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[D&D 5E] Strahd kills Dumbledore.

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Posts

  • AegeriAegeri Plateau of LengRegistered User regular
    edited September 8
    TBH I have been consistently surprised that 5E, despite being held together with rules of silly string, just sort of works? It ends up with players usually being vastly more powerful than any reasonable opposition, especially once martial classes start annihilating everything with multiple attacks. It's a weird edition, because they clearly built a lot of thought into how monsters could stop spellcasters (counter spell, dispel magic, resistances/immunities, ability to instantly negate saving throw spells etc) but did nothing about a fighter hitting an enemy 10+ times in one round of combat for over 200-250 damage (that it can't react to or do anything about).

    I wouldn't ever choose to run 5E over 4E if I did get the ability to run what I wanted, but it's indisputable as someone who owns a retail store as to how incredibly well and widespread 5E is as a game. It's very possibly the best selling roleplaying game of all time at this point and is directly driving sales/interest in other games as well. It has been infinitely more successful than its original critics, including me, would have anticipated.

    Edit: I have chosen to no longer run Adventurers League though. Their organized play format is moving towards something that's great for conventions, but not something that suits the kind of in store shared campaign I want to run.

    Aegeri on
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  • Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    edited September 8
    Aegeri wrote: »
    Lycanthropes for example are entirely immune to everything that isn't silver or magical, which means they are a 500gp brick wall for low level characters. Several adventures have Lycanthropes in low level areas, such as Princes of the Apocalypse which has a wereboar (I think we've even discussed this in a past thread).

    My campaign is using a lot of werebeasts, jackalweres, and perytons right now because they're thematically appropriate. I handwaved their resistances away by having the wealthy trade consortium that hired the party give everybody who needed one a +1 magic weapon (I also gave them a floating lantern that automatically illuminates places for them so I don't have to worry about lighting). The city guards mostly have silvered weapons, too, because a nearby dwarven community was nearly destroyed by a plague started by a wererat cabal and they don't want that to happen to them, too.

    BTW, the werebeasts are all members of a beast cult that refuse to spread lycanthropy to outsiders, just so I don't have to worry about the whole party becoming werebeasts.

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  • webguy20webguy20 Registered User regular
    Zonugal wrote: »
    If you are going to give out your basic +1 longswords you should add some flavor onto them.

    Give them a name. Give them a history? Maybe the player can write something up.

    Either way, make them feel like treasure.

    I'm of the exact opposite mindset. For general campaigns +1 items are rare, but not unheard of, and the party can collect them, and to help make sure everyone can get around resistances by the time that starts cropping up regularly.

    +2 on up and items with additional effects? Those are super rare and come with backstories and other cool stuff. Also players can usually take their generic +1 and through quests and general campaign progression can upgrade their weapon and make it one a super rare of their own creation. The backstory of the weapon is then theirs. I've had it work to pretty great effect before.

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  • AegeriAegeri Plateau of LengRegistered User regular
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    Aegeri wrote: »
    Lycanthropes for example are entirely immune to everything that isn't silver or magical, which means they are a 500gp brick wall for low level characters. Several adventures have Lycanthropes in low level areas, such as Princes of the Apocalypse which has a wereboar (I think we've even discussed this in a past thread).

    My campaign is using a lot of werebeasts, jackalweres, and perytons right now because they're thematically appropriate. I handwaved their resistances away by having the wealthy trade consortium that hired the party give everybody who needed one a +1 magic weapon (I also gave them a floating lantern that automatically illuminates places for them so I don't have to worry about lighting). The city guards mostly have silvered weapons, too, because a nearby dwarven community was nearly destroyed by a plague started by a wererat cabal and they don't want that to happen to them, too.

    BTW, the werebeasts are all members of a beast cult that refuse to spread lycanthropy to outsiders, just so I don't have to worry about the whole party becoming werebeasts.

    Yes and this is exactly the kind of thinking that 5e has as a hidden assumption. It assumes the DM knows that this is a thing and needs to think about it to incorporate it into the game. It's part of why CR just doesn't function whatsoever, because a lot of monsters are built with little hidden assumptions behind how the game works or will be established by the DM.

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  • LindLind Registered User regular
    Any thoughts on Dragon Heist, I belive its out now?

