The Official Bug Identification Thread Starring Arch, Bugboy, and Fiendishrabbit

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  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    A friend is looking for help identifying a spider. Picture was taken in Indiana, as far as I know.

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    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKER!
  • Bliss 101Bliss 101 Registered User regular
    I'm more concerned about the two alien cocoons on the right side of the pic.

    MSL59.jpg
    H3KnucklesElvenshae38thDoedavidsdurions
  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    Bliss 101 wrote: »
    I'm more concerned about the two alien cocoons on the right side of the pic.
    Don't worry, the spider's got us covered. If not her, then that bag of spider eggs will surely protect us.

    Spider wise, from the color, leg shape and web design I really want to say it's some kind of black widow, but the abdomen shape is different from the ones that I've seen around here (Colorado).

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    edited June 5
    see317 wrote: »
    Bliss 101 wrote: »
    I'm more concerned about the two alien cocoons on the right side of the pic.
    Don't worry, the spider's got us covered. If not her, then that bag of spider eggs will surely protect us.

    Spider wise, from the color, leg shape and web design I really want to say it's some kind of black widow, but the abdomen shape is different from the ones that I've seen around here (Colorado).

    Genuine Widows (lactrodectus) have a somewhat different leg anatomy (with its front and rear pair being longer and spikier than this) and they tend to be more glistening and reflective. There is just something about the lactrodectus genus, something in their stance, how they hold their legs, and shape and reflectiveness. Something that makes them instantly stand out, no matter image quality.

    My guess is that it's a Rabbit Hutch spider, Steatoda bipunctata, (a species belonging to the false widow spiders family). It fits the general shape and the look of its web and egg-nest.
    bipunctata15.jpg

    But honestly it could be a cobweb spider, the image quality isn't great.

    Regardless, it's not a dangerous spider (unless you happen to be an insect).

    Fiendishrabbit on
    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
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  • DecomposeyDecomposey Registered User regular
    edited June 8
    Bliss 101 wrote: »
    I'm more concerned about the two alien cocoons on the right side of the pic.

    I am not an insect expert, but I DID used to live in the Pacific Northwest.

    So I can identify those with no hesitation as slugs.

    Specifically, leopard slugs.

    Limax_maximus_5.jpg

    Decomposey on
    Before following any advice, opinions, or thoughts I may have expressed in the above post, be warned: I found Keven Costners "Waterworld" to be a very entertaining film.
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  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Weird. From their texture I assumed they were the chrysalis of some sort of butterfly.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
  • mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    I cam across a giant leopard slug once. Thing was like 8 in long.

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    FryElvenshae
  • CauldCauld Registered User regular
    Any idea what this is? I found it in my apt in NYC. It's about 2-3 mm long. Mainly concerned about bed bugs. It doesn't look like the pictures online, but I'm clearly no expert. We were recently in some wooded areas of long island, so could it be a tick?

    kgqttus9mx7d.jpg

  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    I'm not one of the thread experts, but that is almost definitely a tick.
    A fat, well fed tick.

    Check yourself and anyone else who was with you for additional ticks.

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
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  • CauldCauld Registered User regular
    OK, cool. I squeezed it and it popped out some blood, so yeah that makes sense.. We'll do some checks and another round of showers. Thanks!

  • DecomposeyDecomposey Registered User regular
    Showers may not help, ticks latch on TIGHT. You'll have to do real careful checks to make sure you find the little bastards.

    Before following any advice, opinions, or thoughts I may have expressed in the above post, be warned: I found Keven Costners "Waterworld" to be a very entertaining film.
    see31738thDoeH3KnucklesElvenshaeCauldJedocRingochromdomMoridin889DisruptedCapitalist
  • Bliss 101Bliss 101 Registered User regular
    Definitely a tick, but not a well fed one. When they're well fed, you can barely even see their legs.

    If you have any pets other than fish, better check them very thoroughly.

    MSL59.jpg
    H3Knuckles
  • 38thDoe38thDoe lets never be stupid again wait lets always be stupid foreverRegistered User regular
    Also squeezing them is bad if I remember correctly because it can make them vomit blood into you increasing your chance of infection.

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  • FryFry Registered User regular
    Consider putting that tick in a jar and taking it to a doctor, to check for Lyme disease?

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  • 38thDoe38thDoe lets never be stupid again wait lets always be stupid foreverRegistered User regular
    Or even in a plastic bag. I found one in myself that had been there for a day and its only one pill once to make sure you don't get lime disease.

