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Saturday morning cartoons are just about dead...

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    Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Last night I watched the first three episodes of Mighty Max just to test the nostalgia theory.

    In my opinion, they still rock - pretty much non-stop action with decent dialogue and plots that, while simple, are fun to watch. Plus, the opening credits and music are awesome.

    I'd forgotten about the little info snippets that they had at the end - I loved that sort of stuff as a kid. It reminded me of the animated Bill and Ted adventures - they were also fun to watch. How many other kids' shows talk about Mark Twain and how he got that name?

    I don't know, maybe back in our time it was assumed that all life's lessons like "be nice to your friends" were taught by parents, leaving kids' TV free for cap-wearing portal-warping heroes and historical factoids.

    Rhesus Positive on
    [Muffled sounds of gorilla violence]
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    JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    edited May 2007
    Here's something interesting I read a while back on Mark Evanier's blog - he's a comics/animation writer who worked, among other things, on the D&D cartoon that I'm sure many of you fondly remember.
    IDungeons & Dragons was a series about six kids who were transported to a dimension filled with wizards and fire-snorting reptiles and cryptic clues and an extremely-evil despot named Venger. The youngsters were trapped in this game-like environment but, fortunately, they were armed with magical skills and weaponry, the better to foil Venger's insidious plans each week.

    The kids were all heroic — all but a semi-heroic member of their troupe named Eric. Eric was a whiner, a complainer, a guy who didn't like to go along with whatever the others wanted to do. Usually, he would grudgingly agree to participate, and it would always turn out well, and Eric would be glad he joined in. He was the one thing I really didn't like about the show.

    So why, you may wonder, did I leave him in there? Answer: I had to.

    As you may know, there are those out there who attempt to influence the content of childrens' television. We call them "parents groups," although many are not comprised of parents, or at least not of folks whose primary interest is as parents. Study them and you'll find a wide array of agendum at work...and I suspect that, in some cases, their stated goals are far from their real goals.

    Nevertheless, they all seek to make kidvid more enriching and redeeming, at least by their definitions, and at the time, they had enough clout to cause the networks to yield. Consultants were brought in and we, the folks who were writing cartoons, were ordered to include certain "pro-social" morals in our shows. At the time, the dominant "pro-social" moral was as follows: The group is always right...the complainer is always wrong.

    This was the message of way too many eighties' cartoon shows. If all your friends want to go get pizza and you want a burger, you should bow to the will of the majority and go get pizza with them. There was even a show for one season on CBS called The Get-Along Gang, which was dedicated unabashedly to this principle. Each week, whichever member of the gang didn't get along with the gang learned the error of his or her ways.

    We were forced to insert this "lesson" in D & D, which is why Eric was always saying, "I don't want to do that" and paying for his social recalcitrance. I thought it was forced and repetitive, but I especially objected to the lesson. I don't believe you should always go along with the group. What about thinking for yourself? What about developing your own personality and viewpoint? What about doing things because you decide they're the right thing to do, not because the majority ruled and you got outvoted?

    We weren't allowed to teach any of that. We had to teach kids to join gangs. And then to do whatever the rest of the gang wanted to do.

    What a stupid thing to teach children.

    My mom was an early childhood developmentalist at the height of this era so I'd been exposed to a lot of these ideas in the past, but I hadn't realized how pervasive it was. It does help ease the pain of rewatching a once-beloved show if you start noticing how underneath the horrible animation and embarrasingly hamfisted appeals to commercialism lurks the malign influence of these busybody groups, or the sickly echoes of the Reagan years in general - like the GI Joe episode where the nosy girl reporter saying bad things about our brave troops turned out to be the Baroness.

    Jacobkosh on
  • Options
    SneezerSneezer Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    MrMister wrote: »
    We're tiny,
    We're tooney,
    We're all a little looney!

    And in this cartoony,
    We're invading your TV!
    We're comic dispensers,
    We crack up all the censors,
    On tiny toon adventures
    Get a dose of comedy!

    So here's Acme Acres,
    It's a whole wide world apart,
    Our home sweet home,
    It stands alone,
    A cartoon work of art!
    The scripts were rejected,
    Expect the unexpected
    On tiny toon adventures
    It's about to start!

