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It's Party Thyme in the [PLANTS] Thread!

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    japanjapan Registered User regular
    You get some really odd looking blooms out of sunflowers sometimes. Blooms within blooms, heart shaped or star shaped blooms, etc. I wonder if it'll turn out like that.

    Today I gave in and got a heated propagator. Some things are just totally failing to germinate either in the ground, in the greenhouse, or in the unheated propagator that I have already.

    Successes:
    Tomatoes
    Lettuce
    Peas (albeit like, three, out of a large handful of peas down - they were old so I thought I might get poor germination)
    Brassicas generally (cabbage, mizuna, caulis, romanesco, sprouting broccoli)

    Failures:
    Any and all roots (carrots, beets, perpetual spinach, radishes, Hamburg parsley)
    Cos lettuce (might just be old seed)

    The radishes really surprised me, and I'm chalking that up to being so much further north. Where I was before you could literally scatter radish seed on the ground in April and it would shoot up in a matter of days.

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    MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    Way too early to tell how that sunflower's going to turn out. I just hope tall, because it's fun watching them grow from a seed to above my head in a few months.

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    japanjapan Registered User regular
    I have one particular squash seedling going like a rocket, having been planted six days ago. Wasn't expecting that, so I'll need to get it out into the greenhouse even though it might still be too cold. Otherwise, it's going to start levering the lid off the propagator. The tiny one in the same tray didn't properly shed its seed coat, so I had to take some scissors to it to release the cotyledons. It's a bit stunted but will hopefully be fine once it makes a couple of true leaves. Also some chilli plants.

    DEw34Oth.jpg

    This is one of the Hamburg parsley seeds that have been in the ground for eight weeks, and have only now decided they're going to show themselves. I'd honestly written these off but it looks like I'll actually have near perfect germination from what I sowed. Gives me some hope for the carrots planted about the same time (though I also started some in modules in the greenhouse just in case).

    iEnJ1FZh.jpg

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    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    Plant check-ins!

    Here are some newbies:

    2019-05-06%2018.59.06.jpg

    Top: On the left we have some Thai chili and basil, they’ll be staying in this pot. In the middle are sunflowers, I need to plant them soon. On the right is lemon balm, which started off tiny and has already more than doubled in size. Once it’s a bit bigger I’ll plant it in a corner where it can spread to its heart’s content. All of these were given to me by Mori’s mom.
    Bottom: Mori’s mom gave me a few leftover nasturtium seeds and I think they actually all sprouted! They’re along the bottom.
    The clustered together sprouts are bee’s friend.

    Next, let’s check in on some plants I planted earlier:

    2019-05-06%2018.59.28.jpg

    Left: The bee balm has doubled in size since I planted it.
    It’s a little weird through because it’ll look lovely and healthy in the morning, then any hint of sun (bearing in mind I’m in Washington so it’s not too hot and it’s not a shade plant) it goes all sad and droopy. Online sources say it only needs an inch of water a week but this bee balm seems to be thirsty for a lot more. It perks up after water in the evening. Anyway, it is growing very well and I have now spread mulch around the base to keep the soil moist.
    Right: The golden gate fuschia has put up this one very tall stalk, while the rest of it is growing at a steady pace. Mori’s mom is jealous because she also bought one and she planted it in an arguably more sunny spot and hers has barely grown at all.

    2019-05-06%2019.00.37.jpg

    Top: This is where one of the blue corydalis was (more on that in a bit). It was suffering in the sun so I transplanted it and put this hummingbird fuschia. In the bottom-right mystery bulbs are sprouting. What are they?!
    Bottom: Yay wisteria

    2019-05-06%2019.00.58.jpg

    Left: The wallflower orchid’s flowers have lasted over 6 weeks, plus new blooms are sprouting, so I think it is doing pretty well!
    Right: Baby fig tree, just planted... hopefully it does well!

    2019-05-06%2020.57.44.jpg

    Top: So I planted four corydalis in different spots around the yard to see how well they did (this was before it grew really sunny and I thought some parts of the yard were shadier than they actually are...). The one on the left is the one I transplanted after its previous position saw it frying in the sun. I think it already looks better... we shall see if it survives.
    Bottom: The surprise hostas are growing in!

