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[Canadian Politics] Surprise! You elected the Calgary Airport!

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Posts

  • Nova_CNova_C I have the need The need for speedRegistered User regular
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Nova_C wrote: »
    I guess it depends on what our goals are when it comes to prison.

    If reckless driving resulted in longer sentences, do you believe people would drive less recklessly? Because I don't, because no one thinks they're going to go to prison when they blow through a stop sign, so it really doesn't matter how long the sentences are.

    So, next is, do you believe he's a dangerous offender who shouldn't be released? I don't, this was obviously a mistake, one he's owned up to and taken responsibility for.

    So the last is, do you want to wield our justice system as an implementation of vengeance? Then yeah, I guess longer sentences would make sense.

    I'd rather not abandon our humanity, though.

    I don't know if he's a dangerous offender, I'm not a lawyer or a judge.

    "no one thinks they're going to prison when they do X" is true for a lot of things we have laws and sentences for. Why have prison at all when I'm sorry works?

    I'm ok with the judges sentence on this one and the next time someone is inattentive driving and kills someone or multiple someone's I'd like to not see them back on the road 18 months later.

    I knew this was going to be the response, or something like it. Any time anyone is at all critical of the justice system, there's always someone going "WELL LETS JUST HAVE NO LAWS AT ALL THEN". There's just no point to having discussions anymore.

    psyck0ShadowenZibblsnrtForar
  • CelloCello Registered User regular
    edited March 23
    Jason Kenney's comms team is learning about the Streisand Effect.

    Cello on
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  • KetBraKetBra FISTS OF JUSTICE! Registered User regular
    Nice

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  • AridholAridhol Registered User regular
    Nova_C wrote: »
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Nova_C wrote: »
    I guess it depends on what our goals are when it comes to prison.

    If reckless driving resulted in longer sentences, do you believe people would drive less recklessly? Because I don't, because no one thinks they're going to go to prison when they blow through a stop sign, so it really doesn't matter how long the sentences are.

    So, next is, do you believe he's a dangerous offender who shouldn't be released? I don't, this was obviously a mistake, one he's owned up to and taken responsibility for.

    So the last is, do you want to wield our justice system as an implementation of vengeance? Then yeah, I guess longer sentences would make sense.

    I'd rather not abandon our humanity, though.

    I don't know if he's a dangerous offender, I'm not a lawyer or a judge.

    "no one thinks they're going to prison when they do X" is true for a lot of things we have laws and sentences for. Why have prison at all when I'm sorry works?

    I'm ok with the judges sentence on this one and the next time someone is inattentive driving and kills someone or multiple someone's I'd like to not see them back on the road 18 months later.

    I knew this was going to be the response, or something like it. Any time anyone is at all critical of the justice system, there's always someone going "WELL LETS JUST HAVE NO LAWS AT ALL THEN". There's just no point to having discussions anymore.

    You put nothing forward except to thinly hide calling me a vengeful monster so I don't know what kind of nuanced response you expected.

    I read the judges decision and her reasoning behind it and I agree with it.

    I'm good to drop it since we obviously disagree.

  • DeciusDecius Registered User regular
    edited March 23
    On the subject of the Humboldt crash, has any punishment been placed on the company that put him out there in the first place? Or the people who ran it?

    Having second hand experience with the trucking industry and professional driving as a career (father has driven highway coach and tractor-trailer for longer then I've been alive), the company has a significant amount of responsibility for putting a driver out there that wasn't fully trained or ready.

    Decius on
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  • BlarghyBlarghy Registered User regular
    Decius wrote: »
    On the subject of the Humboldt crash, has any punishment been placed on the company that put him out there in the first place? Or the people who ran it?

    Having second hand experience with the trucking industry and professional driving as a career (father has driven highway coach and tractor-trailer for longer then I've been alive), the company has a significant amount of responsibility for putting a driver out there that wasn't fully trained or ready.