    They're furry, they're funny,
    They're Babs and Buster Bunny,
    Montana Max has money,
    Elmyra is a pain!
    Here's Hamton and Plucky,
    Dizzy Devil's yucky,
    Furrball's unlucky,
    And Gogo is insane!

    At Acme Looniversity we earn our toon degree,
    The teaching staff's been getting laughs since 1933!
    We're tiny, we're toony,
    We're all a little looney,
    It's tiny toon adventures,
    Come and join the fun!

    And now our song is done!


    How awesome was Tiny Toons?

    Sneezer on
    tmpphp0si07o.jpg
    Available for weddings, bar-mitzvahs and risings of the people against oppressive states.
  • Options
    Gorilla SaladGorilla Salad Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Sneezer wrote: »
    MrMister wrote: »
    We're tiny,
    We're tooney,
    We're all a little looney!

    And in this cartoony,
    We're invading your TV!
    We're comic dispensers,
    We crack up all the censors,
    On tiny toon adventures
    Get a dose of comedy!

    So here's Acme Acres,
    It's a whole wide world apart,
    Our home sweet home,
    It stands alone,
    A cartoon work of art!
    The scripts were rejected,
    Expect the unexpected
    On tiny toon adventures
    It's about to start!

    They're furry, they're funny,
    They're Babs and Buster Bunny,
    Montana Max has money,
    Elmyra is a pain!
    Here's Hamton and Plucky,
    Dizzy Devil's yucky,
    Furrball's unlucky,
    And Gogo is insane!

    At Acme Looniversity we earn our toon degree,
    The teaching staff's been getting laughs since 1933!
    We're tiny, we're toony,
    We're all a little looney,
    It's tiny toon adventures,
    Come and join the fun!

    And now our song is done!

    How awesome was Tiny Toons?
    More awesome then we will all ever realize.

    Gorilla Salad on
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    ArikadoArikado Southern CaliforniaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2007
    I think the last Saturday Morning cartoon I would go out of my way to watch was Batman Beyond.

    Arikado on
    BNet: Arikado#1153 | Steam | LoL: Anzen
  • Options
    tyrannustyrannus i am not fat Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Arikado wrote: »
    I think the last Saturday Morning cartoon I would go out of my way to watch was Batman Beyond.

    Batman Beyond is so awesome.

    tyrannus on
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    SpeedySwafSpeedySwaf Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    jacobkosh wrote: »
    Here's something interesting I read a while back on Mark Evanier's blog - he's a comics/animation writer who worked, among other things, on the D&D cartoon that I'm sure many of you fondly remember.
    IDungeons & Dragons was a series about six kids who were transported to a dimension filled with wizards and fire-snorting reptiles and cryptic clues and an extremely-evil despot named Venger. The youngsters were trapped in this game-like environment but, fortunately, they were armed with magical skills and weaponry, the better to foil Venger's insidious plans each week.

    The kids were all heroic — all but a semi-heroic member of their troupe named Eric. Eric was a whiner, a complainer, a guy who didn't like to go along with whatever the others wanted to do. Usually, he would grudgingly agree to participate, and it would always turn out well, and Eric would be glad he joined in. He was the one thing I really didn't like about the show.

    So why, you may wonder, did I leave him in there? Answer: I had to.

    As you may know, there are those out there who attempt to influence the content of childrens' television. We call them "parents groups," although many are not comprised of parents, or at least not of folks whose primary interest is as parents. Study them and you'll find a wide array of agendum at work...and I suspect that, in some cases, their stated goals are far from their real goals.

    Nevertheless, they all seek to make kidvid more enriching and redeeming, at least by their definitions, and at the time, they had enough clout to cause the networks to yield. Consultants were brought in and we, the folks who were writing cartoons, were ordered to include certain "pro-social" morals in our shows. At the time, the dominant "pro-social" moral was as follows: The group is always right...the complainer is always wrong.

    This was the message of way too many eighties' cartoon shows. If all your friends want to go get pizza and you want a burger, you should bow to the will of the majority and go get pizza with them. There was even a show for one season on CBS called The Get-Along Gang, which was dedicated unabashedly to this principle. Each week, whichever member of the gang didn't get along with the gang learned the error of his or her ways.

