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There is no such thing as a moral or immoral [book] thread

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    JedocJedoc In the scuppers with the staggers and jagsRegistered User regular
    Is Tor books having some sort of spat with Amazon? There's a new release I want (The Monster Baru Cormorant) that seems to only be available in hardcover with no Kindle option (not even pre-order)

    I know they're experimenting with a six-month embargo for selling new ebook titles to libraries. Not sure how that would affect buyers in other regions, but that's the only change I've heard from them.

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    WassermeloneWassermelone Registered User regular
    Jedoc wrote: »
    Is Tor books having some sort of spat with Amazon? There's a new release I want (The Monster Baru Cormorant) that seems to only be available in hardcover with no Kindle option (not even pre-order)

    I know they're experimenting with a six-month embargo for selling new ebook titles to libraries. Not sure how that would affect buyers in other regions, but that's the only change I've heard from them.

    Hrmm I wonder why then. That is odd.

    I switched over to entirely Kindle ages ago. It feels odd to be contemplating ordering a hardback

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    Forever ZefiroForever Zefiro cloaked in the midnight glory of an event horizonRegistered User regular
    edited November 2018
    Is Tor books having some sort of spat with Amazon? There's a new release I want (The Monster Baru Cormorant) that seems to only be available in hardcover with no Kindle option (not even pre-order)

    That's strange, because I bought it on my Kindle after my post the other day

    Forever Zefiro on
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    WassermeloneWassermelone Registered User regular
    I'm in the UK, it seems like it's just not available on Kindle here for some unknown reason

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    Forever ZefiroForever Zefiro cloaked in the midnight glory of an event horizonRegistered User regular
    That's a bummer!

    Well, I'm really enjoying it so far! So I hope you find some way to get it. Seth Dickinson is good with words.

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    XBL - Foreverender | 3DS FC - 1418 6696 1012 | Steam ID | LoL
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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Unforeseen brexit consequence.

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    captainkcaptaink TexasRegistered User regular
    edited November 2018
    Book thread I experimented with some new books on a whim recently but neither really took me in.

    I tried some mystery with Agatha Christie's Three Blind Mice and Other Tales, and I just didn't have much interest. I'm not sure if I'm supposed to be tracking clues and figuring things out as we go, or just waiting for the end when the essential reveal comes. Maybe I read too fast to enjoy mystery. I read the novella and a few of the short stories then dropped it.

    I also tried Elmore Leonard's Raylan. I can't tell if I'm supposed to find Raylan charming or repulsive, but I didn't really like him. And I wasn't too wrapped up in what was going on either. Made it through the second case and quit.

    So now I'm back on my bullshit, Marvel comics and Iain Banks books.

    captaink on
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    IoloIolo iolo Registered User regular
    Has anyone read Thurber recently? I thought about getting some of his short stories for my son who is about the age I read them. But then I wondered if they have not held up and maybe also are littered with old timey casual misogyny/racism?

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    PhillisherePhillishere Registered User regular
    edited November 2018
    Shorty wrote: »
    I'm still into it for now but I suspect it's gonna join Kingkiller on the list of books I describe as "pretty good buuuuuuuuuut"

    I need to reread, but I remember going "Hmmm, this is a bit sketchy" several times during the Long Sun trilogy. Wolf's reputation as the literary conservative SF go-to is probably do for some revisiting.

    Phillishere on
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    jalokjalok Registered User regular
    Finished Kings of the Wylde the other day; don't recall if it was this thread or the D&D one that suggested it. Was fairly entertaining, and a decent page-turner. Haven't decided yet whether I'll pick up the sequel Bloody Rose. has anyone tried that one?

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    webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    jalok wrote: »
    Finished Kings of the Wylde the other day; don't recall if it was this thread or the D&D one that suggested it. Was fairly entertaining, and a decent page-turner. Haven't decided yet whether I'll pick up the sequel Bloody Rose. has anyone tried that one?

    It's not as good as the first, but it's still a fun romp. It does what a lot of books are doing these days and having the sequel focus on other characters in the same world. I would recommend it for sure.

    Steam ID: Webguy20
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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Been trying to find books on Saxon mythology/religion and it's proving difficult. Lots available on the Norse version but I guess Saxon stuff was less well recorded or fewer people care about researching it.

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    PeenPeen Registered User regular
    I just finished The Delirium Brief and my goodness but Charles Stross doesn't have any problems raising the stakes in his books, does he?

