As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/

It's Party Thyme in the [PLANTS] Thread!

11819202123

Posts

  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    I found some hops vines growing in our hedge. Anyone know anything they can be used for other than beer? Otherwise I guess I need to start sowing some barley.

    DoodmannRadiation
  • PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Realtor Santa ClaritaRegistered User regular
    You could make soap with them, if you're into that kinda shit. With another nice, aromatic herb or two you could really make something unique.

  • MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    Got those bulbs planted.

    Assuming I/we make it to the spring and it looks alright, I plan to take some pictures of the bloom.

    JansonCalicaIruka
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    edited October 2020
    Note to self: Don't wear a thermal underlayer when manually scarifying a lawn, you will die.

    Second note to self: If you're going to manually scarify a lawn maybe invest in a full size rake instead of using one literally designed for use by children.

    Brovid Hasselsmof on
    Donovan Puppyfuckertynic3clips3CalicaEinzel
  • Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Note to self: Don't wear a thermal underlayer when manually scarifying a lawn, you will die.

    Second note to self: If you're going to manually scarify a lawn maybe invest in a full size rake instead of using one literally designed for use by children.

    Fuck that, I'd hire a powered machine. Gotta be worth the money to get it done in 1/10th of the time and 1/100th of the effort.

  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Eh, I'm not short on time, and ground work is the only way I can make my lazy arse get any exercise

    Donovan Puppyfucker
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Very excited today because I just got delivery of some seeds I ordered to hopefully start a wildflower meadow in one corner of our plot

    rcd1llvccnnu.jpg

    Also I just spent an hour cutting grass with a hedge trimmer, which was extremely satisfying but my arms ache now.

    N1tSt4lkerIrukawebguy20L Ron Howard3clips3Donovan PuppyfuckermrpakuCalicaTynnanSkeithDonnictonApocalyptus
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    It's okay, thread, I'll keep you alive.

    I sowed those seeds on November 4th and when I checked the area today I noticed some have germinated already. Exciting stuff! I am never not surprised when seeds I've sowed actually start to grow.

    This is where they are

    2y1odo13g6mc.jpg

    The intention is to try and convert a good 25% of this paddock into traditional meadow. I've started it off by stripping turf from an 8*4m area and sowing a curated meadow species mix, which includes 8 grasses and 20 perennial flowering species, along with a mix of 13 cornfield annuals to act as nursery cover for the first year while the perennials are getting established.

    Alongside that is another 8*4m area where I've just scarified the ground to open up the grass, and have sowed only Rhinanthus minor which is a meadow flower that is partially parasitic on grasses. The idea is it will weaken the grass that's already there, making more space for the meadow species to seed into at the end of summer.

    I'm pretty psyched to see if it works. The meadow mix I'm using is one for loam soils, and that type of meadow is rare these days. It would be awesome to be able to establish a patch and help keep that type of habitat around.

    DidgeridooJedocL Ron Howard3clips3DoodmannJansonbowenDonovan Puppyfuckerwebguy20CalicaSkeithAl_wat
  • Red RaevynRed Raevyn because I only take Bubble Baths Registered User regular
    Awesome! Our wildflower patch is one of our favorite areas in the garden, especially because it just keeps coming up with new surprises throughout the year. And pollinators and other birds love it. The ratio of effort to results can't be beat!

    Brovid Hasselsmof
  • JedocJedoc Bringing the past to life so we can beat it to death with a shovelRegistered User regular
    Jedoc wrote: »
    Man, my begonias are real champions. I "propagated" them by haphazardly chopping bits off and jamming them into new pots with some rooting hormone, and all four of them are acting like it was just another Tuesday.

    eg6ib4uif4pa.png

    And the original plant is already well back on the path to world domination after being cut down to bare stems.

    amrmjf4rlf0u.png

    Update:

    km7grj699jqn.png

    Oh god, I've made a huge mistake, the house belongs to the begonias now.

    GDdCWMm.jpg
    IrukaDonovan PuppyfuckerTynnanBrovid HasselsmofCalicaSkeithwebguy203clips3Red RaevynL Ron HowardmrpakuEinzelbowenN1tSt4lkerRadiationAl_watApocalyptus
  • Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Quick question - have you read Day Of The Triffids?

