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The Official Bug Identification Thread Starring Arch, Bugboy, and Fiendishrabbit

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Posts

  • Blameless ClericBlameless Cleric An angel made of sapphires each more flawlessly cut than the last Registered User regular
    4wBwVTVl.jpg

    l5xVscwl.jpg

    Hey @arch what are these cool grubs I found living in a stump that I was breaking up in my yard (Western mass)

    Orphane wrote: »

    one flower ring to rule them all and in the sunlightness bind them

    I'd love it if you took a look at my art and my PATREON!
    Kristmas Kthulhu
  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    Hmmm. Grubs are v hard. The one on the bottom looks like a meal-worm type grub, which probably puts it in the beetle family Tenebrionidae. The one on top looks familiar but I can't place it. Im fairly certain they are both beetle larvae, though, especially if you found them in wood.

  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    Also, worth noting that I think the first "grub" is actually either a beetle pupa or a larvae that is in the process of metamorphosis into a pupae.

  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    OH, duh. In wood.

    That first picture is probably a slightly deformed Cerambycid (long horn beetle, noted wood dwelling beetle) pupa!

    Blameless ClericElvenshaeXaquinShadowfireForarDedwrekka
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    I decided to plant a palm seed today because I enjoy watching paint dry, and I used some potting soil I've had around since sometime in the early spring. The soil was stored in the bag it came in which I'd folded closed, and it was even still a little moist. I filled the pot and started some water dripping into it to re-wet it, and I noticed tiny, tiny bugs crawling around in part of it. They were really, really tiny, maybe .5mm... maybe. They were gray, a little silvery, maybe even beige-ish; it was hard to tell because they were so small. They didn't look like fliers and I didn't see any fly, although again it was hard to tell. They shortly disappeared, probably back into the soil to get away from the light. I did make sure to check the bag for holes before I used it (in case something had an obvious nest in there), and didn't find any.

    My question is, how likely are these things to eat my seed/plant, and should I replant it in new soil? Or can I leave it alone and not worry too much about it?

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • WiseManTobesWiseManTobes Registered User regular
    Is that second one really zoomed in? that blue is crazy pretty, but how big is that sucker?

    Steam! Battlenet:Wisemantobes#1508
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    Dammit they might be thrips. Though I haven't seen one that looks tons like the things in my potting soil.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    edited June 2018
    I....if theres a picture it's not loading for me but if they are very small and blue or grey they are probably Collembola, family Poduridae

    Also known as springtails, they might do some damage to rootstocks but I don't think they are a big deal.

    Edit: I don't actually know if Collembola are garden pests or not, nor do I know how to get rid of them. Until now, my only interaction with Collembola has been to look at them and go "awwwww"

    Arch on
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    Arch wrote: »
    I....if theres a picture it's not loading for me but if they are very small and blue or grey they are probably Collembola, family Poduridae

    Also known as springtails, they might do some damage to rootstocks but I don't think they are a big deal.

    Edit: I don't actually know if Collembola are garden pests or not, nor do I know how to get rid of them. Until now, my only interaction with Collembola has been to look at them and go "awwwww"

    Objection, hearsay.

    Just because you're a credentialed and respected bug expert doesn't mean you can claim a bug is cute and not present any evidence.

    This is an implicit argument from authority and I w-

    Sminthurus+viridis?format=720w
    ..Withdrawn.

    Drake ChambersArchElvenshaeceresFiendishrabbitShadowfireBouwsTKristmas KthulhuMoridin889Blameless ClericSkeithIncenjucarDedwrekkavalhalla130
  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    That's a Sminthurid, one of the cutest "bugs" (since Collembola aren't considered insects any longer)

  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    z0ytfnydfu6d.jpg
    Can anyone tell me what laid these alien eggs on my basil?

    I'm in texas, and this is a small basil leaf from the plant I have on my 3rd floor balcony.

    knitdanCambiata
  • Drake ChambersDrake Chambers Lay out my formal shorts. Registered User regular
    edited June 2018
    Iruka wrote: »
    Can anyone tell me what laid these alien eggs on my basil?

    I'm in texas, and this is a small basil leaf from the plant I have on my 3rd floor balcony.

    No idea but just wanted to say that's a beautiful photo.

    Drake Chambers on
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  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    I'm not good enough to get them to genus, species, or even family level, but those look like the eggs of some True Bug (so, a Hemipteran).

    It's probably a pest insect, ultimately, so a little mechanical removal or soap and water can help you out here.

