It's Party Thyme in the [PLANTS] Thread!

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  • sponospono Mining for Nose Diamonds Registered User regular
    Cactus!

    xv0v21ihz65n.jpg

    Tree!

    ky2kzgfium3j.jpg

    Other tree!

    w9yvwk9oq1hj.jpg

    Three more trees (plus one dead tree)!

    x2hi5x1qnpb6.jpg

    Weeds???

    jvxgev1pwfd0.jpg

    Alien??

    4wvr52gom0q9.jpg

    640qocnq4ske.gif
    JedocL Ron Howardwebguy20JansonmrpakuTynnanSkeithSporkAndrewchr1sh4ll3ttb3N1tSt4lkerCalicasee317
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    I want a lemon tree so bad.

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  • JedocJedoc Once to start a new life and once just to start a fireRegistered User regular
    What, you think life is just going to give you lemons?

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    Tynnansponowebguy20see317
  • Mortal SkyMortal Sky queer punk hedge witchRegistered User regular
    edited May 22
    You should get insurance on your lemon tree, and use it as collateral on a loan

    Mortal Sky on
    Madpoet
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    I want a grapefruit tree but they seem to be minimum $100.

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  • JansonJanson Registered User regular
    edited May 22
    I'm thinking of planting apple trees in my front yard... I wonder if the HOA has any rules on that?

    Edit: And that lemon tree is beautiful! <3

    Janson on
    spono
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    Man garden soil is expensive!

    Whippy wrote: »
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  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    spono wrote: »
    Cactus!

    xv0v21ihz65n.jpg

    Tree!

    ky2kzgfium3j.jpg

    Other tree!

    w9yvwk9oq1hj.jpg

    Three more trees (plus one dead tree)!

    x2hi5x1qnpb6.jpg

    Weeds???

    jvxgev1pwfd0.jpg

    Alien??

    4wvr52gom0q9.jpg

    That’s no weed! That’s a geranium regrowing from previous years’ woody growth

    Heh, woody growth

    sponochr1sh4ll3ttb3
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Juggernut wrote: »
    Question: this pothos I bought refuses to fit into any of the planters I have thus far bought. Mainly because I'm bad at eyeballing size. It definitely needs a 10" pot but the one I ended up getting is about an inch and a half too short. So theres a bit of rooted soil sticking up.

    Will it settle or be ok or do I need to make a 3rd trip to home depot and try a new pot?

    Pothos grow really quickly. Definitely get the 10" pot, you won't regret it!

    If the roots are starting to poke through the top of the soil, you probably also want to add 0.5-1 inches of new soil on top to keep them covered.

  • KamiroKamiro Registered User regular
    So, I planted garlic back in October and they’ve been growing steadily.

    But back in March about 1/3 of them just withered away. And now another 1/3 of them withered away. The remaining ones seem to be going strong. I’m not sure why some would die off while others seem to be thriving.

    Only thing I can think of is they may have come from different bulbs?

  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    Went to a hardware store yesterday to pick up some stuff completely unrelated to plants.
    Wound up buying a handful of small succulents and a wide shallow pot for them. Not sure what kind of succulents they are, I mostly picked up stuff that looked like it escaped from a Star Trek set.

    Anyone have any tips on potting succulents?

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
  • Lost SalientLost Salient blink twice if you'd like me to mercy kill youRegistered User regular
    Plant question

    My Monstera (Boris) is thriving to a degree that's a bit alarming in all honesty, but one of the oldest leaves is dying off. Anyone know the best way to prune a dying leaf on these? Snip it high? Low? Let it die and drop off?

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    "Sandra has a good solid anti-murderer vibe. My skin felt very secure and sufficiently attached to my body when I met her. Also my organs." HAIL SATAN
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    I've cobbled together a box from wood scraps that I'm using for compost.

    So far that has meant throwing fruits and veggies and eggshells, and wherever else seems right, in there. But now I'm wondering if I need to anything to keep it from becoming more flies than trash.

    You want a balance of green and brown waste. Green means fresh plant matter, lawn trimmings, veggies etc. Brown is dried leaves, cardboard, brown paper, very fine wood chips/sawdust. Green stuff is high in nitrogen and can make a stinky sludge if it's all you have, brown adds carbon to compensate. You don't need them to be equal but a scattering of brown in a layer after every a few inches of green will do.

    Also you probably already know but adding cooked food, meat, or bones will probably attract rats, so don't do that.

    Doodmann
  • chr1sh4ll3ttb3chr1sh4ll3ttb3 A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Plant question

    My Monstera (Boris) is thriving to a degree that's a bit alarming in all honesty, but one of the oldest leaves is dying off. Anyone know the best way to prune a dying leaf on these? Snip it high? Low? Let it die and drop off?

