She Blinded Me With [Science] Thread

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  • LuvTheMonkeyLuvTheMonkey High Sierra Serenade Registered User regular
    Platy wrote: »
    Evidence for branched feathers has been established in pterosaurs
    The statistically most likely result (Fig. 3 and Supplementary Table 3; highest log-likelihood value) shows that the avemetatarsalian ancestors of dinosaurs and pterosaurs possessed integumentary filaments, with the highest likelihood of possessing monofilaments; tufts of filaments (especially brush-type filaments) are less likely ancestral states.

    @Blankzilla

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  • BlankZoeBlankZoe Registered User regular
    God why is this my brand now

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  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    you know why

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    Andy Joe
  • BlankZoeBlankZoe Registered User regular
    I haven't argued about it in at least a year!

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  • KwoaruKwoaru Registered User regular
    Then you gotta override it with a new bit

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  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    Old Bits never die, they just fade away

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    Andy Joe
  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    Bad news, ring fans, Saturn's rings are going to vanish in a mere 300 million years. Better get your ring appreciation in now while you still have the chance.

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    ElvenshaeAndy Joeironsizide
  • ChicoBlueChicoBlue Registered User regular
    So what you're saying is

    Saturn's gonna be available in 300 million years...

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  • Der Waffle MousDer Waffle Mous Blame this on the misfortune of your birth. New Yark, New Yark.Registered User regular
    Bad news, ring fans, Saturn's rings are going to vanish in a mere 300 million years. Better get your ring appreciation in now while you still have the chance.


    That's... actually longer than I thought was the last estimate which was more like ten thousand years.

    tbf that was from I think the 2001 A Space Odyssey novel.

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  • WeaverWeaver Who are you? What do you want?Registered User regular
    Space is not only big, but also slow.

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    Steam: weavermatic xbox: weavermatico
  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    Weaver wrote: »
    Space is not only big, but also slow.

    it can't run fast
    but this planet
    is made of gas

    BahamutZERO.gif
  • PlatyPlaty Registered User regular
    edited December 2018
    Platy wrote: »
    Evidence for branched feathers has been established in pterosaurs
    The statistically most likely result (Fig. 3 and Supplementary Table 3; highest log-likelihood value) shows that the avemetatarsalian ancestors of dinosaurs and pterosaurs possessed integumentary filaments, with the highest likelihood of possessing monofilaments; tufts of filaments (especially brush-type filaments) are less likely ancestral states.

    This is the reconstruction

    nipCk6S.jpg

    Platy on
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  • BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    I hate it

    Thro
  • PlatyPlaty Registered User regular
    Well I love it

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  • 3clipse3clipse I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    look how cute he is

    who's daddy's precious widdle baby

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  • PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    Platy wrote: »
    Platy wrote: »
    Evidence for branched feathers has been established in pterosaurs
    The statistically most likely result (Fig. 3 and Supplementary Table 3; highest log-likelihood value) shows that the avemetatarsalian ancestors of dinosaurs and pterosaurs possessed integumentary filaments, with the highest likelihood of possessing monofilaments; tufts of filaments (especially brush-type filaments) are less likely ancestral states.

    This is the reconstruction

    nipCk6S.jpg

    And that gives me a strong urge to take an oversized sword to it. Looks straight out of Monster Hunter like that.

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  • PeasPeas Registered User regular

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    Darmakfurlion
  • BroloBrolo Broseidon Lord of the BroceanRegistered User regular
    donate to my gofundme so we can raise monety to build a dyson sphere around the sun

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  • DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    I like that Magikarp is in that video

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  • ShadowenShadowen Snores in the morning Registered User regular
    Mister Astronomer

    You could have saved Pluto

    I gave you all the clues

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  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    edited January 2019
    China reached the moon!



    e: oh I guess they've been landing or controlled impacting moon probes since 2007

