Our Lady of Blessed Acceleration, don't fail me now [Cars]

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  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    If your daily commute is short enough you can get away with 120v charging.
    I've done it for the last 7 years on my Leaf.

    Also getting the 240 charger can be cheaper if you have the right setup: breaker panel in your garage with space free for the new circuit. Only need to pay an electrician to install the breaker, a foot of conduit, and a 240v outlet which isn't too expensive, then the actual chargers are $500-$1000.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    I have a townhome with a driveway. However I don't have a garage so I imagine getting a level 2 charger will be a bit higher. I usually get home around 5 and don't leave again until 7 the next day. I figure I'll get between 45 and 65 miles a day of range from just slow charging at home. That should be plenty for most days.

    I'm trying to decide between getting a hard wired charging station and just getting them to install a dryer plug where the standard 3 pin sockets are on the outside next to my front door. I imagine my HOA would prefer the latter.

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  • KetarKetar Ready to feel better about your own miserable lives?Registered User regular
    That_Guy wrote: »
    I have a townhome with a driveway. However I don't have a garage so I imagine getting a level 2 charger will be a bit higher. I usually get home around 5 and don't leave again until 7 the next day. I figure I'll get between 45 and 65 miles a day of range from just slow charging at home. That should be plenty for most days.

    I'm trying to decide between getting a hard wired charging station and just getting them to install a dryer plug where the standard 3 pin sockets are on the outside next to my front door. I imagine my HOA would prefer the latter.

    You don't need a charging station unless you frequently need to re-charge most of the battery quickly. A regular 240V outlet should be good for around 25 miles worth of range per hour of charging, and is already a huge step up from the 3-4/hour you get from a regular outlet.

    We've been using a 240V outlet for the last 3.5 years or so with no problems.

  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    edited February 10
    I was looking at EVs but it looks like I would be fucked on the 240v charging front. My regular electrician said I'd need to replace my breaker panel to have that added, so that's an extra 3-4k on top of just having a level 2 charger installed.. so 7-8k total just to be able to charge an EV. I could charge off the regular 120v but I'm told the winters here are cold enough that you will actually lose miles trying to charge on 120 as it doesn't have enough oomph to both keep the battery warm and charge it.

    So, fuck it. Guess I'll be sticking with ICE for the foreseeable future.

    AbsoluteZero on
    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    I was looking at EVs but it looks like I would be fucked on the 240v charging front. My regular electrician said I'd need to replace my breaker panel to have that added, so that's an extra 3-4k on top of just having a level 2 charger installed.. so 7-8k total just to be able to charge an EV. I could charge off the regular 120v but I'm told the winters here are cold enough that you will actually lose miles trying to charge on 120 as it doesn't have enough oomph to both keep the battery warm and charge it.

    So, fuck it. Guess I'll be sticking with ICE for the foreseeable future.

    this is nonsense
    charging and discharging the battery heats it up as a side effect
    I don't think any EVs even have battery heaters, the question is usually whether they active cooling or not.

    But yeah if your panel is maxed out then you're in for a bad time.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
  • JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    Yeah, in the summer when it's hot, charging on 120 slowed for us significantly due to having to run cooling for the batteries. The main thing for cold weather is RANGE drops, not charging.

    @That_Guy - check with your electrical company. Mine actually gave me a free lv2 charger, although I had to pay for the install. I thankfully had space on my breaker.

    A friend of mine had both volt and bolt at various times, and they were nice. We have a Kia Niro EV, and really like it a lot so far, but judging from sales stats they seem to not be making a lot of them for the states so they're hard to find.

  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    Aioua wrote: »
    I was looking at EVs but it looks like I would be fucked on the 240v charging front. My regular electrician said I'd need to replace my breaker panel to have that added, so that's an extra 3-4k on top of just having a level 2 charger installed.. so 7-8k total just to be able to charge an EV. I could charge off the regular 120v but I'm told the winters here are cold enough that you will actually lose miles trying to charge on 120 as it doesn't have enough oomph to both keep the battery warm and charge it.

