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Mods know too much about the [Conspiracy Theories] thread

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Posts

  • ExtreaminatusExtreaminatus Registered User regular
    Yep, lots of traditional Okinawan karate weapons were actually born from farm implements, so they don't just like they could do farm things, they actually did do farm things in addition to not-farm things (like killing). This not only made them easier to hide in plain sight, but no samurai would think twice about a peasant carrying their tools around a village, so it was easy to keep them nearby when it came time to fight.

    Preacher wrote: »
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  • CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    edited November 8
    Kama ARE you used to cut grass, and implements a lot like nunchucks are used for manual grain threshing.

    Being handed an actual kama, available at any home goods store, and told to use it to cut weeds on the school grounds was one of the more amusing parts about teaching in Japan.

    Yeah I knew they were actual grass implements. I didn't know exactly what nunchaku were used for though, thanks for that!

    But yeah it's a case of laborers rising up against the man. Which is super cool.

    Bringing it back to the topic, I have to wonder if there was some Samurai somewhere saying, "I swear, these farmers are plotting, they're trying to fight against the order of society! They're hiding weapons in secret, I know it!" and his friends shaking their heads and saying, "Oh god, here comes Shotaro with his dumb conspiracy theories again."

    Cambiata on
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  • FryFry Registered User regular
    Shower thought: I wonder if there's a Mandela Effect for the Sara Lee slogan.

    Nobody does it like Sara Lee!

    Cambiata
  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User regular
    Fry wrote: »
    Shower thought: I wonder if there's a Mandela Effect for the Sara Lee slogan.

    Nobody does it like Sara Lee!
    I've always heard it as "Nobody Doesn't Like Sara Lee", precisely because it seemed a ridiculous double negative. Although the thing about "Nobody does it like" version is the euphemism factor.

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  • CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    Fry wrote: »
    Shower thought: I wonder if there's a Mandela Effect for the Sara Lee slogan.

    Nobody does it like Sara Lee!

    I had no idea I was remembering it wrong until you posted this. "Nobody doesn't like Sara Lee"? That's what they've been saying this whole time?!

  • EvanderEvander Registered User regular
    That falls more in the category of “misheard lyrics/phrases” to me. There’s a million song lyrics that if you asked me to sing off the top of my head I’d get a word wrong here or there, but that’s just because I’m going from auditory memory, and I never saw what they actually were.

    It’s the same as “Luke, I am your father.” or “Alas, poor Yorrick, I knew him well.” (Yes, it’s just as easy to read Hamlet as to watch it, but also the people who read Hamlet are more than happy to correct the people who get that line wrong.)

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  • I ZimbraI Zimbra Registered User regular
    Great new everyone:



    Trump stopped them from doing the bad chemtrails and they're only doing the good chemtrails now.

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  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    edited November 9
    I Zimbra wrote: »
    Great new everyone:



    Trump stopped them from doing the bad chemtrails and they're only doing the good chemtrails now.

    Wait, that's literally all it took?

    What other conspiracy nonsense can we claim our good and best President has put to rest?

    Has he eradicated the reptilians by filling the cavities between the core and the Earth's crust with a molten slurry of rock which he has dubbed 'Magma'?

    And did he do it to end their spread of their Flat Earth propaganda, designed to keep people from believing the Earth could even be hollow?

    I defy anyone to prove he didn't.

    ArbitraryDescriptor on
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  • EvanderEvander Registered User regular
    I heard he bought Comet Pingpong and fired all of the bad people there.

  • Mild ConfusionMild Confusion Smash All Things Registered User regular
    They just want you to think chemtrails have stopped so the real plan can begin, but I’m not fooled!

    steam_sig.png

    Battlenet ID: MildC#11186 - If I'm in the game, send me an invite at anytime and I'll play.
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  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    According to sources, who totally work at Nintendo you guys I'm serious, you can definitely play as Luigi in Mario 64, but only now that the PRESIDENT has OWNED THE LIBS AND TERRORISTDS!

    NobeardMild ConfusionElvenshaeZilla360
  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    edited November 10
    Because swords are commonly recognized for their noble history and quite prevalent in the UK, while the deadly nunchaku are an insidious and poorly understood foreign murder tool.