    The company has been charged with various record keeping violations, but there were no mandatory training rules for professional truck drivers beyond ensuring they had the appropriate class of driver's license. Most provinces are now bringing forward new regulations on this now, though.

  • Gnome-InterruptusGnome-Interruptus Registered User regular
    Decius wrote: »
    On the subject of the Humboldt crash, has any punishment been placed on the company that put him out there in the first place? Or the people who ran it?

    Having second hand experience with the trucking industry and professional driving as a career (father has driven highway coach and tractor-trailer for longer then I've been alive), the company has a significant amount of responsibility for putting a driver out there that wasn't fully trained or ready.

    The article said they were pursuing charges against the company, but I forget if it was just management or the company as a whole.

    From the article it was either due to logbook irregularities or failure to enforce logbook recordkeeping or something like that.

    The guy that hit the bus, apparently the accident happened in his first week being a solo driver after whatever amount of training the company thought was acceptable before sending him out solo. Apparently only Ontario has strict limits on driver training, but now Saskatchewan is tightening their guidelines in light of the crash. Though the company is based out of Alberta. I have no idea why this isn't managed federally.

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  • Nova_CNova_C I have the need The need for speedRegistered User regular
    edited March 23
    Decius wrote: »
    On the subject of the Humboldt crash, has any punishment been placed on the company that put him out there in the first place? Or the people who ran it?

    Having second hand experience with the trucking industry and professional driving as a career (father has driven highway coach and tractor-trailer for longer then I've been alive), the company has a significant amount of responsibility for putting a driver out there that wasn't fully trained or ready.

    The article said they were pursuing charges against the company, but I forget if it was just management or the company as a whole.

    From the article it was either due to logbook irregularities or failure to enforce logbook recordkeeping or something like that.

    The guy that hit the bus, apparently the accident happened in his first week being a solo driver after whatever amount of training the company thought was acceptable before sending him out solo. Apparently only Ontario has strict limits on driver training, but now Saskatchewan is tightening their guidelines in light of the crash. Though the company is based out of Alberta. I have no idea why this isn't managed federally.

    Licensing is provincial, which means that the provinces have the authority over who gets to drive on their roads. Honestly, I wouldn't object to this becoming federally managed, but I like not having to put a front plate on my car, and I'm certain the provinces who require them wouldn't be okay with the feds saying no if such a takeover happened.

    EDIT: Which is to say, I think it's mostly fine that licensing for driving being provincial works. It being federal doesn't make any kind of guarantee about this not happening again.

    Nova_C on
    Aridhol
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    Whelp, today there were a bunch of yellow-vested weirdos standing at a well-travelled corner in my city waving signs calling Trudeau treasonous and calling for UNexit.

    Good times. Hopefully they'll all get COPD from standing near traffic all day.

    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
  • breton-brawlerbreton-brawler Registered User regular
    Whelp, today there were a bunch of yellow-vested weirdos standing at a well-travelled corner in my city waving signs calling Trudeau treasonous and calling for UNexit.

    Good times. Hopefully they'll all get COPD from standing near traffic all day.

    what the hell is UNexit??

  • mrondeaumrondeau Montréal, CanadaRegistered User regular
    Whelp, today there were a bunch of yellow-vested weirdos standing at a well-travelled corner in my city waving signs calling Trudeau treasonous and calling for UNexit.

    Good times. Hopefully they'll all get COPD from standing near traffic all day.

    what the hell is UNexit??
    They believe that the UN is a horrible violation of national sovereignty because it occasionally talks about human rights and not starting wars (and also because not having constant wars is a sign of the Antichrist), so they want to get out of the UN.

    Descendant X
  • LordSolarMachariusLordSolarMacharius Registered User regular
    But if Britain leaving the EU is Brexit then shouldn't it be Peachowser Canexit?

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    ArcticLancerhomogenizedForar
  • mrondeaumrondeau Montréal, CanadaRegistered User regular
    But if Britain leaving the EU is Brexit then shouldn't it be Peachowser Canexit?
    You are putting more thought into this than they did.