    We were forced to insert this "lesson" in D & D, which is why Eric was always saying, "I don't want to do that" and paying for his social recalcitrance. I thought it was forced and repetitive, but I especially objected to the lesson. I don't believe you should always go along with the group. What about thinking for yourself? What about developing your own personality and viewpoint? What about doing things because you decide they're the right thing to do, not because the majority ruled and you got outvoted?

    We weren't allowed to teach any of that. We had to teach kids to join gangs. And then to do whatever the rest of the gang wanted to do.

    What a stupid thing to teach children.

    My mom was an early childhood developmentalist at the height of this era so I'd been exposed to a lot of these ideas in the past, but I hadn't realized how pervasive it was. It does help ease the pain of rewatching a once-beloved show if you start noticing how underneath the horrible animation and embarrasingly hamfisted appeals to commercialism lurks the malign influence of these busybody groups, or the sickly echoes of the Reagan years in general - like the GI Joe episode where the nosy girl reporter saying bad things about our brave troops turned out to be the Baroness.
    It seems whenever you start digging into the production history of a show, you're bound to run into stories where pressure from outside groups forces the shows to do certain things that are overall detrimental to the show's quality.

    As another example, there's this Disney show called American Dragon: Jake Long. The producers have this blog set up, and it's a really interesting read because they talked about the process of being greenlit, trying to keep up with the schedules they're given, and forming the show as a whole. But one of the more interesting posts they made involve their struggles with Disney's Standards and Pratices, who often had the final say in what went into an episode. The problem was that they were ridiculously strict, and seemed to be under the impression that even the tiniest amount of "inappropriate" behavior could lead to trouble. They had to abide to inconsistent guidelines, from the usual(no violence in schools, teachers are always good, no weapons) to the silly(Jake wear protection gear when flying, not being allowed to breath fire), which usually lead to episodes ending up in worse states. What really pained me weren't really the guidelines they had to work under, but the fact that some ideas relating to plot or story development were barred from happening, in fear that the viewers would get "confused" from the new developments.

    It's stuff like this that makes me really want to know how bad it was for other shows, and how much different they would be if people kept their noses out.

    SpeedySwaf on
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    h3nduh3ndu Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    I've been re-watching some old cartoons I liked as a kid, which can be found here. Honestly I am very surprised at the depth the old batman and superman cartoons had. Deep shit for a nine or ten year old. Some of them, however, are just straight up horrible.

    h3ndu on
    Lo Que Sea, Cuando Sea, Donde Sea.
  • Options
    SavedSaved Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Is anyone here watching Avatar: The Last Airbender?

    The Cartoon Force is strong in that one.

    Saved on
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    TrenogTrenog Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Adventuresofteddyruxpinlogo.jpg

    Need I say more?

    Trenog on
    steam_sig.png
    Malkor wrote: »
    Rolo wrote: »
    opium is all natural shit son

    makes you stronger

    It also makes you immune to time.
    Bama wrote: »
    Two weeks ago, I lost the bulk of my female friends

    She really hates it when you call her that.
    FCD wrote: »
    Ahhh, Orochimaru. Or, as I like to call him, Japanese Pedophile Voldemort.
  • Options
    ShiosaiShiosai Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2007
    h3ndu wrote: »
    I've been re-watching some old cartoons I liked as a kid, which can be found here.

    Oooh, that's a pretty nice archive. Watching those old Batman TAS episodes makes me want to go out and buy the DVD

    Shiosai on
    60353019xm5.jpg
  • Options
    FellhandFellhand Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Trenog wrote: »
    Adventuresofteddyruxpinlogo.jpg

    Need I say more?

    Um. I was born a boy.
    I hope my mom still has my Teddy Ruxpin in storage.

    Fellhand on
  • Options
    BuntaBunta Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    muppetbabiestitlegf3.jpg

    Oh how I loved this show growing up. That and the Ghostbusters cartoon.

    Bunta on
  • Options
    skippydumptruckskippydumptruck begin again Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Ant000 wrote: »
    King Arthur and the KNIGHTS OF JUSTICE!@?

    YES. Excalibur, be my strength!

    Also, Captain Planet.