    Tldr: racist moral panic nonsense.

    The US has had a similar thing - nunchuks are still illegal in several states. A bunch of state and local bans have been dropped, and New York's was found to violate the 2nd Amendment, but the decision was based on specific bill language that California, Massachusetts, and Arizona didn't share in their bans, so last I knew those still stood. Edit: Google tells me Arizona's fell earlier this year as well.

    The bans started in the 70's because according to politicians, nunchuks are designed solely as a weapon with no purpose except to maim and kill, and street gangs were learning to spread mayhem and destruction with them far more effectively than they ever did with good clean American guns. Also kids saw them in movies and immediately do everything they see in movies (hence those dark days in 1986-87 when 34% of children ages 5-16 had their heads exploded with karate chops).

    On the flip side, cops in a number US cities (including some where civilian possession is illegal) use them, and defend their use because they're *not* solely designed as weapons and are instead a safe and harmless restraint device.

    Actual cop use of nunchuks tends to illustrate that neither claim is particularly true - they are one of the least lethal things in a cops arsenal, but also one of the most unsafe and harmful restraint devices in it.


    Meanwhile, much like the UK, swords are basically unregulated. My state bans carrying a "non-tool" knife longer than 3", but you can open carry a sword without a permit as long as you don't take it in a church, school, sports arena, or mall.

    Hevach on
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  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited November 10
    Nunchucks are two hard things connected by a soft thing, seems entirely pointless to legislate. Might as well legislate sticks.

    Honk on
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  • Linespider5Linespider5 ALL HAIL KING KILLMONGER Registered User regular
    Through the old Room 237 doc I sort of fell through a keyhole online and inadvertently discovered the existence of youtube channels that start out as new age/conspiracy fare but have pivoted into hardcore white supremacy programming.

    I always was aware that there’s plenty inroads between the hollow earth/lizard people/chem trail crowd and organized racism, but this was the first time I’d seen what I perceived to be an uncomfortable and terrifying example of drawing people in with the fanciful stuff about crystals and aliens and then over time phasing the viewership into hateful doctrine about the health of the white race.

    I’m not 100% certain where I’m going with this, beyond finding out that conspiracies can be weaponized into gateways towards more radical behavior where the anointed have been lead through a maze of nonsense prior to their initiation, further muddying a way back to a rational belief structure or any appeals to reason. It’s legitimately scary stuff.

    RchanenCentipede DamascusCaulk Bite 6Elvenshae
  • [Expletive deleted][Expletive deleted] The mediocre doctor NorwayRegistered User regular
    Hevach wrote: »
    Because swords are commonly recognized for their noble history and quite prevalent in the UK, while the deadly nunchaku are an insidious and poorly understood foreign murder tool.

    Tldr: racist moral panic nonsense.

    The US has had a similar thing - nunchuks are still illegal in several states. A bunch of state and local bans have been dropped, and New York's was found to violate the 2nd Amendment, but the decision was based on specific bill language that California, Massachusetts, and Arizona didn't share in their bans, so last I knew those still stood. Edit: Google tells me Arizona's fell earlier this year as well.

    The bans started in the 70's because according to politicians, nunchuks are designed solely as a weapon with no purpose except to maim and kill, and street gangs were learning to spread mayhem and destruction with them far more effectively than they ever did with good clean American guns. Also kids saw them in movies and immediately do everything they see in movies (hence those dark days in 1986-87 when 34% of children ages 5-16 had their heads exploded with karate chops).

    On the flip side, cops in a number US cities (including some where civilian possession is illegal) use them, and defend their use because they're *not* solely designed as weapons and are instead a safe and harmless restraint device.

    Actual cop use of nunchuks tends to illustrate that neither claim is particularly true - they are one of the least lethal things in a cops arsenal, but also one of the most unsafe and harmful restraint devices in it.


    Meanwhile, much like the UK, swords are basically unregulated. My state bans carrying a "non-tool" knife longer than 3", but you can open carry a sword without a permit as long as you don't take it in a church, school, sports arena, or mall.

    What's the legal difference between a large knife and a small sword?

    (Incidentally, both are illegal here in Norway. It's technically illegal to transport your store-bought bread knife from the store to your home.)