  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Made our first No Dig bed today. 100 cloves of garlic, of 8 different varieties. Hopefully the results will be good but either way I'm already a fan of no dig, considerably less backbreaking than traditional methods.

    d5srvhb00s6c.jpg

    JedocDonovan PuppyfuckermrpakuAl_watJansonDonnictontynic
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    edited December 2020
    Made our first No Dig bed today. 100 cloves of garlic, of 8 different varieties. Hopefully the results will be good but either way I'm already a fan of no dig, considerably less backbreaking than traditional methods.

    No dig is great. We use a method called Square foot gardening that uses 4'x4'x8" raised beds, and you partition each square foot out, and plant something different in it. Like 9 carrots, or 1 squash plant, things like that.

    webguy20 on
    Steam ID: Webguy20
    Origin ID: Discgolfer27
    Untappd ID: Discgolfer1981
    Virgil_Leads_You
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Hey northern hemisphere folks, spring is on its way. What plant plans do you have for the year?

    I've ordered figurative tons of seeds we need for the year, plus literal tons of compost. 30 cubic metres of it. I hope the delivery vehicle can actually fit into our paddock.

    Southern hemisphere folks, what's happening? Let me live vicariously through your leafy lives.

  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    I have roma sprouts and 3-4 different pepper plant sprouts going in my kitchen at the moment. I'll probably buy 4-6 other pepper plants come march when the breeders start selling live plants.

    I also have a box round back that would be a good setup for a trestle/something that vines if anyone has suggestions.

    For the rest of the garden, my goal is still to have my own sala so I'll probably rotate in some onions and herbs.

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
    GrpAhic DeiGn is My PAssIon
    Janson
  • Al_watAl_wat Registered User regular
    My backyard grass took a real beating last year, I need to figure out how to rehabilitate it. I'm thinking of top coating some soil and then seeding the fuck out of it? I don't even like having grass.... I'm just maintaining it for like, property appeal purposes.

    Also of course a weed plant, going to do a CBD dominant strain again. Last years grew very vigorously but I think it wasn't actually fully ripe when I harvested it. This year I'm going to try a different strain, hopefully one that matures faster.

    Probably do some veggies too, some mix of tomatoes? some peppers?

    Its way too early for this region to start most of these things up though.

  • JansonJanson Registered User regular
    What region are you in?

    Tomatoes grow very well for me in the PNW, we always end up with far too many. Radishes also grow well, however, both onions and garlic were a bust, not just for me but for my in-laws and other friends in the area.

  • KamiroKamiro Registered User regular
    I've got my winter garlic planted, they've sprouted their little green shoots and will probably remain like that until it gets a bit warmer. I give them their own entire raised bed since I don't grow anything else in the winter and they should be ready by late spring so I can plant something where they were. we'll see if more than 3 end up surviving this time...

    I've also still got a few rosemary plants still going and some sage that's still hanging on.

    I'll be planting a bunch of tomatoes, basil, and various peppers (some regular bell and some hot). I'm debating on whether to plant pie pumpkins again as they just spread their vines everywhere and only managed 3 pumpkins from 6 plants.

    Might try some tomatillos this year so I can make some hot sauce. Gonna rearrange where I place the plants now that I sorta know how all the stuff grows from last year.

  • Al_watAl_wat Registered User regular
    I'm near Toronto. I find I can't really plant things until early June. Late May if the weather cooperates

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    So I think I've found a solution to my slight flooding problems in the back of my yard after winter.

    Apparently there's a native wild blueberry species in NY that is thirsty as fuck. So I'm going to try to get a few bushes and plant them to see if I can't get that nonsense to not look like a swamp. (highbush blueberry?) I guess it has a few plants it can pair well with, so I'll reach out to a gardening company when I get to that point but added benefit of drawing in some birds and local bees (honey bees don't really care for them I guess?).

    Just thought I'd share for anyone who might have a sligthly swampy back yard. I'll probably aerate it a bunch, but as long as it cuts down on post winter swampiness all the better (it's normally fine the rest of the year).

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
    Mayabird
  • KamiroKamiro Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    So I think I've found a solution to my slight flooding problems in the back of my yard after winter.

    Apparently there's a native wild blueberry species in NY that is thirsty as fuck. So I'm going to try to get a few bushes and plant them to see if I can't get that nonsense to not look like a swamp. (highbush blueberry?) I guess it has a few plants it can pair well with, so I'll reach out to a gardening company when I get to that point but added benefit of drawing in some birds and local bees (honey bees don't really care for them I guess?).

