The Official Bug Identification Thread Starring Arch, Bugboy, and Fiendishrabbit

11819202123

Posts

  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    edited August 12
    Arch wrote: »
    That's not a cockroach, that's for sure.

    It looks to be some kind of ground beetle in the family Carabidae.

    My gut says it's a Black Clock Beetle - Pterostichus madidus, but I'd need a bit more information (location, for example, I think Black Clock Beetles are a UK thing) a better scale and a better picture of the antennae to be sure.

    The eyes are a bit off as well, but it could just be the picture quality and angle.

    Oh sorry! Forgot location. I'm in Maine. Next one that visits, we'll try to corral it for a better pic. Just happy it's not a roach. :D

    If you're in Maine, then I'd go with my edit- Harpalus pensylvanicus, or something so closely related I'm not equipped to tell them apart.

    EDIT: Also, the good news is these guys are predators! ....but roaches would probably be too large for them to eat. They're kind of stereotypical Good Bugs.

    EDIT EDIT: H. pensylvanicus is apparently a weed predator, meaning it eats important weeds, and not other bugs.

    Learn new things every day, I guess.

    Arch on
    Pixelated PixieH3Knuckles38thDoeFryElvenshaeRingoceresArbitraryDescriptor
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Started seeing a few of these running around the office at work the last few days. Are these cockroaches, or something less gross that just wandered in? They're maybe 3/4 of an inch long. Best pic I could get because the little asshole wouldn't stand still very long.

    xsauipnkts4z.jpg

    Not a cockroach. Cockroaches have (for example) very noticable spines along their legs and the abdomen and thorax joins smoothly.

    This is a ground beetle. note the large "spurs" that are common to many varieties of ground beetle. The shape of the pronotum is also typical for ground beetles.
    Now ground beetles is a huuuuge family of beetles and I'm not an expert so the exact species eludes me. I don't know of any specific groundbeetle that has spurs that large, lacks a striated elytra and has that general bodyshape. But it's 100% a ground beetle.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    Pixelated PixieRingoceres
  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    edited August 12
    (I think the elytra are striated, it's just a blurry picture. I'm getting more confident that it's a member of the genus Harpalus)

    EDIT: Harpalus has so many species oh man

    Arch on
    H3KnucklesFryElvenshaeRingoceres
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Arch wrote: »
    (I think the elytra are striated, it's just a blurry picture. I'm getting more confident that it's a member of the genus Harpalus)

    EDIT: Harpalus has so many species oh man

    Even the "pseudo-pennsylvanicus" group is pretty darn big (yes, there is a scientific category for ground beetles that look similar to pennsylvania ground beetles)

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    H3KnucklesFryElvenshaeRingo
  • 38thDoe38thDoe lets never be stupid again wait lets always be stupid foreverRegistered User regular
    Started seeing a few of these running around the office at work the last few days. Are these cockroaches, or something less gross that just wandered in? They're maybe 3/4 of an inch long. Best pic I could get because the little asshole wouldn't stand still very long.

    xsauipnkts4z.jpg

    Not a cockroach. Cockroaches have (for example) very noticable spines along their legs and the abdomen and thorax joins smoothly.

    This is a ground beetle. note the large "spurs" that are common to many varieties of ground beetle. The shape of the pronotum is also typical for ground beetles.
    Now ground beetles is a huuuuge family of beetles and I'm not an expert so the exact species eludes me. I don't know of any specific groundbeetle that has spurs that large, lacks a striated elytra and has that general bodyshape. But it's 100% a ground beetle.

    What's the difference between a spine and a spur?

  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    Spines typically run down the length of a limb, and spurs are located at joints, is what I was taught

    38thDoeFiendishrabbitH3KnucklesMoridin889
  • FryFry Registered User regular
    38thDoe wrote: »
    Started seeing a few of these running around the office at work the last few days. Are these cockroaches, or something less gross that just wandered in? They're maybe 3/4 of an inch long. Best pic I could get because the little asshole wouldn't stand still very long.

    xsauipnkts4z.jpg

    Not a cockroach. Cockroaches have (for example) very noticable spines along their legs and the abdomen and thorax joins smoothly.