    Sic transit gloria mundi.
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  • GvzbgulGvzbgul Ask me about my scrotalist agenda Registered User regular
    In medieval Germany it was illegal to own a sword if you were a lower class. But you could own a knife... so the middle class would have giant knives for personal defence. I forget the specific definition but if you picture a common kitchen knife, with the wooden handles riveted onto the blade, that'd be a knife type construction, and it didn't matter how big it was, only that it was a knife design and not a sword design.

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  • Gabriel_PittGabriel_Pitt (effective against the Irish) Registered User regular
    Actual cop use of nunchuks tends to illustrate that neither claim is particularly true - they are one of the least lethal things in a cops arsenal, but also one of the most unsafe and harmful restraint devices in it.
    Nunchuks and most other varieties of multi-section staffs, and similar flexible 'reach' weapons all tend to be rather poor as actual weapons, although in the hands of a trained user, look really really cool. The classic example is the baton the same length as the nunchuk's reach. You hit with a lot more force and have a lot more control with the baton, although the nunchuks do allow for unexpected angles of attack and additional moves likes disarming or entangling that a baton can't.

    But, it takes a lot more skill and effort to get to that point, and while doing cool and flashy things is one of the fun parts of martial arts, it's a lot less practical as something to actually use in a fight.

    Also, really really good at whacking yourself with, hard, as anyone who's tried training with one will have stories of.

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  • ProhassProhass Registered User regular
    edited November 10
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    In medieval Germany it was illegal to own a sword if you were a lower class. But you could own a knife... so the middle class would have giant knives for personal defence. I forget the specific definition but if you picture a common kitchen knife, with the wooden handles riveted onto the blade, that'd be a knife type construction, and it didn't matter how big it was, only that it was a knife design and not a sword design.

    Ah yes the “you call that a knife?” Law of 1209

    Prohass on
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  • Typhoid MannyTyphoid Manny Registered User regular
    edited November 10
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    In medieval Germany it was illegal to own a sword if you were a lower class. But you could own a knife... so the middle class would have giant knives for personal defence. I forget the specific definition but if you picture a common kitchen knife, with the wooden handles riveted onto the blade, that'd be a knife type construction, and it didn't matter how big it was, only that it was a knife design and not a sword design.

    this is called a messer, which is german for knife!

    they ranged from something small enough that you could reasonably be expected to carry during a regular day to big fuckoff two-handed deals that there's credible primary sources of soldiers using to cut unarmored dudes in half

    TsIBHBS.jpg

    Typhoid Manny on
    Don't mess with me, lady. I've been drinking with skeletons.
    hitting hot metal with hammers
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  • Caulk Bite 6Caulk Bite 6 One of the multitude of Dans infesting this place Registered User regular
    I see you’ve played “knifey/swordy” before

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  • Typhoid MannyTyphoid Manny Registered User regular
    lemme talk a little bit more about messers because swords are really cool

    @Gvzbgul got it pretty much right on the construction, on swords you basically don't ever see wooden scales pinned to a tang that has pretty much the same profile as the blade except on messers but it's a common (though not ubiquitous!) way of putting together a knife

    another interesting thing is the getting-around-laws thing is one of two possible explanations for why messers were built the way they were. the other is that in like the late 1200s some cutlers' guild in germany got uppity and started making swords, which the swordmakers' guild didn't like. they got some nobleman to decree that only swordmakers could make swords, and the cutlers responded by making swords that were just really big knives as a way of thumbing their noses at The Man, and it turned out they evolved into horrifically effective cutting weapons

    Don't mess with me, lady. I've been drinking with skeletons.
    hitting hot metal with hammers
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  • Anarchy Rules!Anarchy Rules! Registered User regular
    Hevach wrote: »
    Because swords are commonly recognized for their noble history and quite prevalent in the UK, while the deadly nunchaku are an insidious and poorly understood foreign murder tool.

    Tldr: racist moral panic nonsense.

    The US has had a similar thing - nunchuks are still illegal in several states. A bunch of state and local bans have been dropped, and New York's was found to violate the 2nd Amendment, but the decision was based on specific bill language that California, Massachusetts, and Arizona didn't share in their bans, so last I knew those still stood. Edit: Google tells me Arizona's fell earlier this year as well.