    BahamutZERO on
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  • FleebFleeb has all of the fleeb juice Registered User regular
    edited January 2019
    Hey so, this is BS, right? There's no way Saturn would appear that large from Earth's moon:

    https://www.reddit.com/r/interestingasfuck/comments/aiznlf/saturn_rising_from_behind_the_moon/

    Maybe from one of Saturn's moons

    Fleeb on
  • 3clipse3clipse I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    Fleeb wrote: »
    Hey so, this is BS, right? There's no way Saturn would appear that large from Earth's moon:

    https://www.reddit.com/r/interestingasfuck/comments/aiznlf/saturn_rising_from_behind_the_moon/

    Maybe from one of Saturn's moons

    It's probably an optical illusion or some zoom fuckery (or it's fake) but yes, Saturn is not that much larger from the moon than it is from Earth. Saturn might appear that large if you were past the orbit of Jupiter. Maybe.

    Fleeb
  • JedocJedoc Once to start a new life and once just to start a fireRegistered User regular
    That's not how big Saturn would look from the moon, no. But it's how it looks when you look at Saturn through a telescope on Earth with the moon in the foreground. The reason the sizes aren't lining up in your brain is that we don't have an intuitive grasp for how big things look through telescopes. That's why predicting the angular diameter of objects through various lenses requires trigonometry instead of simple arithmetic.

    To crunch the composition of this photo down to a human scale, imagine that you're standing at one end of a football field with a bowling ball five yards in front of you and a beach ball at the other end of the field. From here, the bowling ball looks much larger than the beach ball. If someone wrote a message on both balls in a clear 20-point font, you could just about read the message on the bowling ball, but definitely not the beach ball.

    If you got a good pair of binoculars and got down on the ground, you could focus on the beach ball in such a way that it filled most of the view and you could read the message. If the top of the bowling ball was in the frame, it would appear huge, many times larger than your field of view.

    If you walked forward five yards and tried to recreate the view of the bowling ball you saw through the binoculars, you probably could, providing your nose isn't too big. But if you did that, you'd notice that the beach ball appears much smaller than it did through the binoculars, and you definitely couldn't read the message written on it.

    So while you can take a picture of Saturn apparently rising over the horizon of the moon with a pretty simple telescope and camera setup, you couldn't recreate the same photo by taking a picture of Saturn with a regular camera close to the moon.

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  • MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    Hot water heaters: you know how the temperatures are supposed to be kept high to kill bacteria? Turns out we made millions of tiny hot spring habitats for happy little extremophiles Over a third of water heaters tested were positive in one way or another for Thermus scotoductus, a thermophile naturally found in hot springs. A few other thermophiles were detected as well. Those water tanks are kept at temperatures they prefer, and it's all full of nutrients and lacking in competition for them.

    They're probably harmless to us; our body temperatures are too cold for them. Probably.

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  • ButlerButler 89 episodes or bust Registered User regular
    Modern biology would be a hell of a lot slower without thermophilic bacteria. PCR, the process used to amplify selected fragments of DNA, used to require the scientist to add more polymerase (the DNA replicating enzyme) after each step, because the very temperatures needed for PCR to work destroyed the polymerase after each cycle. When a heat-stable enzyme was isolated from Thermus aquaticus, it enabled PCR to be performed with a single dose of enzyme, freeing up enormous amounts of time that scientists could then better spend drinking coffee and sweating over grant applications.

    Gvzbgul wrote: »
    A new born baby's skin is still porous, you can just leave them sitting in a bucket of blood and they'll soak up what they need.
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  • DiplominatorDiplominator Hardcore Porg Registered User regular
    Butler wrote: »
    Modern biology would be a hell of a lot slower without thermophilic bacteria. PCR, the process used to amplify selected fragments of DNA, used to require the scientist to add more polymerase (the DNA replicating enzyme) after each step, because the very temperatures needed for PCR to work destroyed the polymerase after each cycle. When a heat-stable enzyme was isolated from Thermus aquaticus, it enabled PCR to be performed with a single dose of enzyme, freeing up enormous amounts of time that scientists could then better spend drinking coffee and sweating over grant applications.