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    mccartmccart Registered User regular
    I picked the absolute worst day to put my tomato plants outside; the low last night was forecasted to be 40F, but it dropped down to 31F before I noticed. All of the plants are pretty much fucked now. I feel extra bad about it since the plants were a gift from a friend.

    Learn from me and cover your stuff if frost is even remotely possible.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    What kinda plants we talkin' here? Are you looking for blooming, nice foliage, trees or shrubs? Low maintenance? Something that doesn't need to be replanted every year, I assume?

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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    What kinda plants we talkin' here? Are you looking for blooming, nice foliage, trees or shrubs? Low maintenance? Something that doesn't need to be replanted every year, I assume?

    no wait I figured it all out make a giant CRANBERRY BOG

    You harvest when it floods!

    I'll be here all week you guys

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    What kinda plants we talkin' here? Are you looking for blooming, nice foliage, trees or shrubs? Low maintenance? Something that doesn't need to be replanted every year, I assume?

    low maintenance shrubbery would be perfect, but anything to reduce the standing water and boggy nature in the spring would be great

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    What kinda plants we talkin' here? Are you looking for blooming, nice foliage, trees or shrubs? Low maintenance? Something that doesn't need to be replanted every year, I assume?

    low maintenance shrubbery would be perfect, but anything to reduce the standing water and boggy nature in the spring would be great

    Sounds like some good drainage and a nice ground cover would work wonders.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited May 2019
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    What kinda plants we talkin' here? Are you looking for blooming, nice foliage, trees or shrubs? Low maintenance? Something that doesn't need to be replanted every year, I assume?

    low maintenance shrubbery would be perfect, but anything to reduce the standing water and boggy nature in the spring would be great

    Sounds like some good drainage and a nice ground cover would work wonders.

    I need a permit for that, a general contractor to sign off on it, the 'before you dig' company to come out and do a survey, and inspector to come out to make sure I didn't fuck up the grading (and a few other dumb processes).

    I don't need a permit for planting shrubs and trees though! (just gotta call the 811 before you dig people)

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    I doubt there is a plant that would drink enough water to prevent flooding if the area has poor drainage

    If there is, it is probably an invasive species of some type

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    I doubt there is a plant that would drink enough water to prevent flooding if the area has poor drainage

    If there is, it is probably an invasive species of some type

    Oh it's not like 3 feet deep it's like this:

    b4hG9TR.png

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    That's sort of what I was referring to, that's a pretty serious drainage issue

    At least at the state park I worked at, we were told you couldn't fix that sort of situation with a plant

    The best thing you can do with a plant there is cover it up

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Someone told me to plant american hazelnuts or elderberries because they love the swampy ground we have in syracuse but I dunno if I want to deal with the nuisance of hazelnuts everywhere (and attracting stinkbugs). Someone else mentioned blueberries too.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister It Gets Worse before it gets any better.Registered User regular
    cranberries.

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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    I can think of plants that love that much water but none that also love the climate of central New York.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    cranberries.

    I'm giving both you and ND the evil eye so bad right now

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    bowen have you thought about planting the famous 1994 song Zombie there?

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    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    What kinda plants we talkin' here? Are you looking for blooming, nice foliage, trees or shrubs? Low maintenance? Something that doesn't need to be replanted every year, I assume?

    low maintenance shrubbery would be perfect, but anything to reduce the standing water and boggy nature in the spring would be great

    Sounds like some good drainage and a nice ground cover would work wonders.

    I need a permit for that, a general contractor to sign off on it, the 'before you dig' company to come out and do a survey, and inspector to come out to make sure I didn't fuck up the grading (and a few other dumb processes).

    I don't need a permit for planting shrubs and trees though! (just gotta call the 811 before you dig people)

    What? In the land of the free you can't put a soakwell and a collector drain in your own back yard?