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    knitdanknitdan In ur base Killin ur guysRegistered User regular
    I read somewhere that a lot of what popular culture thinks of as associated with the “Vikings” was actually from the Saxons. And that like the Vikings, the term was used at times more like a catchall for raiders and pirates.

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
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    webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Peen wrote: »
    I just finished The Delirium Brief and my goodness but Charles Stross doesn't have any problems raising the stakes in his books, does he?

    Right? It's certainly a "where do they go from here?" scenario.

    Steam ID: Webguy20
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    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    I need to get off Stardew Valley and get back into reading (I stalled after moving here) and... not sure what book I want to plunge into first.

    I was 1/4 though NOS4A2 but it’s a little too scary for nighttime. Not exactly a complaint, Joe Hill writes very vivid scenes.

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    JedocJedoc In the scuppers with the staggers and jagsRegistered User regular
    It's been a while since the book club has done fiction, so for our December meeting we're reading Krampus: The Yule Lord by Brom.

    2dbpspq1b1bp.png


    This will be in addition to the annual celebration of Dreck the Halls: Cheer and Loathing Gripeapalooza '018, where we look back over the worst books we read this year and mercilessly drag them.

    I think my loser this year is Dear Girls Above Me, apparently based on the Twitter feed of the same name. I think the author was going for kind of a self-deprecating David Sedaris thing where you criticize others in a way that makes you the butt of the joke, but I don't think you can do self-deprecating if you haven't presented any evidence that you're not just a weird mean prick. One star.

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    DedwrekkaDedwrekka Metal Hell adjacentRegistered User regular
    Been trying to find books on Saxon mythology/religion and it's proving difficult. Lots available on the Norse version but I guess Saxon stuff was less well recorded or fewer people care about researching it.

    If I remember correctly, it's because the 'norse' religion is pre-Roman, and the region where it was practiced could be roughly described as "north of modern switzerland", though Celts, Picts, Scots, and Britons lived around the same area in the north west of europe. If you're looking for anything before they migrated from modern Denmark to England then it'd probably be listed as 'germanic', because that was the catch-all term that the Roman empire used to describe the mostly similar cultures on the far side of the Rhine.

    I think Tacitus and Caesar wrote about the germanic tribes, though Caesar is at best an unreliable narrator and at worst a total italian supremacist. I don't think either has anything like an extensive description of their mythology, but they're basically some of the earliest written records of the people.

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2018
    Tolkien rather famously felt the same way, and created LoTR as part of an attempt at a norse-style epic based on Saxon themes. I don't know if he wrote scholarly essays on the subject, but might be worth looking into?

    edit: I've found a rather wonderful book from the late 18th century on the history and religion of Denmark, which appears to be free.

    tynic on
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    jalokjalok Registered User regular
    Some thoughts:

    Still pondering Bloody Rose; I imagine I'll pick it up eventually, but still iffy on how much I care about continuing the series with all(or almost all) new characters.

    So Delirium Brief is good? I have been on the fence about the Laundry series for a while now. I've read all of them aside from the newest, but only do rereads on the Bob-centric ones. Aside from various character issues I don't mind the different protag books, but much prefer when it was snarky IT guy in over his head to the escalation we've been getting for a while now. I also have never cared for Mhari.

    Anyone read Drew Hayes books? I only know one other person who's read them, and I gave them to him so doesn't really count :)
    started reading him with Fred, the Vampire Accountant series and branched out from there. He has a number of continuing series that I can gush about if anyone is interested; or just wants to compare notes :)

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Dedwrekka wrote: »
    Been trying to find books on Saxon mythology/religion and it's proving difficult. Lots available on the Norse version but I guess Saxon stuff was less well recorded or fewer people care about researching it.

    If I remember correctly, it's because the 'norse' religion is pre-Roman, and the region where it was practiced could be roughly described as "north of modern switzerland", though Celts, Picts, Scots, and Britons lived around the same area in the north west of europe. If you're looking for anything before they migrated from modern Denmark to England then it'd probably be listed as 'germanic', because that was the catch-all term that the Roman empire used to describe the mostly similar cultures on the far side of the Rhine.

    I think Tacitus and Caesar wrote about the germanic tribes, though Caesar is at best an unreliable narrator and at worst a total italian supremacist. I don't think either has anything like an extensive description of their mythology, but they're basically some of the earliest written records of the people.