    So, fuck it. Guess I'll be sticking with ICE for the foreseeable future.

    this is nonsense
    charging and discharging the battery heats it up as a side effect
    I don't think any EVs even have battery heaters, the question is usually whether they active cooling or not.

    But yeah if your panel is maxed out then you're in for a bad time.

    They have battery heaters, but they are only needed to keep the battery just above freezing when sitting in cold weather. And it only affects the start of a trip because as you mention, charging/discharging will heat the battery up too.

    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
  • Nova_CNova_C I have the need The need for speedRegistered User regular
    Aioua wrote: »
    I was looking at EVs but it looks like I would be fucked on the 240v charging front. My regular electrician said I'd need to replace my breaker panel to have that added, so that's an extra 3-4k on top of just having a level 2 charger installed.. so 7-8k total just to be able to charge an EV. I could charge off the regular 120v but I'm told the winters here are cold enough that you will actually lose miles trying to charge on 120 as it doesn't have enough oomph to both keep the battery warm and charge it.

    So, fuck it. Guess I'll be sticking with ICE for the foreseeable future.

    this is nonsense
    charging and discharging the battery heats it up as a side effect
    I don't think any EVs even have battery heaters, the question is usually whether they active cooling or not.

    But yeah if your panel is maxed out then you're in for a bad time.

    They better have heaters, or it would be foolish for any Canadian to buy an EV.

    Naphtali
  • mRahmanimRahmani DetroitRegistered User regular
    Volt/Bolt have battery heaters for cold weather use. Most EVs do, but the Leaf notably didn't, which impacted battery life significantly.

    chrishallett83
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    The amount of power the battery heater requires is miniscule compared to the power required for charging. While the vehicle is charing, it's producing heat so that's even less work that the internal heater has to do. The battery compartment is very well insulated and all the heater has to do is keep the cells from freezing. It's not like they have to keep them at a toasty 70f all the time.

    If EV sales in Sweden and Norway are any indication, EVs do better in cold climates because there are fewer moving parts to freeze and you can keep what parts can freeze warm via mains power instead of having to install aftermarket heaters.

    camo_sig.png
    Lind
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    Aioua wrote: »
    I was looking at EVs but it looks like I would be fucked on the 240v charging front. My regular electrician said I'd need to replace my breaker panel to have that added, so that's an extra 3-4k on top of just having a level 2 charger installed.. so 7-8k total just to be able to charge an EV. I could charge off the regular 120v but I'm told the winters here are cold enough that you will actually lose miles trying to charge on 120 as it doesn't have enough oomph to both keep the battery warm and charge it.

    So, fuck it. Guess I'll be sticking with ICE for the foreseeable future.

    this is nonsense
    charging and discharging the battery heats it up as a side effect
    I don't think any EVs even have battery heaters, the question is usually whether they active cooling or not.

    But yeah if your panel is maxed out then you're in for a bad time.

    I live in a part of the world where temperatures can stay below 0F for weeks, I could believe it would take a fair amount of juice just to keep the batteries above freezing. Which brings me to another concern. I don't drive all that much anyway so I wonder if I might end up spending more just keeping batteries warm/cool than I would spend on gas with my current car? I wonder if anyone has done some kind of analysis.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • CormacCormac Registered User regular
    Aioua wrote: »
    I was looking at EVs but it looks like I would be fucked on the 240v charging front. My regular electrician said I'd need to replace my breaker panel to have that added, so that's an extra 3-4k on top of just having a level 2 charger installed.. so 7-8k total just to be able to charge an EV. I could charge off the regular 120v but I'm told the winters here are cold enough that you will actually lose miles trying to charge on 120 as it doesn't have enough oomph to both keep the battery warm and charge it.

    So, fuck it. Guess I'll be sticking with ICE for the foreseeable future.

    this is nonsense
    charging and discharging the battery heats it up as a side effect
    I don't think any EVs even have battery heaters, the question is usually whether they active cooling or not.