    The bans started in the 70's because according to politicians, nunchuks are designed solely as a weapon with no purpose except to maim and kill, and street gangs were learning to spread mayhem and destruction with them far more effectively than they ever did with good clean American guns. Also kids saw them in movies and immediately do everything they see in movies (hence those dark days in 1986-87 when 34% of children ages 5-16 had their heads exploded with karate chops).

    On the flip side, cops in a number US cities (including some where civilian possession is illegal) use them, and defend their use because they're *not* solely designed as weapons and are instead a safe and harmless restraint device.

    Actual cop use of nunchuks tends to illustrate that neither claim is particularly true - they are one of the least lethal things in a cops arsenal, but also one of the most unsafe and harmful restraint devices in it.


    Meanwhile, much like the UK, swords are basically unregulated. My state bans carrying a "non-tool" knife longer than 3", but you can open carry a sword without a permit as long as you don't take it in a church, school, sports arena, or mall.

    Wut? Swords are heavily regulated in the UK and are illegal if the intention is to be used as an offensive weapon (samurai swords, katanas and those 'zombie killer' type weapons are all banned). You'd certainly be picked up by the police if you wandering around with a sword

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  • NyysjanNyysjan FinlandRegistered User regular
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    In medieval Germany it was illegal to own a sword if you were a lower class. But you could own a knife... so the middle class would have giant knives for personal defence. I forget the specific definition but if you picture a common kitchen knife, with the wooden handles riveted onto the blade, that'd be a knife type construction, and it didn't matter how big it was, only that it was a knife design and not a sword design.
    Largely dependant on location and time.
    In some cities a resident had to own a weapon, which often was a sword, especially in later middle ages when swrds got more common and you could just buy a secondhand one.

  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    Cambiata wrote: »
    I enjoy Berenstain/Berenstein and the Sinbad Shazaam movie, because they are a reminder of the truly spectacular creepiness of memory, which we don't notice most of the time.

    Ok but in defense of the Berenstain/Berenstein Bears thing my dad took me to a book signing at an elementary school when I was 5 and I met Stan Berenstain. He 100% pronounced it "Berenstein". There's still a signed copy of The Berenstain Bears Get Stage Fright in a box somewhere at my parents house.

    My head cannon is that at some point they just gave up and leaned into it.

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  • Kipling217Kipling217 Registered User regular
    Hevach wrote: »
    Because swords are commonly recognized for their noble history and quite prevalent in the UK, while the deadly nunchaku are an insidious and poorly understood foreign murder tool.

    Tldr: racist moral panic nonsense.

    The US has had a similar thing - nunchuks are still illegal in several states. A bunch of state and local bans have been dropped, and New York's was found to violate the 2nd Amendment, but the decision was based on specific bill language that California, Massachusetts, and Arizona didn't share in their bans, so last I knew those still stood. Edit: Google tells me Arizona's fell earlier this year as well.

    The bans started in the 70's because according to politicians, nunchuks are designed solely as a weapon with no purpose except to maim and kill, and street gangs were learning to spread mayhem and destruction with them far more effectively than they ever did with good clean American guns. Also kids saw them in movies and immediately do everything they see in movies (hence those dark days in 1986-87 when 34% of children ages 5-16 had their heads exploded with karate chops).

    On the flip side, cops in a number US cities (including some where civilian possession is illegal) use them, and defend their use because they're *not* solely designed as weapons and are instead a safe and harmless restraint device.

    Actual cop use of nunchuks tends to illustrate that neither claim is particularly true - they are one of the least lethal things in a cops arsenal, but also one of the most unsafe and harmful restraint devices in it.


    Meanwhile, much like the UK, swords are basically unregulated. My state bans carrying a "non-tool" knife longer than 3", but you can open carry a sword without a permit as long as you don't take it in a church, school, sports arena, or mall.

    What's the legal difference between a large knife and a small sword?

    (Incidentally, both are illegal here in Norway. It's technically illegal to transport your store-bought bread knife from the store to your home.)

    Actually its not, in fact you are allowed to openly carry a knife in your belt if you are heading too and from a wildlife/hunting/fishing area.

