There is no such thing as a moral or immoral [book] thread

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  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Oh shit there's a new Becky Chambers book I gotta finish one of these other books now

  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Just got an email from Amazon saying the release of the novel Axiom's End has been cancelled by the publisher so my kindle pre-order has been cancelled. I have no memory of what that book is, let alone pre-ordering it.

  • PlatyPlaty Registered User regular
    It's Lindsay Ellis's book

  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    I bought the Hitchhikers Guide the other day. I've been meaning to read it for years. I have to finish two books first, then I'll read it.

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
    Satanic Jesus
  • Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    Why did I start reading The Road again?

    Aren't I depressed enough without assistance?

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  • Grey GhostGrey Ghost Registered User regular
    I want to like Record of a Spaceborn Few but I can't build up any momentum on it

    I read the previous two each in a single day

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  • StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular
    Last night I finished reading Isadora by Amelia Gray, which was absolutely spectacular.

    Isadora is about Isadora Duncan, who if you're not familiar, was an influential dancer from the first half of the twentieth century, one of the pioneers of modern dance as an art form. Specifically it is about the year of her life following the tragic death of her two children, who drowned when their runaway car plunged into the Seine in 1913. It is an often heart wrenching book about grief and recovery and artistic expression.

    It's also absolutely not something I expected from Amelia Gray. I mean, the subject matter fits quite well, but a historical novel isn't really the sort of thing I've come to expect from her. She's an author I fell in love with for her short stories, specifically her collection Gutshot, in which the stories are very short, surreal, terrifying, and often short on things like named characters. Much of which doesn't seem entirely suited to historical fiction.

    And she does the same thing here. The book is comprised out of chapters which are maybe better described as scenes - the whole thing has a theatrical feel to it, which I am certain is intentional. Her staging and dance was based on the idea of natural movement, as opposed to the heavily regimented forms of ballet, and the idea that the beauty a dancer should be expressing is an emotional openness created through the natural (if still heavily rehearsed) movements of life. The scenes in this book reflect that, to an extent, with each one having a title explaining what (and who) it is going to be about, which allows her to both skip directly to the main action of the scene and to play with expectations and anticipation of what is going to happen.

    Anyways the point is that it's a good book and you should read it. I had barely any familiarity with Isadora Duncan going into it (I knew she was an influential dancer and I knew about her own tragic death, which is ever so briefly foreshadowed here), and while I certainly know a lot more now, it's a novel more focused on her emotional reality than like, the exact sequence of events that happened in her life.

    N1tSt4lkerBhow
  • KrathoonKrathoon Registered User regular
    I bought the Hitchhikers Guide the other day. I've been meaning to read it for years. I have to finish two books first, then I'll read it.

    There is a leather bound one that also collects the other books.

  • JedocJedoc Take a look. It's in a book. It was always in a book, you fool.Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    I think it’s also important to note, on this historic day, that the guy right next to me on the plane was reading a cultural analysis of the anus.

    Sounds like a real fundamental text.

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  • 3clipse3clipse I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    Jedoc wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    I think it’s also important to note, on this historic day, that the guy right next to me on the plane was reading a cultural analysis of the anus.

    Sounds like a real fundamental text.

    i appreciate this joke

    Lost Salient
  • TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    Jedoc you are on fire today

    3clipseLost Salient
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited February 12
    Its subtitle was "a view from behind".

    tynic on
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  • JuggernutJuggernut Registered User regular
    I'm trying to learn French in bits and pieces so I bought Le Petit Nicolas a beloved and simple childrens book for young children and not idiot adults what don't know basic French like some kinda dumbass.

    The pictures are nice, though.

    Platy
  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    I finished Deliverance. It was an unpleasant book with some occasional nice writing about archery.