    I prefer snip it low.

    N1tSt4lker
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Plant question

    My Monstera (Boris) is thriving to a degree that's a bit alarming in all honesty, but one of the oldest leaves is dying off. Anyone know the best way to prune a dying leaf on these? Snip it high? Low? Let it die and drop off?

    I cut them low. I read recently that you don't want to cut off dying leaves until they're fully yellow (which means the plant has re-absorbed as much energy as it can from that leaf), but it sounds like that monstera doesn't need any help there :razz:

  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck begin again Registered User regular
    I had to get rid of all my houseplants when we moved (sad face) but I bought a few new ones today and repotted them

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    (some little succulents I picked out! they're tiny and fragile, who knows if any will survive!)

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    (a bird's nest fern and a pothos, and idk what that is in the red pot but I like its shape)

    eee excited to have plants in the house again

    mrpakubowenNightDragonSkeithchr1sh4ll3ttb3JansonlonelyahavaTynnan
  • N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    I believe that is an areca palm? It's very small though, so maybe a related dwarf version?

    NightDragonSkeith
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    From what I remember, palms can take years to reach heights of 3' or more - I have that same palm cluster and I'd also guess that it's an Areca, just young.

  • SkeithSkeith Registered User regular
    Yeah treat it right and it'll get plenty big. Assume a foot per year for four years or so, after that it shouldn't grow much.

    mts wrote: »
    heres how i see it being a total win situation for you
    1. stay with your wife while she dog sits. this wins husband points since she knows its out of your comfort zone
    2. have sex all over her friends house so that the next time you see her friend look at you condescendingly, you can wink back knowing you did the freaky deaky where she eats her cheerios.
  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    I started a kitchen vermicompost bin under the sink. That's tangentially related to plants, right?

    I started with shredded brown paper and edamame hulls I'd been saving in the freezer, plus ~250 composting worms ordered online. A couple of hours later, there were a whole bunch of worms trying to climb out of the bucket. I though maybe it was too dry, so I added a chopped-up apple core and some coco coir and misted everything a bunch. Then I spent half an hour gently dropping upwardly mobile worms back in the pile.

    The next morning, I found half a dozen dead escapees under the sink and a maybe a couple dozen climbing the inside walls of the bucket.

    The morning after that - this morning - there were two dead escapees and five hanging out on the inside walls. Progress!

    I'm hoping this venture will stabilize once a decent layer of castings builds up. The worms shipped in a double handful of something dirtlike, which wasn't enough to burrow in once added to the bucket. I think my paper should have had a lot more moisture to start.

    (The bucket has a lid, but the vent holes are 1/8" and most of the worms are tiny)

    Jedoc wrote: »
    The GOP cares about babies until they're born, soldiers until they're in need of care, and families until they interfere with stockholder dividends.
    Janson
  • N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    From what I remember, palms can take years to reach heights of 3' or more - I have that same palm cluster and I'd also guess that it's an Areca, just young.

    That's true. I'm so used to seeing 3'-4' ones being sold that I didn't even think of it just being a really young one.

    NightDragon
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    I went out to check on theback garden since it's not raining and not frigid right now.

    My lime tree has some blossoms on it! yay!
    My Lemons are almost ready to pick! I've got at least 3 or 4 good looking ones.
    My potato plants should be almost ready to pull and go digging for taters.

    My single parsley plant that I put out into the self watering tub has, um, it's well a parsley forest.

    I'm letting my broccoli and cauli go to seed. I'll try again some other time, when I can devote the time to making sure the white fly doesn't even get started.

    But yeah, parsley forest.

    webguy20CalicaJansonmrpakuPeasDoodmannDonnicton
  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    edited June 24
    Part 1:
    How to grow tomatoes, p. 1: Preparing and planting 13:16

    How to grow tomatoes, p. 2: Maintaining and harvesting 12:15


    Peas on
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  • EinzelEinzel Registered User regular
    At the start of winter I had five baby peach trees. They're about 3 years old, but stunted due to being in an apartment with less than great sun exposure.

    In March or so, I lost one. It kept shutting off branches, causing them to shrivel and the leaves to wilt. I trimmed the shrivel parts but it never recovered.

    Yesterday I looked outside and the next least-healthy one had 100% wilting leaves. All the branches are shriveled slightly. I couldn't find concrete answers to what is happening, but some things point to a fungal infection that prevents water traveling through the branches.

    This morning I inserted syringes with water along its trunk and branches hoping that capillary action might draw some along the body, but so far nothing is improving.

    Does anyone have any ideas?

  • EinzelEinzel Registered User regular
    It's... kind of working?

    h8y74ob0lpbo.jpg

    This isn't a long term solution though. I need to figure out the problem so I can feed it. I came across some canker fungus search hits that suggested feeding various anti fungals into the bark but I don't want to pick the wrong one.