    This is a ground beetle. note the large "spurs" that are common to many varieties of ground beetle. The shape of the pronotum is also typical for ground beetles.
    Now ground beetles is a huuuuge family of beetles and I'm not an expert so the exact species eludes me. I don't know of any specific groundbeetle that has spurs that large, lacks a striated elytra and has that general bodyshape. But it's 100% a ground beetle.

    What's the difference between a spine and a spur?

    One of them prevents things from riding you, one of them helps you ride other things

    ElvenshaeArchRingoDisruptedCapitalistceresInquisitor77E.CoyoteHappylilElfH3KnucklesMoridin889XaquinIncenjucar
  • H3KnucklesH3Knuckles Jack of all interests... ...master of noneRegistered User regular
    edited August 13
    If it looks like the limb forks to better grip things, that's a spur.

    If it looks like the limb has a row of spikes for defense, that's a spine.

    H3Knuckles on
    If you're curious about my icon; it's an update of the early Lego Castle theme's "Black Falcons" faction.
    camo_sig2-400.png
  • Red RaevynRed Raevyn because I only take Bubble Baths Registered User regular
    Man this thread is so good, I love reading it. Thank you all!

    I have my own bug question now. The first time we saw this bug was when I was cutting an apple I'd just washed. I noticed one bug on the bottom then turned it upside down and realized there were scads of them crawling out of the bottom bit. Sure enough they appeared to have tunneled into the bottom and gotten cozy inside the core. I'd (jokingly) chastised my wife for buying these apples sourced from New Zealand when we live in WA (she said none of the local apples at the store looked good) and now she's really not going to buy NZ apples again.

    But now the little buggers are showing up all over the place! I took a (cloth) diaper liner out of the washbasket at the other end of the house and found one crawling on it (they do come out of the dryer in the room off the kitchen). My wife found one on the toilet and one on the bed as well. After a bit I noticed some have little wings so that may be how they're getting around. Tough to get a picture of because they're really tiny. I tried googling based off the apple core experience, but just got a lot of orchard pest information.

    Pre-edit - I typed that and googled a little more and it's daggone weevils isn't it? A few days ago my wife said our big ol' bag of brown rice was infested (tossed it), and right at the top of wikipedia it says the maize weevil sometimes gets into apples. Daggone it, time for pantry cleaning and more reading about how to cleanse the house.

    aufr1srtc89o.jpg
    mk4cqdcaes80.jpg

    ElvenshaeFiendishrabbitJedocArch
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Yep, those look like weevils. Just remember, if you have to choose, pick the smaller one.

    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
    The Disappearance of Inigo Sharpe: Tomas à Dunsanin
    RingoFryFiendishrabbitceresJedocRed RaevynH3Knucklessee317MichaelLCBloodySlothMoridin889adejaanDisruptedCapitalistIncenjucar
  • chromdomchromdom Who? Where?Registered User regular
    As my father said when he thought weevils got into our oatmeal: protein!

    In retrospect, I wonder if comments like that play into his current health issues.

    Drez wrote: »

    Being quoted out of context is honestly what I live for.
  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    Congrats, you live out of ziplock bags for 6 weeks now!

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    FiendishrabbitElvenshaeMoridin889
  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    On the plus side, that is some pretty impressive close up photography of weevil kind.
    I mean, it's not much of a comfort, I'm sure. But it's something.

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
    RingoElvenshae
  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    I'm not sure those are maize weevils specifically, but it does look like some kind of grain pest weevil.

    You can seal up bags of grain and put them in the freezer for a few days if you don't mind the notion that you might end up eating the larvae inside the rice grains. Ziplock bags, as mentioned, are your friends, as is the freezer (NOT FRIDGE) for anything you think can survive a few days in there and be edible.

    I'm always the last person to recommend chemical methods of control, but you could try minor fumigation if the problem persists, but I'd contact a professional first.

  • bwaniebwanie Posting into the void Registered User regular
    free proteine!

    Yh6tI4T.jpg
  • Bliss 101Bliss 101 Registered User regular
    bwanie wrote: »
    free proteine!

