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The [Ready Player One] Quarantine Thread

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  • Librarian's ghostLibrarian's ghost Librarian, Ghostbuster, and TimSpork Registered User regular
    The Alamo had bits in their pre-show with Cline talking which were very bad and eye rolly. At one point he is showing his stupid car and showed how he has a Proton Pack in the front storage area.


    Yo. I took great satisfaction in immediately noticing how my proton pack was much more accurate than his, which had several flaws.

    (Switch Friend Code) SW-4910-9735-6014(PSN) timspork (Steam) timspork (XBox) Timspork


  • CorporateLogoCorporateLogo The toilet knows how I feelRegistered User regular
    never read books
    Way ahead of you, I’ve had Annotated Mantooth for 7 years and still haven’t opened it

    Do not have a cow, mortal.

    c9PXgFo.jpg
  • CelloCello Registered User regular
    Kyougu wrote: »
    discrider wrote: »
    Fearghaill wrote: »
    He's rushing through Zork while an enemy fleet is coming to kill him and spawn camp the test so that no one can play that part ever again. I think in his hurry, a walk through is fair play.

    maybe he should have thought of that before spending weeks goofing off with his girlfriend, doing pointless sidequests, boning sex dolls, and I'm pretty sure at one point he spends multiple days staring blankly at a scoreboard?

    Yes he's... a flawed character? Like, in universe, he makes dumb moves that cost him, like most protagonists do. The idea that the book treats him as a flawlessly awesome wizkid at all times is pure fiction put out there by haters of the book. The character himself admits that he reacts poorly to the breakup and acts like an asshole. He is NEVER cheered on for the whining and begging he does there and apologizes for doing it, while also putting himself at personal risk to make sure that no one else will be killed by the bad guys.

    No one is wrong to dislike the book, but some of the complaints come off as unfair. Like (movie spoiler here, skip if you intend to see without knowing plot stuff beforehand),
    when he realizes his male, white, straight friend is actually a female, gay, lesbian (because she shares that information for the first time) he is shocked but then asserts that this information does not change that he still is her friend. Is that a bad way to handle someone coming out to you?
    How should the scene have played out better? Serious question.

    Doesn't he get a 'Continue' whilst getting over the break-up?
    Like it's not that he's awesome all the time, it's that he's terrible all the time and then wins without needing to put any effort in or change at all.

    Never puts in any effort? That's... not accurate at all. That two page quote that everyone constantly mocks is a list of stuff he studied like it was the SAT for YEARS. He plays classic games so often and with such focus that he's able to play a perfect game of Pac-Man to earn that continue. As the story starts, he's put Indiana Jones or Nathan Drake-esque focus into solving the first clue, and finally does, being only the second person to ever do it. Once he solves the first riddle, he leaves the first planet for the first time and immediately begins full time grinding to become a high level player, starting from completely square one. Now... playing a really cool game isn't exactly work, but completely disregarding it is like saying esports player or Youtuber isn't a "real job" and imo that's kind of shitty. Wade is meant to be a rather standard shonen style protagonist, a true believer who has put in years of work to get to the first stage of a certain discipline, and who then excels once given the chance to try. It's not the most original character plot, but it's popular for a reason.

    He starts the book as a complete one-upping loner asshat. This is somewhat understandable, since the whole point of the contest is that having this knowledge is potentially worth billions of dollars, but yeah, he's not a nice person. As the book goes on, his selfish attitude makes him fall behind in the contest and lose the closeness of the new friendships he starts to develop. To win in the end, he has to become a team player and shares his gear and knowledge among a huge swath of players. So he learns the power of friendship and beats the bad guys as a team, rather than being rewarded for being selfish. Again, standard/cliche whatever but compelling to some degree.

    And finally, he gets off his butt in the last part of the book and works his ass off physically to do something important and dangerous in the real world. I would totally agree that the book doesn't spend a long time going into this... but is someone going to argue that it's implausible that a 20 something put work into exercising and got results from that? That's where the suspension of disbelief is tested?

    There's a lot to dislike in there for sure, Cline's writing style is pretty simplistic and judging by Armada he didn't learn anything from doing this book. But people keep describing things that aren't actually problems in the text or are extremely common in the "wish fulfillment fantasy adventure" genre. Like, the hero gets to the end with a mix of skill, luck, and help from his friends. That's... Lord of the Rings, Spider-Man, Harry Potter, Big Hero 6, etc.

    Man, this part of the book bugged the fucking hell out of me.

    In a book that is already nerd wish fulfillment it seemed way too much. He also got fit before he decided to go with his plan.

    "Oh check it out, I'm not fat anymore, I'm ripped and beautiful and awesome. And now I'm going to go be basically Batman and pull out an complicated plan with no problems and have all my friends tell me how awesome I am afterwards."

    Yeah, but he went from a life of having nothing and surviving off of processed government issued corn flakes to having the funds to eat healthier. He brought a software that locked him it if his Oasis account until he exercised the required amount. He basically had a personal trainer who had control over his drugs

    This is....so goofy

    Is that...is any of that supposed to be a good thing, beyond eating healthier

    Why are you doing this

    Steam
    3DS Friend Code: 0216-0898-6512
    Switch Friend Code: SW-7437-1538-7786
  • MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    Okay, serious question about the ending.

    The world is dying and Mr. 80s gets control of the company and rich and all that. Does he, or anyone, do anything about the whole "the world is dying" thing? Fixes or stabilizes things before the biosphere completely collapses and they all die? Or did they just all decide to eat digital lotuses until the oxygen ran out?

  • BucketmanBucketman Call me SkraggRegistered User regular
    edited March 2018
    It's seating at 83% on RT. Who's ready to eat crow?

    The book got weirdly good reviews too

    I think my diet is looking crow free

    I read RPO and it wasn't all that bad. I've read worst books, some that sold more and has a whole series (Sword of Truth, anyone?)

    The dog piling on RPO is a lot like how Twilight got dog piled. It's just cool to make fun of it, and if you want a few likes them you can just jump right in the dog pile.