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Have you changed anything recently in regards to all three? It's weird for two of them to have the same issue back-to-back...if it's a disease/infection, they may be toast unless you can nail down the exact cause and check to see if the plant is salvageable (just search "peach tree diseases" in Google Images, or look up what's happening with the leaves on peach plants specifically). Just to be safe, I'd quarantine the problem peach tree away from all your other plants. Also, when you water it make sure you're not touching any part of the plant or pot (and if you do, disinfect the watering container before watering any other plants)...you don't want to transfer whatever this is over to your other plants, if it is indeed transferrable.

    Entire branches closing off sounds like it might be a root issue? I'd gently take the plant out of the pot to see if the roots look healthy, or if they smell bad, or if there are bugs/pests in the soil, or anything out of the usual. You said these plants were inside...did this start happening when you brought them outside? Could be heat stress, humidity stress, sunburn, etc. I've heard a lot of people have issues when they first bring their indoor plants outside, because the shift in environment can be too much for some plants to handle.

  • DonnictonDonnicton Registered User regular
    So my mother bought an old mountain property with the intent of remodeling the old house into her retirement, and the old lady who lived here originally was apparently fond of trumpet creeper. And it of course has not been maintained since she passed.

    Good Lord do I now hate this plant. Every runner has to be cut individually back to the original plant because it has spread around all of the other original garden patches(there are a lot of wild/domestic blackberries/raspberries that I want to avoid hitting as collateral). Eradicating this thing is going to be a summer goal it seems like.

  • EinzelEinzel Registered User regular
    Have you changed anything recently in regards to all three? It's weird for two of them to have the same issue back-to-back...if it's a disease/infection, they may be toast unless you can nail down the exact cause and check to see if the plant is salvageable (just search "peach tree diseases" in Google Images, or look up what's happening with the leaves on peach plants specifically). Just to be safe, I'd quarantine the problem peach tree away from all your other plants. Also, when you water it make sure you're not touching any part of the plant or pot (and if you do, disinfect the watering container before watering any other plants)...you don't want to transfer whatever this is over to your other plants, if it is indeed transferrable.

    Entire branches closing off sounds like it might be a root issue? I'd gently take the plant out of the pot to see if the roots look healthy, or if they smell bad, or if there are bugs/pests in the soil, or anything out of the usual. You said these plants were inside...did this start happening when you brought them outside? Could be heat stress, humidity stress, sunburn, etc. I've heard a lot of people have issues when they first bring their indoor plants outside, because the shift in environment can be too much for some plants to handle.

    The first one is gone. It died back branch by branch.

    These guys live outside spring through fall each year. This past winter though I didn't let them lose their leaves and go dormant in the house.

    Google has told me that it's either Verticulim Wilt or brown rot. Or a half dozen other things.

    I've got it inside on its life support. Which is more like an experiment because of the things it might have, they're fatal. So far it seems that syringe into bark wood isn't as successful as into green stems. But you also have to get the depth right or it won't take up the water.

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Presented without comment:

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    N1tSt4lkerL Ron HowardsponoJedoc3clipseMetzger MeistertynicSporkAndrewDouglasDangerEinzelwebguy20TynnanlonelyahavaCaptain InertiaSkeithNightDragon
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    Seems like a dumb questions but:

    I currently have 3 tomato plants going, I'm in southern california so I'm not worried about frost or anything. Am I really supposed completely start over from seedlings next season?

    Whippy wrote: »
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  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    Seems like a dumb questions but:

    I currently have 3 tomato plants going, I'm in southern california so I'm not worried about frost or anything. Am I really supposed completely start over from seedlings next season?

    Tomatoes are perennials that can survive warm winters and will produce fruit throughout the year if it stays warm enough.

    DoodmannDouglasDangerwebguy20Skeith
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    I decided to buy a book on southern california gardening because the online resources seem to be mostly cold climate focused.

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
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  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    It does tend to be trickier when winter exists.

    Einzel
  • EinzelEinzel Registered User regular
    To be fair, there are some plants that are like, "I've reproduced. Time to die."

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  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    How Plants Became Meat Eaters 10:07

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  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    Cape Sundews Trap Bugs In A Sticky Situation | Deep Look 3:57

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    Metzger Meister
  • Al_watAl_wat Registered User regular
    Back when i was younger and pot was illegal (in canada) my mom used to get really mad at me about pot. Lividly, violently mad.

    And now?

    She has fucking ten foot tall weed plants growing in her backyard

    They are like towers

    Metzger MeisterL Ron HowardJansonJedocTynnanwebguy203clipseDisruptedCapitalistSkeithtynicNightDragon
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