[Cooking Thread] Burning questions and searing remarks

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  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Javen wrote: »
    Ketar wrote: »
    I've made creme brulee hundreds of times in many different ovens - I'm a pastry school grad who worked in pastry for a time. It really isn't that fiddly. Unless you have an oven that is seriously miscalibrated and just not hitting your desired temp at all, you're going to be fine.

    Making caramels or other candies? Those things require very specific temperatures to be hit - often for specific lengths of time as well while taking care not to exceed that temperature. Creme brulee is not at all that dependent on precision in temperature.

    Cool! No one said that you can't make it in an oven. But the benefits to sous vide are pretty clear; namely that it removes more points of failure for people who aren't trained or haven't made it hundreds of times.

    Determining doneness by sight or touch isn't necessary. You don't need to test via jiggle where you're forced to open the oven and maybe it's too jiggly or not jiggly enough. You don't need to worry about oven hot-spots, so what if one dish heats up faster than another? Not insurmountable obstacles, but still kind of a pain, and pretty common.

    Creme brulee is best pulled after hitting 170-175, so I'd call a 5 degree range to be pretty precise, considering you don't really want to keep opening the oven to check.

    It's certainly not the only way to make creme brulee, and does result in a slightly different texture that is going to make the results subjective to taste, but the stated benefits are very much "it's more foolproof than the alternatives"

    America's Test Kitchen recently posted their recipe for sous vide creme brulee and it's like stupidly easy. Mix a bunch of stuff in a bowl, strain, fill jars, cook in water bath.

    AbsoluteZeroAlazull
  • breton-brawlerbreton-brawler Registered User regular
    Sous vide creme brulee also lets you use non oven safe containers like glass etc.

    AbsoluteZeroAlazull
  • BurtletoyBurtletoy Registered User regular
    Can you report someone for talking shit about strip steaks?

    spool32
  • KamiroKamiro Registered User regular
    rib eye > strip steak

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  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    Javen wrote: »
    Ketar wrote: »
    I've made creme brulee hundreds of times in many different ovens - I'm a pastry school grad who worked in pastry for a time. It really isn't that fiddly. Unless you have an oven that is seriously miscalibrated and just not hitting your desired temp at all, you're going to be fine.

    Making caramels or other candies? Those things require very specific temperatures to be hit - often for specific lengths of time as well while taking care not to exceed that temperature. Creme brulee is not at all that dependent on precision in temperature.

    Cool! No one said that you can't make it in an oven. But the benefits to sous vide are pretty clear; namely that it removes more points of failure for people who aren't trained or haven't made it hundreds of times.

    Determining doneness by sight or touch isn't necessary. You don't need to test via jiggle where you're forced to open the oven and maybe it's too jiggly or not jiggly enough. You don't need to worry about oven hot-spots, so what if one dish heats up faster than another? Not insurmountable obstacles, but still kind of a pain, and pretty common.

    Creme brulee is best pulled after hitting 170-175, so I'd call a 5 degree range to be pretty precise, considering you don't really want to keep opening the oven to check.

    It's certainly not the only way to make creme brulee, and does result in a slightly different texture that is going to make the results subjective to taste, but the stated benefits are very much "it's more foolproof than the alternatives"

    America's Test Kitchen recently posted their recipe for sous vide creme brulee and it's like stupidly easy. Mix a bunch of stuff in a bowl, strain, fill jars, cook in water bath.

    Huh. Jars is a good idea. I was making it in ramekins, so I had to get it in the water bath with the water raised up to almost the top of the ramekin but not over, and it has to be up on a rack if for no other reason than to get past the minimum fill line on the water circulator. Putting it in a little jar would mean you could just slap lids on and dunk the whole thing in the bath. I may have to try that.

    The advantage to sous vide creme brulee is it hits a specific temperature and holds it there, zero guesswork, you don't have to pull them "at the right moment" to get them right. There's no carryover heat that continues to cook them after you've pulled them from the sous vide bath, either. You get the perfect consistency and texture every time.