    Just thought I'd share for anyone who might have a sligthly swampy back yard. I'll probably aerate it a bunch, but as long as it cuts down on post winter swampiness all the better (it's normally fine the rest of the year).

    oh yeah, we mulched along one of our fences and planted some bushes to help with the flooding in heavy rains. That side of the yard is the only place where water just pools if there is a heavy rain so we're hoping as they grow, it'll help.

  • EinzelEinzel Registered User regular
    Well last year my partner asked for a plant for her birthday (next month) and that set off the chain reaction that lead to the previous photos I posted here of PLANTMANIA. I'm reticent to do that again.

  • sponospono Mining for Nose Diamonds Registered User regular
    Oh good, my weeds have sprouted

    dof7omvean4j.jpg

    Should be a fine crop this year

    640qocnq4ske.gif
    Brovid HasselsmofTynnanMechMantis
  • MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    So I think I've found a solution to my slight flooding problems in the back of my yard after winter.

    Apparently there's a native wild blueberry species in NY that is thirsty as fuck. So I'm going to try to get a few bushes and plant them to see if I can't get that nonsense to not look like a swamp. (highbush blueberry?) I guess it has a few plants it can pair well with, so I'll reach out to a gardening company when I get to that point but added benefit of drawing in some birds and local bees (honey bees don't really care for them I guess?).

    Just thought I'd share for anyone who might have a sligthly swampy back yard. I'll probably aerate it a bunch, but as long as it cuts down on post winter swampiness all the better (it's normally fine the rest of the year).

    Make sure they're not all clones of each other so they can cross-pollinate and you can get some blueberries. (Also check if the soil is acidic because blueberries need acid soil.)

    N1tSt4lker
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Mayabird wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    So I think I've found a solution to my slight flooding problems in the back of my yard after winter.

    Apparently there's a native wild blueberry species in NY that is thirsty as fuck. So I'm going to try to get a few bushes and plant them to see if I can't get that nonsense to not look like a swamp. (highbush blueberry?) I guess it has a few plants it can pair well with, so I'll reach out to a gardening company when I get to that point but added benefit of drawing in some birds and local bees (honey bees don't really care for them I guess?).

    Just thought I'd share for anyone who might have a sligthly swampy back yard. I'll probably aerate it a bunch, but as long as it cuts down on post winter swampiness all the better (it's normally fine the rest of the year).

    Make sure they're not all clones of each other so they can cross-pollinate and you can get some blueberries. (Also check if the soil is acidic because blueberries need acid soil.)

    Hey even if I don't, as long as the local bees like that shit. Everything is a bog up here so I'm pretty sure I'm rocking a low pH.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • JansonJanson Registered User regular
    My blueberries did well in their first year, looking forward to seeing how they do this year.

    One variety is called pink lemonade and they were delicious. The others were a little too tart for our liking.

    bowenMayabird
  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    Something ate all the branches off my year-old potted trees.

    No need to prune this winter, I guess ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Jedoc wrote: »
    The GOP cares about babies until they're born, soldiers until they're in need of care, and families until they interfere with stockholder dividends.
  • Lost SalientLost Salient blink twice if you'd like me to mercy kill youRegistered User regular
    edited January 26
    A friend who's moving to the States left me two plants, a rosemary bush - which is the one type of plant I have managed to kill repeatedly - and a Fukien tea tree bonsai. So I guess I'm going to learn how to tend/prune a bonsai and also, hopefully, not kill a Fukien tea tree, whose care instructions are EXTREMELY COMPLICATED.

    So uhh hey if anyone's into bonsai tending let me know I guess?

    Also my monstera was losing leaves because it was thiiiiirsty so now I'm watering it and my fuckin' basil every two days

    Fuckin' basil

    E: Monstera's going gangbusters though so that's cool, and a bunch of its aerial roots are sticking straight up along its planter poles or crawling along the window ledge

    Lost Salient on
    RUVCwyu.jpg
    "Sandra has a good solid anti-murderer vibe. My skin felt very secure and sufficiently attached to my body when I met her. Also my organs." HAIL SATAN
  • TefTef Registered User regular
    edited January 26
    Please teach me the secret of growing basil. I swear its the only herb that hates me and dies just to spite me
    Calica wrote: »
    Something ate all the branches off my year-old potted trees.

    No need to prune this winter, I guess ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    If it's any consolation, they were delicious

    Tef on
    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better

    bit.ly/2XQM1ke
    CalicatynicVirgil_Leads_You
  • EinzelEinzel Registered User regular
    I can't basil either, if it's any consolation. Ours was struggling for a while and recently died from a scale infection.