    ElvenshaeJaysonFour
  • CauldCauld Registered User regular
    Thanks all. it was in a plastic bag when i took the picture and when I squished it. No pets in our family and I've checked over the me and the kids pretty closely so I think we're OK. I'll consult a dr about lyme disease, since i'm pretty sure it bit me.

  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Cauld wrote: »
    Thanks all. it was in a plastic bag when i took the picture and when I squished it. No pets in our family and I've checked over the me and the kids pretty closely so I think we're OK. I'll consult a dr about lyme disease, since i'm pretty sure it bit me.

    They'll probably give you the short course of doxycycline.

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  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    Deer ticks are the main carriers of Lyme disease, IIRC. I grew up in PA, we always had to watch out for them pretty much whenever we walked on grass.

    They are less than 1/4" long though, and the larvae (which also bite) are around 1/16" and if you were bitten you'll want to look out for a bullseye around where the bite may have been, but they are so very tiny and if you aren't looking for them specifically they can be nearly impossible to catch.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
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  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited June 19
    Last night I sat down with my husband and watched a bunch of zefrank videos, and since quite a few are about bugs and I learned about them here I'm ready to declare them all officially on topic. I knew a little about the ogre-faced spiders, but the leaf hoppers etc. are awesome, and hilarious apparently.

    The other day my kids found a spider on the window and asked what it was, and I said "Oh hey, that's a jumping spider. They hunt by jumping really fast at the thing they want to kill. They're adorable." My son went D:

    I fail really hard at the "killing many-legged things and being a hero" parenting requirement.

    ceres on
    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
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  • RingoRingo HE KEEPS REPEATING THE LINE I'M GONNA CRY BLEASE LET HIM LIVE YOU MADE ME WATCH SO MUCH KISSING IN THIS FILM LET INIGO LIVERegistered User regular
    Show him the Giant Jumping Spiders versus Dirt bike Teens scene from Eught Legged Freaks for a real educational moment!

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
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  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    edited June 19
    ceres wrote: »
    Last night I sat down with my husband and watched a bunch of zefrank videos, and since quite a few are about bugs and I learned about them here I'm ready to declare them all officially on topic. I knew a little about the ogre-faced spiders, but the leaf hoppers etc. are awesome, and hilarious apparently.

    The other day my kids found a spider on the window and asked what it was, and I said "Oh hey, that's a jumping spider. They hunt by jumping really fast at the thing they want to kill. They're adorable." My son went D:

    I fail really hard at the "killing many-legged things and being a hero" parenting requirement.

    The "But if I kill it, think of all the gross bugs it won't eat" premise is gaining traction with my kids.

    It helps to have a reliable supply of mosquitos and big gross cockroaches to demonize, so it may not be as effective in more arid climates.

    ArbitraryDescriptor on
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  • JedocJedoc Once to start a new life and once just to start a fireRegistered User regular
    No, it works in the desert as well. Nobody thinks bad thoughts about a jumping spider when they see it eating a stupid miller bug in the middle of the summer.

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  • FryFry Registered User regular
    Need that comic of the spider saying "I protect you while you sleep"

    House centipedes are another one. Scary looking with the eleven billion legs, but they will never bother you ever, and they're basically roombas with regards to cleaning up other bugs

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  • DisruptedCapitalistDisruptedCapitalist rugged, weathered Registered User regular
    edited June 19
    I should warn you that might backfire. After 12 years of teaching her to cherish bugs, my eldest daughter has become such a huge fan of arthropods that she is absolutely horrified anytime I want to eat shrimp.

    DisruptedCapitalist on
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  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Cauld wrote: »
    Thanks all. it was in a plastic bag when i took the picture and when I squished it. No pets in our family and I've checked over the me and the kids pretty closely so I think we're OK. I'll consult a dr about lyme disease, since i'm pretty sure it bit me.

    @Cauld make sure to check head/hair too, ticks sometimes like to sneak on up and hide in your hair

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
    CauldElvenshaeJaysonFourDisruptedCapitalist
  • Inquisitor77Inquisitor77 2 x Penny Arcade Fight Club Champion A fixed point in space and timeRegistered User regular
    I should warn you that might backfire. After 12 years of teaching her to cherish bugs, my eldest daughter has become such a huge fan of arthropods that she is absolutely horrified anytime I want to eat shrimp.