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
  • Lost SalientLost Salient blink twice if you'd like me to mercy kill youRegistered User regular
    edited February 14
    Me: Oh hey I forgot my mom kidnapped back her copy of the Complete Works of William Shakespeare
    My Kinokuniya basket thirty minutes later:
    PFEsiSEh.png

    Lost Salient on
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    "Sandra has a good solid anti-murderer vibe. My skin felt very secure and sufficiently attached to my body when I met her. Also my organs." HAIL SATAN
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  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    I read some Stanislaw Lem recently and like

    I totally get why he was considered a legend. His stuff is very inventive. But I'm not really enjoying it. It's fun the first few times we listen to pompous windbags giving rather surreal speaches but it ran out of steam. Although they are short stories so I'm being unfair reading a collection in a row perhaps

    tynic
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Me: Oh hey I forgot my mom kidnapped back her copy of the Complete Works of William Shakespeare

    One-up her with the RSC Complete Works.

    With annotations and footnotes.

    Satanic Jesus
  • MrGrimoireMrGrimoire Pixflare Registered User regular
    knitdan wrote: »
    If you want Douglas Adams check out Space Opera by Cat Valente

    I picked that up because of this post and it's great.

    JedocDevoutlyApatheticV1mknitdanhatedinamerica
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    I bought the Broken Earth trilogy, largely because I was reading a reprise of the Sad Puppies episode, and it occurred to me that if it vexed people like them then it would probably please people like me.

    Also there's a storm coming, and I want something to read while I drink this rum.

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  • 3clipse3clipse I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    Oh you're in for a treat

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  • TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    N.K. Jemisin is a goddamn word wizard.

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  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    I just bought Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, I look forward to yelling about how many names I recognize from present day politics.

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
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  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    edited February 14
    Doodmann wrote: »
    I just bought Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, I look forward to yelling about how many names I recognize from present day politics.

    Not just names, either.

    Plus ca change...

    EDIT: btw, you might find this helpful when you read it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibogaine

    V1m on
    Doodmanntynic
  • PhillisherePhillishere Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    I just bought Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, I look forward to yelling about how many names I recognize from present day politics.

    Read all the jacket and interior quotes by mainstream journalists praising it as "the best book about modern politics" and wonder just how much of the current clusterfuck has to do with the attitude by the press that only Hunter S. Thompson was "crazy" enough to write about politics as it really happened.

  • Lost SalientLost Salient blink twice if you'd like me to mercy kill youRegistered User regular
    V1m wrote: »
    Me: Oh hey I forgot my mom kidnapped back her copy of the Complete Works of William Shakespeare

    One-up her with the RSC Complete Works.

    With annotations and footnotes.

    Why yes that IS what I'm looking for

    What books do you all consider the definitive bookshelf staples?

    I think for me my list is:
    Complete Works of William Shakespeare
    A dictionary
    A style manual

    Secondarily I would add a complete Sherlock Holmes, at least one book of familiar quotations a la Bartlett's and some form of wildlife guide. I guess I used to think of an atlas as a staple too when I was younger but uhh hello internet

    RUVCwyu.jpg
    "Sandra has a good solid anti-murderer vibe. My skin felt very secure and sufficiently attached to my body when I met her. Also my organs." HAIL SATAN
    V1m
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    V1m wrote: »
    Me: Oh hey I forgot my mom kidnapped back her copy of the Complete Works of William Shakespeare

    One-up her with the RSC Complete Works.

    With annotations and footnotes.

    Why yes that IS what I'm looking for

    What books do you all consider the definitive bookshelf staples?

    I think for me my list is:
    Complete Works of William Shakespeare
    A dictionary
    A style manual

    Secondarily I would add a complete Sherlock Holmes, at least one book of familiar quotations a la Bartlett's and some form of wildlife guide. I guess I used to think of an atlas as a staple too when I was younger but uhh hello internet

    Depending on your interests, perhaps this?

  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    edited February 15
    It's sort of covered by Shakespeare, but I'd add at least one volume of poetry.

    Tamin on
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    edited February 15
    Tamin wrote: »
    It's sort of covered by Shakespeare, but I'd add at least one volume of poetry.

    This would probably be the go-to?

    EDIT: For English poetry, that is. No Neruda will be found in there, alas.

    V1m on
  • MrGrimoireMrGrimoire Pixflare Registered User regular
    A version of Lord of the Rings, (the older, the better) and the Hobbit.