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  • breton-brawlerbreton-brawler Registered User regular
    mrondeau wrote: »
    Whelp, today there were a bunch of yellow-vested weirdos standing at a well-travelled corner in my city waving signs calling Trudeau treasonous and calling for UNexit.

    Good times. Hopefully they'll all get COPD from standing near traffic all day.

    what the hell is UNexit??
    They believe that the UN is a horrible violation of national sovereignty because it occasionally talks about human rights and not starting wars (and also because not having constant wars is a sign of the Antichrist), so they want to get out of the UN.

    That certainly is a position.....

    The UN is important, it may not be particularly effective, but its better to be involved than to be the outside looking in.

    IS it a splinter group from the harper years? I know Harper was walking back involvement with the UN as much as he could.

    It also sounds alot like the arguments the US has for not supporting the ICC (international crimes court)

  • HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    The fumes from down south are potent enough that Canadians get big fat whiffs of it all the time, I'm sure it is a parrot of American contempt for, uh, the world

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  • ZibblsnrtZibblsnrt Registered User regular
    edited March 24
    The UN thing is the right getting convinced by the far right that the Global Compact for Migration is some sort of probably-Jewish conspiracy to destroy the white race via unrestricted mass immigration by foreigners who are swarthy or worse because, uh, reasons, or something.

    (I'm not actually exaggerating.)

    Canadian yellowjackets are xenophobes first and whatever-else-they-claim-to-be second so they're pretty big on that theory.

    That's on top of the Canadian right traditionally hating the UN because the GOP told them to, of course.

    Zibblsnrt on
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  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Zibblsnrt wrote: »
    The UN thing is the right getting convinced by the far right that the Global Compact for Migration is some sort of probably-Jewish conspiracy to destroy the white race via unrestricted mass immigration by foreigners who are swarthy or worse because, uh, reasons, or something.

    (I'm not actually exaggerating.)

    Canadian yellowjackets are xenophobes first and whatever-else-they-claim-to-be second so they're pretty big on that theory.

    That's on top of the Canadian right traditionally hating the UN because the GOP told them to, of course.

    The UN has been a right-wing boogeyman for decades and decades.

    AridholShadowenCaulk Bite 6El Mucho
  • AridholAridhol Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    Zibblsnrt wrote: »
    The UN thing is the right getting convinced by the far right that the Global Compact for Migration is some sort of probably-Jewish conspiracy to destroy the white race via unrestricted mass immigration by foreigners who are swarthy or worse because, uh, reasons, or something.

    (I'm not actually exaggerating.)

    Canadian yellowjackets are xenophobes first and whatever-else-they-claim-to-be second so they're pretty big on that theory.

    That's on top of the Canadian right traditionally hating the UN because the GOP told them to, of course.

    The UN has been a right-wing boogeyman for decades and decades.

    Yep.

    World government!
    Those effeminite euros are gonna take your guns/jobs/women/etc...

  • HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    And/or bring about the Apocalypse which is a thing you do/don't want to happen

    Caulk Bite 6
  • The Cow KingThe Cow King Walls of Jakiro Registered User regular
    Hobnail wrote: »
    And/or bring about the Apocalypse which is a thing you do/don't want to happen

    Well weve got climate change coming and guess where mostly lucky given our location

    Our electoral system is buit to preserve the status quo and since the status quo keeps drifting right due to neo-mccarthyism so itll be a lot of ecofacists in our future

    icGJy2C.png
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Six research institutes combined forces to run a survey of federalism and provincialism in Canada, and just released their results:
    https://www.environicsinstitute.org/projects/project-details/confederation-of-tomorrow---2018

    Nation-wide, the proportion of people who identify by their province first or only has been increasing and the proportion that identify as Canadians first or only has been decreasing. An increasing number of people in most provinces feel their provinces does not get its fair share of influence over provincial matters nor its fair share of funding from the federal government, and the proportion of people who feel federalism has more advantages than disadvantages has been decreasing.

