She Blinded Me With [Science] Thread

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  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    what if they run out of matter to consume? I confess not to be a big black hole knowledge-haver

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  • SanderJKSanderJK Crocodylus Pontifex Sinterklasicus Madrid, 3000 ADRegistered User regular
    Hawking radiation as proposed does offer an a way for a Black Hole to not remove information from the universe (A thing that would break QM).
    It scales very quickly with the size of Black Hole though. A tiny one would almost instantly annihilate, but a stellar (or supermassive...) Black Hole doesn't dent its own mass in any finite proposition for the life expectancy of the Universe.

    Black Holes without mass near them just keep moving and spinning. Outside of their event horizon all they do is exert gravity.

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  • SolarSolar Registered User regular
    I think the whole problem is that you can't use Hawking radiation to unpick what has gone into the Black Hole. And if the Black Hole evaporates, then the information is lost forever, which violates the 2nd law of thermodynamics I think?

  • PlatyPlaty Registered User regular
    We'd need a theory of quantum gravity to figure out the exact interactions at the event horizon

  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    what if they run out of matter to consume? I confess not to be a big black hole knowledge-haver

    So your knowledge here is a

    Black hole

  • JedocJedoc Once to start a new life and once just to start a fireRegistered User regular
    edited July 22
    This is really neat, we rarely get isolated pop-up storms like this in Oklahoma. This is some Florida nonsense.



    The ring you see on the radar is a gust of denser air that's been cooled by heavy rainfall underneath a small, nearly stationary thunderstorm. They've been popping off all afternoon. Driving home I went from a baking dry summer day to the aftermath of a monsoon a couple of blocks from my house. The gutters were running like crazy under a half-clear sunny sky.

    Jedoc on
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  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    edited July 22
    Platy wrote: »
    Hey kids, do you want to build a quantum eraser at home

    This is about collapsing the wavefunction and then returning everything to an "unobserved" state



    One thing I didn't really understand until recently is that a particle is unobserved as long as it is informationally isolated from the rest of the universe (quoting Arvin Ash), the particle is a probability wave as long as there is no information encoded about it in the rest of the universe

    As far as I personally understand it, this seems to point towards reality being a really granular thing

    Pretty sure this isn't quantum.
    I don't think beams that are polarised at 90 degrees from each other will constructively/deconstructively interfere with each other.

    So what you have is:
    Unpolarised: interference pattern
    Polarised opposite to each other: image as from two sources, no interference
    Polarised parallel to each other: interference pattern

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  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Don't they repeat the same thing with the quantum slit experiment though?

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • VeeveeVeevee WisconsinRegistered User regular
    edited July 22
    A blackhole is simply an object whose mass is large enough to have an escape velocity that is faster than the speed of light. Due to the amount of mass required to do that and the Pauli exclusion principal there is thought to be a minimum size of a black hole of about 3 solar masses. A black hole at the absolute minimum mass would become a neutron star if it lost mass due to Hawking radiation. If the Pauli exclusion principal doesn't actually exist, then there might not be a true lower limit of a blackhole since you can stuff enough mass into a small enough area to have a very tiny black hole. The smallest observed black hole is about 3.8 solar masses with a 15 mile diameter.

    The smallest hypothetical black hole is known as a Planck particle, which has an event horizon that is one planck length (1.616288x10^-35m) in diameter, is one planck mass (21.76470 micrograms), and would evaporate due to hawking radiation in about 5x10^-39 seconds. This would require violating the Pauli exclusion principal to squish that much mass into a space that is much smaller than a proton, so it's not actually possible unless the Pauli exclusion principal is not a real thing or we find a way to put about 2GigaJoules into that small of a space

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  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    Don't they repeat the same thing with the quantum slit experiment though?

    I'm not sure how the actual experiment does the measurements.
    But this home version is not doing what it's advertising it's doing.

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  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    It might be the same in the actual experiment honestly, but going photon by photon instead of using a beam.
    But then the same would apply?
    I don't see how you could conclude particle behaviour when you've eliminated the possibility of interference by using orthogonal polarisations at the slits.

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  • PlatyPlaty Registered User regular
    edited July 22
    I used to think the same but you cannot measure the path of individual photons without absorbing them

    Platy on
  • PlatyPlaty Registered User regular
    edited July 22
    Also interference can only happen in this case because of the quantum nature of light, the beam is made out of individual photons

    Two streams of classical particles would not interfere with each other

    The point of the filters is to destroy the interference pattern in order to recreate it, the filters impart "which way" information on the passing particles

    Platy on
  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    Platy wrote: »
    Also interference can only happen in this case because of the quantum nature of light, the beam is made out of individual photons

    Two streams of classical particles would not interfere with each other

    The point of the filters is to destroy the interference pattern in order to recreate it, the filters impart "which way" information on the passing particles

    No no, the interference occurs due to the wave nature of light, and the quantum nature is evidenced when you start registering individual detections of the interference (and then build the wave pattern from individual points of impact).