    (and very YES to Mighty Max).

    skippydumptruck on
  • Options
    skippydumptruckskippydumptruck begin again Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Sneezer wrote: »
    I've lived in England for 21 of my 22 years, and grwn up on it's cartoon shows (ironicly, the best ones being from mainland Europe) Cartoons such as Dreamstone, The Moomins, Dogtanian (see what I mean about foreigne cartoons being the best) What has brought about the decline of good cartoons is the rise of reality shows, Fear Factor, Big Brother, stuff like that.

    I lived in England for a short time when I was young. The only three shows I remember liking were Danger Mouse, and some live-action Dungeons & Dragons show that was maybe also a gameshow?

    I think there was also postman pat and paddington the bear, but I don't remember those well at all.

    skippydumptruck on
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    DynagripDynagrip Break me a million hearts HoustonRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2007
    Oh god yes an EliteLamer thread.

    Dynagrip on
  • Options
    skippydumptruckskippydumptruck begin again Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    Ant000 wrote: »

    Arthur and the knights of justice, puttin' evil doooooown!

    /guitar, dodo do dodo do dodo do dodo do doooo.


    Best show ever, man. All the unique and crazy armor for each individual knight, and the shield summoned animal powers! Yeeeah baby!

    Wait is that the one with the holograms?

    Oh man, do you guys remember when hologram toys were big?

    "Oh shit his face is 3D and greenish"

    m19xt4.jpg

    visionaries2rd8.jpg

    skippydumptruck on
  • Options
    JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    edited May 2007
    Visionaries, yeah, but those holograms were on their chests. I think Incenjuar might be thinking of Super Naturals, where the whole, like, front half of their torsos and faces were missing, replaced by holograms of people morphing into animals.

    Jacobkosh on
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    LitejediLitejedi New York CityRegistered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Foster's home for imaginary friends is pretty clever. And I really like the animation style.

    Litejedi on
    3DS FC: 1907-9450-1017
    lj_graaaaahhhhh.gif
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    IncenjucarIncenjucar VChatter Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited May 2007
    jacobkosh wrote: »
    Visionaries, yeah, but those holograms were on their chests. I think Incenjuar might be thinking of Super Naturals, where the whole, like, front half of their torsos and faces were missing, replaced by holograms of people morphing into animals.

    It was a whole thing.

    I also remember one where it was just someone's hooded face.

    The hologram years were awesome.

    Incenjucar on
  • Options
    ImperialwarImperialwar Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Bots Master?
    RoboCop?
    James Bond Jr?

    Imperialwar on
  • Options
    NovidNovid Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    jacobkosh wrote: »
    Here's something interesting I read a while back on Mark Evanier's blog - he's a comics/animation writer who worked, among other things, on the D&D cartoon that I'm sure many of you fondly remember.
    IDungeons & Dragons was a series about six kids who were transported to a dimension filled with wizards and fire-snorting reptiles and cryptic clues and an extremely-evil despot named Venger. The youngsters were trapped in this game-like environment but, fortunately, they were armed with magical skills and weaponry, the better to foil Venger's insidious plans each week.

    The kids were all heroic — all but a semi-heroic member of their troupe named Eric. Eric was a whiner, a complainer, a guy who didn't like to go along with whatever the others wanted to do. Usually, he would grudgingly agree to participate, and it would always turn out well, and Eric would be glad he joined in. He was the one thing I really didn't like about the show.

    So why, you may wonder, did I leave him in there? Answer: I had to.

    As you may know, there are those out there who attempt to influence the content of childrens' television. We call them "parents groups," although many are not comprised of parents, or at least not of folks whose primary interest is as parents. Study them and you'll find a wide array of agendum at work...and I suspect that, in some cases, their stated goals are far from their real goals.

    Nevertheless, they all seek to make kidvid more enriching and redeeming, at least by their definitions, and at the time, they had enough clout to cause the networks to yield. Consultants were brought in and we, the folks who were writing cartoons, were ordered to include certain "pro-social" morals in our shows. At the time, the dominant "pro-social" moral was as follows: The group is always right...the complainer is always wrong.