  • PowerpuppiesPowerpuppies Registered User regular
    Real mad that the dragon involved is a type of currency

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  • GoumindongGoumindong Registered User regular
    edited September 8
    5th edition, despite any claims to the contrary by various wotc people, really seems balanced around people that hit things with things doing magic damage of some sort around 6th level

    This doesn't even mean you need to give them a magic weapon, letting your party's wizard enchant their stabstick to be considered magical damage by grinding up a diamond and spending a night on it is another option

    I am not even so sure anymore. You do so much damage as a fighter or barbarian just hitting things not dealing resistance piercing damage isn't even a big deal. The ability of casters to cast magic weapon (2rd level spell, concentration up to an hour, bonus action cast) can pretty easily negate the need if the players are prepared.

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  • Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    edited September 8
    Aegeri wrote: »
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    Aegeri wrote: »
    Lycanthropes for example are entirely immune to everything that isn't silver or magical, which means they are a 500gp brick wall for low level characters. Several adventures have Lycanthropes in low level areas, such as Princes of the Apocalypse which has a wereboar (I think we've even discussed this in a past thread).

    My campaign is using a lot of werebeasts, jackalweres, and perytons right now because they're thematically appropriate. I handwaved their resistances away by having the wealthy trade consortium that hired the party give everybody who needed one a +1 magic weapon (I also gave them a floating lantern that automatically illuminates places for them so I don't have to worry about lighting). The city guards mostly have silvered weapons, too, because a nearby dwarven community was nearly destroyed by a plague started by a wererat cabal and they don't want that to happen to them, too.

    BTW, the werebeasts are all members of a beast cult that refuse to spread lycanthropy to outsiders, just so I don't have to worry about the whole party becoming werebeasts.

    Yes and this is exactly the kind of thinking that 5e has as a hidden assumption. It assumes the DM knows that this is a thing and needs to think about it to incorporate it into the game. It's part of why CR just doesn't function whatsoever, because a lot of monsters are built with little hidden assumptions behind how the game works or will be established by the DM.

    I will say that one of my least favorite things about 5E is that making new monsters is a lot more time consuming and a lot less intuitive than it was in 4E. I made a lot of monsters in 4E just for fun, but trying to make a new monster in 5E recently was kind of a headache.

    EDIT: I did just find this, though:

    The Angry GM: Monster Dissection Lab

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  • SmrtnikSmrtnik job boli zub Registered User regular
    Real mad that the dragon involved is a type of currency

    I think that's quite clever actually.

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  • PowerpuppiesPowerpuppies Registered User regular
    I wanna work at Gringotts. Every customer at the bank the party staffs is a dragon. It's an ordinary shift until the first mind fog spell is cast. They're after the rare orbs!

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  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    Tell me cool homebrew world facts!

    Tritons have “dreadlocks” of thick bioluminescent tentacles on their heads in place of hair.

    Demons and other fiends kill tieflings on sight, when they’re not tempting them to evil, because if enough “representatives” of their demon lord are good it may fundamentally alter their alignment in a weird conceptual feedback loop.

    The “Underdark” equivalent of Outlands, the plane of neutrallity, is the Heartward Labyrinth. Here instead of being about the balance of true neutral, it’s the spiritual home for people that have no idea what the fuck.

    The first step to a dragon becoming powerful is shedding their colour coded scales and taking on a look that suits them personally. Very few if any dragons worship their own gods because tenet number 1 of being a dragon is to surpass your elders. Obviously, older dragons trick adventurers into slaying young upstarts all the time (not wanting to seem like they’re nervous about their own strength by killing them themselves).

    Elves think humans are dirt elementals.

    NipsDarkPrimusIvelliusElvenshaeMoridin889JustTeeMostlyjoe13never dieThe Hanged ManMvrck
  • NipsNips Luxuriating in existential crisis.Registered User regular
    Tell me cool homebrew world facts!
    ...
    The “Underdark” equivalent of Outlands, the plane of neutrallity, is the Heartward Labyrinth. Here instead of being about the balance of true neutral, it’s the spiritual home for people that have no idea what the fuck.
    ...
    Elves think humans are dirt elementals.

    Not gonna lie, these two made me lol pretty hard.

    Kinda neat homebrew world fact: I ran a session of The Quiet Year for my home campaign, to help establish some background on a region/territory I was struggling with. The place ended up with an abundance of bones and magic, and in the end became an entire society based on sympathetic, neutral necromancy that even the gods of life and death were like "Yeah, sure, that seems fine".

    Their living population is smaller than their neighboring countries in the current day, but they make up for it with literally 100x that in robed, skeletal warriors and a council of broadly-aligned (i.e. not Evil) Death Knights.