    Cooking them (or anything) in the oven is perfectly valid and if you want to do it that way, go ahead. It's a matter of personal preference. For me, I find the sous vide method less prone to mistakes.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • JavenJaven Registered User regular
    Mason jars are best imo because you can air-seal them

    And while you can certainly do it in a larger mason jar and then dish it out into smaller vessels, this can mess with the consistency and carmelization of the sugar. But the 4 oz ones work REALLY well

    AbsoluteZeroshryke
  • BurtletoyBurtletoy Registered User regular
    Kamiro wrote: »
    rib eye > strip steak

    I personally prefer strip steaks, but even if you rank them backwards...that just means strip steak is the 2nd best cut of beef.

  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    If I'm eating a whole steak I prefer ribeye but if I'm cutting it into slices so that I can eat an actually reasonable portion of meat I like strip better. I can't explain why as it makes no sense.

    Regarding sous vide and jars: cheesecake. You mix the ingredients, dump it in small mason jars, and in the water at 170 for 90 minutes. Excellent cheesecake.

    I haven't tried putting graham cracker crumbs in the bottom as a 'crust' yet but I've got a box to try it this weekend. Also going to have to try this creme brulee business.

    If you've got a smoker, sous vide makes ultra-tender smoked ribs dead simple. Put 'em in the sous vide for 48 hours, fridge for a few hours to firm up, refresh the rub, on the smoker until they're back to 165. I've heard debate about smoking it first, then sous vide but that just seems super weird to me, process-wise. Way easier to toss the ribs in on a weekday and smoke on the weekend than smoke on the weekend and then my ribs are done on a Tuesday or something.

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  • BurtletoyBurtletoy Registered User regular
    edited May 28
    I'm just saying, I don't think the second best cut of beef is a bad steak.

    I mean, we aren't talking filet over here, or God forbid, bacon wrapped filet

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  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Give me a good 45 day aged sirloin or NY strip. Damn does that sound good.

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  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Burtletoy wrote: »
    I'm just saying, I don't think the second best cut of beef is a bad steak.

    I mean, we aren't talking filet over here, or God forbid, bacon wrapped filet

    I honestly prefer hanger steak to strip or ribeye (which is my preferred among those two) but that's not exactly something most people think of when they talk about steak. There's also just not much of it on a cow too so availability is much lower.

    I can enjoy filet mignon since I used to cook all my steaks rare and that's the best temperature for filet but I'm pretty sure most people get it because they think it's fancy. However, I will not pay what filet normally costs as it is not worth it when ribeyes and strips are usually less expensive.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

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  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    ribeye has f l a v o r

    KamiroMugsley
  • KamiroKamiro Registered User regular
    Gimme that bone in, 2 inch thick, fatty cut of meat!

    BurtletoyVishNubV1m
  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    Kamiro wrote: »
    Gimme that bone in, 2 inch thick, fatty cut of meat!

    As you say
    hzenswh2p4n3.png

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  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    edited May 28
    I made this for my Birthday last year. Smoked for like an hour and a half and pan finished. My family thought it was weird I wanted to cook on my birthday, but this was the best present. That's a 12" skillet it's in.

    5zctncro2s8d.jpg

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  • ShivahnShivahn Unaware of her barrel shifter privilege Western coastal temptressRegistered User regular
    My wife and I went to some cooking classes last year, and while they were LARGELY not worth the insane cost, each one taught us tiny things we use almost daily that I wish to pass on to you:

    1) crack eggs against flat surfaces instead of bowls, because it preserves the yolk from breaking
    2) you can and should use a spoon to peel ginger

    Also you can make creme brulee with ginger and it's dope, but really those were the two very tiny things that people may or may not know but which I've found very helpful.

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  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Made smash burgers tonight. I love cooking in cast iron for two reasons. One is that it makes amazing food. These burgers came out with the most amazing crust on both sides while still being incredibly juicy. Second reason is when everything cooks perfectly in the pan, the patties release with no issue, it only takes like 30 seconds to clean up once the burgers are done, and then you're left with this pan with a deep black consistent seasoning, and it's like that because I've taken good care of the pan and cooked a ton of food in it. I love that the pans get better with every use.