    Nah I am specifically after the mythology/practices that were present in England, which are similar to but still vary from the much more well known Scandinavian versions.

    I have found a couple of books. Attempting to look stuff up on youtube has sent me down a white supremacist rabbit hole so I think I'll abandon that effort.

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    SolarSolar Registered User regular
    I wonder if kindly old Professor Tolkien might be a good source for information on Anglo-Saxon mythology. He definitely was an Anglo-Saxon linguist who noted a distinction between British, or English (Anglo-Saxon) and Norse mythic cycles.

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    GrisloGrislo Registered User regular
    Jedoc wrote: »
    It's been a while since the book club has done fiction, so for our December meeting we're reading Krampus: The Yule Lord by Brom.

    2dbpspq1b1bp.png


    This will be in addition to the annual celebration of Dreck the Halls: Cheer and Loathing Gripeapalooza '018, where we look back over the worst books we read this year and mercilessly drag them.

    I think my loser this year is Dear Girls Above Me, apparently based on the Twitter feed of the same name. I think the author was going for kind of a self-deprecating David Sedaris thing where you criticize others in a way that makes you the butt of the joke, but I don't think you can do self-deprecating if you haven't presented any evidence that you're not just a weird mean prick. One star.

    Since you're reading a Brom book, hold off on declaring a worst book until you start that one.

    (He might be okay, I just couldn't get through his Peter Pan book. It was awful.)

    This post was sponsored by Tom Cruise.
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    DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    jalok wrote: »
    So Delirium Brief is good? I have been on the fence about the Laundry series for a while now. I've read all of them aside from the newest, but only do rereads on the Bob-centric ones. Aside from various character issues I don't mind the different protag books, but much prefer when it was snarky IT guy in over his head to the escalation we've been getting for a while now. I also have never cared for Mhari.

    Mhari is much better when you're not viewing her through Bob's or Mo's eyes. I'm kinda with you on the Not Bob narrators. Mo could have been fine but she was in a really bad mental place during that period so it is sorta intentionally unpleasant? Alex felt like young Bob again and suffered for it.

    Anyways the Laundry Files have always had this air of waiting for the shoe to drop and oh god how are we going to cope with that shoe and somehow holding onto hope amidst all that. Stross has no truck with that "Reset at end of book" thing some series do. No, end of his books are where you stomp on the gas and shoes rain down around you.

    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
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    DedwrekkaDedwrekka Metal Hell adjacentRegistered User regular
    Dedwrekka wrote: »
    Been trying to find books on Saxon mythology/religion and it's proving difficult. Lots available on the Norse version but I guess Saxon stuff was less well recorded or fewer people care about researching it.

    If I remember correctly, it's because the 'norse' religion is pre-Roman, and the region where it was practiced could be roughly described as "north of modern switzerland", though Celts, Picts, Scots, and Britons lived around the same area in the north west of europe. If you're looking for anything before they migrated from modern Denmark to England then it'd probably be listed as 'germanic', because that was the catch-all term that the Roman empire used to describe the mostly similar cultures on the far side of the Rhine.

    I think Tacitus and Caesar wrote about the germanic tribes, though Caesar is at best an unreliable narrator and at worst a total italian supremacist. I don't think either has anything like an extensive description of their mythology, but they're basically some of the earliest written records of the people.

    Nah I am specifically after the mythology/practices that were present in England, which are similar to but still vary from the much more well known Scandinavian versions.

    I have found a couple of books. Attempting to look stuff up on youtube has sent me down a white supremacist rabbit hole so I think I'll abandon that effort.

    Ah, Anglo-Saxons, my bad.

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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    jalok wrote: »
    So Delirium Brief is good? I have been on the fence about the Laundry series for a while now. I've read all of them aside from the newest, but only do rereads on the Bob-centric ones. Aside from various character issues I don't mind the different protag books, but much prefer when it was snarky IT guy in over his head to the escalation we've been getting for a while now. I also have never cared for Mhari.

    Mhari is much better when you're not viewing her through Bob's or Mo's eyes. I'm kinda with you on the Not Bob narrators. Mo could have been fine but she was in a really bad mental place during that period so it is sorta intentionally unpleasant? Alex felt like young Bob again and suffered for it.