  • Raijin QuickfootRaijin Quickfoot I'm your Huckleberry YOU'RE NO DAISYRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    No poetry collection is complete without some Keats

    HEY SATAN! HERE'S MY WISHLIST! GO NUTS YOU DEVIL!

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/registry/wishlist/1JI9WWSRW1YJI
  • JedocJedoc Take a look. It's in a book. It was always in a book, you fool.Registered User regular
    Irreplaceable reference volumes, you say?

    i5jxt2s0h4fw.png

    Maybe skip the Shakespeare if you need to make room.

    GDdCWMm.jpg
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  • Lord_AsmodeusLord_Asmodeus goeticSobriquet: Here is your magical cryptic riddle-tumour: I AM A TIME MACHINERegistered User regular
    Glynn Stewart released the first book in another new sci fi series, and I always really like his sci fi stuff, plus the Audible version is being done by the same guy who did audio for the Quintaglio Ascension series and I think he's pretty good. He does have a bit of a habit of making every sentence feel like it ends on a cliffhanger.

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  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Jedoc wrote: »
    Irreplaceable reference volumes, you say?

    i5jxt2s0h4fw.png

    Maybe skip the Shakespeare if you need to make room.

    Absurd.

    There's always room for another shelf if you really want it.

    Quid
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    I have a strict one book shelf policy.

    Which is why there are piles.

    DrovekTynnanskippydumptruck
  • JedocJedoc Take a look. It's in a book. It was always in a book, you fool.Registered User regular
    edited February 16
    I just started reading Sundown Towns by James W. Loewen, author of Lies Your Teacher Told You. A "sundown town" is a town with explicit policies prohibiting non-whites from living there, commonly marked during the early twentieth century by signs at the city limits saying something like "N******, don't let the sun go down on you in White Falls, Illinois."

    Residential segregation was actually pretty good right after the Civil War, peaked in the 1870s, and then grew steadily worse right up until the Civil Rights era. Levels of integrated communities didn't actually return to 1870s levels until the 1980s, and progress remains sluggish.

    This is the 2018 second edition of the 2006 original, which has been revised and expanded due to all the crowd-sourced evidence the author collected that shows things were even worse than he thought when he first wrote the book. In many midwestern states, the majority of all towns and cities were sundowned by the 1960s. A whole lot of previously official sundown suburbs are still de facto all-white enclaves, and it's never accidental. You can probably come up with the ones in your own metropolitan area without thinking too hard, but there's also a map if you want to get sad today.

    Jedoc on
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  • Crimson KingCrimson King Registered User regular
    reading The Periphery

    no idea what's going on but the main character seems to go to the toilet a lot

    tynicJedoc
  • Lost SalientLost Salient blink twice if you'd like me to mercy kill youRegistered User regular
    My haul after I anger-bought six new books because Kinokuniya didn't have any Complete Works of William Shakespeare somehow:

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    RUVCwyu.jpg
    "Sandra has a good solid anti-murderer vibe. My skin felt very secure and sufficiently attached to my body when I met her. Also my organs." HAIL SATAN
    tynicchrishallett83JedocRaijin QuickfootIoloDisruptedCapitalist
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Ninth House claims to be a book about secret societies and their conspiratorial magic but it's actually about a young women becoming a detective while railing against the social injustices of capitalism, nepotism, sexism, racism, and mainstream feminism's failure to help poor women if color.

    Also the magic is really neat.

    MrGrimoireV1m
  • Mr. GMr. G Registered User regular
    who of y'all have read One Hundred Years of Solitude

    it was cited as a major influence on Kentucky Route Zero so I think I'm gonna grab it outta the library

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    Lost Salient
  • Crimson KingCrimson King Registered User regular
    The Peripheral seems to me to be limited and needlessly depressing in its conception of the future

    i have to believe it's going to be more than just good companies fighting bad companies

    i get that a lot of fucked things are going to happen but a lot of fucked things have always happened, get some historical perspective

    also i'm wondering if Daedra West is supposed to be descended from Kanye, i think it says she's from a rich American family

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