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  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    Shivahn wrote: »
    My wife and I went to some cooking classes last year, and while they were LARGELY not worth the insane cost, each one taught us tiny things we use almost daily that I wish to pass on to you:

    1) crack eggs against flat surfaces instead of bowls, because it preserves the yolk from breaking
    2) you can and should use a spoon to peel ginger

    Also you can make creme brulee with ginger and it's dope, but really those were the two very tiny things that people may or may not know but which I've found very helpful.

    Wait, what? How do you peel ginger with a spoon?

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  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Scraping with the tip. Don't gouge.

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  • CauldCauld Registered User regular
    I've never been able to crack eggs on a flat surface well. Either the shell doesn't crack enough, or the shell smashes and I make a huge mess.

    AbsoluteZeroV1m
  • KamiroKamiro Registered User regular
    Made a dish with rabbit for the first time.

    Braised it and then made ragu. Made homemade pasta as well, so it was a nice from scratch meal. Though the recipe is like 5 pages!

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  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Cauld wrote: »
    I've never been able to crack eggs on a flat surface well. Either the shell doesn't crack enough, or the shell smashes and I make a huge mess.

    The former is fine since you just lightly crack it again.
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Scraping with the tip. Don't gouge.

    Adding to this, this is a common trick in some restaurant kitchens that go through a lot of ginger when the cooks don't want to hunt down the vegetable peelers.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

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  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    I always do eggs on the edge of A bowl or something and I’ve literally never had a problem

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  • CormacCormac Registered User regular
    Wow, peeling ginger with a spoon actually worked really well. I would usually do it with a paring knife but the spoon worked better and much faster.

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  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Like once every 7 eggs I get the perfect crack where it just neatly splits and I can dump it with one hand without ever getting any of the runny bits on me and zero fear of a shell fragment. I have no idea what I'm doing that one perfect time but it feels so damn good when it happens.

    Campy
  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    edited June 10
    Shivahn wrote: »
    My wife and I went to some cooking classes last year, and while they were LARGELY not worth the insane cost, each one taught us tiny things we use almost daily that I wish to pass on to you:

    1) crack eggs against flat surfaces instead of bowls, because it preserves the yolk from breaking
    2) you can and should use a spoon to peel ginger

    Also you can make creme brulee with ginger and it's dope, but really those were the two very tiny things that people may or may not know but which I've found very helpful.

    Wait, what? How do you peel ginger with a spoon?

    The correct answer is buy twice as much ginger as you need, since it will only cost you $.07 more, then make 4 or 5 quick cuts with your chef's knife to cube it down to no skin and chop in one go. Normally I'm against food waste, but this is such a small amount, and again, approximately $.07 worth of waste.

    Simpsonia on
  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    edited June 10
    I will give you the secret of cracking eggs.

    Crack an egg against a flat surface. It keeps the membrane inside the shell intact so that it's more likely to hold on to bits of shell so they don't flake off.

    After you tap the egg hard enough to make a slight dent - usually I find "dropping" the egg from an inch or so from the counter is sufficient - look at the dimple you just made. Rather than press your finger tips into the dimple in an effort to open it, go to one side of it along the fissure you just made, using your fingertips push in on the fissure and not the dimple to direct the crack to encircle the egg instead of roam off in random directions. It should just be a matter of prying it apart a tiny bit.

    I've found the initial "impact crater" or dimple on the egg is too damaged to really get leverage without fucking up the shell and possibly having the crack just go random directions, by moving to a point along the vector you wish the crack to spread you force it to go "around" the egg and split it in the direction you want.

    Edit: Other tips.

    Hold the egg with the narrow point away from you with your index finger on the spot you want it to crack as you tap it on the counter. Almost like you're bridging a deck of cards after a shuffle.

    Obviously if you're a professional cook or something you've probably nailed cracking an egg perfectly every time one handed against the side of your belt buckle or whatever the fuck, but I find consistency means I can at least figure out mechanically what I'm fucking up.

    dispatch.o on
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Does anyone have any ideas on how to do lentil curry inside of the recipe I normally do for curry?

    Normally I do saute'd veggies, a tablespoon of yellow curry powder, then a can of coconut milk, and then some tofu (and if I have time/potatoes, parboiled potatoes).

    I got a couple bags of lentils in a care package thing, and I'm not entirely sure what to do them with.