    JXUBxMxP0QndjQUEnTwTxOkfKmx8kWNvuc-FUtbSz_23_DAhGKe7W9spFKLXAtkpTBqM8Dt6kQrv-rS69Hi3FheL3fays2xTeVUvWR7g5UyLHnFA0frGk1BC12GYdOSRn9lbaJB-uH0htiLPJMrc9cSRsIgk5Dx7jg9K8rJVfG43lkeAWxTgcolNscW9KO2UZjKT8GMbYAFgFvu2TaMoLH8LBA5p2pm6VNYRsQK3QGjCsze1TOv2yIbCazmDwCHmjiQxNDf6LHP35msyiXo3CxuWs9Y8DQvJjvj10kWaspRNlWHKjS5w9Y0KLuIkhQKOxgaDziG290v4zBmTi-i7OfDz-foqIqKzC9wTbn9i_uU87GRitmrNAJdzRRsaTW5VQu_XX_5gCN8XCoNyu5RWWVGTsjJuyezz1_NpFa903Uj2TnFqnL1wJ-RZiFAAd2Bdut-G1pdQtdQihsq2dx_BjtmtGC3KZRyylO1t2c12dhfb0rStq4v8pg46ciOcdtT_1qm85IgUmGd7AmgLxCFPb0xnxWZvr26G-oXSqrQdjKA1zNIInSowiHcbUO2O8S5LRJVR6vQiEg0fbGXw4vqJYEn917tnzHMh8r0xom8BLKMvoFDelk6wbEeNq8w8Eyu2ouGjEMIvvJcb2az2AKQ1uE_7gdatfKG2QdvfdSBRSc35MQ=w498-h80-no
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  • NarbusNarbus Registered User regular
    Now I wanna run a game where the players are hired to take out the local necromancer's guild, not because of any moral issues, but because the necromancers are renting out the dead as labor and are destroying the local labor market for the living.

    Luddites for the undead.

    NipsjoshgotroDarkPrimusSmrtnikIvelliusElvenshaeRhesus PositiveMoridin889never dieMvrckNyysjan
  • SleepSleep Registered User regular
    edited September 8
    Narbus wrote: »
    Now I wanna run a game where the players are hired to take out the local necromancer's guild, not because of any moral issues, but because the necromancers are renting out the dead as labor and are destroying the local labor market for the living.

    Luddites for the undead.

    Holy shit this is good.

    This fits so well in my setting I'm sorry I might have to use this.

    Fuck this is may be the next arc for my dragonborn nobles game.

    I got a fun twist on it involving some dumb college kids.

    Necromancy is like hilariously common in my setting, literally all elven societies are known to have necromancers (up till recently they sat at or just shortly below level 4 at their highest levels working by ritual to animate the dead rather than quick and dirty spell slots). Well folks are getting to the point of quick and dirty animation... of course affluent university students first move is to monetize it.

    Sleep on
    NarbusNips
  • NipsNips Luxuriating in existential crisis.Registered User regular
    Narbus wrote: »
    Now I wanna run a game where the players are hired to take out the local necromancer's guild, not because of any moral issues, but because the necromancers are renting out the dead as labor and are destroying the local labor market for the living.

    Luddites for the undead.

    In this country I surmised, as I reflected on its history, that the the undead are the labor force because practically every living citizen is a necromancer to some degree! Only 113 living citizens survived the end of the Quiet Year, and then the D&D campaign comes several hundred years later. That gives the community time to regrow, but also that growth is literally infused with necromancy in almost all aspects of the society.

    Everything, from farming to construction and beyond, is powered by legions of skeletal thralls. Even the youngest child knows a minor cantrip to talk to the dead, and they can visit the Cadaver Assemblage and learn innumerable facts about history from the people who were there; imagine an enormous underground library of preserved and cataloged skeletal corpses, that you can query with questions...like a real library, if the books were dead people. All the while, the council of living and (sapient) undead leaders ensure that there are no abuses, and laws and traditions are maintained with proper respect.

    Like, I'm still not sure I've wrapped my head around all the repercussions the growth of such a society might have.