    Yeah I read the book and there's some really fun stuff in there, at the time I really enjoyed it, even if I didn't really like the majority of the characters but just loved the treasure hunt and scenery. I know it hasn't been that long, but I tried rereading it a few months back and I just couldn't, maybe because everything is nostalgia now, but those cool moments weren't enough to get me through the characters I disliked shooting off 80s trivia non-stop.

    Bucketman on
  • Librarian's ghostLibrarian's ghost Librarian, Ghostbuster, and TimSpork Registered User regular
    Mayabird wrote: »
    Okay, serious question about the ending.

    The world is dying and Mr. 80s gets control of the company and rich and all that. Does he, or anyone, do anything about the whole "the world is dying" thing? Fixes or stabilizes things before the biosphere completely collapses and they all die? Or did they just all decide to eat digital lotuses until the oxygen ran out?

    In the book Artemis specifically want to use the money to help the planet.

    Wade initially wants to use the money to build a big rocket for him and his friends and leave the planet to like somewhere else. Artemis tells him how crap that idea is.

    (Switch Friend Code) SW-4910-9735-6014(PSN) timspork (Steam) timspork (XBox) Timspork


  • Lindsay LohanLindsay Lohan Registered User regular
    Cello wrote: »
    Kyougu wrote: »
    discrider wrote: »
    Fearghaill wrote: »
    He's rushing through Zork while an enemy fleet is coming to kill him and spawn camp the test so that no one can play that part ever again. I think in his hurry, a walk through is fair play.

    maybe he should have thought of that before spending weeks goofing off with his girlfriend, doing pointless sidequests, boning sex dolls, and I'm pretty sure at one point he spends multiple days staring blankly at a scoreboard?

    Yes he's... a flawed character? Like, in universe, he makes dumb moves that cost him, like most protagonists do. The idea that the book treats him as a flawlessly awesome wizkid at all times is pure fiction put out there by haters of the book. The character himself admits that he reacts poorly to the breakup and acts like an asshole. He is NEVER cheered on for the whining and begging he does there and apologizes for doing it, while also putting himself at personal risk to make sure that no one else will be killed by the bad guys.

    No one is wrong to dislike the book, but some of the complaints come off as unfair. Like (movie spoiler here, skip if you intend to see without knowing plot stuff beforehand),
    when he realizes his male, white, straight friend is actually a female, gay, lesbian (because she shares that information for the first time) he is shocked but then asserts that this information does not change that he still is her friend. Is that a bad way to handle someone coming out to you?
    How should the scene have played out better? Serious question.

    Doesn't he get a 'Continue' whilst getting over the break-up?
    Like it's not that he's awesome all the time, it's that he's terrible all the time and then wins without needing to put any effort in or change at all.

    Never puts in any effort? That's... not accurate at all. That two page quote that everyone constantly mocks is a list of stuff he studied like it was the SAT for YEARS. He plays classic games so often and with such focus that he's able to play a perfect game of Pac-Man to earn that continue. As the story starts, he's put Indiana Jones or Nathan Drake-esque focus into solving the first clue, and finally does, being only the second person to ever do it. Once he solves the first riddle, he leaves the first planet for the first time and immediately begins full time grinding to become a high level player, starting from completely square one. Now... playing a really cool game isn't exactly work, but completely disregarding it is like saying esports player or Youtuber isn't a "real job" and imo that's kind of shitty. Wade is meant to be a rather standard shonen style protagonist, a true believer who has put in years of work to get to the first stage of a certain discipline, and who then excels once given the chance to try. It's not the most original character plot, but it's popular for a reason.

    He starts the book as a complete one-upping loner asshat. This is somewhat understandable, since the whole point of the contest is that having this knowledge is potentially worth billions of dollars, but yeah, he's not a nice person. As the book goes on, his selfish attitude makes him fall behind in the contest and lose the closeness of the new friendships he starts to develop. To win in the end, he has to become a team player and shares his gear and knowledge among a huge swath of players. So he learns the power of friendship and beats the bad guys as a team, rather than being rewarded for being selfish. Again, standard/cliche whatever but compelling to some degree.

    And finally, he gets off his butt in the last part of the book and works his ass off physically to do something important and dangerous in the real world. I would totally agree that the book doesn't spend a long time going into this... but is someone going to argue that it's implausible that a 20 something put work into exercising and got results from that? That's where the suspension of disbelief is tested?

    There's a lot to dislike in there for sure, Cline's writing style is pretty simplistic and judging by Armada he didn't learn anything from doing this book. But people keep describing things that aren't actually problems in the text or are extremely common in the "wish fulfillment fantasy adventure" genre. Like, the hero gets to the end with a mix of skill, luck, and help from his friends. That's... Lord of the Rings, Spider-Man, Harry Potter, Big Hero 6, etc.

    Man, this part of the book bugged the fucking hell out of me.

    In a book that is already nerd wish fulfillment it seemed way too much. He also got fit before he decided to go with his plan.

    "Oh check it out, I'm not fat anymore, I'm ripped and beautiful and awesome. And now I'm going to go be basically Batman and pull out an complicated plan with no problems and have all my friends tell me how awesome I am afterwards."

    Yeah, but he went from a life of having nothing and surviving off of processed government issued corn flakes to having the funds to eat healthier. He brought a software that locked him it if his Oasis account until he exercised the required amount. He basically had a personal trainer who had control over his drugs

    This is....so goofy

    Is that...is any of that supposed to be a good thing, beyond eating healthier

    Why are you doing this

    I know that people really want to shit all over this because the book isn't great and has some troubling passages but "guy has money to eat better and blocks video games until exercising" seems like an odd one to disagree with. I mean, I've certainly done similar things where going to the gym enough times means I get a record.

  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    Cello wrote: »
    Kyougu wrote: »
    discrider wrote: »
    Fearghaill wrote: »
    He's rushing through Zork while an enemy fleet is coming to kill him and spawn camp the test so that no one can play that part ever again. I think in his hurry, a walk through is fair play.

    maybe he should have thought of that before spending weeks goofing off with his girlfriend, doing pointless sidequests, boning sex dolls, and I'm pretty sure at one point he spends multiple days staring blankly at a scoreboard?