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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    What kinda plants we talkin' here? Are you looking for blooming, nice foliage, trees or shrubs? Low maintenance? Something that doesn't need to be replanted every year, I assume?

    low maintenance shrubbery would be perfect, but anything to reduce the standing water and boggy nature in the spring would be great

    Sounds like some good drainage and a nice ground cover would work wonders.

    I need a permit for that, a general contractor to sign off on it, the 'before you dig' company to come out and do a survey, and inspector to come out to make sure I didn't fuck up the grading (and a few other dumb processes).

    I don't need a permit for planting shrubs and trees though! (just gotta call the 811 before you dig people)

    What? In the land of the free you can't put a soakwell and a collector drain in your own back yard?

    When you live in a populated area? No. Loads of utility lines, and changes you make could easily have knock-on effects for your neighbors, so you need qualified folks to actually agree that what you're planning to do won't make the rest of the neighborhood uninhabitable because e.g. whoops you didn't know there was already a french drain under your neighbor's yard that ran into his garden and now you're also flooding him with your runoff.

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    L Ron HowardL Ron Howard The duck MinnesotaRegistered User regular
    Bowen, you might want to look into French Drains for that.

    Or plant a weeping willow.

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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    That's exactly the kind of thing french drains were invented for. Shouldn't be too expensive to have a plumber come out and install them.

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    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    3clipse wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    What kinda plants we talkin' here? Are you looking for blooming, nice foliage, trees or shrubs? Low maintenance? Something that doesn't need to be replanted every year, I assume?

    low maintenance shrubbery would be perfect, but anything to reduce the standing water and boggy nature in the spring would be great

    Sounds like some good drainage and a nice ground cover would work wonders.

    I need a permit for that, a general contractor to sign off on it, the 'before you dig' company to come out and do a survey, and inspector to come out to make sure I didn't fuck up the grading (and a few other dumb processes).

    I don't need a permit for planting shrubs and trees though! (just gotta call the 811 before you dig people)

    What? In the land of the free you can't put a soakwell and a collector drain in your own back yard?

    When you live in a populated area? No. Loads of utility lines, and changes you make could easily have knock-on effects for your neighbors, so you need qualified folks to actually agree that what you're planning to do won't make the rest of the neighborhood uninhabitable because e.g. whoops you didn't know there was already a french drain under your neighbor's yard that ran into his garden and now you're also flooding him with your runoff.

    Lol I put a soakwell in my backyard, didn't even bother to see if I needed a permit. I know where the sewage, water, and gas lines are though and I'm at least 40 feet away from all of them. The lawn area Bowen mentioned having to mow is nearly 100 sqm bigger than my entire block, too.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    3clipse wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    What kinda plants we talkin' here? Are you looking for blooming, nice foliage, trees or shrubs? Low maintenance? Something that doesn't need to be replanted every year, I assume?

    low maintenance shrubbery would be perfect, but anything to reduce the standing water and boggy nature in the spring would be great

    Sounds like some good drainage and a nice ground cover would work wonders.

    I need a permit for that, a general contractor to sign off on it, the 'before you dig' company to come out and do a survey, and inspector to come out to make sure I didn't fuck up the grading (and a few other dumb processes).

    I don't need a permit for planting shrubs and trees though! (just gotta call the 811 before you dig people)

    What? In the land of the free you can't put a soakwell and a collector drain in your own back yard?

    When you live in a populated area? No. Loads of utility lines, and changes you make could easily have knock-on effects for your neighbors, so you need qualified folks to actually agree that what you're planning to do won't make the rest of the neighborhood uninhabitable because e.g. whoops you didn't know there was already a french drain under your neighbor's yard that ran into his garden and now you're also flooding him with your runoff.

    Lol I put a soakwell in my backyard, didn't even bother to see if I needed a permit. I know where the sewage, water, and gas lines are though and I'm at least 40 feet away from all of them. The lawn area Bowen mentioned having to mow is nearly 100 sqm bigger than my entire block, too.