    Bread knives fall under a variant of that; the transport of dangerous tools to and from their legal destination. Now if you where stopping to buy some bread on the way...

    Communicating from the last of the Babylon Stations.
  • NorgothNorgoth cardiffRegistered User regular
    Hevach wrote: »
    Because swords are commonly recognized for their noble history and quite prevalent in the UK, while the deadly nunchaku are an insidious and poorly understood foreign murder tool.

    Tldr: racist moral panic nonsense.

    The US has had a similar thing - nunchuks are still illegal in several states. A bunch of state and local bans have been dropped, and New York's was found to violate the 2nd Amendment, but the decision was based on specific bill language that California, Massachusetts, and Arizona didn't share in their bans, so last I knew those still stood. Edit: Google tells me Arizona's fell earlier this year as well.

    The bans started in the 70's because according to politicians, nunchuks are designed solely as a weapon with no purpose except to maim and kill, and street gangs were learning to spread mayhem and destruction with them far more effectively than they ever did with good clean American guns. Also kids saw them in movies and immediately do everything they see in movies (hence those dark days in 1986-87 when 34% of children ages 5-16 had their heads exploded with karate chops).

    On the flip side, cops in a number US cities (including some where civilian possession is illegal) use them, and defend their use because they're *not* solely designed as weapons and are instead a safe and harmless restraint device.

    Actual cop use of nunchuks tends to illustrate that neither claim is particularly true - they are one of the least lethal things in a cops arsenal, but also one of the most unsafe and harmful restraint devices in it.


    Meanwhile, much like the UK, swords are basically unregulated. My state bans carrying a "non-tool" knife longer than 3", but you can open carry a sword without a permit as long as you don't take it in a church, school, sports arena, or mall.

    Wut? Swords are heavily regulated in the UK and are illegal if the intention is to be used as an offensive weapon (samurai swords, katanas and those 'zombie killer' type weapons are all banned). You'd certainly be picked up by the police if you wandering around with a sword

    Yeah, any “swords” you get in the UK are totally blunt terrible display pieces. Actual blades weapons are highly illegal, including this one.

  • autono-wally, erotibot300autono-wally, erotibot300 love machine Registered User regular
    Norgoth wrote: »
    Hevach wrote: »
    Because swords are commonly recognized for their noble history and quite prevalent in the UK, while the deadly nunchaku are an insidious and poorly understood foreign murder tool.

    Tldr: racist moral panic nonsense.

    The US has had a similar thing - nunchuks are still illegal in several states. A bunch of state and local bans have been dropped, and New York's was found to violate the 2nd Amendment, but the decision was based on specific bill language that California, Massachusetts, and Arizona didn't share in their bans, so last I knew those still stood. Edit: Google tells me Arizona's fell earlier this year as well.

    The bans started in the 70's because according to politicians, nunchuks are designed solely as a weapon with no purpose except to maim and kill, and street gangs were learning to spread mayhem and destruction with them far more effectively than they ever did with good clean American guns. Also kids saw them in movies and immediately do everything they see in movies (hence those dark days in 1986-87 when 34% of children ages 5-16 had their heads exploded with karate chops).

    On the flip side, cops in a number US cities (including some where civilian possession is illegal) use them, and defend their use because they're *not* solely designed as weapons and are instead a safe and harmless restraint device.

    Actual cop use of nunchuks tends to illustrate that neither claim is particularly true - they are one of the least lethal things in a cops arsenal, but also one of the most unsafe and harmful restraint devices in it.


    Meanwhile, much like the UK, swords are basically unregulated. My state bans carrying a "non-tool" knife longer than 3", but you can open carry a sword without a permit as long as you don't take it in a church, school, sports arena, or mall.

    Wut? Swords are heavily regulated in the UK and are illegal if the intention is to be used as an offensive weapon (samurai swords, katanas and those 'zombie killer' type weapons are all banned). You'd certainly be picked up by the police if you wandering around with a sword

    Yeah, any “swords” you get in the UK are totally blunt terrible display pieces. Actual blades weapons are highly illegal, including this one.

    yIn neH nugh

    kFJhXwE.jpgkFJhXwE.jpg
  • jothkijothki Registered User regular
    Cambiata wrote: »
    I enjoy Berenstain/Berenstein and the Sinbad Shazaam movie, because they are a reminder of the truly spectacular creepiness of memory, which we don't notice most of the time.