    Anyways the Laundry Files have always had this air of waiting for the shoe to drop and oh god how are we going to cope with that shoe and somehow holding onto hope amidst all that. Stross has no truck with that "Reset at end of book" thing some series do. No, end of his books are where you stomp on the gas and shoes rain down around you.

    Mhari ended up being my favorite of the non-Bobs thus far.

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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    edited November 2018
    Dedwrekka wrote: »
    Dedwrekka wrote: »
    Been trying to find books on Saxon mythology/religion and it's proving difficult. Lots available on the Norse version but I guess Saxon stuff was less well recorded or fewer people care about researching it.

    If I remember correctly, it's because the 'norse' religion is pre-Roman, and the region where it was practiced could be roughly described as "north of modern switzerland", though Celts, Picts, Scots, and Britons lived around the same area in the north west of europe. If you're looking for anything before they migrated from modern Denmark to England then it'd probably be listed as 'germanic', because that was the catch-all term that the Roman empire used to describe the mostly similar cultures on the far side of the Rhine.

    I think Tacitus and Caesar wrote about the germanic tribes, though Caesar is at best an unreliable narrator and at worst a total italian supremacist. I don't think either has anything like an extensive description of their mythology, but they're basically some of the earliest written records of the people.

    Nah I am specifically after the mythology/practices that were present in England, which are similar to but still vary from the much more well known Scandinavian versions.

    I have found a couple of books. Attempting to look stuff up on youtube has sent me down a white supremacist rabbit hole so I think I'll abandon that effort.

    Ah, Anglo-Saxons, my bad.

    I think at the time they were still Saxons, cos the Angles were in the northern half of England while the Saxons were down here. I dunno. This country's history is confusing. As I understand it 'Anglo-Saxon' only became a thing when the population of England converted to Christianity. I could be wrong though.

    Brovid Hasselsmof on
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    PeenPeen Registered User regular
    I understand why he had to switch away from Bob as the narrator, both for the story and for his own sake, but I don't love any of the non-Bob narrated books.

    That being said The Delirium Brief is very much a Bob book and also is very very good and there's a new one coming out soon so now's the right time to read it.

    What Stross is doing with The Laundry Files does make me wonder how Jim Butcher's going to deal with what he's setting up in The Dresden Files. They had a similar problem of events in their fictional worlds building towards some kind of apocalypse and Stross ran straight into it and turned it up to 11, I don't know if Butcher can or will do the same thing .

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    ShortyShorty touching the meat Intergalactic Cool CourtRegistered User regular
    I finished Shadow of the Torturer and I'm pretty sure the main reason people like it is because the main character has a neat sword

    I doubt I'll keep going

    instead, I started Ancillary Sword today

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    DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    Peen wrote: »
    I understand why he had to switch away from Bob as the narrator, both for the story and for his own sake, but I don't love any of the non-Bob narrated books.

    That being said The Delirium Brief is very much a Bob book and also is very very good and there's a new one coming out soon so now's the right time to read it.

    What Stross is doing with The Laundry Files does make me wonder how Jim Butcher's going to deal with what he's setting up in The Dresden Files. They had a similar problem of events in their fictional worlds building towards some kind of apocalypse and Stross ran straight into it and turned it up to 11, I don't know if Butcher can or will do the same thing .

    Stross has stated a few times that if you're writing a series of books promising the Cthullu Singularity/Apocalypse you have to deliver on it. Which really doesn't make me hopeful for a happy ending at all.

    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
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    PeenPeen Registered User regular
    I love it because having read his other books I'm confident that he'll totally end the world if he has to and that's rare and very exciting to me.

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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    Peen wrote: »
    I understand why he had to switch away from Bob as the narrator, both for the story and for his own sake, but I don't love any of the non-Bob narrated books.

    That being said The Delirium Brief is very much a Bob book and also is very very good and there's a new one coming out soon so now's the right time to read it.

    What Stross is doing with The Laundry Files does make me wonder how Jim Butcher's going to deal with what he's setting up in The Dresden Files. They had a similar problem of events in their fictional worlds building towards some kind of apocalypse and Stross ran straight into it and turned it up to 11, I don't know if Butcher can or will do the same thing .

    Stross has stated a few times that if you're writing a series of books promising the Cthullu Singularity/Apocalypse you have to deliver on it. Which really doesn't make me hopeful for a happy ending at all.