    On the positive side, most Canadians agree we have shared values, that we more in common with each other than with Americans, that religion/racial background is not part of what makes us Canadian, and that we can resolve our internal differences together.

    So, as a country it seems we're fractured, but not divided.

    sig.gif
    ArcticLancershryke
  • NosfNosf Registered User regular
    edited March 25
    https://globalnews.ca/news/5091982/alberta-election-ucp-candidate-calgary-south-east-resigns/

    Ha, it must be so tiresome and vexing to be bullied for thinking minorities are a pack of savages! Maybe Eva should come out and say she was just "speaking her truth".
    psyck0 wrote: »
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Nova_C wrote: »
    I guess it depends on what our goals are when it comes to prison.

    If reckless driving resulted in longer sentences, do you believe people would drive less recklessly? Because I don't, because no one thinks they're going to go to prison when they blow through a stop sign, so it really doesn't matter how long the sentences are.

    So, next is, do you believe he's a dangerous offender who shouldn't be released? I don't, this was obviously a mistake, one he's owned up to and taken responsibility for.

    So the last is, do you want to wield our justice system as an implementation of vengeance? Then yeah, I guess longer sentences would make sense.

    I'd rather not abandon our humanity, though.

    I don't know if he's a dangerous offender, I'm not a lawyer or a judge.

    "no one thinks they're going to prison when they do X" is true for a lot of things we have laws and sentences for. Why have prison at all when I'm sorry works?

    I'm ok with the judges sentence on this one and the next time someone is inattentive driving and kills someone or multiple someone's I'd like to not see them back on the road 18 months later.

    He doesn't have to be in jail to be off the road. You could give him a driving ban. This is purely vengeance. We should be better than that.

    You don't get a driving ban for killing 16 people because you weren't paying attention after showing a pattern of neglect in your job.

    Nosf on
  • Disco11Disco11 Registered User regular
    Nosf wrote: »
    https://globalnews.ca/news/5091982/alberta-election-ucp-candidate-calgary-south-east-resigns/

    Ha, it must be so tiresome and vexing to be bullied for thinking minorities are a pack of savages! Maybe Eva should come out and say she was just "speaking her truth".
    psyck0 wrote: »
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Nova_C wrote: »
    I guess it depends on what our goals are when it comes to prison.

    If reckless driving resulted in longer sentences, do you believe people would drive less recklessly? Because I don't, because no one thinks they're going to go to prison when they blow through a stop sign, so it really doesn't matter how long the sentences are.

    So, next is, do you believe he's a dangerous offender who shouldn't be released? I don't, this was obviously a mistake, one he's owned up to and taken responsibility for.

    So the last is, do you want to wield our justice system as an implementation of vengeance? Then yeah, I guess longer sentences would make sense.

    I'd rather not abandon our humanity, though.

    I don't know if he's a dangerous offender, I'm not a lawyer or a judge.

    "no one thinks they're going to prison when they do X" is true for a lot of things we have laws and sentences for. Why have prison at all when I'm sorry works?

    I'm ok with the judges sentence on this one and the next time someone is inattentive driving and kills someone or multiple someone's I'd like to not see them back on the road 18 months later.

    He doesn't have to be in jail to be off the road. You could give him a driving ban. This is purely vengeance. We should be better than that.

    You don't get a driving ban for killing 16 people because you weren't paying attention after showing a pattern of neglect in your job.

    The UCP is going all in on right wing morons.

    I'm truly nervous how things are going to go if (when) they win. Kenny's platform is pretty much " Blame the NDP and Trudeau for every problem that Alberta has ever had" and nothing else.

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  • BlazeFireBlazeFire Registered User regular
    Nosf wrote: »
    https://globalnews.ca/news/5091982/alberta-election-ucp-candidate-calgary-south-east-resigns/

    Ha, it must be so tiresome and vexing to be bullied for thinking minorities are a pack of savages! Maybe Eva should come out and say she was just "speaking her truth".
    psyck0 wrote: »
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Nova_C wrote: »
    I guess it depends on what our goals are when it comes to prison.

