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It's Party Thyme in the [PLANTS] Thread!

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    JedocJedoc In the scuppers with the staggers and jagsRegistered User regular
    edited April 2019
    When I was a kid, my dad and uncles tried to pull a stump by chaining it to the hitch ball of a farm truck. Unfortunately, some part of the apparatus near the stump snapped under tension, and what they ended up with was a twenty-foot-long chain bullwhip. It made a hell of a noise when it took out the back window of the truck, and scared the shit out of my uncle behind the wheel.

    After that, they stuck to good reliable explosive charges for stump removal.

    Jedoc on
    GDdCWMm.jpg
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    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    It’s rained every day this week and my outdoor plants are happy.

    I overwatered the African violets (their leaves were drooping) but I helped dry them out a bit and haven’t watered them since Monday and they’re looking a lot happier.

    The trees I separated/re-potted have grown new leaves so they seem to be doing well, too (still not sure what I’ll do with them).

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    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    edited April 2019
    Hmm, one of my African violets is doing significantly less well than the other.

    The only difference between the two is that the one that is doing better is getting slightly more sun (they’re both not getting too much sun light) so I might swap positions and see how that helps.

    Here are plants in the yard that are doing particularly well and have grown new flowers in the past week:

    2019-04-11%2018.18.27.jpg

    And here’s the difference between our two hydrangeas. The top one was left with dead flowers on it until two weeks ago when I finally pruned it. The bottom one we pruned back in January, because it’s in the front yard and we didn’t think dead heads would go down well with our HOA. We then had a cold snap and a ton of snow in February and are lucky it survived:

    2019-04-12%2009.41.29.jpg


    Janson on
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    EinzelEinzel Registered User regular
    Been introducing my toddler nephew to plants by helping him grow some sunflowers from seed. One seems to be a bit of an overachiever

    q9vhssozjj9e.jpg

    There's always one.

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    DidgeridooDidgeridoo Flighty Dame Registered User regular
    GOSH DARN SQUIRRELS

    Squirrels have eaten/ dug up all my delphinium and snapdragon seedlings! Guess i've got to find something to replace them.

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    XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    Didgeridoo wrote: »
    GOSH DARN SQUIRRELS

    Squirrels have eaten/ dug up all my delphinium and snapdragon seedlings! Guess i've got to find something to replace them.

    try squirrel corpses!

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    My tomato seedlings died. I think it got too cold. Damn my hubris, planting them so early.

    Fortunately it was only 5 seedlings out of a pack of 200 seeds so I think I'll be ok to try again.

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    My baby brassicas have leveled up

    b89b8aqb4kck.jpg

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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    We started moving some baby plants we were growing in our indoor greenhouse outside to acclimate them now that it's warming up, and immediately got a huge wind storm that knocked most of them over. We salvaged the ones we could and moved them back inside. My wife is so sad.

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    mccartmccart Registered User regular
    I sowed my beets in my little garden last night, it's probably about two weeks early for where I live but I figured I'd give it a shot considering I still have like 50 seeds left over from last year.

    Still trying to decide if I want to try to plant stuff that the slugs destroyed last year and construct some kind of slug barrier. Perhaps I'll just stick to things they don't like. A friend gave us some totmato plants that are doing well indoors, so I don't have to worry about that anymore which is awesome.

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    PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    I've heard a little saucer with a bit of cheap malt liquor attracts slugs, but I cannot attest to the veracity of the claim.

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    webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    edited April 2019
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    I've heard a little saucer with a bit of cheap malt liquor attracts slugs, but I cannot attest to the veracity of the claim.

    Oh it totally does, We use bud lite personally. What works really well is sinking in a saucer of beer with the lip level with the ground, then put one of those Taco shell cookers over it. Keeps it from getting rained on and still has little slots for the slugs to crawl in.

    Diatomaceous earth can work as well, but it has to be dry.

    webguy20 on
    Steam ID: Webguy20
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    PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    webguy20 wrote: »
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    I've heard a little saucer with a bit of cheap malt liquor attracts slugs, but I cannot attest to the veracity of the claim.

    Oh it totally does, We use bud lite personally. What works really well is sinking in a saucer of beer with the lip level with the ground, then put one of those Taco shell cookers over it. Keeps it from getting rained on and still has little slots for the slugs to crawl in.

    Diatomaceous earth can work as well, but it has to be dry.

    My roommate swore by using Hurricane, and I was shocked even slugs would drink that shit.

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    mccartmccart Registered User regular
    Nice I'll have to try that, I really want some Napa cabbage this year.