    My dad started his undergrad education on a ton of math and physics and chemistry classes. Then he got to biochemistry and regarded it as basically cheating because of all the stuff that doesn't really seem possible.

    Ultimately he became an MD

  • TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    Butler wrote: »
    Modern biology would be a hell of a lot slower without thermophilic bacteria. PCR, the process used to amplify selected fragments of DNA, used to require the scientist to add more polymerase (the DNA replicating enzyme) after each step, because the very temperatures needed for PCR to work destroyed the polymerase after each cycle. When a heat-stable enzyme was isolated from Thermus aquaticus, it enabled PCR to be performed with a single dose of enzyme, freeing up enormous amounts of time that scientists could then better spend drinking coffee and sweating over grant applications.

    What really blows my mind is how quickly we went from the invention of heat-stable polymerase chain reactions to the magical bullshit we now use for rapid sequencing.

    3clipse
  • MeeqeMeeqe Lord of the pants most fancy Someplace amazingRegistered User regular
    The further I get into my stem career the more I realize that a great many fields are waiting for a small breakthrough in an adjacent field in order to progress. The electrical engineering world where I play is pretty much waiting for an improvement from the material science guys giving us a much better battery/portable source of electricity. Robotics would immediately take off in a way that would make our current rapid advances look like nothing.

    3clipseDuke 2.0
  • DepressperadoDepressperado I just wanted to see you laughing in the pizza rainRegistered User regular
    well one of you guys needs to get on with it

    I can't stand this meat prison much longer please put me in a robot body

    or maybe the internet

    would a consciousness be able to withstand a separation of that magnitude, or would I fragment into an infinite number of pieces, spread across the virtual vastness?

    cB557valhalla130kime
  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    no, you'd still be in your meat prison, you'd just either have your meat senses replaced with a neural connection to a web browser, or a digital simulation copy of your brain would be made and the meat-prison version of you wouldn't get shit

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  • KrathoonKrathoon Registered User regular
    The question that begs to be answered is if we could transfer a consciousness to a robot, not just copy it.

    discrider
  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    edited February 2019
    nope!
    unless you believe in souls and transmigration and that sort of thing I guess, literal ghosts in the shell instead of figurative ones

    BahamutZERO on
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  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    Ah yes the Transporter of Theseus

  • cB557cB557 voOOP Registered User regular
    nope!
    unless you believe in souls and transmigration and that sort of thing I guess, literal ghosts in the shell instead of figurative ones
    Nah, you can maintain continuity of consciousness through a mind upload, you just gotta go with gradual neuron replacement or somesuch.

    Gvzbguldiscrider
  • DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    cB557 wrote: »
    nope!
    unless you believe in souls and transmigration and that sort of thing I guess, literal ghosts in the shell instead of figurative ones
    Nah, you can maintain continuity of consciousness through a mind upload, you just gotta go with gradual neuron replacement or somesuch.

    On the one hand, being able to transfer consciousness would be rad.

    On the other hand, it would mean you could delete somebody's mind

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  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    I shot a man in Reno just to watch his mind get deleted

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  • cB557cB557 voOOP Registered User regular
    Darmak wrote: »
    cB557 wrote: »
    nope!
    unless you believe in souls and transmigration and that sort of thing I guess, literal ghosts in the shell instead of figurative ones
    Nah, you can maintain continuity of consciousness through a mind upload, you just gotta go with gradual neuron replacement or somesuch.

    On the one hand, being able to transfer consciousness would be rad.

    On the other hand, it would mean you could delete somebody's mind
    I mean I can do that now with a heavy rock and the element of surprise.

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  • KrathoonKrathoon Registered User regular
    Past versions of ourselves die as we age. We are but our memories. More so if you are Doctor Who.

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