    If reckless driving resulted in longer sentences, do you believe people would drive less recklessly? Because I don't, because no one thinks they're going to go to prison when they blow through a stop sign, so it really doesn't matter how long the sentences are.

    So, next is, do you believe he's a dangerous offender who shouldn't be released? I don't, this was obviously a mistake, one he's owned up to and taken responsibility for.

    So the last is, do you want to wield our justice system as an implementation of vengeance? Then yeah, I guess longer sentences would make sense.

    I'd rather not abandon our humanity, though.

    I don't know if he's a dangerous offender, I'm not a lawyer or a judge.

    "no one thinks they're going to prison when they do X" is true for a lot of things we have laws and sentences for. Why have prison at all when I'm sorry works?

    I'm ok with the judges sentence on this one and the next time someone is inattentive driving and kills someone or multiple someone's I'd like to not see them back on the road 18 months later.

    He doesn't have to be in jail to be off the road. You could give him a driving ban. This is purely vengeance. We should be better than that.

    You don't get a driving ban for killing 16 people because you weren't paying attention after showing a pattern of neglect in your job.

    I wasn't following this in great detail. What pattern of neglect did Sidhu show?

    Gnome-InterruptusDescendant X
  • The WolfmanThe Wolfman Registered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    Six research institutes combined forces to run a survey of federalism and provincialism in Canada, and just released their results:
    https://www.environicsinstitute.org/projects/project-details/confederation-of-tomorrow---2018

    Nation-wide, the proportion of people who identify by their province first or only has been increasing and the proportion that identify as Canadians first or only has been decreasing. An increasing number of people in most provinces feel their provinces does not get its fair share of influence over provincial matters nor its fair share of funding from the federal government, and the proportion of people who feel federalism has more advantages than disadvantages has been decreasing.

    On the positive side, most Canadians agree we have shared values, that we more in common with each other than with Americans, that religion/racial background is not part of what makes us Canadian, and that we can resolve our internal differences together.

    So, as a country it seems we're fractured, but not divided.

    I wonder of the people who identify with their province first, how many of them have actually... left the province? If you've lived in one general area your entire life (or even just generally long enough), I can totally see you having that kind of mentality.

    Me personally, I lived the first ~10 years of my life in Edmonton. The next ~20 were on Vancouver Island being buds with the pacific ocean. And today I'm now on the clear other side of the country high fiving the atlantic ocean in New Brunswick. I suppose I'd naturally have said "I'm a BC'er" near the end of that stint, because I was there long enough and grew up there. But overall I wouldn't identify myself by my province, because my province has never been 100% static in my life.

    I suppose being in BC long enough has affected me in a few ways, as it would. One day my mother just out of the blue and out of curiosity finally decided to ask me if I ever did any drugs in my life like pot. And I told her "I lived in western British Columbia for damn near my entire formative life. Yes, I have obviously smoked pot before".

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  • Nova_CNova_C I have the need The need for speedRegistered User regular
    In the context of being Canadian, I identify as an Albertan for sure, but I'm Canadian first.

    And I've always been that way, even before I moved north.

    I honestly struggle to empathize with a province first perspective. What part of Canada we're from shouldn't make a difference since we're all in this together. Canada works or fails together. A single province isn't going to withstand failure at a national level.

    CaedwyrBroloSatanIsMyMotorshrykeCanadianWolverineEl MuchoDescendant XTubularLuggageForar
  • BouwsTBouwsT Wanna come to a super soft birthday party? Registered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    Six research institutes combined forces to run a survey of federalism and provincialism in Canada, and just released their results:
    https://www.environicsinstitute.org/projects/project-details/confederation-of-tomorrow---2018

    Nation-wide, the proportion of people who identify by their province first or only has been increasing and the proportion that identify as Canadians first or only has been decreasing. An increasing number of people in most provinces feel their provinces does not get its fair share of influence over provincial matters nor its fair share of funding from the federal government, and the proportion of people who feel federalism has more advantages than disadvantages has been decreasing.