    Yes he's... a flawed character? Like, in universe, he makes dumb moves that cost him, like most protagonists do. The idea that the book treats him as a flawlessly awesome wizkid at all times is pure fiction put out there by haters of the book. The character himself admits that he reacts poorly to the breakup and acts like an asshole. He is NEVER cheered on for the whining and begging he does there and apologizes for doing it, while also putting himself at personal risk to make sure that no one else will be killed by the bad guys.

    No one is wrong to dislike the book, but some of the complaints come off as unfair. Like (movie spoiler here, skip if you intend to see without knowing plot stuff beforehand),
    when he realizes his male, white, straight friend is actually a female, gay, lesbian (because she shares that information for the first time) he is shocked but then asserts that this information does not change that he still is her friend. Is that a bad way to handle someone coming out to you?
    How should the scene have played out better? Serious question.

    Doesn't he get a 'Continue' whilst getting over the break-up?
    Like it's not that he's awesome all the time, it's that he's terrible all the time and then wins without needing to put any effort in or change at all.

    Never puts in any effort? That's... not accurate at all. That two page quote that everyone constantly mocks is a list of stuff he studied like it was the SAT for YEARS. He plays classic games so often and with such focus that he's able to play a perfect game of Pac-Man to earn that continue. As the story starts, he's put Indiana Jones or Nathan Drake-esque focus into solving the first clue, and finally does, being only the second person to ever do it. Once he solves the first riddle, he leaves the first planet for the first time and immediately begins full time grinding to become a high level player, starting from completely square one. Now... playing a really cool game isn't exactly work, but completely disregarding it is like saying esports player or Youtuber isn't a "real job" and imo that's kind of shitty. Wade is meant to be a rather standard shonen style protagonist, a true believer who has put in years of work to get to the first stage of a certain discipline, and who then excels once given the chance to try. It's not the most original character plot, but it's popular for a reason.

    He starts the book as a complete one-upping loner asshat. This is somewhat understandable, since the whole point of the contest is that having this knowledge is potentially worth billions of dollars, but yeah, he's not a nice person. As the book goes on, his selfish attitude makes him fall behind in the contest and lose the closeness of the new friendships he starts to develop. To win in the end, he has to become a team player and shares his gear and knowledge among a huge swath of players. So he learns the power of friendship and beats the bad guys as a team, rather than being rewarded for being selfish. Again, standard/cliche whatever but compelling to some degree.

    And finally, he gets off his butt in the last part of the book and works his ass off physically to do something important and dangerous in the real world. I would totally agree that the book doesn't spend a long time going into this... but is someone going to argue that it's implausible that a 20 something put work into exercising and got results from that? That's where the suspension of disbelief is tested?

    There's a lot to dislike in there for sure, Cline's writing style is pretty simplistic and judging by Armada he didn't learn anything from doing this book. But people keep describing things that aren't actually problems in the text or are extremely common in the "wish fulfillment fantasy adventure" genre. Like, the hero gets to the end with a mix of skill, luck, and help from his friends. That's... Lord of the Rings, Spider-Man, Harry Potter, Big Hero 6, etc.

    Man, this part of the book bugged the fucking hell out of me.

    In a book that is already nerd wish fulfillment it seemed way too much. He also got fit before he decided to go with his plan.

    "Oh check it out, I'm not fat anymore, I'm ripped and beautiful and awesome. And now I'm going to go be basically Batman and pull out an complicated plan with no problems and have all my friends tell me how awesome I am afterwards."

    Yeah, but he went from a life of having nothing and surviving off of processed government issued corn flakes to having the funds to eat healthier. He brought a software that locked him it if his Oasis account until he exercised the required amount. He basically had a personal trainer who had control over his drugs

    This is....so goofy

    Is that...is any of that supposed to be a good thing, beyond eating healthier

    Why are you doing this

    Reckonizing that you have an ever increasing problem and deciding that it's better to do something about it then continue having it be a problem is a bad thing? Realizing that continued good health is actually a good thing that helps you focus is a bad thing?

  • HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    If I made a lot of money by knowing about ghostbusters I would pay a scientist to build a robot that just fucking screams at me, hideous abuse in a hideous robot voice

    Broke as fuck in the style of the times. Gratitude is all that can return on your generosity.

    https://www.paypal.me/hobnailtaylor
  • Commander ZoomCommander Zoom Registered User regular
    XBOX Live doesn't cost that much.

  • Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Hobnail wrote: »
    If I made a lot of money by knowing about ghostbusters I would pay a scientist to build a robot that just fucking screams at me, hideous abuse in a hideous robot voice

    Are-

    Are you Walter Peck?!?

  • MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    edited March 2018
    Mayabird wrote: »
    Okay, serious question about the ending.

    The world is dying and Mr. 80s gets control of the company and rich and all that. Does he, or anyone, do anything about the whole "the world is dying" thing? Fixes or stabilizes things before the biosphere completely collapses and they all die? Or did they just all decide to eat digital lotuses until the oxygen ran out?

    In the book Artemis specifically want to use the money to help the planet.

    Wade initially wants to use the money to build a big rocket for him and his friends and leave the planet to like somewhere else. Artemis tells him how crap that idea is.

    But did they help the planet, is what I'm asking, anything explicit about actually definitely making a difference or trying at it, or does it just end with the guy rolling around in his money and references and more healthy body? Because that would kinda imply that they just left everything to continue to go to shit and humanity goes extinct clutching shallow 80s references, which is an incredibly bleak way to go. It would be the way a dark satire would end, though that would need to include self-awareness.

    Mayabird on
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    edited March 2018
    Mayabird wrote: »
    Mayabird wrote: »
    Okay, serious question about the ending.

    The world is dying and Mr. 80s gets control of the company and rich and all that. Does he, or anyone, do anything about the whole "the world is dying" thing? Fixes or stabilizes things before the biosphere completely collapses and they all die? Or did they just all decide to eat digital lotuses until the oxygen ran out?