    But yeah if your panel is maxed out then you're in for a bad time.

    I live in a part of the world where temperatures can stay below 0F for weeks, I could believe it would take a fair amount of juice just to keep the batteries above freezing. Which brings me to another concern. I don't drive all that much anyway so I wonder if I might end up spending more just keeping batteries warm/cool than I would spend on gas with my current car? I wonder if anyone has done some kind of analysis.

    Another thing to factor is if the Hybrid or EV version of a car is $3000-5000 more than the ICE version how long will you have to drive that car to make the increased cost worth it over the ICE version? How much higher will your monthly loan or lease costs be for the more expensive car?

    My Mom's 2012 Prius got totaled over the weekend after hitting a deer (she and her passenger are totally fine).The insurance adjuster quoted the damage as being more the 75% of the value of the car. She had four payments left on the car which really pisses her off. She'll likely get a Prius Prime but I'm going to try and have her look at other plug-in hybrids on the market if she's up for it so she can experience what her other options are. Her commute is short enough and there are EV charging stations where she works, but a full EV is not a good fit for her outside of work car use.

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  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Cormac wrote: »
    Aioua wrote: »
    I was looking at EVs but it looks like I would be fucked on the 240v charging front. My regular electrician said I'd need to replace my breaker panel to have that added, so that's an extra 3-4k on top of just having a level 2 charger installed.. so 7-8k total just to be able to charge an EV. I could charge off the regular 120v but I'm told the winters here are cold enough that you will actually lose miles trying to charge on 120 as it doesn't have enough oomph to both keep the battery warm and charge it.

    So, fuck it. Guess I'll be sticking with ICE for the foreseeable future.

    this is nonsense
    charging and discharging the battery heats it up as a side effect
    I don't think any EVs even have battery heaters, the question is usually whether they active cooling or not.

    But yeah if your panel is maxed out then you're in for a bad time.

    I live in a part of the world where temperatures can stay below 0F for weeks, I could believe it would take a fair amount of juice just to keep the batteries above freezing. Which brings me to another concern. I don't drive all that much anyway so I wonder if I might end up spending more just keeping batteries warm/cool than I would spend on gas with my current car? I wonder if anyone has done some kind of analysis.

    Another thing to factor is if the Hybrid or EV version of a car is $3000-5000 more than the ICE version how long will you have to drive that car to make the increased cost worth it over the ICE version? How much higher will your monthly loan or lease costs be for the more expensive car?

    My Mom's 2012 Prius got totaled over the weekend after hitting a deer (she and her passenger are totally fine).The insurance adjuster quoted the damage as being more the 75% of the value of the car. She had four payments left on the car which really pisses her off. She'll likely get a Prius Prime but I'm going to try and have her look at other plug-in hybrids on the market if she's up for it so she can experience what her other options are. Her commute is short enough and there are EV charging stations where she works, but a full EV is not a good fit for her outside of work car use.

    If nothing else the hybrid Corolla deserves a look while she's on a Toyota lot.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

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  • jimb213jimb213 Registered User regular
    Cormac wrote: »
    My Mom's 2012 Prius got totaled over the weekend after hitting a deer (she and her passenger are totally fine).The insurance adjuster quoted the damage as being more the 75% of the value of the car. She had four payments left on the car which really pisses her off. She'll likely get a Prius Prime but I'm going to try and have her look at other plug-in hybrids on the market if she's up for it so she can experience what her other options are. Her commute is short enough and there are EV charging stations where she works, but a full EV is not a good fit for her outside of work car use.
    That timing is a bummer! I think the Rav4 Prime plugin hybrid is going to be the bee's knees. It's supposed to release this summer. I'm probably going to get one to replace my truck. 39 miles of all-electric range will be plenty for my average daily driving (with a fast charger at home...), and then high-30's/low-40's mpg is still freaking great for a mid-sized crossover. It should still have enough storage space that I won't miss the bed on my Colorado (it was the short bed anyways), and getting double the mileage when I do actually use gas will definitely be nice.