    Yep, there's a silver lining to everything. I recently waged war against a meal moth infestation. Those fuckers reproduce like crazy and every time I thought they were gone, a new generation would emerge from somewhere, driving me crazy.

    But I also have an aquarium, and the moths and their larvae make perfect fish food. My fish have never looked as colorful and healthy as during the Moth War.

    MSL59.jpg
    H3KnucklesFiendishrabbitRingoFryceresElvenshaeMoridin889DisruptedCapitalistIncenjucar
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Bliss 101 wrote: »
    bwanie wrote: »
    free proteine!

    Yep, there's a silver lining to everything. I recently waged war against a meal moth infestation. Those fuckers reproduce like crazy and every time I thought they were gone, a new generation would emerge from somewhere, driving me crazy.

    But I also have an aquarium, and the moths and their larvae make perfect fish food. My fish have never looked as colorful and healthy as during the Moth War.

    I wonder how the fish viewed that
    "The mythological time in history when the Ape gods waged war against the air meat. It was a time of plenty my son. When the bodies of the fallen fell into the sacred waters to be consumed, and everyone was wearing a coat of gold."

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    ArbitraryDescriptorJedocH3KnucklesBliss 101RingoFryVishNubHappylilElfceresAegisElvenshaeMoridin889adejaanDisruptedCapitalistbowenIncenjucar
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    edited August 22
    Found this little guy on my son’s leg during our bike ride. Assuming some kind of stick bug nymph?

    Northern VA.

    c3cc33jhbh5m.jpeg
    6cx2du2qikkk.jpeg
    yqy8u6me4vuy.jpeg

    Ed: Ugh. iPhone uploads.
    Ed2: ooh! Might be an assassin bug nymph, which might really hurt if it was older. Good thing we didn’t play with it too much and put it back on a nearby tree after pictures.

    Elvenshae on
    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
    The Disappearance of Inigo Sharpe: Tomas à Dunsanin
    FiendishrabbitceresH3Knuckles38thDoeExtreaminatus
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    edited August 22
    It's a Zelus luridus nymph, aka Pale Green Assassin bug, So your guess of an assassin bug nymph is correct.
    The easiest way to tell the difference is that walking sticks have a very long distance between each pair of legs, while assassin bug nymphs have their legs clustered in a more normal insect manner.

    Fiendishrabbit on
    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    FryElvenshaeH3KnucklesDisruptedCapitalist38thDoeMoridin889Incenjucar
  • H3KnucklesH3Knuckles Jack of all interests... ...master of noneRegistered User regular
    edited August 28
    Not asking for ID's, just thought people here might enjoy this weird video YouTube recommended after I watched one of those stick bug meme videos.


    Edit: although, if someone happens to know what species the big one on the far left, and the little one in the center are, I'd be interested (kind of surprised the video description doesn't say).

    H3Knuckles on
    If you're curious about my icon; it's an update of the early Lego Castle theme's "Black Falcons" faction.
    camo_sig2-400.png
    see317davidsdurionsArbitraryDescriptorRingoIncenjucar
  • Bliss 101Bliss 101 Registered User regular
    edited August 28
    H3Knuckles wrote: »
    Not asking for ID's, just thought people here might enjoy this weird video YouTube recommended after I watched one of those stick bug meme videos.

    Edit: although, if someone happens to know what species the big one on the far left, and the little one in the center are, I'd be interested (kind of surprised the video description doesn't say).

    I think that's a devil's flower mantis (Idolomantis diabolica). Mantids are my favorite insects, and that's my favorite mantis.

    edit: the one on the left that is.

    Bliss 101 on
    MSL59.jpg
    H3KnucklesFryElvenshaeRingo
  • WiseManTobesWiseManTobes Registered User regular
    H3Knuckles wrote: »
    Not asking for ID's, just thought people here might enjoy this weird video YouTube recommended after I watched one of those stick bug meme videos.


    Edit: although, if someone happens to know what species the big one on the far left, and the little one in the center are, I'd be interested (kind of surprised the video description doesn't say).

    I love the green one on the right,

    What are we doing guys? Posing? ok !!!!