    This was the message of way too many eighties' cartoon shows. If all your friends want to go get pizza and you want a burger, you should bow to the will of the majority and go get pizza with them. There was even a show for one season on CBS called The Get-Along Gang, which was dedicated unabashedly to this principle. Each week, whichever member of the gang didn't get along with the gang learned the error of his or her ways.

    We were forced to insert this "lesson" in D & D, which is why Eric was always saying, "I don't want to do that" and paying for his social recalcitrance. I thought it was forced and repetitive, but I especially objected to the lesson. I don't believe you should always go along with the group. What about thinking for yourself? What about developing your own personality and viewpoint? What about doing things because you decide they're the right thing to do, not because the majority ruled and you got outvoted?

    We weren't allowed to teach any of that. We had to teach kids to join gangs. And then to do whatever the rest of the gang wanted to do.

    What a stupid thing to teach children.

    My mom was an early childhood developmentalist at the height of this era so I'd been exposed to a lot of these ideas in the past, but I hadn't realized how pervasive it was. It does help ease the pain of rewatching a once-beloved show if you start noticing how underneath the horrible animation and embarrasingly hamfisted appeals to commercialism lurks the malign influence of these busybody groups, or the sickly echoes of the Reagan years in general - like the GI Joe episode where the nosy girl reporter saying bad things about our brave troops turned out to be the Baroness.


    I heard about that. Basicly, for several syndicated series they had to have an education adviser on the show working with the writers, and in the networks the BsNP (note the FCC didnt get into the networks crawl until 1990-1991.) had do do what Evander explained.

    Dispite all this, D&D is one of the best cartoons written for that period. (Dini got his start there as well as well as Michael Reeves who did episodes of Law and Order) But everbody remembers the anime/syndcated series better because it seems they didnt feel so...overhanded at times. (As for that Gi-Joe episode and several others, Casey Casem (remember him, before he got replased by that Seacrest Kid) did the Narration for Gi-Joe UNTIL one episode where they bombed a Mid-Eastern City (it was fake city by the way) and he left.

    SpeedySwaf wrote:
    It seems whenever you start digging into the production history of a show, you're bound to run into stories where pressure from outside groups forces the shows to do certain things that are overall detrimental to the show's quality.

    As another example, there's this Disney show called American Dragon: Jake Long. The producers have this blog set up, and it's a really interesting read because they talked about the process of being greenlit, trying to keep up with the schedules they're given, and forming the show as a whole. But one of the more interesting posts they made involve their struggles with Disney's Standards and Pratices, who often had the final say in what went into an episode. The problem was that they were ridiculously strict, and seemed to be under the impression that even the tiniest amount of "inappropriate" behavior could lead to trouble. They had to abide to inconsistent guidelines, from the usual(no violence in schools, teachers are always good, no weapons) to the silly(Jake wear protection gear when flying, not being allowed to breath fire), which usually lead to episodes ending up in worse states. What really pained me weren't really the guidelines they had to work under, but the fact that some ideas relating to plot or story development were barred from happening, in fear that the viewers would get "confused" from the new developments.

    It's stuff like this that makes me really want to know how bad it was for other shows, and how much different they would be if people kept their noses out.

    Thats just typical. No wonder the show seems to reach greatness but keeps falling apart. I can tell you that Kids WB (when the WB existed) did the same thing in Mucha Lucha for several episodes. CN did somewhat the same. Its just very unsual that they get away with things you cant say in live action but basic story structre and the networks start having fits.

    Novid on
  • Options
    CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    The Children's Television Act is responsible for a lot of that crap in the early 90's.
    http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/Mass_Media/Factsheets/kidstv.txt
    http://tv.about.com/od/frequentlyaskedquestions/f/EI_CTA1990.htm
    The FCC has created rules for broadcast stations to follow. According to the FCC, all stations must:
    EI is often seen on Saturday mornings.

    1) Provide parents and consumers with advance information about core programs being aired
    2) Define the programming that qualifies as core programs
    3) Air a minimum of three hours per week of core educational programming.
    This meant that they had to have stuff that they could claim as educational enough to get an E/I rating. What is needed to get the rating? It wasn't clear so many stations just bullshitted and claimed stuff like GI Joe deserved the rating because of the PSA's (which were originally there becaue of government regulation requiring it).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E/I
    This has a list of some of the stuff with an E/I rating.