    In the book Artemis specifically want to use the money to help the planet.

    Wade initially wants to use the money to build a big rocket for him and his friends and leave the planet to like somewhere else. Artemis tells him how crap that idea is.

    But did they help the planet, is what I'm asking, anything explicit about actually definitely making a difference or trying at it, or does it just end with the guy rolling around in his money and references and more healthy body? Because that would kinda imply that they just left everything to continue to go to shit and humanity goes extinct clutching shallow 80s references, which is an incredibly bleak way to go. It would be the way a dark satire would end, though that would need to include self-awareness.

    It end with Artemis and parcival smooching after pledging to try to make a difference

    Casually Hardcore on
  • CelloCello Registered User regular
    Cello wrote: »
    Kyougu wrote: »
    discrider wrote: »
    Fearghaill wrote: »
    He's rushing through Zork while an enemy fleet is coming to kill him and spawn camp the test so that no one can play that part ever again. I think in his hurry, a walk through is fair play.

    maybe he should have thought of that before spending weeks goofing off with his girlfriend, doing pointless sidequests, boning sex dolls, and I'm pretty sure at one point he spends multiple days staring blankly at a scoreboard?

    Yes he's... a flawed character? Like, in universe, he makes dumb moves that cost him, like most protagonists do. The idea that the book treats him as a flawlessly awesome wizkid at all times is pure fiction put out there by haters of the book. The character himself admits that he reacts poorly to the breakup and acts like an asshole. He is NEVER cheered on for the whining and begging he does there and apologizes for doing it, while also putting himself at personal risk to make sure that no one else will be killed by the bad guys.

    No one is wrong to dislike the book, but some of the complaints come off as unfair. Like (movie spoiler here, skip if you intend to see without knowing plot stuff beforehand),
    when he realizes his male, white, straight friend is actually a female, gay, lesbian (because she shares that information for the first time) he is shocked but then asserts that this information does not change that he still is her friend. Is that a bad way to handle someone coming out to you?
    How should the scene have played out better? Serious question.

    Doesn't he get a 'Continue' whilst getting over the break-up?
    Like it's not that he's awesome all the time, it's that he's terrible all the time and then wins without needing to put any effort in or change at all.

    Never puts in any effort? That's... not accurate at all. That two page quote that everyone constantly mocks is a list of stuff he studied like it was the SAT for YEARS. He plays classic games so often and with such focus that he's able to play a perfect game of Pac-Man to earn that continue. As the story starts, he's put Indiana Jones or Nathan Drake-esque focus into solving the first clue, and finally does, being only the second person to ever do it. Once he solves the first riddle, he leaves the first planet for the first time and immediately begins full time grinding to become a high level player, starting from completely square one. Now... playing a really cool game isn't exactly work, but completely disregarding it is like saying esports player or Youtuber isn't a "real job" and imo that's kind of shitty. Wade is meant to be a rather standard shonen style protagonist, a true believer who has put in years of work to get to the first stage of a certain discipline, and who then excels once given the chance to try. It's not the most original character plot, but it's popular for a reason.

    He starts the book as a complete one-upping loner asshat. This is somewhat understandable, since the whole point of the contest is that having this knowledge is potentially worth billions of dollars, but yeah, he's not a nice person. As the book goes on, his selfish attitude makes him fall behind in the contest and lose the closeness of the new friendships he starts to develop. To win in the end, he has to become a team player and shares his gear and knowledge among a huge swath of players. So he learns the power of friendship and beats the bad guys as a team, rather than being rewarded for being selfish. Again, standard/cliche whatever but compelling to some degree.

    And finally, he gets off his butt in the last part of the book and works his ass off physically to do something important and dangerous in the real world. I would totally agree that the book doesn't spend a long time going into this... but is someone going to argue that it's implausible that a 20 something put work into exercising and got results from that? That's where the suspension of disbelief is tested?

    There's a lot to dislike in there for sure, Cline's writing style is pretty simplistic and judging by Armada he didn't learn anything from doing this book. But people keep describing things that aren't actually problems in the text or are extremely common in the "wish fulfillment fantasy adventure" genre. Like, the hero gets to the end with a mix of skill, luck, and help from his friends. That's... Lord of the Rings, Spider-Man, Harry Potter, Big Hero 6, etc.

    Man, this part of the book bugged the fucking hell out of me.

    In a book that is already nerd wish fulfillment it seemed way too much. He also got fit before he decided to go with his plan.

    "Oh check it out, I'm not fat anymore, I'm ripped and beautiful and awesome. And now I'm going to go be basically Batman and pull out an complicated plan with no problems and have all my friends tell me how awesome I am afterwards."

    Yeah, but he went from a life of having nothing and surviving off of processed government issued corn flakes to having the funds to eat healthier. He brought a software that locked him it if his Oasis account until he exercised the required amount. He basically had a personal trainer who had control over his drugs

    This is....so goofy

    Is that...is any of that supposed to be a good thing, beyond eating healthier

    Why are you doing this

    Reckonizing that you have an ever increasing problem and deciding that it's better to do something about it then continue having it be a problem is a bad thing? Realizing that continued good health is actually a good thing that helps you focus is a bad thing?

    I mean, if he actually realized it was a problem and stepped away entirely until he could reckon with the game and his addiction to pop culture references, I'd find it a much more interesting read

    Steam
    3DS Friend Code: 0216-0898-6512
    Switch Friend Code: SW-7437-1538-7786
  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    I'm sure it's due to Cline's writing but to me it read less like Wade actually having character growth and more like more nerd wish fulfillment, and the part that comes afterwards didn't help at all.

  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    edited March 2018
    Cello wrote: »
    Cello wrote: »
    Kyougu wrote: »
    discrider wrote: »
    Fearghaill wrote: »
    He's rushing through Zork while an enemy fleet is coming to kill him and spawn camp the test so that no one can play that part ever again. I think in his hurry, a walk through is fair play.

    maybe he should have thought of that before spending weeks goofing off with his girlfriend, doing pointless sidequests, boning sex dolls, and I'm pretty sure at one point he spends multiple days staring blankly at a scoreboard?