    On the positive side, most Canadians agree we have shared values, that we more in common with each other than with Americans, that religion/racial background is not part of what makes us Canadian, and that we can resolve our internal differences together.

    So, as a country it seems we're fractured, but not divided.

    I wonder of the people who identify with their province first, how many of them have actually... left the province? If you've lived in one general area your entire life (or even just generally long enough), I can totally see you having that kind of mentality.

    Me personally, I lived the first ~10 years of my life in Edmonton. The next ~20 were on Vancouver Island being buds with the pacific ocean. And today I'm now on the clear other side of the country high fiving the atlantic ocean in New Brunswick. I suppose I'd naturally have said "I'm a BC'er" near the end of that stint, because I was there long enough and grew up there. But overall I wouldn't identify myself by my province, because my province has never been 100% static in my life.

    I suppose being in BC long enough has affected me in a few ways, as it would. One day my mother just out of the blue and out of curiosity finally decided to ask me if I ever did any drugs in my life like pot. And I told her "I lived in western British Columbia for damn near my entire formative life. Yes, I have obviously smoked pot before".

    I think it also has to do with how closely you align with the general population too (obviously). I was born and raised in Alberta, but this growing trend toward fringe right-wing ideologies, and the outright vitriol to any left thinking has me feeling more Canadian than Albertan. I feel like I live here, but Alberta isn't my MAJORITY identity. Ask m 8-10 years ago though? Might have been closer to 50/50.

    I shall be telling this with a sigh
    Somewhere ages and ages hence:
    Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.
  • finnithfinnith TorontoRegistered User regular
    edited March 25
    I identify as being from Toronto aka the most important city in Canada

    note: i do not live in toronto atm.

    finnith on
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  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    Six research institutes combined forces to run a survey of federalism and provincialism in Canada, and just released their results:
    https://www.environicsinstitute.org/projects/project-details/confederation-of-tomorrow---2018

    Nation-wide, the proportion of people who identify by their province first or only has been increasing and the proportion that identify as Canadians first or only has been decreasing. An increasing number of people in most provinces feel their provinces does not get its fair share of influence over provincial matters nor its fair share of funding from the federal government, and the proportion of people who feel federalism has more advantages than disadvantages has been decreasing.

    On the positive side, most Canadians agree we have shared values, that we more in common with each other than with Americans, that religion/racial background is not part of what makes us Canadian, and that we can resolve our internal differences together.

    So, as a country it seems we're fractured, but not divided.

    I wonder of the people who identify with their province first, how many of them have actually... left the province? If you've lived in one general area your entire life (or even just generally long enough), I can totally see you having that kind of mentality.

    Me personally, I lived the first ~10 years of my life in Edmonton. The next ~20 were on Vancouver Island being buds with the pacific ocean. And today I'm now on the clear other side of the country high fiving the atlantic ocean in New Brunswick. I suppose I'd naturally have said "I'm a BC'er" near the end of that stint, because I was there long enough and grew up there. But overall I wouldn't identify myself by my province, because my province has never been 100% static in my life.

    I suppose being in BC long enough has affected me in a few ways, as it would. One day my mother just out of the blue and out of curiosity finally decided to ask me if I ever did any drugs in my life like pot. And I told her "I lived in western British Columbia for damn near my entire formative life. Yes, I have obviously smoked pot before".

    I'm from Québec, and I've lived 12 years in Ontario.

    I'd say I identify as Québécois first and Canadian second. In fact, I'd say living in Ontario reinforced that feeling. Not that I didn't enjoy life in Ontario - quite the opposite, I've met great people there and made good friends and had many experiences that greatly enriched my life. But there was always a subtle difference in background that stemmed from growing up in different worlds. They could make a joke that called back to something on Sesame Street, for instance, that went right over my head, and I could have the perfect comeback that called back to Passe-Partout or François Perusse and I'd have no one to share it with because no one around me would get it. It's those small differences that kept reminding me where I'm from. I could live and thrive and be happy in Ontario, but I fit in in Québec.