    Yeah I live in an area that has rules/regulations out the wazoo because they're trying to keep a certain appearance of small quaint village. I have to get a permit to install those plastic sheds you can buy at home depot for $1000. Anything larger than 12" deep needs a permit in my village.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    3clipse wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    What kinda plants we talkin' here? Are you looking for blooming, nice foliage, trees or shrubs? Low maintenance? Something that doesn't need to be replanted every year, I assume?

    low maintenance shrubbery would be perfect, but anything to reduce the standing water and boggy nature in the spring would be great

    Sounds like some good drainage and a nice ground cover would work wonders.

    I need a permit for that, a general contractor to sign off on it, the 'before you dig' company to come out and do a survey, and inspector to come out to make sure I didn't fuck up the grading (and a few other dumb processes).

    I don't need a permit for planting shrubs and trees though! (just gotta call the 811 before you dig people)

    What? In the land of the free you can't put a soakwell and a collector drain in your own back yard?

    When you live in a populated area? No. Loads of utility lines, and changes you make could easily have knock-on effects for your neighbors, so you need qualified folks to actually agree that what you're planning to do won't make the rest of the neighborhood uninhabitable because e.g. whoops you didn't know there was already a french drain under your neighbor's yard that ran into his garden and now you're also flooding him with your runoff.

    Lol I put a soakwell in my backyard, didn't even bother to see if I needed a permit. I know where the sewage, water, and gas lines are though and I'm at least 40 feet away from all of them. The lawn area Bowen mentioned having to mow is nearly 100 sqm bigger than my entire block, too.

    I mean I know for a fact people just do shit here without checking too. Doesn't mean there aren't procedures for it!

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    I also don't want to be fined, have to pay to have the work redone and checked, just do it right the first time because they find out eventually.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    3clipse wrote: »
    3clipse wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    does anyone have any good recommendation for plants I can put at the back of my yard? It's got some water issues and slightly floods during super heavy rainstorms and during the winter thaw, and I'd like to get something to help deal with that or at least make it look prettier in the back instead of super swampy

    What kinda plants we talkin' here? Are you looking for blooming, nice foliage, trees or shrubs? Low maintenance? Something that doesn't need to be replanted every year, I assume?

    low maintenance shrubbery would be perfect, but anything to reduce the standing water and boggy nature in the spring would be great

    Sounds like some good drainage and a nice ground cover would work wonders.

    I need a permit for that, a general contractor to sign off on it, the 'before you dig' company to come out and do a survey, and inspector to come out to make sure I didn't fuck up the grading (and a few other dumb processes).

    I don't need a permit for planting shrubs and trees though! (just gotta call the 811 before you dig people)

    What? In the land of the free you can't put a soakwell and a collector drain in your own back yard?

    When you live in a populated area? No. Loads of utility lines, and changes you make could easily have knock-on effects for your neighbors, so you need qualified folks to actually agree that what you're planning to do won't make the rest of the neighborhood uninhabitable because e.g. whoops you didn't know there was already a french drain under your neighbor's yard that ran into his garden and now you're also flooding him with your runoff.

    Lol I put a soakwell in my backyard, didn't even bother to see if I needed a permit. I know where the sewage, water, and gas lines are though and I'm at least 40 feet away from all of them. The lawn area Bowen mentioned having to mow is nearly 100 sqm bigger than my entire block, too.

    I mean I know for a fact people just do shit here without checking too. Doesn't mean there aren't procedures for it!

    I actually went looking after I made that post, and no, there is no requirement for local council planning approval for garden soakwells in my suburb. Hell even in one of Perth's snootiest suburbs (Peppermint Grove) they couldn't give a hoot, put in as many soakwells as you want on your tens of millions of dollars worth of property!

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    "is soil going to be disturbed in an area larger than 5 square feet?" is the conditional for a permit for me

    You could probably skirt the rules for a soakwell there, but I think my village has rainwater right capture nonsense because we're basically abutting onondaga lake (I'm 3 blocks from it)

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    PerrsunPerrsun Registered User regular
    tHnzhuMl.jpg
    I’ve got this guy on my desk at work. It used to be one of those “3 plants braided around each other” but the other 2 plants dropped all of their leaves and died some months ago. This one has kept strong, though. For a while I thought it would die, too, but for every branch that wilted and dropped a new one came in, and now it seems to be growing without dropping.