    Ok but in defense of the Berenstain/Berenstein Bears thing my dad took me to a book signing at an elementary school when I was 5 and I met Stan Berenstain. He 100% pronounced it "Berenstein". There's still a signed copy of The Berenstain Bears Get Stage Fright in a box somewhere at my parents house.

    My head cannon is that at some point they just gave up and leaned into it.

    I'll bet if you could find a tape of the event, it'd show that he clearly said "Berenstain".

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  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    jothki wrote: »
    Cambiata wrote: »
    I enjoy Berenstain/Berenstein and the Sinbad Shazaam movie, because they are a reminder of the truly spectacular creepiness of memory, which we don't notice most of the time.

    Ok but in defense of the Berenstain/Berenstein Bears thing my dad took me to a book signing at an elementary school when I was 5 and I met Stan Berenstain. He 100% pronounced it "Berenstein". There's still a signed copy of The Berenstain Bears Get Stage Fright in a box somewhere at my parents house.

    My head cannon is that at some point they just gave up and leaned into it.

    I'll bet if you could find a tape of the event, it'd show that he clearly said "Berenstain".

    Are you implying that an over 30 year old memory of mine at an event I didn't even want to be at and recall being both incredibly boring and frankly a little awkward because I'd stopped reading the books about two years prior might somehow not be 100% accurate?

    How dare you.

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  • furlionfurlion Riskbreaker Lea MondeRegistered User regular
    The berenstain thing got me pretty bad but in my defense my last name has Stein in it. I feel that gets me a little leeway.

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  • [Expletive deleted][Expletive deleted] The mediocre doctor NorwayRegistered User regular
    Kipling217 wrote: »
    Hevach wrote: »
    Because swords are commonly recognized for their noble history and quite prevalent in the UK, while the deadly nunchaku are an insidious and poorly understood foreign murder tool.

    Tldr: racist moral panic nonsense.

    The US has had a similar thing - nunchuks are still illegal in several states. A bunch of state and local bans have been dropped, and New York's was found to violate the 2nd Amendment, but the decision was based on specific bill language that California, Massachusetts, and Arizona didn't share in their bans, so last I knew those still stood. Edit: Google tells me Arizona's fell earlier this year as well.

    The bans started in the 70's because according to politicians, nunchuks are designed solely as a weapon with no purpose except to maim and kill, and street gangs were learning to spread mayhem and destruction with them far more effectively than they ever did with good clean American guns. Also kids saw them in movies and immediately do everything they see in movies (hence those dark days in 1986-87 when 34% of children ages 5-16 had their heads exploded with karate chops).

    On the flip side, cops in a number US cities (including some where civilian possession is illegal) use them, and defend their use because they're *not* solely designed as weapons and are instead a safe and harmless restraint device.

    Actual cop use of nunchuks tends to illustrate that neither claim is particularly true - they are one of the least lethal things in a cops arsenal, but also one of the most unsafe and harmful restraint devices in it.


    Meanwhile, much like the UK, swords are basically unregulated. My state bans carrying a "non-tool" knife longer than 3", but you can open carry a sword without a permit as long as you don't take it in a church, school, sports arena, or mall.

    What's the legal difference between a large knife and a small sword?

    (Incidentally, both are illegal here in Norway. It's technically illegal to transport your store-bought bread knife from the store to your home.)

    Actually its not, in fact you are allowed to openly carry a knife in your belt if you are heading too and from a wildlife/hunting/fishing area.

    Bread knives fall under a variant of that; the transport of dangerous tools to and from their legal destination. Now if you where stopping to buy some bread on the way...

    Well, you learn something every day.

    Sic transit gloria mundi.
  • Centipede DamascusCentipede Damascus Registered User regular
    edited November 11
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    In medieval Germany it was illegal to own a sword if you were a lower class. But you could own a knife... so the middle class would have giant knives for personal defence. I forget the specific definition but if you picture a common kitchen knife, with the wooden handles riveted onto the blade, that'd be a knife type construction, and it didn't matter how big it was, only that it was a knife design and not a sword design.