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    JedocJedoc In the scuppers with the staggers and jagsRegistered User regular
    I feel a little bit bad about poisoning slugs in a way that I don't worry about when eradicating bugs with a decent exoskeleton. It's like, you're basically a streak of snot with no defensive capabilities, who am I to give you more problems?

    Not enough to actually refrain from poisoning them, of course. Crops is crops, and I needs my leafy greens.

    GDdCWMm.jpg
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    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    Top: Any idea what these variegated leafy fellows are?
    Bottom: Yay, my lil huckleberry has flowers!

    2019-04-18%2016.37.24.jpg

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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    Top are hostas

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    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    Oh, cool! My coworker was saying I should get some hostas, looks as if I already have some!

    And more bleeding hearts, because they are just growing so well:

    2019-04-18%2019.45.08.jpg

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    PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    Boy jeez I wonder why they call them bleeding hearts.

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    Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister It Gets Worse before it gets any better.Registered User regular
    bleeding hearts are one of my favorites ever. they're a root, too, so they're a perennial! if i'm not mistaken...

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    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    They are!

    I believe my entire shady bed is perennials, so it’ll be interesting to see how it does throughout this year and next!

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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    They are perennials but most varieties’ leaves die off after blooming, which is a shame because the foliage is nearly as striking as the flowers

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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    You know what goes well in a shady bed with hostas and the heuchera/coral bells you posted above? Hakenochloa, “Japanese forest grass”:
    03xn8ohp6h1s.jpeg

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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    You know what goes well in a shady bed with hostas and the heuchera/coral bells you posted above? Hakenochloa, “Japanese forest grass”:
    03xn8ohp6h1s.jpeg

    Oh snap that's a really great look.

    Damn I need to buy a house with a lawn.

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    PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    You know what goes well in a shady bed with hostas and the heuchera/coral bells you posted above? Hakenochloa, “Japanese forest grass”:
    03xn8ohp6h1s.jpeg

    Oh snap that's a really great look.

    Damn I need to buy a house with a lawn.

    Then you better stop buying avocado toast.
    In this economy?!
    Good luck!

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    KaplarKaplar On Google MapsRegistered User regular
    Janson wrote: »
    *snip*

    Niko helped me a little and we found treasure!:

    2019-04-07%2019.58.02.jpg

    *snip*

    Gardening is cool and all, but Niko's shirt is rad.

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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    In other news

    I managed to get all of my indoor plants into my car for the long journey from Texas to Seattle. I wasn't sure how they'd handle it, but I think they might all survive!? Which is amazing. The fern and monstera might end up losing a leaf/frond or two, because they were touching the glass windows overnight during an unavoidable freeze, and now those parts are a dark brown/black. BUT! Everything else seems to be doing okay, and the remaining parts of those two plants seem to be okay, so fingers crossed!

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    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    That’s awesome! I have faith in you, little plants. Make that cross-country journey!

    I put in another 5-6 hours of yardwork today; didn’t plant anything new, but I did dig up two large bushes and moved a ton of river rock. My back is complaining immensely.

    I didn’t know whether this should go here or in the house thread, but I’ve put most of my yard updates in this thread so far...

    Firstly, (top) is a photo of the bizarre dry river bed that was in our back yard; just pointless and didn’t go anywhere and was impossible to mow around. I ended up moving about 3/4 of the rocks in it; some rocks went to line two more beds, some rocks got tossed into the spider/fern/moss infested corner. Luckily Mori’s parents loaned me their wagon so I could more easily transport rocks to the front yard.
    (Bottom) is the back yard in sun! We had sun today after 10 days of rain; I heard and saw sooo many neighbors doing yardwork today. You can see that I have removed most of the river bed and that Mori was able to mow the grass (except around the fire pit):

    2019-04-20%2017.16.34.jpg

    The front yard: I removed bushes. This is before and after. This was tough work; those roots went pretty deep! And some of those rocks are as big as Niko’s head!

    2019-04-20%2017.06.08.jpg

    Next: the side yard. Looks so much better with a mown lawn. The wisteria was all the way up to the roof when we first viewed the house and one of our conditions of sale was that it be trimmed back. It’s starting to bud now.

    You can see in the top photo that my shady bed does actually get some sun! It was October when we moved in, so the sun path was lower, and it’s been overcast for so long that I thought it was in full shade. But it gets about an hour of afternoon sun.

    2019-04-20%2017.06.43.jpg

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    japanjapan Registered User regular
    I built some raised beds over the winter to try the square foot garden thing for vegetable growing.