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  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    Does anyone have any ideas on how to do lentil curry inside of the recipe I normally do for curry?

    Normally I do saute'd veggies, a tablespoon of yellow curry powder, then a can of coconut milk, and then some tofu (and if I have time/potatoes, parboiled potatoes).

    I got a couple bags of lentils in a care package thing, and I'm not entirely sure what to do them with.

    Rinse the lentils and then cook them in the curry. You can overcook lentils so you may want to wait until the curry is almost done depending on how long you normally cook them.

    You can basically just toss them into any liquid centered dish. I've sometimes put them in miso soup and chicken soup.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

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  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Yeah, I've just never used lentils before, and for curry I normally cook most the things that need cooking before adding the curry powder/coconut milk, and just let it heat up the tofu/liquid rq.

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  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    I peel my ginger with a potato peeler.

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  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    Had to smash up some croutons to make breadcrumbs for burgers and it's so fun and satisfying. Love when I get to use a hammer for cooking.

  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    I'm going to be making these today, really looking forward to it. Having some friends over to go do some socially distanced creek walking and we're going to finish off with these. Only difference is that I'm going to be cooking these on the smoker for about 45 minutes or so.

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  • BurtletoyBurtletoy Registered User regular
    I do the bacon wrapped ones, but I cut mine like this instead

    https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/01/how-to-make-the-best-baked-jalapeno-poppers.html

  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Burtletoy wrote: »
    I do the bacon wrapped ones, but I cut mine like this instead

    https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/01/how-to-make-the-best-baked-jalapeno-poppers.html

    I just got a nice new boning knife, so I'm going to take the tops off, and hollow it out without splitting the pepper.

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  • BurtletoyBurtletoy Registered User regular
    Even spread of the cheese might be a bit hard if the peppers are still whole and you're using cream cheese

  • Romantic UndeadRomantic Undead Registered User regular
    Well, I made my first ever double-decker chocolate cake from scratch for my wife’s birthday. (Recipie from Nerdy Nummies)

    It was a bit rich but otherwise a big hit and I am quite pleased with myself.

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  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    yea, ended up cutting in half. The big change i would make is to use thinner bacon, just so it crisps up nicer in the smoker. They turned out very tasty though.

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  • Raiden333Raiden333 Registered User regular
    edited August 8
    oh my lord. Girlfriend and I were seriously craving some steak, we haven't had any since the prices shot up super high around the start of the quarantine. Well she lucked out on our recent shopping trip and scored a 4.5 lb monster of a tri-tip, for half price even! Gotta love safeway deals.

    I was so worried I fucked up because I hadn't grilled steak in awhile, at one point while inside the fat-cap caught fire, but that just ended up doing a good job giving it a nice smoky flavor, and you cut the fat-cap off tri-tip anyway. And I was getting inconsistent temperature reads depending on where I probed, but I trusted my instincts and pulled it off and foiled it when I felt it was done.

    I think it turned out to be the best goddamn fucking steak I've ever grilled.
    20200807_175018.jpg

    Perfect texture. Crunchy crust, center just melts in your mouth. I think I've hit my apex and this is what I have to shoot for for the rest of my life.

    edit: oh and, exactly what I did if anyone wants to know, not very technical but still just in case:
    basic rub of kosher salt, pepper, garlic powder, and minced onion bits. Grill ~325-350 degrees via the front burner alone. ~45 minutes at the back of the grill on indirect heat, flipping half way. when the average internal temp is ~115F, move it directly onto the flame to sear it and finish heating it up for 5-8 minutes a side, till it's about ~140 internal average. Pull off, immediately wrap it to your tray with a layer of heavy duty foil, and forget it exists for 10 minutes while the meat evens itself out and cooks its lesser done middle portions with itself.

    Thanks Dad for teaching me. You'd be proud of this one.

    Raiden333 on
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  • CarpyCarpy Registered User regular
    edited August 8
    Doing a stroganoff this weekend. Last time I made it I basically followed the recipe exactly, added some garlic in with the onions, but this time I'm dropping the meat. Probably going to add some sliced shitakes and then cube some extra firm tofu to soak a bit at the end before I hit it with the noodles.

    Carpy on
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