    Yes he's... a flawed character? Like, in universe, he makes dumb moves that cost him, like most protagonists do. The idea that the book treats him as a flawlessly awesome wizkid at all times is pure fiction put out there by haters of the book. The character himself admits that he reacts poorly to the breakup and acts like an asshole. He is NEVER cheered on for the whining and begging he does there and apologizes for doing it, while also putting himself at personal risk to make sure that no one else will be killed by the bad guys.

    No one is wrong to dislike the book, but some of the complaints come off as unfair. Like (movie spoiler here, skip if you intend to see without knowing plot stuff beforehand),
    when he realizes his male, white, straight friend is actually a female, gay, lesbian (because she shares that information for the first time) he is shocked but then asserts that this information does not change that he still is her friend. Is that a bad way to handle someone coming out to you?
    How should the scene have played out better? Serious question.

    Doesn't he get a 'Continue' whilst getting over the break-up?
    Like it's not that he's awesome all the time, it's that he's terrible all the time and then wins without needing to put any effort in or change at all.

    Never puts in any effort? That's... not accurate at all. That two page quote that everyone constantly mocks is a list of stuff he studied like it was the SAT for YEARS. He plays classic games so often and with such focus that he's able to play a perfect game of Pac-Man to earn that continue. As the story starts, he's put Indiana Jones or Nathan Drake-esque focus into solving the first clue, and finally does, being only the second person to ever do it. Once he solves the first riddle, he leaves the first planet for the first time and immediately begins full time grinding to become a high level player, starting from completely square one. Now... playing a really cool game isn't exactly work, but completely disregarding it is like saying esports player or Youtuber isn't a "real job" and imo that's kind of shitty. Wade is meant to be a rather standard shonen style protagonist, a true believer who has put in years of work to get to the first stage of a certain discipline, and who then excels once given the chance to try. It's not the most original character plot, but it's popular for a reason.

    He starts the book as a complete one-upping loner asshat. This is somewhat understandable, since the whole point of the contest is that having this knowledge is potentially worth billions of dollars, but yeah, he's not a nice person. As the book goes on, his selfish attitude makes him fall behind in the contest and lose the closeness of the new friendships he starts to develop. To win in the end, he has to become a team player and shares his gear and knowledge among a huge swath of players. So he learns the power of friendship and beats the bad guys as a team, rather than being rewarded for being selfish. Again, standard/cliche whatever but compelling to some degree.

    And finally, he gets off his butt in the last part of the book and works his ass off physically to do something important and dangerous in the real world. I would totally agree that the book doesn't spend a long time going into this... but is someone going to argue that it's implausible that a 20 something put work into exercising and got results from that? That's where the suspension of disbelief is tested?

    There's a lot to dislike in there for sure, Cline's writing style is pretty simplistic and judging by Armada he didn't learn anything from doing this book. But people keep describing things that aren't actually problems in the text or are extremely common in the "wish fulfillment fantasy adventure" genre. Like, the hero gets to the end with a mix of skill, luck, and help from his friends. That's... Lord of the Rings, Spider-Man, Harry Potter, Big Hero 6, etc.

    Man, this part of the book bugged the fucking hell out of me.

    In a book that is already nerd wish fulfillment it seemed way too much. He also got fit before he decided to go with his plan.

    "Oh check it out, I'm not fat anymore, I'm ripped and beautiful and awesome. And now I'm going to go be basically Batman and pull out an complicated plan with no problems and have all my friends tell me how awesome I am afterwards."

    Yeah, but he went from a life of having nothing and surviving off of processed government issued corn flakes to having the funds to eat healthier. He brought a software that locked him it if his Oasis account until he exercised the required amount. He basically had a personal trainer who had control over his drugs

    This is....so goofy

    Is that...is any of that supposed to be a good thing, beyond eating healthier

    Why are you doing this

    Reckonizing that you have an ever increasing problem and deciding that it's better to do something about it then continue having it be a problem is a bad thing? Realizing that continued good health is actually a good thing that helps you focus is a bad thing?

    I mean, if he actually realized it was a problem and stepped away entirely until he could reckon with the game and his addiction to pop culture references, I'd find it a much more interesting read

    Think about all these twitch players who play the same game 10 hours a day because they're trapped. Their livlihood revolves around twitch and the demands of their fans.

    Wade finds himself in the same situation. There's nothing in his life outside of the Oasis and finding the Easter egg. Don't forget that there's a hostile entity that wants him dead and that killed his entire family already. At this point in the book, Wade has nothing. It doesn't help that the people participating in this egg hunt turned isolation into a fetish.

    So Wade has nothing. He can't get a honest job because there aren't any. He can't turn to his family cause he doesn't have any. He can't turn to his friends because he didn't have any outside of a few inside a virtual game. He's so distrustful of the outside world that he created a literal prison.

    Casually Hardcore on
  • CelloCello Registered User regular
    Cello wrote: »
    Cello wrote: »
    Kyougu wrote: »
    discrider wrote: »
    Fearghaill wrote: »
    He's rushing through Zork while an enemy fleet is coming to kill him and spawn camp the test so that no one can play that part ever again. I think in his hurry, a walk through is fair play.

    maybe he should have thought of that before spending weeks goofing off with his girlfriend, doing pointless sidequests, boning sex dolls, and I'm pretty sure at one point he spends multiple days staring blankly at a scoreboard?

    Yes he's... a flawed character? Like, in universe, he makes dumb moves that cost him, like most protagonists do. The idea that the book treats him as a flawlessly awesome wizkid at all times is pure fiction put out there by haters of the book. The character himself admits that he reacts poorly to the breakup and acts like an asshole. He is NEVER cheered on for the whining and begging he does there and apologizes for doing it, while also putting himself at personal risk to make sure that no one else will be killed by the bad guys.