    Well,
    the discussions with the SA that are alluded to in Delirium Brief suggest that while happy is off the table, something better than "enslaved by evil gods" might be possible.

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    QuantumTurkQuantumTurk Registered User regular
    Shorty wrote: »
    I finished Shadow of the Torturer and I'm pretty sure the main reason people like it is because the main character has a neat sword

    I doubt I'll keep going

    instead, I started Ancillary Sword today

    So the only Ann Leckie I've read is Provenance and the best thing I can say for it was that...well, I got through it? But now a library copy of Ancillary Justice sits on my kindle and I didn't realize until I started it that it was the same author. Should I push through? Is it going to grab me more than Provenances wandering nothingness?

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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    Shorty wrote: »
    I finished Shadow of the Torturer and I'm pretty sure the main reason people like it is because the main character has a neat sword

    I doubt I'll keep going

    instead, I started Ancillary Sword today

    So the only Ann Leckie I've read is Provenance and the best thing I can say for it was that...well, I got through it? But now a library copy of Ancillary Justice sits on my kindle and I didn't realize until I started it that it was the same author. Should I push through? Is it going to grab me more than Provenances wandering nothingness?

    Provenance came out after the Ancillary trilogy so that may be why you bounced off it. It kind of assumes a familiarity with the setting. That said, I do think it's a weaker book than any of the Ancillary trilogy.

    Ancillary Justice is absolutely brilliant, and absolutely worth a read.

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    ShortyShorty touching the meat Intergalactic Cool CourtRegistered User regular
    I haven't read Provenance

    I liked Ancillary Justice a fair bit and it has some velocity to it but I won't lie to you, it has a slow start and it's a lot cagier about the main conflict than I think it really needed to be

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    DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    edited November 2018
    3clipse wrote: »
    Peen wrote: »
    I understand why he had to switch away from Bob as the narrator, both for the story and for his own sake, but I don't love any of the non-Bob narrated books.

    That being said The Delirium Brief is very much a Bob book and also is very very good and there's a new one coming out soon so now's the right time to read it.

    What Stross is doing with The Laundry Files does make me wonder how Jim Butcher's going to deal with what he's setting up in The Dresden Files. They had a similar problem of events in their fictional worlds building towards some kind of apocalypse and Stross ran straight into it and turned it up to 11, I don't know if Butcher can or will do the same thing .

    Stross has stated a few times that if you're writing a series of books promising the Cthullu Singularity/Apocalypse you have to deliver on it. Which really doesn't make me hopeful for a happy ending at all.

    Well,
    the discussions with the SA that are alluded to in Delirium Brief suggest that while happy is off the table, something better than "enslaved by evil gods" might be possible.

    So yeah, SPOILERS for the latest book:
    I have trouble reconciling that whole SA thread with the rest of the book where The Black Pharaoh runs circles around everyone and everything including the other Elder God involved. We've got multiple statements that He is aware of things he should absolutely not be aware of, is inhumanly clever and enjoys playing with people. I strongly suspect that the whole thread may just be a way of crushing our hopes and dreams.

    Stross has started on the bastard author trail with what happened to Pete. Anyway that resolves is going to be tragic and heartbreaking.

    Oh, one thing I was unclear on and since you've read it: What did Mhari do to Jonquil?

    DevoutlyApathetic on
    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    3clipse wrote: »
    Peen wrote: »
    I understand why he had to switch away from Bob as the narrator, both for the story and for his own sake, but I don't love any of the non-Bob narrated books.

    That being said The Delirium Brief is very much a Bob book and also is very very good and there's a new one coming out soon so now's the right time to read it.

    What Stross is doing with The Laundry Files does make me wonder how Jim Butcher's going to deal with what he's setting up in The Dresden Files. They had a similar problem of events in their fictional worlds building towards some kind of apocalypse and Stross ran straight into it and turned it up to 11, I don't know if Butcher can or will do the same thing .

    Stross has stated a few times that if you're writing a series of books promising the Cthullu Singularity/Apocalypse you have to deliver on it. Which really doesn't make me hopeful for a happy ending at all.

    Well,
    the discussions with the SA that are alluded to in Delirium Brief suggest that while happy is off the table, something better than "enslaved by evil gods" might be possible.

