The electric griddle you've got, is that a solid piece, or is it like a sandwich press that can fold flat?
    I've got one of these that I an offer some suggestions with.

    On the subject of quesadillas, this came to mind:
    Slow cooker Mexican chicken
    2-3 pounds boneless skinless chicken (I like thighs, but cooks choice)
    Can of red enchilada sauce, medium or hot
    Can of chipotle peppers in adobo sauce

    Put all ingredients in the slow cooker on low for several hours.
    Extract the chipotle peppers carefully (they'll fall apart and get seeds all over if you're not careful), drain the excess liquid and set some aside, shred the chicken.
    Add some of the liquid back so the chicken doesn't dry out.
    Use as filling for tacos, burritos or quesadillas, also makes a tasty addition to microwave nachos.

    see317 on
    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
    Commander Zoom
  • m!ttensm!ttens Registered User regular
    The griddle is one of these which is about 10"x19" and heats up to about 400F (at least that's what the heating element says it goes to). It's done a pretty decent job so far making bacon, fried eggs and pancakes!

    gBkHOAt.png

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