    In other news I might be losing my third (of five) peach tree child to a fungal disease that prevents it from sending water up the branches. Lame.

  • RadiationRadiation Registered User regular
    Has anyone done live moss inside? Kind of considering making a thing, but wondering how terrible it'd be to upkeep (or if bringing moss into the house is a terrible idea).

    Also what other plants are water soaks? I have an area in the yard that is pretty wet/soggy, and would love to have something soak that stuff up. It's on the fence line (and the fence blocks morning sun), so I might be a bit limited on things. I guess I could ask the plant store near us, especially for local stuff.

    PSN: jfrofl
  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck begin again Registered User regular
    Radiation wrote: »
    Has anyone done live moss inside? Kind of considering making a thing, but wondering how terrible it'd be to upkeep (or if bringing moss into the house is a terrible idea).

    Also what other plants are water soaks? I have an area in the yard that is pretty wet/soggy, and would love to have something soak that stuff up. It's on the fence line (and the fence blocks morning sun), so I might be a bit limited on things. I guess I could ask the plant store near us, especially for local stuff.

    I have a staghorn fern mounted on a bit of cork and nestled in some moss (I'm not sure what type)
    50950204427_7b36257cfa_c.jpg

    the instructions that came with it indicated that misting the fern and the moss would keep them both happy in between occasional soaks, but really they seem mad if I don't soak them every week (maybe because my house is dry from winter heat?)

    the moss greens up a bit right after the soak, but then shades back to brownish so maybe even that isn't often enough

    it's kinda a pain, I fill a sink with tepid water and then try to get as much of it into the water as possible for an hour or so, and then let it drip dry for another hour or two in the shower

    on a day to day though, the moss is fine - smells earthy right after a soak but otherwise unnoticable

  • KamiroKamiro Registered User regular
    When do I start my indoor seedlings?

    I'm planning on doing tomatoes, peppers, and tons of various herbs.

    I've got a multi-tiered growing shelf with lights.

    Eventually they'll be going out in a raised bed.

    I'm in the mid-atlantic region

    Thro
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    If you have lights and climate control I'm pretty sure you can start now?

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
    GrpAhic DeiGn is My PAssIon
    EinzelMayabirdApocalyptus
  • ThroThro [email protected] Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    If you have lights and climate control I'm pretty sure you can start now?
    I'm in a similar boat as Kamiro. When I did my googling it seemed I could get away with a 6 week lead time for tomatoes and peppers before they would like to go outside (or into a bigger pot than the starter ones). In zone 7, so that means the earliest I should go to avoid the last frost is the start of March.

    Herbs though, just go nuts if you have room inside. Cut them and make more herbs if you want.

    webguy20
  • RadiationRadiation Registered User regular
    Trying out basic hydroponic (kratky method) stuff this year for some herbs/lettuce/maybe strawberries. Also doing outdoor garden which may or may not fail entirely, but going to do potatoes and corn along with some other stuff. It's dumb but I'm a bit excited.

    PSN: jfrofl
    DoodmannThrowebguy20ApocalyptusAl_wat
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Sowed a few seeds today

    kmlakdn7fmep.jpg
    xqfxx0lbdf52.jpg

    Yes that's my shower, I don't have many decent spots for germinating seeds.

    N1tSt4lkerTynnanJedocPeasSkeithbowen3clips3L Ron HowardCalicaRadiationwebguy20Ashaman42mrpakuDisruptedCapitalistEinzelApocalyptusAl_wat
  • JedocJedoc Bringing the past to life so we can beat it to death with a shovelRegistered User regular
    Oh dang, after a decade of propagating one of my angel wing begonias actually bloomed!

    316zifxxxvq8.png

    Not sure what triggered it, but I appreciate the effort, buddy.

    GDdCWMm.jpg
    mrpakuN1tSt4lker3clips3Brovid HasselsmofL Ron HowardDisruptedCapitalistCalicaEinzelRadiationSkeithApocalyptussee317TynnanAl_watMayabirdAdelliosJansonRed Raevyn
  • Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    edited April 7
    hey folks what do you call those little plastic walls you put around the edge of a garden to stop the soil washing away? my front yard is on an incline and we're losing a bunch to the street

    edit: RETAINING WALLS

    Magic Pink on
    Mayabird
Sign In or Register to comment.