  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    I test drove the Bolt today, after work. It's got a nice bit of pickup and go to it. It was raining so I had to go easy on it but I gunned it once and felt the traction control kick in because it was so slippery. I really like the color. It's quite nice and I gotta say, I like it. I had them run my credit and got some lease offers to mull over. After some pressing, they offered by $3500 for my trade. I think I can get them up to 4k. The monthly on the lease will be right around what the monthly was for my Fiesta's loan. I told them I wanted to test drive a Leaf (I'm not actually going to) and would make my decision by Friday when I get paid and when I expect my tax refund by.

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  • JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    https://www.thedrive.com/news/32142/electric-vehicles-outsold-cars-with-manual-transmissions-in-2019

    In the US, EVs were 1.6% of the car market (up from 1.5%), while manuals were 1.1% (down from 1.6%). So it's not particularly noteworthy because they're both EFFECTIVELY a miniscule portion of the market. I just hadn't realized how small the manual segment had gotten.

  • davidsdurionsdavidsdurions Your Trusty Meatshield Panhandle NebraskaRegistered User regular
    Yeah it’s basically impossible to find manual transmission vehicles for sale. If you want one that is offered you’ll have to order it. Pretty much all the high performance stuff has gone to auto double clutch flappy paddles.

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  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    All the time I spent stalling the truck in a parking lot was for naught

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  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    What kind of unicorn does it make me that I'm going for a manual to an EV?

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  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    An EV is kind of a manual... I mean there's only the one gear. But you shift into it!

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
  • KrieghundKrieghund Registered User regular
    When can I start claiming my manual as an anti theft device?

    JragghenJazzAbsoluteZeroBullheadL Ron HowardVishNubBlackDragon480TNTrooperTehSloth
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    VishNub wrote: »
    All the time I spent stalling the truck in a parking lot was for naught

    I learned how to drive a manual on a '48 Willys Jeep Pickup

    Which means I did not learn how to drive a manual.

    CommunistCow
  • JazzJazz Fuck cancer. Un-UKRegistered User regular
    edited February 11
    Jragghen wrote: »
    https://www.thedrive.com/news/32142/electric-vehicles-outsold-cars-with-manual-transmissions-in-2019

    In the US, EVs were 1.6% of the car market (up from 1.5%), while manuals were 1.1% (down from 1.6%). So it's not particularly noteworthy because they're both EFFECTIVELY a miniscule portion of the market. I just hadn't realized how small the manual segment had gotten.

    Blimey. The last time I looked (probably in the '00s) I think it was closer to 10%, maybe a little under. 1.1% is insane. (It used to be like 90% here... I bet that's changed now too.)

    My XF has flappy paddles (they never made a manual version even though it was introduced way back in 2008), although it's not double-clutch, but every time I actually use the paddles (instead of just driving it as a regular auto), I find myself missing the stick. With the paddles on the wheel, I can only really reliably shift manually without needing to think when the car's going in a mostly straight line. Junctions, roundabouts, that sort of thing? Muscle memory simply doesn't work when your shifting devices are twirling around up to or beyond 360° or 720°. (When paddles were introduced on F1 cars, of course, this was a non-issue when you'd only got like 270° or so lock-to-lock and your hands never came off the 9 and 3 position - not applicable to road cars.)

    I expect a car where the paddles are on the steering column instead would alleviate that problem, but they still seem to be the exception rather than the rule.

    My favourite thing about the paddles on my XF is using them as a finger rest, honestly. They're comfy for that.

    Jazz on
    davidsdurions
  • JazzJazz Fuck cancer. Un-UKRegistered User regular
    edited February 11
    VishNub wrote: »
    All the time I spent stalling the truck in a parking lot was for naught

    I learned how to drive a manual on a '48 Willys Jeep Pickup

    Which means I did not learn how to drive a manual.

    Heh. My first car was a Citroën 2CV. Manual, but the stick slid in and out of the dashboard.

    cy4fuyi7jwfh.jpg

    Mine was RHD but the movement was identical.