    When my daughter was born, the nurse handed her to us saying she was white from the womb residue (whose medical name I forget). By reflex I replied "Je pensais qu'elle serait violet comme deux dix piaces." ("I thought she'd be purple like two ten bucks.") That got a chuckle from the nurse, but I bet no one outside of Québec will get it. It's not something I would even have been able to say if she had been born in Ontario. That's the difference I'm talking about.

    sig.gif
  • Disco11Disco11 Registered User regular
    Nova_C wrote: »
    In the context of being Canadian, I identify as an Albertan for sure, but I'm Canadian first.

    And I've always been that way, even before I moved north.

    I honestly struggle to empathize with a province first perspective. What part of Canada we're from shouldn't make a difference since we're all in this together. Canada works or fails together. A single province isn't going to withstand failure at a national level.

    Well to be fair Quebec has been beating a different drum on that for many many years now....

    Why do we blame other provinces for following suit?

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  • quovadis13quovadis13 Registered User regular
    I definitely identify as Canadian and I don't really consider my province at all. It might have alot to do with me growing up in a border town to the US and now that I work in the US on a daily basis, I am most certainly happy to come back to Canada at the end of the day.

  • Nova_CNova_C I have the need The need for speedRegistered User regular
    Disco11 wrote: »
    Nova_C wrote: »
    In the context of being Canadian, I identify as an Albertan for sure, but I'm Canadian first.

    And I've always been that way, even before I moved north.

    I honestly struggle to empathize with a province first perspective. What part of Canada we're from shouldn't make a difference since we're all in this together. Canada works or fails together. A single province isn't going to withstand failure at a national level.

    Well to be fair Quebec has been beating a different drum on that for many many years now....

    Why do we blame other provinces for following suit?

    I'm not happy with it happening anywhere?

    I don't think I'm following what you're saying.

    Aridhol
  • oldmankenoldmanken Registered User regular
    Yeah, I'm a Newfoundlander first, and I would even go a bit further in saying I am a Labradorian first. I find the disparity between my home province and the country is pretty significant, so in some cases it's fairly hard to relate the two.

    That said, now that I live in the US, I always just tell people I am Canadian, because most people haven't a sweet clue where Newfoundland or Labrador are. It's gotten a bit better now that we live in Maine, but when we lived in Texas (and when we return) no chance of recognition.

    I actually worry a bit, as we just had our first kid two weeks ago, and it's going to be really hard to raise her with an appreciation of her NL roots. I won't have need to go back to NL anytime soon, as all my family has moved to the mainland or overseas. Sad really... I'm left with playing her some good old traditional music, and annoying the hell out of my wife. :)

    I think I'm an odd case, of course, but generally not surprised by that poll. I've honestly always kind of felt that Ontarians are the only Canadians that don't have a strong unique identity, and often identify as Canadians first. Probably not a totally fair position to take, but just a thought.

  • Disco11Disco11 Registered User regular
    edited March 25
    Nova_C wrote: »
    Disco11 wrote: »
    Nova_C wrote: »
    In the context of being Canadian, I identify as an Albertan for sure, but I'm Canadian first.

    And I've always been that way, even before I moved north.

    I honestly struggle to empathize with a province first perspective. What part of Canada we're from shouldn't make a difference since we're all in this together. Canada works or fails together. A single province isn't going to withstand failure at a national level.

    Well to be fair Quebec has been beating a different drum on that for many many years now....

    Why do we blame other provinces for following suit?

    I'm not happy with it happening anywhere?

    I don't think I'm following what you're saying.

    Quebec was the first province to really push their Provincial identity > Canadian on a grand scale. Hell , they had their own provincial party to push that on the federal level.

    I grew up there but I do wonder what kind of effect that had on other provinces...

    Disco11 on
    PSN: Canadian_llama
  • Nova_CNova_C I have the need The need for speedRegistered User regular
    This thread is super depressing right now.