  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod

    I don't know but this site is amazing. I'll try to get a picture today.
    Iruka wrote: »
    z0ytfnydfu6d.jpg
    Can anyone tell me what laid these alien eggs on my basil?

    I'm in texas, and this is a small basil leaf from the plant I have on my 3rd floor balcony.

    The internet tells me maybe stinkbugs?

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    Arch wrote: »
    I'm not good enough to get them to genus, species, or even family level, but those look like the eggs of some True Bug (so, a Hemipteran).

    It's probably a pest insect, ultimately, so a little mechanical removal or soap and water can help you out here.

    clearly you need to isolate the eggs and see what hatches..

    for SCIENCE!

    camo_sig.png
    XaquinE.CoyoteSo It GoesElvenshaeArchDonnictonFryMoridin889Skeith
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    I got a video because pictures proved impossible. I think some of the clearest footage is around the 1 minute mark. My phone camera doesn't like trying to focus on soil in the wind.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    Honestly, Ceres, I'm not thinking those are thrips, if that's what you're worried about. I'm pretty sure those are some kind of Collembola species, maybe in the family Entomobryidae.

    Here's a test- Do you see anything that looks like wings? If not, do they jump away when you move a pen near them?

    If the answer to the first one is "no" and the second one is "yes", then they are Collembolans!

  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    I can't tell if they have wings, they're so tiny. And they're really fast when they want to get away, but I can't see exactly how they do it. They may well jump. Do Collembolans never have wings?

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • MadicanMadican No face Registered User regular
    Now that summer is here so are these tiny little bugs from last year I can't quite identify. They're small, about the size of a grain of rice, dark color, and they can fly but don't often. They dive into my bug zapper with regularity but otherwise prefer to stay put and crawl around somewhere. That somewhere is occasionally me, but they don't bite. I'll try to get a picture later.

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    PSN: AuthorFrost
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  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    I think I'm going to ditch the soil and move the seed, since they're so long to germinate anyway. Whatever they are, I don't really want them near my plants just in case.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • DisruptedCapitalistDisruptedCapitalist rugged, weathered Registered User regular
    edited July 2018
    Found this on my car.

    qsy5z3bynqq1.jpg
    6miis67fn5n7.jpg

    Particularly weird because it carried its abdomen curled high up.

    DisruptedCapitalist on
  • BugBoyBugBoy boy.EXE has stopped functioning. only bugs remainRegistered User regular
    That’s a baby leaf-footed bug!

    The thread has now come full circle.

    You see lots of things, out there in the swamp at night. Some of them might even be real. But the Bugboy? That's just plain impossible.
    ArchdavidsdurionsceresHahnsoo1ArbitraryDescriptorDisruptedCapitalistElvenshaeXaquinTOGSolidSkeithKristmas KthulhuShadowfireForarH3KnucklesAegisDedwrekka
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    The circle... of life.

    A bug's life.

    Okay I'm done, I'll let it go.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    DisruptedCapitalistElvenshaeXaquinShadowfireLovelyH3Knuckles
  • chromdomchromdom Why do bad things keep happening to me? Oh yeah, because of the things I've done.Registered User regular
    edited July 2018
    Ok, got one for you guys.
    Very small, too small to get a good picture or to count legs. I'd guess about 3mm long; 1mm head, 2mm thorax?
    Dark in color, probably black but maybe dark brown.
    Found in the baking cupboard of my friend in Portland, OR. We're thinking some kind of weevil or beetle, but insectidentification.org did not yeild results. Ideas?

    chromdom on
    Mr. Rogers wrote:
    You've made this day a special day, by just your being you. There's no person in the whole world like you; and I like you just the way you are.
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    I can't remember the scientific name, but it's commonly known as "time to throw away all your food, set your kitchen on fire, and start over".

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    XaquinElvenshaeVishNubHahnsoo1tyrannusDonnictonFiendishrabbitLovelyTNTrooper
  • BouwsTBouwsT Wanna come to a super soft birthday party? Registered User regular
    ceres wrote: »
    I can't remember the scientific name, but it's commonly known as "time to throw away all your food, set your kitchen on fire, and start over".

    What a catchy colloquial name for them...

    I shall be telling this with a sigh
    Somewhere ages and ages hence:
    Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.
  • chromdomchromdom Why do bad things keep happening to me? Oh yeah, because of the things I've done.Registered User regular
    :+1:

    Mr. Rogers wrote:
    You've made this day a special day, by just your being you. There's no person in the whole world like you; and I like you just the way you are.
  • El MuchoEl Mucho Registered User regular
    I don't have any pictures more a question. Asian lady beetles were a bit of an issue in my area last year and I've seen a lot again this year, my question is are they a threat to Elm trees?