    No one is wrong to dislike the book, but some of the complaints come off as unfair. Like (movie spoiler here, skip if you intend to see without knowing plot stuff beforehand),
    when he realizes his male, white, straight friend is actually a female, gay, lesbian (because she shares that information for the first time) he is shocked but then asserts that this information does not change that he still is her friend. Is that a bad way to handle someone coming out to you?
    How should the scene have played out better? Serious question.

    Doesn't he get a 'Continue' whilst getting over the break-up?
    Like it's not that he's awesome all the time, it's that he's terrible all the time and then wins without needing to put any effort in or change at all.

    Never puts in any effort? That's... not accurate at all. That two page quote that everyone constantly mocks is a list of stuff he studied like it was the SAT for YEARS. He plays classic games so often and with such focus that he's able to play a perfect game of Pac-Man to earn that continue. As the story starts, he's put Indiana Jones or Nathan Drake-esque focus into solving the first clue, and finally does, being only the second person to ever do it. Once he solves the first riddle, he leaves the first planet for the first time and immediately begins full time grinding to become a high level player, starting from completely square one. Now... playing a really cool game isn't exactly work, but completely disregarding it is like saying esports player or Youtuber isn't a "real job" and imo that's kind of shitty. Wade is meant to be a rather standard shonen style protagonist, a true believer who has put in years of work to get to the first stage of a certain discipline, and who then excels once given the chance to try. It's not the most original character plot, but it's popular for a reason.

    He starts the book as a complete one-upping loner asshat. This is somewhat understandable, since the whole point of the contest is that having this knowledge is potentially worth billions of dollars, but yeah, he's not a nice person. As the book goes on, his selfish attitude makes him fall behind in the contest and lose the closeness of the new friendships he starts to develop. To win in the end, he has to become a team player and shares his gear and knowledge among a huge swath of players. So he learns the power of friendship and beats the bad guys as a team, rather than being rewarded for being selfish. Again, standard/cliche whatever but compelling to some degree.

    And finally, he gets off his butt in the last part of the book and works his ass off physically to do something important and dangerous in the real world. I would totally agree that the book doesn't spend a long time going into this... but is someone going to argue that it's implausible that a 20 something put work into exercising and got results from that? That's where the suspension of disbelief is tested?

    There's a lot to dislike in there for sure, Cline's writing style is pretty simplistic and judging by Armada he didn't learn anything from doing this book. But people keep describing things that aren't actually problems in the text or are extremely common in the "wish fulfillment fantasy adventure" genre. Like, the hero gets to the end with a mix of skill, luck, and help from his friends. That's... Lord of the Rings, Spider-Man, Harry Potter, Big Hero 6, etc.

    Man, this part of the book bugged the fucking hell out of me.

    In a book that is already nerd wish fulfillment it seemed way too much. He also got fit before he decided to go with his plan.

    "Oh check it out, I'm not fat anymore, I'm ripped and beautiful and awesome. And now I'm going to go be basically Batman and pull out an complicated plan with no problems and have all my friends tell me how awesome I am afterwards."

    Yeah, but he went from a life of having nothing and surviving off of processed government issued corn flakes to having the funds to eat healthier. He brought a software that locked him it if his Oasis account until he exercised the required amount. He basically had a personal trainer who had control over his drugs

    This is....so goofy

    Is that...is any of that supposed to be a good thing, beyond eating healthier

    Why are you doing this

    Reckonizing that you have an ever increasing problem and deciding that it's better to do something about it then continue having it be a problem is a bad thing? Realizing that continued good health is actually a good thing that helps you focus is a bad thing?

    I mean, if he actually realized it was a problem and stepped away entirely until he could reckon with the game and his addiction to pop culture references, I'd find it a much more interesting read

    Think about all these twitch players who play the same game 10 hours a day because they're tapped.

    Nah

    I like my version better

    Steam
    3DS Friend Code: 0216-0898-6512
    Switch Friend Code: SW-7437-1538-7786
  • StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular


    This article had some good takes that I think have mostly been covered before but were worded very nicely.

  • shoeboxjeddyshoeboxjeddy Registered User regular
    Opty wrote: »
    Oh, "it got out to the media." That's great. Fantastic.
    Look at cyberpunk, look around you right now, and tell me how you think that would actually go.
    These people are in the business of selling bullshit underdog narratives to a credulous audience, not making them happen.

    This is not quality material dude. "In real life, evil corporations WIN, dude." Whoa... you sure did blow my mind there.

    It's a fictional wish fulfillment narrative, not a cyberpunk dystopia. Do you whine that the ending of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is just too unrealistic? It's a trite complaint.

    Wish fulfillment is something that we expect in children's literature. I expect narratives aimed at adults to be a bit more serious than that.

    Also, Dahl wrote a sequel to said book that was in part "be careful what you wish for - you might just get it."

    RP1 is generally considered a young adult novel? Also... did you just attempt to suggest that adult novels can't end in a happy ending? They have to come up with some swerve where the worst possible thing that COULD happen, does? You have been reading the wrong stuff...

    There's a vast difference between a happy ending and wish fulfillment.

    The beginning of the book says "there is a contest to win a billion dollars" and at the end of the book, the hero wins that contest. Ending the book in any other way would be impressively stupid, so long as the contest is played straight the whole time. If the whole thing devolved into like... currency isn't worth anything anymore or the Singularity happens during the novel, then sure, another ending would make sense. But based on this story outline... that's the only ending. It's like Star Wars where the movie opens with plans to destroy the Death Star and at the end... they use the plans to destroy the Death Star. Credits.

    On the topic of the goal changing mid-novel, has anyone read/heard of the RP1/Sword Art Online inspired "Warcross"? The ending of that book is a bit different in that it unexpectedly is part 1 of a series by the end.

    I happened to read the first few chapters of Warcross as I was waiting in a Barnes and Noble due to my eye being caught by its pretty rainbow cover and checked it out from the library to finish reading since I cannot bring myself to abandon media I've started consuming without finishing, even if it was already a train wreck. It's another entry in the "a video game somehow takes over the world" genre written by yet another author who doesn't have any idea how hardware and software development works, leading to a setting and scenario that collapses under the smallest bit of critical thought. It even tosses in a dystopian future sort of deal, but only for the very beginning of the book as a means to get the story rolling, as once that happens the protagonist is whisked off to a wonderland and the dystopia is basically forgotten. The ending made me excessively angry.