    JXUBxMxP0QndjQUEnTwTxOkfKmx8kWNvuc-FUtbSz_23_DAhGKe7W9spFKLXAtkpTBqM8Dt6kQrv-rS69Hi3FheL3fays2xTeVUvWR7g5UyLHnFA0frGk1BC12GYdOSRn9lbaJB-uH0htiLPJMrc9cSRsIgk5Dx7jg9K8rJVfG43lkeAWxTgcolNscW9KO2UZjKT8GMbYAFgFvu2TaMoLH8LBA5p2pm6VNYRsQK3QGjCsze1TOv2yIbCazmDwCHmjiQxNDf6LHP35msyiXo3CxuWs9Y8DQvJjvj10kWaspRNlWHKjS5w9Y0KLuIkhQKOxgaDziG290v4zBmTi-i7OfDz-foqIqKzC9wTbn9i_uU87GRitmrNAJdzRRsaTW5VQu_XX_5gCN8XCoNyu5RWWVGTsjJuyezz1_NpFa903Uj2TnFqnL1wJ-RZiFAAd2Bdut-G1pdQtdQihsq2dx_BjtmtGC3KZRyylO1t2c12dhfb0rStq4v8pg46ciOcdtT_1qm85IgUmGd7AmgLxCFPb0xnxWZvr26G-oXSqrQdjKA1zNIInSowiHcbUO2O8S5LRJVR6vQiEg0fbGXw4vqJYEn917tnzHMh8r0xom8BLKMvoFDelk6wbEeNq8w8Eyu2ouGjEMIvvJcb2az2AKQ1uE_7gdatfKG2QdvfdSBRSc35MQ=w498-h80-no
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  • SleepSleep Registered User regular
    Nips wrote: »
    Narbus wrote: »
    Now I wanna run a game where the players are hired to take out the local necromancer's guild, not because of any moral issues, but because the necromancers are renting out the dead as labor and are destroying the local labor market for the living.

    Luddites for the undead.

    In this country I surmised, as I reflected on its history, that the the undead are the labor force because practically every living citizen is a necromancer to some degree! Only 113 living citizens survived the end of the Quiet Year, and then the D&D campaign comes several hundred years later. That gives the community time to regrow, but also that growth is literally infused with necromancy in almost all aspects of the society.

    Everything, from farming to construction and beyond, is powered by legions of skeletal thralls. Even the youngest child knows a minor cantrip to talk to the dead, and they can visit the Cadaver Assemblage and learn innumerable facts about history from the people who were there; imagine an enormous underground library of preserved and cataloged skeletal corpses, that you can query with questions...like a real library, if the books were dead people. All the while, the council of living and (sapient) undead leaders ensure that there are no abuses, and laws and traditions are maintained with proper respect.

    Like, I'm still not sure I've wrapped my head around all the repercussions the growth of such a society might have.

    Yeah I'd play here

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  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    Alternately, imagine a setting where the citizens live in a life of leisure, because it's only once they die that they will have to perform manual labor.

    Puts a whole new spin on "work to the bone," doesn't it?

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  • webguy20webguy20 Registered User regular
    Oh man I could imagine where the living rich would bribe the necromancers to make sure that once they die, their corpse gets a cushy job, so that even in undeath they get to lead a privileged life.

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  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    Narbus wrote: »
    Now I wanna run a game where the players are hired to take out the local necromancer's guild, not because of any moral issues, but because the necromancers are renting out the dead as labor and are destroying the local labor market for the living.

    Luddites for the undead.

    I used to have a dwarf necromancer who was kicked out of his home for using undead as miners.
    It made sense to him, they don't unionize, they don't take breaks, they don't particularly mind the occasional pocket of toxic gas... I mean, the deal was all on the up and up of course (our Wee Jas liked contract law), he paid people well for the rights to their posthumous remains, and was a fairly regular sight at the local hospital.

    But the Canary Breeder Guild wasn't putting up with him potentially destroying the need for their services, so they organized a massive community protest against poor Phoulstones and got him cast out.

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
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  • doomybeardoomybear Hi People Registered User regular
    I'm kinda surprised dwarves + undead aren't a more popular combo, lichdom is a way to keep your gold after death, seems like a natural fit to me

    what a happy day it is
    Nips
  • ArcanisTheImpotentArcanisTheImpotent Registered User regular
    it only seems benign until you drive it to its natural forgone conclusion where necromantic might makes right and an ambitious lich lord kills everyone he comes across to bring them under his sway

  • Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    The late AD&D setting Jakandor featured a society of necromancers called the Charonti as one of its two factions. Corporeal undead contolled by the necromancers are called Charonath.

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  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    edited September 9
    I’m now picturing an insane mountain fortress where undead dwarves are just digging and building for the sake of it.