    A similar rule regarding knife duels led Jim Bowie to commission his famous knife.

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  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    I think I'd have kept an axe, personally. And a shield. I got stubby arms but quick feet and good balance. According to the SCA guy I borrowed some gear from for a "come do some swordfighting in the park and maybe sign up for the SCA" thing they were doing. It was fun!

    Also, the French martial art Savate has some of its roots in the banning of dueling swords in France, of I recall correctly. Cane fighting, plus some kicks and such from French sailors, voila, Savate. I think anyway. Maybe it was aliens.

  • Jealous DevaJealous Deva Registered User regular
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    In medieval Germany it was illegal to own a sword if you were a lower class. But you could own a knife... so the middle class would have giant knives for personal defence. I forget the specific definition but if you picture a common kitchen knife, with the wooden handles riveted onto the blade, that'd be a knife type construction, and it didn't matter how big it was, only that it was a knife design and not a sword design.

    I’m surprised someone didn’t take that ruling and make a naginata style polearm to carry around.

  • evilmrhenryevilmrhenry Registered User regular
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    In medieval Germany it was illegal to own a sword if you were a lower class. But you could own a knife... so the middle class would have giant knives for personal defence. I forget the specific definition but if you picture a common kitchen knife, with the wooden handles riveted onto the blade, that'd be a knife type construction, and it didn't matter how big it was, only that it was a knife design and not a sword design.

    I’m surprised someone didn’t take that ruling and make a naginata style polearm to carry around.

    A polearm isn't a self-defense weapon, it's what you use in war. When you're fighting as a part of a larger group, a polearm is a good weapon. When somebody tries to mug you, it's less useful than a sword, and is a nuisance the rest of the time. (You can just leave your sword in your scabbard when not in use, but a polearm basically has to be carried in a hand. Plus you need to watch out for doorways and such.)

  • Jealous DevaJealous Deva Registered User regular
    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    In medieval Germany it was illegal to own a sword if you were a lower class. But you could own a knife... so the middle class would have giant knives for personal defence. I forget the specific definition but if you picture a common kitchen knife, with the wooden handles riveted onto the blade, that'd be a knife type construction, and it didn't matter how big it was, only that it was a knife design and not a sword design.

    I’m surprised someone didn’t take that ruling and make a naginata style polearm to carry around.

    A polearm isn't a self-defense weapon, it's what you use in war. When you're fighting as a part of a larger group, a polearm is a good weapon. When somebody tries to mug you, it's less useful than a sword, and is a nuisance the rest of the time. (You can just leave your sword in your scabbard when not in use, but a polearm basically has to be carried in a hand. Plus you need to watch out for doorways and such.)


    Eh, smaller Naginatas (like 4 foot shaft - 5 or 6 foot total length) were used as self defense weapons in Japan all the time, especially by women.

    It was thought that for a smaller fighter the reach would help negate a height and arm length disadvantage and the ability to brace with 2hands in a wider grip helped negate a strength disadvantage vs a larger fighter using a sword.

  • Gabriel_PittGabriel_Pitt (effective against the Irish) Registered User regular
    edited November 11
    You do not seem to have understood the post you were responding too. A 5 foot spear is not a self defence weapon.

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  • VeeveeVeevee WisconsinRegistered User regular
    You do not seem to have understood the post you were responding too. A 5 foot spear is not a self defence weapon.

    Said another way, it was thought of as strictly an offensive weapon in Europe, even though it is primarily used in a defensive manner. The banning of offensive weapons for the peasantry meant a spear was not something one could own, nor was there a credible way to claim it as anything but a spear.

  • PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    furlion wrote: »
    The berenstain thing got me pretty bad but in my defense my last name has Stein in it. I feel that gets me a little leeway.

    Depends if your first name is Frank.

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  • Jealous DevaJealous Deva Registered User regular
    edited November 11
    You do not seem to have understood the post you were responding too. A 5 foot spear is not a self defence weapon.

    If you mean in the sense of carrying around as a sidearm into a bar or something, sure. But Naginata were absolutely used for one on one combat, and as a self defense weapon in the sense that a shotgun may be a defensive weapon today - like “hey there is a strange guy prowling around the house/standing in the road, let me grab my Naginata and go see what he wants.”

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