    So yeah, SPOILERS for the latest book:
    I have trouble reconciling that whole SA thread with the rest of the book where The Black Pharaoh runs circles around everyone and everything including the other Elder God involved. We've got multiple statements that He is aware of things he should absolutely not be aware of, is inhumanly clever and enjoys playing with people. I strongly suspect that the whole thread may just be a way of crushing our hopes and dreams.

    Stross has started on the bastard author trail with what happened to Pete. Anyway that resolves is going to be tragic and heartbreaking.

    Oh, one thing I was unclear on and since you've read it: What did Mhari do to Jonquil?
    Yeah, could be - hard to say, since the SA himself has also pulled some very nearly deus ex machina moves before (and may or may not be wholly human, a la Bob/Eater of Souls).

    Jonquil is, I assume, still in the elf internment camp where she was left after having her face and memories stolen.

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    DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    3clipse wrote: »
    3clipse wrote: »
    Peen wrote: »
    I understand why he had to switch away from Bob as the narrator, both for the story and for his own sake, but I don't love any of the non-Bob narrated books.

    That being said The Delirium Brief is very much a Bob book and also is very very good and there's a new one coming out soon so now's the right time to read it.

    What Stross is doing with The Laundry Files does make me wonder how Jim Butcher's going to deal with what he's setting up in The Dresden Files. They had a similar problem of events in their fictional worlds building towards some kind of apocalypse and Stross ran straight into it and turned it up to 11, I don't know if Butcher can or will do the same thing .

    Stross has stated a few times that if you're writing a series of books promising the Cthullu Singularity/Apocalypse you have to deliver on it. Which really doesn't make me hopeful for a happy ending at all.

    Well,
    the discussions with the SA that are alluded to in Delirium Brief suggest that while happy is off the table, something better than "enslaved by evil gods" might be possible.

    So yeah, SPOILERS for the latest book:
    I have trouble reconciling that whole SA thread with the rest of the book where The Black Pharaoh runs circles around everyone and everything including the other Elder God involved. We've got multiple statements that He is aware of things he should absolutely not be aware of, is inhumanly clever and enjoys playing with people. I strongly suspect that the whole thread may just be a way of crushing our hopes and dreams.

    Stross has started on the bastard author trail with what happened to Pete. Anyway that resolves is going to be tragic and heartbreaking.

    Oh, one thing I was unclear on and since you've read it: What did Mhari do to Jonquil?
    Yeah, could be - hard to say, since the SA himself has also pulled some very nearly deus ex machina moves before (and may or may not be wholly human, a la Bob/Eater of Souls).

    Jonquil is, I assume, still in the elf internment camp where she was left after having her face and memories stolen.
    They are quickly running out of wholly human folks as the series progresses.

    On Jonquil on my initial read it was unclear if Mhari had PHANG'd her with her talk of "an app for that." With her duress on the topic of PHANG creation later in the book that felt really off. She struggled about Jim who is generally a good guy. Jonquil as a PHANG would be a hideous monster.

    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
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    V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Shorty wrote: »
    I finished Shadow of the Torturer and I'm pretty sure the main reason people like it is because the main character has a neat sword

    And the dense, packed prose, the incredible imagery, Wolfe being the master of show-not-tell, the puzzles, the deftly handled unreliable narration, and the amazing ambition of the story.

    Oh and the soldiers tales in book 3, those are just phenomenal. Like free bonus short stories right there.


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    webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    3clipse wrote: »
    Peen wrote: »
    I understand why he had to switch away from Bob as the narrator, both for the story and for his own sake, but I don't love any of the non-Bob narrated books.

    That being said The Delirium Brief is very much a Bob book and also is very very good and there's a new one coming out soon so now's the right time to read it.

    What Stross is doing with The Laundry Files does make me wonder how Jim Butcher's going to deal with what he's setting up in The Dresden Files. They had a similar problem of events in their fictional worlds building towards some kind of apocalypse and Stross ran straight into it and turned it up to 11, I don't know if Butcher can or will do the same thing .

    Stross has stated a few times that if you're writing a series of books promising the Cthullu Singularity/Apocalypse you have to deliver on it. Which really doesn't make me hopeful for a happy ending at all.

    Well,
    the discussions with the SA that are alluded to in Delirium Brief suggest that while happy is off the table, something better than "enslaved by evil gods" might be possible.

    Isn't the new book due out soon? It's another US centric one I believe?

    Steam ID: Webguy20
    Origin ID: Discgolfer27
    Untappd ID: Discgolfer1981
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