    *looks around again*

    Still posing? you sure? ok, I guess

    *poses again*

    Steam! Battlenet:Wisemantobes#1508
    H3KnucklesElvenshaeArbitraryDescriptorIncenjucar
  • Bliss 101Bliss 101 Registered User regular
    edited August 29
    Yeah mantids are basically the insect version of cats. Graceful and terrifying predators, but also kind of dumb and cute. Those mantids in the video are all terrified though. The only reason they're not attacking one another is, they're trying to defend themselves against an even bigger predator, the camera man. In my opinion it's not right to subject them to that kind of treatment.

    Bliss 101 on
    MSL59.jpg
    RanlinIncenjucar
  • H3KnucklesH3Knuckles Jack of all interests... ...master of noneRegistered User regular
    edited August 28
    Aw, crud. Didn't know any of that.

    The channel it's on has a whole bunch of videos showing different arthropods, so I'd just assumed they were some kind of professional handler or something.

    H3Knuckles on
    If you're curious about my icon; it's an update of the early Lego Castle theme's "Black Falcons" faction.
    camo_sig2-400.png
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    edited August 29
    Speaking of mantids, we had a visitor the other day. Spent all day on our window, moved on overnight to places unknown.
    Morning:

    dkdgds2a5oyo.jpeg

    Nighttime:

    tse88mviiqu3.jpeg

    338iu3qcawy7.jpeg

    Elvenshae on
    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
    The Disappearance of Inigo Sharpe: Tomas à Dunsanin
    JedocBliss 101H3KnucklesceresArbitraryDescriptorMichaelLC
  • Bliss 101Bliss 101 Registered User regular
    S/he's gorgeous.

    Like some other ambush predator insects and spiders, they have the ability to enter a kind of standby mode where their metabolism and energy consumption is next to zero. Yet they can instantly spring to action at maximum efficiency when they detect prey or a threat. Our electronic technology is still getting there.

    MSL59.jpg
    BahamutZEROH3KnucklesRingoceresElvenshaeIncenjucar
  • Bliss 101Bliss 101 Registered User regular
    I see my nerdiness killed this conversation. Story of my life.

    MSL59.jpg
  • mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited September 3
    fzazkv1r1i2h.jpg


    one of three big ladies

    mts on
    camo_sig.png
    H3KnucklesJedocFrydavidsdurionsDisruptedCapitalistFiendishrabbitceres38thDoeAegis
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    I'm really curious about that spider. It looks like some kind of orb weaver, but those spike clusters on its front legs are quite peculiar.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    Moridin889
  • mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    I was told it was an Neoscona crucifera, the Hentz orb weaver
    we have a bunch of them on our porch

    camo_sig.png
    FiendishrabbitElvenshae
  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    mts wrote: »
    I was told it was an Neoscona crucifera, the Hentz orb weaver
    we have a bunch of them on our porch

    Looking at the identification for that species, I'd probably agree with whoever told you that, but I'm not a spider expert by any stretch of the imagination.

    Bliss 101
  • RingoRingo HE KEEPS REPEATING THE LINE I'M GONNA CRY BLEASE LET HIM LIVE YOU MADE ME WATCH SO MUCH KISSING IN THIS FILM LET INIGO LIVERegistered User regular
    Arch wrote: »
    mts wrote: »
    I was told it was an Neoscona crucifera, the Hentz orb weaver
    we have a bunch of them on our porch

    Looking at the identification for that species, I'd probably agree with whoever told you that, but I'm not a spider expert by any stretch of the imagination.

    That's for sure, I've seen you play your Widow in City of Heroes

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
    H3Knucklesceressee317Moridin88938thDoeElvenshaeAegisAuralynxArchDecomposey
  • FryFry Registered User regular
    Here are a couple cool bugs I have seen recently.
    CAxDxIOl.jpg
    Lens says: this moth is Haematopis grataria, the chickweed geometer. It has feathery antennae, which probably means it's male

    D4XWZhUl.jpg
    Lens says: this butterfly is Limenitis arthemis, the "red-spotted purple" (this one) or "white admiral". Apparently there are two fairly distinct patterns for this species, based on location, but the groups overlap so there are lots of hybrids in between. They're also pretty cool because light interacts with them in tricky ways, from many angles they just appear black or dark blue. Took me a bit to get an angle that would show the colors and pattern.