    Jazz on
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  • mRahmanimRahmani DetroitRegistered User regular
    1.1% manual take rate for the entire market, but if you look at enthusiast vehicles there's still a decent percentage of manuals. I know the C7 Corvette was around 20-30%, Miatas I think have the highest percentage of manuals.

  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Jazz wrote: »
    Jragghen wrote: »
    https://www.thedrive.com/news/32142/electric-vehicles-outsold-cars-with-manual-transmissions-in-2019

    In the US, EVs were 1.6% of the car market (up from 1.5%), while manuals were 1.1% (down from 1.6%). So it's not particularly noteworthy because they're both EFFECTIVELY a miniscule portion of the market. I just hadn't realized how small the manual segment had gotten.

    Blimey. The last time I looked (probably in the '00s) I think it was closer to 10%, maybe a little under. 1.1% is insane. (It used to be like 90% here... I bet that's changed now too.)

    My XF has flappy paddles (they never made a manual version even though it was introduced way back in 2008), although it's not double-clutch, but every time I actually use the paddles (instead of just driving it as a regular auto), I find myself missing the stick. With the paddles on the wheel, I can only really reliably shift manually without needing to think when the car's going in a mostly straight line. Junctions, roundabouts, that sort of thing? Muscle memory simply doesn't work when your shifting devices are twirling around up to or beyond 360° or 720°. (When paddles were introduced on F1 cars, of course, this was a non-issue when you'd only got like 270° or so lock-to-lock and your hands never came off the 9 and 3 position - not applicable to road cars.)

    I expect a car where the paddles are on the steering column instead would alleviate that problem, but they still seem to be the exception rather than the rule.

    My favourite thing about the paddles on my XF is using them as a finger rest, honestly. They're comfy for that.

    Racing car paddles are set up a bit differently. They're mounted on the column and don't rotate with the wheel to provide a consistent location no matter where one's hands are on the wheel. They also don't need to fight for space with things like turn signal or windshield wiper stalks on the column.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

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  • JazzJazz Fuck cancer. Un-UKRegistered User regular
    Jazz wrote: »
    Jragghen wrote: »
    https://www.thedrive.com/news/32142/electric-vehicles-outsold-cars-with-manual-transmissions-in-2019

    In the US, EVs were 1.6% of the car market (up from 1.5%), while manuals were 1.1% (down from 1.6%). So it's not particularly noteworthy because they're both EFFECTIVELY a miniscule portion of the market. I just hadn't realized how small the manual segment had gotten.

    Blimey. The last time I looked (probably in the '00s) I think it was closer to 10%, maybe a little under. 1.1% is insane. (It used to be like 90% here... I bet that's changed now too.)

    My XF has flappy paddles (they never made a manual version even though it was introduced way back in 2008), although it's not double-clutch, but every time I actually use the paddles (instead of just driving it as a regular auto), I find myself missing the stick. With the paddles on the wheel, I can only really reliably shift manually without needing to think when the car's going in a mostly straight line. Junctions, roundabouts, that sort of thing? Muscle memory simply doesn't work when your shifting devices are twirling around up to or beyond 360° or 720°. (When paddles were introduced on F1 cars, of course, this was a non-issue when you'd only got like 270° or so lock-to-lock and your hands never came off the 9 and 3 position - not applicable to road cars.)

    I expect a car where the paddles are on the steering column instead would alleviate that problem, but they still seem to be the exception rather than the rule.

    My favourite thing about the paddles on my XF is using them as a finger rest, honestly. They're comfy for that.

    Racing car paddles are set up a bit differently. They're mounted on the column and don't rotate with the wheel to provide a consistent location no matter where one's hands are on the wheel. They also don't need to fight for space with things like turn signal or windshield wiper stalks on the column.

    I was thinking F1 and other single-seaters, where they are on the wheel because the cabin is so cramped there's literally nowhere else to put them (clutches and suchlike are on other paddles, it's not unusual to see six paddles on a modern one). But yeah, in sportscars and touring cars and the like, that obviously makes more sense if they're not just using a sequential stick or something.