    The party would wander through tons of empty opulent dining halls and forges connected to magma pools doing some never ending melting and cooling of metals, everything clean, masterfully made and unused until they finally find the dwarves mining, some broken on the ground just clawing with their skeletal hands, still singing work songs.

    Endless_Serpents on
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  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    Welcome to Boatmurdered.

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  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    The late AD&D setting Jakandor featured a society of necromancers called the Charonti as one of its two factions. Corporeal undead contolled by the necromancers are called Charonath.

    I like the naming scheme there. Think I’ll make a nation of storm mages and call them Zuesers, led by the Zuesaroos.

    Hexmage-PAFencingsax
  • GaddezGaddez Registered User regular
    As a gm, I hand out magic items sparingly and tend to favor interesting grab bags of items over the perfunctory; an example of such a grab bag might be sending stones, an immovable rod, soverigns glue and a +1 dagger.

    Because yeah: magic items should inspire the imagination and creativity as opposed to provide satistically minute bonuses.

    Richy wrote: »
    But I think the resistance I’m getting more has to do with “rawr! Loklar said it! Rage!” than anything else.

    No, it has to do with the fact that you're done nothing but throw lies, blatant flasehoods, and downright dumb statements at us so far.
    Sleep
  • GaddezGaddez Registered User regular
    Also the last time I experimented with the random magic item table it spawned two bags of devouring.

    Richy wrote: »
    But I think the resistance I’m getting more has to do with “rawr! Loklar said it! Rage!” than anything else.

    No, it has to do with the fact that you're done nothing but throw lies, blatant flasehoods, and downright dumb statements at us so far.
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  • PowerpuppiesPowerpuppies Registered User regular
    I think fun management works best when everyone has magic weapons in addition to whatever creative stuff you want to hand out.

    Or just remove resistances from the game, I'd be fine with that

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  • webguy20webguy20 Registered User regular
    DarkPrimus wrote: »
    Welcome to Boatmurdered.

    I should re-read Boatmurdered. It's been a few years.

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  • AegeriAegeri Plateau of LengRegistered User regular
    edited September 9
    Gaddez wrote: »
    As a gm, I hand out magic items sparingly and tend to favor interesting grab bags of items over the perfunctory; an example of such a grab bag might be sending stones, an immovable rod, soverigns glue and a +1 dagger.

    Because yeah: magic items should inspire the imagination and creativity as opposed to provide satistically minute bonuses.

    Statistically minute bonuses add up hugely. Yes, 5% sounds like nothing, but 5% over 10000 rolls isn't. If that's 10,000 rolls of an average of 20 damage, then 5% of the time preventing damage means you've reduced over 10000 (!!!) damage. Similarly, a magic weapon means you've done a tremendous amount more damage, because the 50% damage reduction means you've done only 100000 damage as opposed to 200000, which is a massive difference to a front line character.

    Because that inability to deal damage means that character and other party members are more likely to take even more damage themselves.

    You need to remember that a player character isn't a monster, in a campaign they face thousands of rolls. It's 5% of a hell of a lot of rolls. Monsters in individual encounters literally do not care about 5%, but it matters over the time of a player character infinitely more because they live longer.

    Edit: Also quirky fun effect magic items are punished much more than the straight up +1 weapons. Most of the higher level monsters and such can simply nope their effects by auto-saving them or just outright ignore them anyway. Creativity only goes so far when the games mechanics are designed to just stop it. This is where the argument about what the game expects is really interesting, because a fighter with a +3 Rod of Lordly Might is going to do things to monsters like Tiamat that are simply unpleasant - while most odd items/caster style stuff will simply do nothing because she can auto-save.
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    Aegeri wrote: »
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    Aegeri wrote: »
    Lycanthropes for example are entirely immune to everything that isn't silver or magical, which means they are a 500gp brick wall for low level characters. Several adventures have Lycanthropes in low level areas, such as Princes of the Apocalypse which has a wereboar (I think we've even discussed this in a past thread).

    My campaign is using a lot of werebeasts, jackalweres, and perytons right now because they're thematically appropriate. I handwaved their resistances away by having the wealthy trade consortium that hired the party give everybody who needed one a +1 magic weapon (I also gave them a floating lantern that automatically illuminates places for them so I don't have to worry about lighting). The city guards mostly have silvered weapons, too, because a nearby dwarven community was nearly destroyed by a plague started by a wererat cabal and they don't want that to happen to them, too.

    BTW, the werebeasts are all members of a beast cult that refuse to spread lycanthropy to outsiders, just so I don't have to worry about the whole party becoming werebeasts.