    Is there a good/easy way to grow more individual plants to replace the ones that died? Like, can I snap/cut off one of these healthy branches and get it to take root and become it's own mini-tree?

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Do you know what species it is?

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    PerrsunPerrsun Registered User regular
    I believe it’s Guiana Chestnut/pachira aquatica/“money plant”... but I could be wrong.

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
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    MadpoetMadpoet Registered User regular
    I've never really been into gardening, but the new house had a raised bed all put together, so I figured we'd put something in it. I figured $20 in seeds, see what comes up, right?
    We wound up with $200 in various starter plants. The raised bed is full and there is a row of blue, black, and raspberries growing along the back. The blueberries seem to be doing okay, but the raspberries seem to be struggling. The leaves are kinda looking yellow and wilting. Which apparently means either they're not getting enough water, or.... they're getting too much water.
    A paper I found says they need 1 inch of water per week. That's a two-dimensional measurement, how does that even make sense?
    At least the raised bed is looking good.... I just gotta get $200 worth of lettuce and spinach out of it to break even.

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    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    Update on wisteria:

    2019-05-11%2000.01.00.jpg

    Also any idea what is at the bottom? Two feet tall, sprung up verrrry quickly the other week.

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    Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    That might be tradescantia/spiderwort?

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    PerrsunPerrsun Registered User regular

    Thank you. I guess I didn’t have the words for what I wanted to do, but yeah, propagate is it :)

    From this and a video I watched (now that I know what to search for) it seems like I may need to let it grow a bit before cutting anything off, since if I make a cutting with 3 leaf nodes... that’s half the existing plant.

    But I guess once I do make the cutting, if I can get one to grow roots then I can maybe transfer it back to the main pot.

    Thanks again. :)

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    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Madpoet wrote: »
    I've never really been into gardening, but the new house had a raised bed all put together, so I figured we'd put something in it. I figured $20 in seeds, see what comes up, right?
    We wound up with $200 in various starter plants. The raised bed is full and there is a row of blue, black, and raspberries growing along the back. The blueberries seem to be doing okay, but the raspberries seem to be struggling. The leaves are kinda looking yellow and wilting. Which apparently means either they're not getting enough water, or.... they're getting too much water.
    A paper I found says they need 1 inch of water per week. That's a two-dimensional measurement, how does that even make sense?
    At least the raised bed is looking good.... I just gotta get $200 worth of lettuce and spinach out of it to break even.

    Put a cup in the garden bed when the plants are watered, and measure how deep the water is in the bottom of the cup when watering is over. From there, maths!

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    N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    Madpoet wrote: »
    I've never really been into gardening, but the new house had a raised bed all put together, so I figured we'd put something in it. I figured $20 in seeds, see what comes up, right?
    We wound up with $200 in various starter plants. The raised bed is full and there is a row of blue, black, and raspberries growing along the back. The blueberries seem to be doing okay, but the raspberries seem to be struggling. The leaves are kinda looking yellow and wilting. Which apparently means either they're not getting enough water, or.... they're getting too much water.
    A paper I found says they need 1 inch of water per week. That's a two-dimensional measurement, how does that even make sense?
    At least the raised bed is looking good.... I just gotta get $200 worth of lettuce and spinach out of it to break even.

    This is my favorite thing about taking care of plants. Everything is always either too much water or too little water and good luck figuring out which! Haha

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    japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited May 2019
    Jobs for today:

    - Potting up my chilli (padron) seedlings
    - Transplanting my carrot seedlings, which I could only get to germinate in the greenhouse
    - Planting out my purple sprouting broccoli seedlings

    I'm hoping that the carrots will be ok, the standard advice is never to transplant them, but nothing sown directly in the ground germinated. I have a few more things on the go in the propagator, including more beetroot (to supplement those already planted out), two kinds of kale, aubergines, and more chillies (cayenne).

    Squashes are doing ok in the greenhouse, and tomatoes are getting to the size that they'll be worth potting up to their final big pots reasonably soon. If we get a couple of warm weeks I think most things will start putting on some proper growth.

    japan on
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