    When I see them on the column of something like an Aston Martin, I can't help but think that's got to be much more useable when in the twisty bits.

  • redxredx I(x)=2(x)+1 whole numbersRegistered User regular
    Jazz wrote: »
    Jazz wrote: »
    Jragghen wrote: »
    https://www.thedrive.com/news/32142/electric-vehicles-outsold-cars-with-manual-transmissions-in-2019

    In the US, EVs were 1.6% of the car market (up from 1.5%), while manuals were 1.1% (down from 1.6%). So it's not particularly noteworthy because they're both EFFECTIVELY a miniscule portion of the market. I just hadn't realized how small the manual segment had gotten.

    Blimey. The last time I looked (probably in the '00s) I think it was closer to 10%, maybe a little under. 1.1% is insane. (It used to be like 90% here... I bet that's changed now too.)

    My XF has flappy paddles (they never made a manual version even though it was introduced way back in 2008), although it's not double-clutch, but every time I actually use the paddles (instead of just driving it as a regular auto), I find myself missing the stick. With the paddles on the wheel, I can only really reliably shift manually without needing to think when the car's going in a mostly straight line. Junctions, roundabouts, that sort of thing? Muscle memory simply doesn't work when your shifting devices are twirling around up to or beyond 360° or 720°. (When paddles were introduced on F1 cars, of course, this was a non-issue when you'd only got like 270° or so lock-to-lock and your hands never came off the 9 and 3 position - not applicable to road cars.)

    I expect a car where the paddles are on the steering column instead would alleviate that problem, but they still seem to be the exception rather than the rule.

    My favourite thing about the paddles on my XF is using them as a finger rest, honestly. They're comfy for that.

    Racing car paddles are set up a bit differently. They're mounted on the column and don't rotate with the wheel to provide a consistent location no matter where one's hands are on the wheel. They also don't need to fight for space with things like turn signal or windshield wiper stalks on the column.

    I was thinking F1 and other single-seaters, where they are on the wheel because the cabin is so cramped there's literally nowhere else to put them (clutches and suchlike are on other paddles, it's not unusual to see six paddles on a modern one). But yeah, in sportscars and touring cars and the like, that obviously makes more sense if they're not just using a sequential stick or something.

    When I see them on the column of something like an Aston Martin, I can't help but think that's got to be much more useable when in the twisty bits.

    I feel like I've seen a thing where instead of paddles, the sequential shift control is a ring that sits inside the steering wheel and you push it in or out to shift. That seems like it would be fairly effective when turning, but I have been unable to get a string of words together which will cause google to return an image of one.

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  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    edited February 11
    That_Guy wrote: »
    I test drove the Bolt today, after work. It's got a nice bit of pickup and go to it. It was raining so I had to go easy on it but I gunned it once and felt the traction control kick in because it was so slippery. I really like the color. It's quite nice and I gotta say, I like it. I had them run my credit and got some lease offers to mull over. After some pressing, they offered by $3500 for my trade. I think I can get them up to 4k. The monthly on the lease will be right around what the monthly was for my Fiesta's loan. I told them I wanted to test drive a Leaf (I'm not actually going to) and would make my decision by Friday when I get paid and when I expect my tax refund by.

    When I drove my FiL's Bolt I gunned it in whatever the sport mode was and it just squatted in the rear SO MUCH. The rear springs must be squishy beyond all belief because I've never had a modern car transfer weight backwards that much. I'm guessing you didn't get to experience that in the rain?
    Jazz wrote: »

    Heh. My first car was a Citroën 2CV. Manual, but the stick slid in and out of the dashboard.
    cy4fuyi7jwfh.jpg

    Mine was RHD but the movement was identical.

    My god what the hell is this? I'm sure I could get used to that, but that is just so weird.

    CommunistCow on
    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
    Jazz
  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited February 11
    My god what the hell is this?