    Yes and this is exactly the kind of thinking that 5e has as a hidden assumption. It assumes the DM knows that this is a thing and needs to think about it to incorporate it into the game. It's part of why CR just doesn't function whatsoever, because a lot of monsters are built with little hidden assumptions behind how the game works or will be established by the DM.

    I will say that one of my least favorite things about 5E is that making new monsters is a lot more time consuming and a lot less intuitive than it was in 4E. I made a lot of monsters in 4E just for fun, but trying to make a new monster in 5E recently was kind of a headache.

    EDIT: I did just find this, though:

    The Angry GM: Monster Dissection Lab

    Honestly, the best way to make 5E monsters is to just straight up not care. Ignore the CR and everything else, just throw stuff together that has roughly certain ballparks HP, damage and decent enough abilities. Most monsters should be able to attack twice at higher levels and generally you need to balance their AC/HP (high AC lower HP if you don't want a fight to be a huge grind). There is a point in 5E where players and monsters will hit high ACs really routinely as well and it becomes increasingly challenging to even remotely bother a group of higher level PCs after around 7th or so level.

    Also be aware that just because something is CR 17 doesn't mean players can't easily demolish it. CR seems to mean more "A player is likely to die in this encounter" than it is any meaningful indication of challenge.

    Aegeri on
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  • joshgotrojoshgotro Queen CityRegistered User regular
    Has anyone come across this gritty space conversion?

    The Fifth Age
    https://www.reddit.com/r/FifthAge/comments/6b75wl/core_document_download/?utm_source=reddit-android

    I think this will be a good way to give my weekly group a break from a fantasy setting without needing to learn a new system before we throw down some laser fire.

    Are there better 5E scifi shenanigans out there my googlefu is finding?

  • AegeriAegeri Plateau of LengRegistered User regular
    Honestly if you're after something that is basically Dungeons and Dragons, but in space, you're infinitely better off looking into Starfinder. It's actually really well done and I think has a tremendous amount of potential, but I've not been able to sit down and reliably run it for myself yet.

    The Roleplayer's Guild: My blog for roleplaying games, advice and adventuring.
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    edited September 9
    To be fair I’m skimming that conversion and it looks swell.

    Endless_Serpents on
    joshgotro
  • joshgotrojoshgotro Queen CityRegistered User regular
    @Aegeri I'm definitely trying to get some scifi without forcing a new system, however similar, on my players.

  • AegeriAegeri Plateau of LengRegistered User regular
    joshgotro wrote: »
    @Aegeri I'm definitely trying to get some scifi without forcing a new system, however similar, on my players.

    It's just smashing a square peg into a round hole imo. Starfinder is a dedicated system and honestly not too hard to pick up if you're familar with DnD. It also does everything space sci-fi with magic really well.

    The Roleplayer's Guild: My blog for roleplaying games, advice and adventuring.
  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    But surely that “dedicated system” is just Pathfinder (which itself is burgled and polished D&D 3.5) hammered into a sci-fi shape. I’m sure it does it fine but I think you’re being a bit quick to throw away someone’s hard work.

  • Endless_SerpentsEndless_Serpents Registered User regular
    Basically I will defend one guy’s patchwork homebrew system to the death.

    It’s my right to bear imaginary arms, the hill I will fail a death saving throw on.

    NipsAegeriSleepElvenshaeZonugalwebguy20
  • GaddezGaddez Registered User regular
    @Aegeri
    Sure, but that's only an issue if you are obsessivley crunching the numbers and not taking things as they go and appreciating that there are days when your dice are absurdly hot and other ones where there will never be a bonus big enough to afford you a success.

    Richy wrote: »
    But I think the resistance I’m getting more has to do with “rawr! Loklar said it! Rage!” than anything else.

    No, it has to do with the fact that you're done nothing but throw lies, blatant flasehoods, and downright dumb statements at us so far.
    Sleep
  • DenadaDenada Registered User regular
    I have long held the belief that resistances on monsters is a garbage mechanic that should be completely excised from the game. There are better ways to model elemental or magical affinities that don't amount to just a yes/no flow chart.

    Nipswebguy20JustTee
  • SleepSleep Registered User regular
    I actually avoid the generalized +1/+2/+3 type stuff somewhat, i usually cap out at +1 or +2 (unless it's some kind of major artifact of some kind)

    However I do have things like the nimblewright blade which is a magic weapon specifically a rapier that has a 2d6 damage die and a 19-20 crit range.

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