    Okay I'm glad another human read this book. The "balance" in the created game might actually be the worst in the entire genre that I've ever seen... ever. It's like Smite kinda except random powerups spawn in at random times and random places. Powerups potentially as good as "your enemy can't move at all" or "you just get the thing that wins the game". Oh and the teams don't get to practice on the championship levels, so they're COMPLETELY unprepared for whatever ends up happening on them. And even small things like "thieves don't get to use daggers!" What?! Thieves are THE dagger using class in any game, what the heck is that about?

  • BucketmanBucketman Call me SkraggRegistered User regular
    As a reminder. Armada is actually worse than RPO in terms of quality and references.

    Again, it has PED weed. Not making this up, not enough drugs in the world.

    I have no idea what this is

  • mori1972mori1972 FF14: Rhotfyr Thosinmharsyn (Y)UKRegistered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    Dubh wrote: »

    Tad William's Otherland is more my thing when it comes to stories about virtual reality

    jesus sometimes I feel like nobody else ever read those books
    the first one especially was so good at doing tech-focussed near-futurism while stepping out from under Gibson's shadow.

    Not really the thread for it, but just wanted to chime in with my own deep love of Otherland specifically, and Tad Williams generally.

    The Otherland series (at least moments in it) are one of the few books that have gotten me close to tearing up with the emotional impact of the writing.

    Plus, I've always thought Tad writes non-human in an effective way (the Sithi and the Qar). Yay fellow...er...Taddites?

    It's all saltwater these days:
    Ocean, tears and heartbreak soup
    Half alive in a whitecap foam
    Half in love with a white half moon
  • milskimilski Poyo! Registered User regular
    Bucketman wrote: »
    As a reminder. Armada is actually worse than RPO in terms of quality and references.

    Again, it has PED weed. Not making this up, not enough drugs in the world.

    I have no idea what this is

    Performance enhancing drug

    I ate an engineer
  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    Straightzi wrote: »


    This article had some good takes that I think have mostly been covered before but were worded very nicely.

    Yeah... I believe that aunt thing was in the book too.
    The protagonist doesn't spare a thought that his family and friends die because of him, and is only concerned that he's now being targeted by IOI.

  • NarbusNarbus Registered User regular
    Bucketman wrote: »
    As a reminder. Armada is actually worse than RPO in terms of quality and references.

    Again, it has PED weed. Not making this up, not enough drugs in the world.

    I have no idea what this is

    In the book, aliens or the government or somebody, the book is trash who cares, create a strain of weed that is a performance enhancing drug, helping the main character play video games better. Since it turns out that video games are actually a training program built to help find the person who can best fight off an actual alien invasion, everytime the "hero" blazes a fatty he is literally, and unironically, helping save the world.

    The book is trash.

  • MaddocMaddoc I'm Bobbin Threadbare, are you my mother? Registered User regular
    What is a thing I like to do?

    What if doing that thing was literally the most important thing in the world, and would make me a hero?

    I've just written a dumb nerd wish fulfillment novel

  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    discrider wrote: »
    Straightzi wrote: »


    This article had some good takes that I think have mostly been covered before but were worded very nicely.

    Yeah... I believe that aunt thing was in the book too.
    The protagonist doesn't spare a thought that his family and friends die because of him, and is only concerned that he's now being targeted by IOI.

    He did. He pretty much said that while his aunt was constantly drugged out and abusive she was still his aunt. The only person he knew on the stack was a old lady he speaks to once and awhile. He regrets that his carelessness and provocations brought their deaths.

  • DoobhDoobh She/Her, Ace Pan/Bisexual 8-) What's up, bootlickers?Registered User regular
    edited March 2018


    This is a pretty good thread for anyone who has a grasp on feminist theory



    and it doesn't stop there

    there's a lot of important elements in both the book and movie to think about, because we very much still live in a world thick with sexism, racism, and the intersection of the two

    I'm not saying anyone should feel guilty for enjoying the non-shitty parts of RPO, but a hard look on how it could have been done better is very much worthwhile

    Doobh on
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  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    I really like this take on Halliday:
    http://www.zam.com/article/1721/ready-player-one-review
    The thesis of Ready Player One is that Halliday, the guy who did the work building this place and then hiding all these secrets, made himself God of the Second Life where everyone now lives. So, in a forever effort to figure out where this guy hid his secrets, there are entire museums set up to allow people to study and relive his entire life. An entire division of the evil company just studies his life, but so do individuals like our hero, Wade. The world revolves around hero-worshipping Halliday, something that was imposed on this world by Halliday himself. Everyone here loves what he loved because, to be painfully honest, understanding his loves are their only route out of their terrible shit lives.

    It is one of the cruelest things I have ever seen committed to film. It is one of the things that I cannot believe the filmmakers did not understand. Halliday is the best supervillain I have ever seen in a movie. He is also the only supervillain I have ever seen in a movie that is sold as the good guy, leaving aside some Unbreakable type of twist.

    There’s this other game-movie called Scott Pilgrim in which a guy who loves pop culture too much has to come to realize that he’s awful to the people around him, and that pop culture is not an excuse for that. I’ve long expected that my review of Ready Player One would revolve around how no one here had a comparable healthy awakening. I don’t get to do that now, because the actual story is so much darker. Halliday is sold as this god but also a down-to-earth guy but also the person whose struggles must be understood to solve this puzzle. Literally, one of the moments of his life that the players must come to understand is how he was afraid of kissing a girl. I’m not making this up: it is that kind of nightmarish nerd culture. I’d call it pandering if I didn’t consider it genuinely dangerous.