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  • PlatyPlaty Registered User regular
    edited July 22
    The interval of the photons doesn't matter too much though, the result is the same when you stagger photon emission or not

    Platy on
    kime
  • PlatyPlaty Registered User regular
    I'm sorry if I misunderstood the issue with the filters

    One variant of the double slit experiment does work exactly as you describe

    This particular experiment builds on it, it doesn't set out to demonstrate the same thing - despite the filters, the system doesn't behave in a fully classical way

  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    Haha
    My brain might be melting considering a photo-screen that detects individual photos as they come staggered through the setup, and how those photons might be choosing which maxima to appear at on the screen.

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  • MeeqeMeeqe Lord of the pants most fancy Someplace amazingRegistered User regular
    Platy wrote: »
    I used to think the same but you cannot measure the path of individual photons without absorbing them

    You can AFAIK, but even if you detect without absorbing that act of measurement still results in waveform collapse.

    BahamutZERO
  • PlatyPlaty Registered User regular
    This is a video of the double slits experiment with individual photons

    Peasfurlion
  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    Intro to Areography | The Geography of Mars 17:06

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  • BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
  • PiptheFairPiptheFair Registered User regular
    absolute fucking nerds

    Andy JoeMidnite
  • HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    As a disgusting crawling squirming shiteating dirtloving worm I

  • PiptheFairPiptheFair Registered User regular
    also, you figure scientists would know the bystander effect is largely a crock of shit and people DID in fact call the cops and try to help kitty genovese and that there were far less witnesses than actually reported

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  • HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    I expect worm scientists to know a lot about worms and potentially literally nothing else

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  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    Expert Wasted Entire Life Studying Anteaters 2:54

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  • TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    edited July 22
    Worms are neat. Ask a worm scientist over a beer about models of aging disease and you might get the same response as Eisen, there. It’s true of all the other animal models we have, too. Everything is an approximation. Even humans and clinical trials are an approximation.

    I think Eisen thought he was making a joke and didn’t think about the power of his pulpit. He’s the editor of a large journal, not some random PI.

    I’ll pick on his phrase, “they fuck themselves,” though. That’s a shitty thing to say. Not because of the verbiage, but because it’s not actually how that works. They’re hermaphrodites and readily self-fertilize internally. It’s basically taking a dump, except viable embryos come out.

    Tynnan on
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  • HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    Worms, like reading, is fundamental

    Tynnan3clipse
  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    Fun

    Mental

    Da

  • BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    Fun Mental D'Alchemiss is a classic anime

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  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    The most overrated animal

    is humans

    they are the worst

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  • 3clipse3clipse I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    I feel a real kinship with worm biologists because I worked with flies and we get dunked on about as much.

    Tynnan
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    bug scientists

    mirite

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
    3clipseTynnanvalhalla130
  • PiptheFairPiptheFair Registered User regular
    The most overrated animal

    is humans

    they are the worst

    I dunno

    cats ain't doing much

  • PiptheFairPiptheFair Registered User regular
    3clipse wrote: »
    I feel a real kinship with worm biologists because I worked with flies and we get dunked on about as much.

    geneticists just like to watch fruit flies fuck a lot

    admit it you pervert

    Brolo3clipsevalhalla130ShadowenMidnite
  • MadicanMadican No face Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    bug scientists

    mirite

    My brother works with mosquitos. His lab's end goal is to exterminate the species that bites humans by replacing it with a species that doesn't. Naturally this involves lots and lots of hatching, rearing, and breeding of mosquitos for research

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  • TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    bug scientists

    mirite

    No don't bug scientists they're busy right now

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  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    bug scientists

    mirite

    mite

    bowen
  • 3clipse3clipse I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    3clipse wrote: »
    I feel a real kinship with worm biologists because I worked with flies and we get dunked on about as much.

    geneticists just like to watch fruit flies fuck a lot

    admit it you pervert

    I did spend an awful lot of time in my mid 20s literally watching them bone down for our mate choice project.

  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    bug scientists

    mirite

    Ahem, actually neither worms nor fruit flies are bugs as they are not members of the order Hemiptera wait where are you going

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