    FiendishrabbitchromdomRingo38thDoeH3KnucklesceresJaysonFourArchBouwsTElvenshae
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Fry wrote: »
    D4XWZhUl.jpg
    Lens says: this butterfly is Limenitis arthemis, the "red-spotted purple" (this one) or "white admiral". Apparently there are two fairly distinct patterns for this species, based on location, but the groups overlap so there are lots of hybrids in between. They're also pretty cool because light interacts with them in tricky ways, from many angles they just appear black or dark blue. Took me a bit to get an angle that would show the colors and pattern.

    Limenitis arthemis. ssp. astyanax. Red spotted purple (not a hybrid). They're only called white admirals when they have that characteristic white stripe further in on their wings (which this specimen lacks).
    This particular pattern is more common around Georgia, but you can find it anywhere in South-eastern United states.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    FryElvenshae
  • FryFry Registered User regular
    edited September 8
    This particular arthemis was also interesting because the right rear wing was pretty much entirely missing, presumably due to a close call with a predator. Wiki says the red-spotted purple patterning is an attempted mimic of the "unpalatable" pipevine swallowtail (Battus philenor). If the missing wing was due to a predator, mimic fail, I guess?

    It still seemed to be moving around ok, though.

    Fry on
  • ArchArch Neat-o, mosquito! Registered User regular
    Well, mimicry isn't like...an innate thing. Birds aren't born knowing that the toxic or unpalatable organisms shouldn't be messed with. The evolutionary game that's played is "Do more mimics survive if they can exploit learned behaviors in predators than not?" and so far the answer is "yes".

    But quite a few mimics still die because predators either haven't encountered the true form, or the predators are desperate enough to take a swing.

    I'm pretty impressed at how close Lens got on those identifications, to be honest. I'll need to play around.

    FiendishrabbitRingoElvenshaeceresH3KnucklesBliss 101Fry
  • fightinfilipinofightinfilipino Angry as Hell #BLMRegistered User regular
    glad this thread is still going! would anyone be able to ID this? afraid it might be a roach nymph:

    5yed1cvyovym.jpg

    ffNewSig.png
    steam | Dokkan: 868846562
    Jedoc
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    edited September 13
    It's a roach nymph. Specificly it's a Luridiblatta trivittata, a roach that has only recently migrated from the mediterranean (in the last 15 years).

    However, you're lucky! They don't form indoor colonies and only wander in from your garden occasionally to seek shelter. So you don't need to tear your kitchen apart (but you might want to do an extra careful cleaning under the sink and fridge). Also. They're super fond of sugary foods, so sugar-water (or even better, fruit juice) is pretty good bait if you want to trap and get rid of any indoor vagabonds.

    P.S: After looking at some images. It's an adult since it's one of the wingless species.

    Fiendishrabbit on
    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    fightinfilipinoFryJedocDisruptedCapitalistceresElvenshaeArchRingoH3KnucklesIncenjucarJaysonFour
  • fightinfilipinofightinfilipino Angry as Hell #BLMRegistered User regular
    glad this thread is still going! would anyone be able to ID this? afraid it might be a roach nymph:
    It's a roach nymph. Specificly it's a Luridiblatta trivittata, a roach that has only recently migrated from the mediterranean (in the last 15 years).

    However, you're lucky! They don't form indoor colonies and only wander in from your garden occasionally to seek shelter. So you don't need to tear your kitchen apart (but you might want to do an extra careful cleaning under the sink and fridge). Also. They're super fond of sugary foods, so sugar-water (or even better, fruit juice) is pretty good bait if you want to trap and get rid of any indoor vagabonds.

    P.S: After looking at some images. It's an adult since it's one of the wingless species.

    we've seen four of these in the past week, and we just had a hellish heat wave here the week before. they probably are inside now seeking shelter?

    thanks for the ID! we keep things pretty clean, so were surprised to see a cockroach of any kind.

    ffNewSig.png
    steam | Dokkan: 868846562
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Most likely yes. If you keep your kitchen clean they're most likely in there looking for moisture.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
Sign In or Register to comment.