    I last did this in open ground when I was living 350 miles further south, so this is ... not going to plan. In particular I am having a hell of a time getting anything sown directly in the beds to germinate, though this is probably a combination of my instinct for when this should be feasible being way off, and the less than ideal position of the beds (at the moment I think they just don't get enough direct sun to warm through).

    I've got a few things on the go from seeds germinated in a propagator so we'll see how those get on. We're having a heatwave so cabbages and cauliflowers are planted out, lettuces have germinated in the beds, and I have a couple of pea shoots.

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    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    Ooh, Mori’s mom has a fig tree to give us

    She bought it for herself but has nowhere to put it

    (It’s also how I got the nine bark; she bought it then realized there was nowhere in her yard for it to go).

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    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    So:

    Nine bark is doing well, huckleberry is getting more sun than I thought and is doing well.

    The bee balm was looking really sad all of a sudden (it had been doing SO well)... we had one partly sunny weekend and it suddenly collapsed from need of water. Watered it and it perked right back up and now I know it loves its water.

    It turns out we have two heavenly bamboo in our yard... I already dug one up last weekend, but I’ll remove the other this weekend. It’s invasive and non-native and poisonous to birds. I’m hoping to replace them with blueberry bushes.

    One African violet looks stunning; the other died but has a small crop of new leaves so hopefully it comes back.

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    japanjapan Registered User regular
    Whelp, the wind today has snapped the stems of all the cabbages I had planted out last week, level with the ground

    I have a few more seedlings, because they germinated really well, but that's annoying

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    MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    Question time:

    I've done crocus lawns successfully. Daffodils and other bulbs also die back relatively early; can they be successfully planted in a lawn area that would be mowed after they die back? I was considering a proposal for in front of a small cemetery that could have flowers in the early spring for beautification, then would be mowed back as the bulbs go dormant and the grass starts getting long. Daffodils are a traditional cemetery flower and some early spring color is always welcome. Any thoughts/experience?

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    One of my nephew's baby sunflowers is a mutant

    Normal sunflower: 2 seed leaves, followed by leaves growing in pairs

    t3jc7hs7bfqt.jpg

    This guy: Conjoined seed leaves (which make a heart, awww), and then it's growing 1 new leaf at a time on alternate sides

    cgq8faowtpp5.jpg


    I am in love with the little freak. Curious what the flower will look like eventually.

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Mayabird wrote: »
    Question time:

    I've done crocus lawns successfully. Daffodils and other bulbs also die back relatively early; can they be successfully planted in a lawn area that would be mowed after they die back? I was considering a proposal for in front of a small cemetery that could have flowers in the early spring for beautification, then would be mowed back as the bulbs go dormant and the grass starts getting long. Daffodils are a traditional cemetery flower and some early spring color is always welcome. Any thoughts/experience?

    All I know with daffodils is you're supposed to let the foliage totally die back and not remove it. So mowing the leaves off might be bad for them?

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    MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    Mayabird wrote: »
    Question time:

    I've done crocus lawns successfully. Daffodils and other bulbs also die back relatively early; can they be successfully planted in a lawn area that would be mowed after they die back? I was considering a proposal for in front of a small cemetery that could have flowers in the early spring for beautification, then would be mowed back as the bulbs go dormant and the grass starts getting long. Daffodils are a traditional cemetery flower and some early spring color is always welcome. Any thoughts/experience?

    All I know with daffodils is you're supposed to let the foliage totally die back and not remove it. So mowing the leaves off might be bad for them?

    Right, wait until after the foliage has died back to mow. This plan wouldn't work so well in more southern places where the grass would already need cutting when the daffodils are blooming, but I've been able to get away with not mowing a lawn until crocuses have died back, and daffodils die back soon after so theoretically it should work too.

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    EinzelEinzel Registered User regular
    My peaches are finally starting to grow leaves again so I feel like a proud dad. Now I just need to find space for my 4 spherical foot large pineapple plants...

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    KaplarKaplar On Google MapsRegistered User regular
    One of my nephew's baby sunflowers is a mutant

    Normal sunflower: 2 seed leaves, followed by leaves growing in pairs

    t3jc7hs7bfqt.jpg

    This guy: Conjoined seed leaves (which make a heart, awww), and then it's growing 1 new leaf at a time on alternate sides

    cgq8faowtpp5.jpg


    I am in love with the little freak. Curious what the flower will look like eventually.

    Feed me, Seymour

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