    We have a large elm tree in our back yard and I see a lot of the nymphs(larva?) hanging out on the leaves of the elm. I keep a close eye on this tree because I have a constant worry that it will develop Dutch elm disease. If these asian lady beetles will stress the tree I'd like to try and do something about them.

    http://www.minionsofmordak.com/ - My friend designed and illustrated a board game check it out! -

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  • BugBoyBugBoy boy.EXE has stopped functioning. only bugs remainRegistered User regular
    Ladybugs and their larvae are predators, so they shouldn’t be a problem for your tree. If anything, they’ll be eating problems.

    You see lots of things, out there in the swamp at night. Some of them might even be real. But the Bugboy? That's just plain impossible.
    FryceresDonnictonEl MuchoRingoFiendishrabbitJaysonFourSkeithTOGSolidArch
  • DecomposeyDecomposey Registered User regular
    Yeah, lady-beetles are considered pests because they like to spend the winter in peoples houses. Because houses are warm and cosey, who wouldn't want to spend the winter there instead of outside?

    But they are definitely a bug that it's good to see on plants, because they are going to kill any eat any insect that would hurt the plant.

    Before following any advice, opinions, or thoughts I may have expressed in the above post, be warned: I found Keven Costners "Waterworld" to be a very entertaining film.
    Elvenshae
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    I think only some are predators, and the rest eat everything. Including other ladybugs. And plants. And fungus. It probably depends on what species you've got and what plant you're protecting, I think some do eat wood.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • RingoRingo Out of things to say Heartbreak HillRegistered User regular
    So apparently my house has earwigs. Besides the fact that they creep my roommates out, is this a problem? And is there a good way of getting them to leave?

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
  • RingoRingo Out of things to say Heartbreak HillRegistered User regular
    Oh, here are the pictures:

    Ny0i3Wj.jpg

    a55Nufx.jpg

    Someone on imgur immediately identified it though

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    ceres wrote: »
    I think only some are predators, and the rest eat everything. Including other ladybugs. And plants. And fungus. It probably depends on what species you've got and what plant you're protecting, I think some do eat wood.

    All ladybugs are predators, primarily on aphids. Occasionally they eat fungus and nectar, but insect meat is their food of choice. Especially insects that eat plantsap.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    Elvenshae
  • E.CoyoteE.Coyote Registered User regular
    edited July 2018
    I'd be less worried about the earwigs and more worried about the moist environment that's attracting them. There would have to be a spot that's constantly damp for them to live in your house. That can lead to some more serious issues like mold.

    E.Coyote on
    DisruptedCapitalistElvenshaeDonnicton
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    ceres wrote: »
    I think only some are predators, and the rest eat everything. Including other ladybugs. And plants. And fungus. It probably depends on what species you've got and what plant you're protecting, I think some do eat wood.

    All ladybugs are predators, primarily on aphids. Occasionally they eat fungus and nectar, but insect meat is their food of choice. Especially insects that eat plantsap.

    Apparently there are a bunch in a subfamily that are either mostly or obligate herbivores, but that's according to wikipedia and I'm not an expert. :P

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    ElvenshaeFiendishrabbit
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    ceres wrote: »
    ceres wrote: »
    I think only some are predators, and the rest eat everything. Including other ladybugs. And plants. And fungus. It probably depends on what species you've got and what plant you're protecting, I think some do eat wood.

    All ladybugs are predators, primarily on aphids. Occasionally they eat fungus and nectar, but insect meat is their food of choice. Especially insects that eat plantsap.

    Apparently there are a bunch in a subfamily that are either mostly or obligate herbivores, but that's according to wikipedia and I'm not an expert. :P

    Wow. There are. I've never even heard of those (primarily since they're super rare in northern and central europe).

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    edited July 2018
    Earwigs vascillate between "it literally just lives in your house" to "it will actively eat the aphids in your garden" depending on species.

    That is, these guys are, at worst, just hanging out and at best are eating other insects or scavenging their corpses.

    They don't climb into your ears, that's a mistranslation of their name. "Earwig" came from "Earwing" and we lost the "g" over time. Their rear wings (which are hidden under those leathery looking tiny wing covers) are shaped remarkably like a human ear.

    Arch on
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  • XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    ugh, that one picture reminds me of Wrath of Khan =/

    Elvenshae
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