    ApogeeAridholDescendant XForar
  • NosfNosf Registered User regular
    BlazeFire wrote: »
    Nosf wrote: »
    https://globalnews.ca/news/5091982/alberta-election-ucp-candidate-calgary-south-east-resigns/

    Ha, it must be so tiresome and vexing to be bullied for thinking minorities are a pack of savages! Maybe Eva should come out and say she was just "speaking her truth".
    psyck0 wrote: »
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Nova_C wrote: »
    I guess it depends on what our goals are when it comes to prison.

    If reckless driving resulted in longer sentences, do you believe people would drive less recklessly? Because I don't, because no one thinks they're going to go to prison when they blow through a stop sign, so it really doesn't matter how long the sentences are.

    So, next is, do you believe he's a dangerous offender who shouldn't be released? I don't, this was obviously a mistake, one he's owned up to and taken responsibility for.

    So the last is, do you want to wield our justice system as an implementation of vengeance? Then yeah, I guess longer sentences would make sense.

    I'd rather not abandon our humanity, though.

    I don't know if he's a dangerous offender, I'm not a lawyer or a judge.

    "no one thinks they're going to prison when they do X" is true for a lot of things we have laws and sentences for. Why have prison at all when I'm sorry works?

    I'm ok with the judges sentence on this one and the next time someone is inattentive driving and kills someone or multiple someone's I'd like to not see them back on the road 18 months later.

    He doesn't have to be in jail to be off the road. You could give him a driving ban. This is purely vengeance. We should be better than that.

    You don't get a driving ban for killing 16 people because you weren't paying attention after showing a pattern of neglect in your job.

    I wasn't following this in great detail. What pattern of neglect did Sidhu show?

    https://globalnews.ca/news/4901778/semi-driver-in-humboldt-broncos-bus-crash-had-70-regulation-violations/

  • SatanIsMyMotorSatanIsMyMotor Registered User regular
    Anecdotally, I can say with no doubt at all that people from Quebec and Newfoundland have the strongest sense of "provincial identity". The rest of provinces seem pretty low level on the provinciality scale.

    Disco11shrykeLordSolarMachariusDescendant X
  • ArcticLancerArcticLancer Best served chilled. Registered User regular
    When you first posted the survey, my gut reaction was "Yes, definitely Canadian, sort of Nova Scotian", but then I kinda thought about it for a bit and it's more accurate to say "Still definitely Canadian, secondarily a Maritimer." I've lived in both NS (most of my life) and NB (8ish years through post-secondary), and spent enough time in PEI through my childhood ... I don't really see the lines between us.

    Now that said, of all the places I've been old enough to remember visiting (I was born in the Yukon, but only have a single memory from it, so I kinda discount my experiences there :P ), I've felt perfectly at home everywhere except Calgary. There was just an overwhelming projection from the area, and the people that I interacted with, that just didn't align with how I felt everywhere else. So I've tended to have a not-entirely-positive view of Alberta for a while ... <_<

    Zibblsnrt
  • HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    I consider myself a human of earth in furtherance of a single world government

    Aridhol
  • ApogeeApogee Lancks In Every Game Ever Registered User regular
    I consider myself Canadian first and Ontarian as a distant second. Third, actually; Toronto means more to my identity than Ontario. Hell, I've spent a good chunk of my years in Quebec (no parle pas francais) and I'd say that means more to me than Ontario.

    Being in Toronto is quite unlike the rest of the province... it's dense, very multicultural, very diverse in every way possible. When I was young I always thought it was weird how much 'accepting differences' was a common theme in school. I mean, I know a bunch of people with different skin colour, some LGBT kids, seen people of every manner of social class and dress... I couldn't conceive of a world where everyone is the same slice of bread, so to speak.

    Then you go visit Smalltown, ON and it's a very different world.

    8R7BtLw.png
    BroloshrykeCaedwyrEtiowsaSwashbucklerXXForarRear Admiral Choco
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