    French

    japan on
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  • Atlas in ChainsAtlas in Chains Registered User regular
    I have a detached garage with shared electricity at my condo. I'm emailing back and forth with my association, trying to figure out what I can do to get ev charging in there. Anybody else go through this?

    I'm looking at the Hyundai Kona, if I can sort things out. I like the Bolt, too, but I'm afraid I'm too large for it.

  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    I have a detached garage with shared electricity at my condo. I'm emailing back and forth with my association, trying to figure out what I can do to get ev charging in there. Anybody else go through this?

    I'm looking at the Hyundai Kona, if I can sort things out. I like the Bolt, too, but I'm afraid I'm too large for it.

    Technically Connections did a video on this very topic a while back.

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  • JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    Hyundai Kona and Kia Niro are basically the same car, but the former has a little more range and the latter has a little more legroom. We went with the latter because we sometime drive co-workers for lunch. Colors are nicer on the Kona though.

    That was the 2019 versions, not sure about 2020.

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited February 12
    Speaking of manuals, dad parked his truck on a slight slope last night to go to a meeting and thinks he must've bumped it out of gear, because when he came back out it had rolled itself into a ditch. Got a wrecker to pull him out and when it did, his front tires were pointing two different directions. Tie rod got hung up on a stump hidden in some grass.

    Oops.

    xnWuKmW.jpg

    For some reason Auto Zone had a driver's side for a 1985 F-150 in stock for only $30. And the engine leaks so much oil, there was no chance anything would be rusted in place so the old one came off without a hassle.

    matt has a problem on
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  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    I've been doing a lot of research on Bolt leases and think I've started to get my head around how this all works. I registered on the Edmonds forums and got some basic rates on leases. They had a thread just for 2020 Bolt lease deals. Some folks had posted the deals they got. I took the lease sheet they gave me at the dealership and started making modifications. I'm going to bring in my stack of research and numbers when I go back to the dealership on Friday. With any luck we'll be able to come to some sort of agreement and I'll be driving home with a brand new Bolt EV.

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  • Nova_CNova_C I have the need The need for speedRegistered User regular
    edited February 13
    Jazz wrote: »
    Jragghen wrote: »
    https://www.thedrive.com/news/32142/electric-vehicles-outsold-cars-with-manual-transmissions-in-2019

    In the US, EVs were 1.6% of the car market (up from 1.5%), while manuals were 1.1% (down from 1.6%). So it's not particularly noteworthy because they're both EFFECTIVELY a miniscule portion of the market. I just hadn't realized how small the manual segment had gotten.

    Blimey. The last time I looked (probably in the '00s) I think it was closer to 10%, maybe a little under. 1.1% is insane. (It used to be like 90% here... I bet that's changed now too.)

    My XF has flappy paddles (they never made a manual version even though it was introduced way back in 2008), although it's not double-clutch, but every time I actually use the paddles (instead of just driving it as a regular auto), I find myself missing the stick. With the paddles on the wheel, I can only really reliably shift manually without needing to think when the car's going in a mostly straight line. Junctions, roundabouts, that sort of thing? Muscle memory simply doesn't work when your shifting devices are twirling around up to or beyond 360° or 720°. (When paddles were introduced on F1 cars, of course, this was a non-issue when you'd only got like 270° or so lock-to-lock and your hands never came off the 9 and 3 position - not applicable to road cars.)

    I expect a car where the paddles are on the steering column instead would alleviate that problem, but they still seem to be the exception rather than the rule.

    My favourite thing about the paddles on my XF is using them as a finger rest, honestly. They're comfy for that.

    I would have chosen a manual in the Q60 if it was an option, but out of all the cars I was looking at (AWD luxury sport coupes, super short list), I think the only one that offered a manual was the Audi.

    Anyway, I've found the flappy paddles are incredible fun on the highway, but for driving around town, not so much.