    When you get to the bottom of it, Ready Player One is not about nostalgia on any level. It is about an entire world forced to deal with the most toxic high school ‘nice guy’ you can imagine. Halliday’s preferences become the key to understanding where he may have hidden his secrets, and everyone wants to uncover those secrets because they have nothing in their own lives worth pursuing. Everyone in the Oasis knows and listens to only the songs that would have been on his sophomore year mixtape he made for a girl he couldn’t talk to. At one point, characters quiz each other (I PROMISE I’M NOT MAKING THIS UP) about what Halliday’s preferences were for a multiplayer Goldeneye 007 game.

    It’s “Snipers Only” and I don’t remember the level but I do remember that Halliday preferred to play as Oddjob and…. Look, I’m sorry to do this. The Jesus Christ of the next frontier of human existence, the God of video games, picked the biggest cop-out cheat character in Goldeneye 007 and we are supposed to worship at that shrine? Kill me. Actually kill me.

  • ZonugalZonugal (He/Him) The Holiday Armadillo I'm Santa's representative for all the southern states. And Mexico!Registered User regular
    That review just sold me on Ready Player One.

    Now I absolutely must see it.

    Ross-Geller-Prime-Sig-A.jpg
  • MalReynoldsMalReynolds The Hunter S Thompson of incredibly mild medicines Registered User regular
    The think pieces on RPO also seem a bit masturbatory.

    Total IOI move.

    "A new take on the epic fantasy genre... Darkly comic, relatable characters... twisted storyline."
    "Readers who prefer tension and romance, Maledictions: The Offering, delivers... As serious YA fiction, I’ll give it five stars out of five. As a novel? Four and a half." - Liz Ellor
    My new novel: Maledictions: The Offering. Now in Paperback!
  • wirehead26wirehead26 Registered User regular
    https://youtube.com/watch?v=_JbpTEtGTz8

    This review is likely to annoy someone who hated the film just so you know

    I'M NOT FINISHED WITH YOU!!!
  • InquisitorInquisitor Registered User regular
    Maddoc wrote: »
    What is a thing I like to do?

    What if doing that thing was literally the most important thing in the world, and would make me a hero?

    I've just written a dumb nerd wish fulfillment novel

    I’m having a hard time making anything coherent out of my own interests.

    I have to... save the world by re winning historical battles using soldiers that fight better the better you build and paint them but also win sword duels with other enemy generals?

  • YaYaYaYa Decent. Registered User regular
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    Maddoc wrote: »
    What is a thing I like to do?

    What if doing that thing was literally the most important thing in the world, and would make me a hero?

    I've just written a dumb nerd wish fulfillment novel

    I’m having a hard time making anything coherent out of my own interests.

    I have to... save the world by re winning historical battles using soldiers that fight better the better you build and paint them but also win sword duels with other enemy generals?

    this is easy

    Small Soldiers but on a massive scale, you defend the entire neighborhood with your army of dudes but also just whack the shit out of the boss alien toys with your sword

  • InquisitorInquisitor Registered User regular
    YaYa wrote: »
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    Maddoc wrote: »
    What is a thing I like to do?

    What if doing that thing was literally the most important thing in the world, and would make me a hero?

    I've just written a dumb nerd wish fulfillment novel

    I’m having a hard time making anything coherent out of my own interests.

    I have to... save the world by re winning historical battles using soldiers that fight better the better you build and paint them but also win sword duels with other enemy generals?

    this is easy

    Small Soldiers but on a massive scale, you defend the entire neighborhood with your army of dudes but also just whack the shit out of the boss alien toys with your sword

    Cool, see you guys on the silver screen inside of a year

  • BucketmanBucketman Call me SkraggRegistered User regular
    So I get that these people are only engrossed in the 80s stiff in the book because of the treasure hunt but paging through the book again, when you get these scenes where people are trying to outdo each other with their knowledge and how good at Atari they are I want to scream, like has there been nothing of substance created in this world? Because we never hear about it. These kids should go write a poem or paint a picture or something every once in awhile.

  • MalReynoldsMalReynolds The Hunter S Thompson of incredibly mild medicines Registered User regular
    Bucketman wrote: »
    So I get that these people are only engrossed in the 80s stiff in the book because of the treasure hunt but paging through the book again, when you get these scenes where people are trying to outdo each other with their knowledge and how good at Atari they are I want to scream, like has there been nothing of substance created in this world? Because we never hear about it. These kids should go write a poem or paint a picture or something every once in awhile.

    That's... not at all what the author was intent on exploring, though? There's plenty of text that exists for RPO worthy of all the scorn, ire and judgment it has been getting.

    That's like asking why no one in Jurassic Park talks about The Lourve.

    "A new take on the epic fantasy genre... Darkly comic, relatable characters... twisted storyline."
    "Readers who prefer tension and romance, Maledictions: The Offering, delivers... As serious YA fiction, I’ll give it five stars out of five. As a novel? Four and a half." - Liz Ellor
    My new novel: Maledictions: The Offering. Now in Paperback!
  • TallahasseerielTallahasseeriel Registered User regular
    Jurassic park should have a scene with an art museum and all the dinosaurs are just quietly appreciating the paintings and sculptures.

  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    I would say it would be more like if everyone in the Jurassic Park setting was obsessed with dinosaurs, basically their entire world ended up revolving around dinosaurs somehow, etc. but all that would make sense because who doesn't love dinosaurs?

  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    Bucketman wrote: »
    So I get that these people are only engrossed in the 80s stiff in the book because of the treasure hunt but paging through the book again, when you get these scenes where people are trying to outdo each other with their knowledge and how good at Atari they are I want to scream, like has there been nothing of substance created in this world? Because we never hear about it. These kids should go write a poem or paint a picture or something every once in awhile.

    That's... not at all what the author was intent on exploring, though? There's plenty of text that exists for RPO worthy of all the scorn, ire and judgment it has been getting.

    That's like asking why no one in Jurassic Park talks about The Lourve.

    Hey! At least in Sword Art Online the female lead learns how to cook between episodes 1 and 2 because the male lead showed her that in-game butter is delicious.

  • ShortyShorty touching the meat Intergalactic Cool CourtRegistered User regular
    every review of this movie seems like it will only be interesting as an unintentional critique of everything it is supposedly lauding

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