    Sea bugs are so tasty though...

    DisruptedCapitalistElvenshaechromdom38thDoe
  • H3KnucklesH3Knuckles Jack of all interests... ...master of noneRegistered User regular
    There's places in South America where they catch and eat large spiders, and I've heard they taste pretty similar to crab and lobster.

    Whereas most descriptions I've seen for edible insects describe them as 'nutty'.

    If you're curious about my icon; it's an update of the early Lego Castle theme's "Black Falcons" faction.
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  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    We've got a pretty strict no pork/shellfish rule around here, so we should be safe.

    I've mostly managed to keep a lid on the fear of spiders, the biggest problem we seem to have with him is that he's terrified of houseflies. He's less afraid of bees.

    We live in the desert, so we're hitting the time of year now when it's too hot for flies, and I always hope we can be done with this by next spring or fall, whichever comes next.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • EnigmedicEnigmedic Registered User regular
    edited June 22
    Hello
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    uoatinduldqb.jpeg

    Sorry for the potato quality, my iphone is OLD. Its about an inch to an inch and a half long. We first thought it was a cockroach but it isnt really fast and doesnt run away at turning on the light, and the ones around here are usually brown and half the size. Then we thought it was a cricket or something but they dont make noise. We usually only see these in the summer and we’re in Oklahoma. So we’re asking here to figure out wtf these things are.

    Enigmedic on
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  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    My spontaneous reaction is "Oriental cockroach".

    They're bigger, slower and less lightsensitive than the smaller (and more common) german cockroaches.
    Oriental cockroach image
    orntlckroch-1f-1.jpg

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    ArbitraryDescriptorJedocRingo
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    edited June 22
    For "Brown and half the size" see the adults on the right, or the juveniles:
    styuxovk5wfj.jpg

    German cockroaches have those two distinct stripes running down their thorax, and the young American/Oriental can be brownish, and are half that size at some point in their life.

    Alternatively:

    I occasionally see something that looks like an American cockroach, black head, much browner body 3/4 the length (same width). Could be one of those, but I've never bothered to ID them because I've never seen them inside.

    (Edit: Actually it looks a lot like the smokey brown, just much lighter in color. The type I'm thinking of could be some variant)

    ArbitraryDescriptor on
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    That one on the right looks a lot like a milkweed bug.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    *shudders*

    I hate roaches so much

  • EnigmedicEnigmedic Registered User regular
    VishNub wrote: »
    *shudders*

    I hate roaches so much

    me too. i never even saw one growing up in maine, then i got stationed in georgia in the army and saw gigantic ones and was like wtf?! now that ive been to a few places in the south it just seems like you cant get away from them where it is warm.

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  • FryFry Registered User regular
    Bleh. Woke up this morning to find a tick attached to my knee. I was only outside yesterday for 5-10 minutes, there isn't any long grass, and I was wearing long pants. :(

    Roommate gave it a gentle tug with tweezers and it seemed to release intact. Wiped down the area with some rubbing alcohol. Hopefully I don't get whatever awful tick-borne illness is going around.

  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    You need to tuck your pants into your socks for full protection. Sometimes they're in long grass, sometimes they hang off things, and I would swear sometimes they just materialize out of thin air depending upon where you are in the country.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    AuralynxMoridin889
  • Blameless ClericBlameless Cleric An angel made of sapphires each more flawlessly cut than the last Registered User regular
    What kind of mite is this!! My housemate brought home some kale and it’s covered in these guys lol. They seem to periodically die and then just rain little bug corpses onto my microwave. We’re not especially bothered by them but I thought they might interest some

    8ethy4j99l70.jpeg

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  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    edited June 25
    Are you sure they're not Cabbage aphids?

    Because I can't see anything but a big grey blob on the image.

    P.S: This is a cabbage aphid.
    Brevicoryne_brassicae01.jpg

    Fiendishrabbit on
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    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
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  • Blameless ClericBlameless Cleric An angel made of sapphires each more flawlessly cut than the last Registered User regular
    Oh that looks about right! Sorry that’s the best my camera can do they’re so tiny

    066bxkzgbreu.jpeg

    Orphane wrote: »

    one flower ring to rule them all and in the sunlightness bind them

    I'd love it if you took a look at my art and my PATREON!
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Yeah. Those look like mealy cabbag aphids.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    RingoBlameless Cleric
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