    Couscous on
  • Options
    NovidNovid Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    titmouse wrote: »
    The Children's Television Act is responsible for a lot of that crap in the early 90's.
    http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/Mass_Media/Factsheets/kidstv.txt
    http://tv.about.com/od/frequentlyaskedquestions/f/EI_CTA1990.htm
    The FCC has created rules for broadcast stations to follow. According to the FCC, all stations must:
    EI is often seen on Saturday mornings.

    1) Provide parents and consumers with advance information about core programs being aired
    2) Define the programming that qualifies as core programs
    3) Air a minimum of three hours per week of core educational programming.
    This meant that they had to have stuff that they could claim as educational enough to get an E/I rating. What is needed to get the rating? It wasn't clear so many stations just bullshitted and claimed stuff like GI Joe deserved the rating because of the PSA's (which were originally there becaue of government regulation requiring it).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E/I
    This has a list of some of the stuff with an E/I rating.

    Its still going on. This is one of the reasons I stated in my first post. And some of the reasons why the Kids Companies left to cable, therefore; they wouldnt be hit as hard.

    But this is the greatest form of censorship ever devised. The FCC's job isnt to promote education, thats a job for the Education Department- so why did they do this? To promote poltical, social "propanada"- as well to punish affilates who do not follow the line of particular adminstrations. They can force an afillate or a Network to pay a huge sum if the Government or a Lobby (say the PTC) files a complaint that CBS News or a local station, offended these groups and want something done. The FCC looks but sees nothing wrong...BUT Ah, heres the catch, they can get them through the E/I requrements to make them complacent and follow the party's line on things. (The FCC can revoke an stations license but it hasnt been done yet)

    And they wonder why Journalism sucks today. (I remember a study that said most Americans knew as much as we did back in 1989 from news papers and TV News, and the Childrens Act didnt start until 1991 make your own conlusions.)

    Novid on
  • Options
    emnmnmeemnmnme Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    I'd like to see that study if you can find it.

    Buy more Pokem-, I mean, Battle Beasts in the meantime:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5O26Dtubh0

    EDIT: Some 80s cartoons fought against giant corporations and corporate expansion.

    Ewoks cartoon
    Captain Planet
    Bots Master
    Did the caucus of concerned parents just happen to miss these?

    emnmnme on
  • Options
    NovidNovid Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    emnmnme wrote: »
    I'd like to see that study if you can find it.

    Buy more Pokem-, I mean, Battle Beasts in the meantime:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5O26Dtubh0

    EDIT: Some 80s cartoons fought against giant corporations and corporate expansion.

    Ewoks cartoon
    Captain Planet
    Bots Master
    Did the caucus of concerned parents just happen to miss these?

    Here's the study.

    http://people-press.org/reports/display.php3?ReportID=319

    Novid on
  • Options
    emnmnmeemnmnme Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    I am shocked that almost 70% of Americans know Dick Cheney - that seems really high. I wish I could find it but I remember a Non Sequitur comic about Obvious Man flying in and reminding people that this is a country where many can't name their own state's senators, congressmen, or governor but can easily rattle off blurbs like actress Dawn Welles played Mary Anne on 'Gilligan's Island.'

    emnmnme on
  • Options
    NovidNovid Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    emnmnme wrote: »
    I am shocked that almost 70% of Americans know Dick Cheney - that seems really high. I wish I could find it but I remember a Non Sequitur comic about Obvious Man flying in and reminding people that this is a country where many can't name their own state's senators, congressmen, or governor but can easily rattle off blurbs like actress Dawn Welles played Mary Anne on 'Gilligan's Island.'

    There is a youtube vid that had people who did such but i forgot the link.

    Novid on
  • Options
    IncenjucarIncenjucar VChatter Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited May 2007
    I wonder if the FCC is ultimately responsible for the popularity of anime.

    A lot harder to find things like Fist of the North Star on Saturday mornings here.

    Incenjucar on
  • Options
    RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    emnmnme wrote: »
    EDIT: Some 80s cartoons fought against giant corporations and corporate expansion.