    I did learn that for turning, don't use the paddles. Use the console lever as a kind of sequential shifter. When I go from 2nd the 3rd in a corner, I'll just reach down and click the lever to gear up instead of contorting my hand to get the paddle. It also means I'm not accidentally dropping to first. >.> No, that never happened. <.<

    Considering how stiff clutches on sport transmissions are, generally I'm okay with the auto and the paddles for a car that I also go get groceries in. I don't live in a big city where traffic is much of a concern, but as I get older, my knees are less and less awesome, and the constant clutch work in traffic on the Impreza was fine, but I remember test driving a WRX and that clutch was just a hundred times more work.

    But when I'm on the highway, and I get stuck behind a slow column and I drop down to 3rd or 4th (7 speed transmission) and click up the gears while hauling ass past a half dozen cars, it is just absolutely wonderful.

    Nova_C on
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    That_Guy wrote: »
    I've been doing a lot of research on Bolt leases and think I've started to get my head around how this all works. I registered on the Edmonds forums and got some basic rates on leases. They had a thread just for 2020 Bolt lease deals. Some folks had posted the deals they got. I took the lease sheet they gave me at the dealership and started making modifications. I'm going to bring in my stack of research and numbers when I go back to the dealership on Friday. With any luck we'll be able to come to some sort of agreement and I'll be driving home with a brand new Bolt EV.

    please let me know how this goes for you since I'm probably going to be doing the same thing in a couple of weeks

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  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    Aioua wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    I've been doing a lot of research on Bolt leases and think I've started to get my head around how this all works. I registered on the Edmonds forums and got some basic rates on leases. They had a thread just for 2020 Bolt lease deals. Some folks had posted the deals they got. I took the lease sheet they gave me at the dealership and started making modifications. I'm going to bring in my stack of research and numbers when I go back to the dealership on Friday. With any luck we'll be able to come to some sort of agreement and I'll be driving home with a brand new Bolt EV.

    please let me know how this goes for you since I'm probably going to be doing the same thing in a couple of weeks

    Sure thing. I'll share everything once I've made a deal. I've been collecting all of my research in a folder. I've got a spreadsheet and a bunch of stuff I found online. Some things I've found so far.

    Value your trade: https://www.nadaguides.com/
    Edmonds forum to get lease info: https://forums.edmunds.com/discussion/59813/chevrolet/bolt-ev/2020-chevrolet-bolt-ev-lease-deals-and-prices#latest
    Lease Calculator: https://www.edmunds.com/calculators/car-lease.html

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  • JazzJazz Fuck cancer. Un-UKRegistered User regular
    The XF is set for another year, having passed its MOT (inspection). The only issue of note was a cut in a front tyre that I hadn't noticed - the tyre had been holding pressure too. Glad that was caught. And wonder if it was deliberate on some toe-rag's part...

    Yet the water-in-fuel warning is still coming on (this after running two lots of dry fuel treatment through it), and for some reason my regular garage seems reluctant to swap out the sensor even though that is a known fault with these cars. (The car is otherwise running absolutely fine, no other symptoms of water in the fuel. No misfire, no loss of power, etc.) I haven't got my hands dirty with the mechanics of a car in any way in a long, long time, and never on this one, so the idea of doing it myself is a daunting one. At least it's easy to get to - the fuel filter is easily accessible at the top of the engine bay, and is held on by a clamp using a single Torx screw. Watching on Youtube, it should be a simple case of take the hoses off the filter, unclamp the filter, take it out, unplug the sensor, put the filter over something to catch all the diesel from it when I unscrew the sensor, swap the sensor out, plug the sensor in, put the filter back in place, put the hoses back on in the right places and prime the fuel pump three or four times before starting the car. But in my experience it never quite works out that simple... I'll try to fix your computer, sure, but I was never great at doing anything that involved with a car on my own...

    Maybe I can rope in a mate to give me a hand (although the only guy I know I can ask is about 15 miles away). Once this weekend's supposedly shitty weather has passed, anyway... and once I've got hold of a replacement sensor!

  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    At the dealership waiting for them to run the numbers so they can lock me in a room with the manager and try to get my money. I think I'm probably going to walk and give them the weekend to make me a better offer..

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