    Ewoks cartoon
    Captain Planet
    Bots Master
    Did the caucus of concerned parents just happen to miss these?
    How about Biker Mice From Mars? The bad guy was a corporate CEO (who's actually an alien in disguise trying to take over the Earth) and the good guys were a biker gang who destroyed the skyscraper housing his corporate offices on a weekly basis. How's that for good influence on our kids... or rather on us, actually.
    I dread to think how many of our generation joined a biker gang to wage war on corporate America after they watched an episode of that show.

    Richy on
    sig.gif
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    IncenjucarIncenjucar VChatter Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Richy wrote: »
    emnmnme wrote: »
    EDIT: Some 80s cartoons fought against giant corporations and corporate expansion.

    Ewoks cartoon
    Captain Planet
    Bots Master
    Did the caucus of concerned parents just happen to miss these?
    How about Biker Mice From Mars? The bad guy was a corporate CEO (who's actually an alien in disguise trying to take over the Earth) and the good guys were a biker gang who destroyed the skyscraper housing his corporate offices on a weekly basis. How's that for good influence on our kids... or rather on us, actually.
    I dread to think how many of our generation joined a biker gang to wage war on corporate America after they watched an episode of that show.

    That's because the 80s morality was derived from Rock and Roll.

    Which is why we rock so hard.

    Incenjucar on
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    JimothyJimothy Not in front of the fox he's with the owlRegistered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Ant000 wrote: »
    King Arthur and the KNIGHTS OF JUSTICE!@?


    Oh my god, thank you. That show recently popped into my mind, and it was killing me how I couldn't remember the name.

    Football playing Knights of the Round Table. What a wonderfully ridiculous premise.

    Jimothy on
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    cherv1cherv1 Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    My parents borrowed the various Thunderbirds videos from a geek friend of theirs, so I used to watch those. And Stringray/Captain Scarlet too. I used to watch Batman too, and I watched some of them recently and they are really good still. And some CGI thing called Shadow Raiders. Not sure if it was any good. They remade Captain Scarlet fairly recently too, with CGI, and I watched it just to see how good it was, and it was pretty OK.

    cherv1 on
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    Niceguyeddie616Niceguyeddie616 All you feed me is PUFFINS! I need NOURISHMENT!Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Anybody here used to watch Bobby's World? That was a pretty crazy show, it was almost like watching somebody hallucinate constantly, kinda like how Doug worked. Then I remember Louie Anderson trying to do the same thing and it sucked. I heard that Howie Mandel got Bobby to appear on Deal or No Deal.

    Niceguyeddie616 on
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    HewnHewn Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Anybody here used to watch Bobby's World? That was a pretty crazy show, it was almost like watching somebody hallucinate constantly, kinda like how Doug worked. Then I remember Louie Anderson trying to do the same thing and it sucked. I heard that Howie Mandel got Bobby to appear on Deal or No Deal.

    I always enjoyed Bobby's World. Not that I remember much about it, other than his mom being obsessed with Elvis.

    And I even enjoyed Life with Louie? That was the name? The dad in that show cracked me up.

    Hewn on
    Steam: hewn
    Warframe: TheBaconDwarf
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    IncenjucarIncenjucar VChatter Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Louie>Bobby

    Incenjucar on
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    VeeveeVeevee WisconsinRegistered User regular
    edited May 2007
    My mother loved Bobby's World and would force us to watch it when it was on, not that I ever complained. Not sure exactly why, but the family being from wisconsin and having that generic northern accent may have helped, don'cha know.

    Veevee on
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    Lucky CynicLucky Cynic Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Hewn wrote: »
    And I even enjoyed Life with Louie? That was the name? The dad in that show cracked me up.

    "Didn't your mother ever tell you never to wake a man sleeping on an Ironing board?!"

    EDIT: Oh shit, how could I forget "For crying out loud!"

    Lucky Cynic on
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    TylerXKJTylerXKJ __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2007
    calamityjane.jpg

    Oh yeah, a show that had only three episodes ever shown in America. And I sort of remeber seeing one.

    Beat that!

    TylerXKJ on
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    DichotomyDichotomy Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    But really, could anything ever top Batman:TAS and Beast Wars?

    Dichotomy on
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