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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    Finishing up some of the shorter stuff I have kicking around in anticipation of Darksiders III eating a bunch of time, just ran through Pinstripe and jesus I was not ready for the full story reveal at the end of that game even a little.

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    FawstFawst The road to awe.Registered User regular
    edited November 2018
    You know what? My Fall Sale gift to myself is not adding to my backlog. I need to play through at least 15 games (1/10th of my library) before I get anything new.

    I think I’ll go with...
    Bastion
    Crysis
    Dungeon of the Endless
    Gunpoint
    Hacknet
    Hollow Knight (already 65 hours into it)
    Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light
    Mark of the Ninja
    Ori and the Blind Forest
    Resonance
    Shadowrun Returns
    Shadowrun: Dragonfall
    STALKER: SoC
    KoTOR II
    VtM: Bloodlines

    That’s actually the majority of games that seem to have an “end” that I haven’t already played before.

    What to play first...

    Geth roll a D15

    Fawst on
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    3cl1ps33cl1ps3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    Man you kinda can't go wrong with that list, basically all of those games are great.

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    Dr. ChaosDr. Chaos Post nuclear nuisance Registered User regular
    Geth, roll the dice..

    ..but choose Dragonfall for him anyway.

    Pokemon GO: 7113 6338 6875/ FF14: Buckle Landrunner /Steam Profile
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    SteevLSteevL What can I do for you? Registered User regular
    Fawst wrote: »
    You know what? My Fall Sale gift to myself is not adding to my backlog. I need to play through at least 15 games (1/10th of my library) before I get anything new.

    I think I’ll go with...
    Bastion
    Crysis
    Dungeon of the Endless
    Gunpoint
    Hacknet
    Hollow Knight (already 65 hours into it)
    Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light
    Mark of the Ninja
    Ori and the Blind Forest
    Resonance
    Shadowrun Returns
    Shadowrun: Dragonfall
    STALKER: SoC
    KoTOR II
    VtM: Bloodlines

    That’s actually the majority of games that seem to have an “end” that I haven’t already played before.

    What to play first...

    Geth roll a D15

    If you ever get a chance to do it, try playing Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light in co-op. They change the puzzles around enough to make it a different experience from the single player -- aside from the shooty bits, of course.

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    KalnaurKalnaur I See Rain . . . Centralia, WARegistered User regular
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Mugsley wrote: »
    So I pocked up the shadowrun games on sale, is there a newb resource anywhere to get my head around what’s going on with the classes and system? Its far enough away from traditional fighter/mage/priest/etc that I am having a hard time getting my bearings.

    I, too, would like this information.

    Jacobkosh

    You are summoned for Shadowrun lowdowns

    Mugsley here's my quickie guide to the game systems!
    WHAT THE STATS MEAN
    Body increases your hit points (10HP per point of Body). 3 Body for 30 HP is a good solid number. If you plan to take more damage (by being a front-line fighter) pump that one up.

    Strength increases your chance to hit with melee attacks and your damage with them. Close Combat is a sub-skill of Strength that allows you to do more critical damage and use better melee weapons, and its max value is capped at your strength score. Melee Weapons and Unarmed Combat are in turn sub-skills of Close Combat and give you extra abilities and accuracy with those weapon types - and again, they're capped at the max value of your Close Combat score. So if you want a 5 in Melee Weapons, you need a 5 in Close Combat and a 5 in Strength first - does that make sense? That attribute > skill > sub-skill thing is the basic structure for all the character options.

    Quickness increases your movement speed and ability to hit with ranged weapons. Ranged Weapons is a sub-skill of Quickness, and Pistols, Rifles, and Shotguns are sub-skills of Ranged Weapons. Again, raising each of those tracks not only improves your general to-hit and damage with those weapons but also unlocks various special abilities with them, like at pistols 4 you can reload without using an action. The Dodge skill improves your general ability to avoid melee attacks and gunfire.

    On its own, Intelligence mainly lets you pass a few dialogue checks; statistically, what it does is contribute to the success of all the skills beneath it. Deckers (hackers) will want the Decking and ESP control skills, while Riggers (dudes who deploy portable combat drones on the battlefield) use Drone Control and Drone Combat.

    Willpower determines your ability to resist magical attacks. Its subskills are Chi Casting. which allows the use of Chi spells that improve unarmed and melee attacks, and Spellcasting, which allows the casting of arcane magic (D&D type stuff: throwing fireballs, lightning, paralyzing dudes, etc).

    Charisma unlocks Etiquettes, which are special social interactions that let you talk your way past difficult situations in the game - if you have the Security etiquette, you might know the right thing to say to talk your way past a security guard without having to fight him, for instance, while Gang etiquette lets you know the right thing to say when accosted on the streets. Charisma's subskills are Spirit Summoning and Spirit Control, which allow shamans to call forth powerful spirit creatures to help them in battle (albeit with an increasing chance each round that the spirit will break free from their control and wreak havoc) and Conjuring unlocks the ability to cast conjuration spells, which generally revolve around the creation of barriers/force fields/traps/etc.

    BUILDING A GUY
    Pick a concept for the character you want to make - the system is flexible and the classes listed at character creation are just suggestions; you can build your own by spending an equivalent amount of karma points as you choose.

    A good approach to character building is to focus on one (1) combat skill, two (2) utilities, and Charisma. (There's never really a good reason not to be a charismatic main character in a PC RPG, because it always opens up so many options.)

    Pretty much any weapon approach is totally viable. Assault rifles are the best overall weapon, but tend to use both of your action points (leaving you unable to move after firing). Shotguns do massive damage up-close and get a couple of nasty powers as you level up your shotgun skill. Pistols do less damage round-to-round but have decent range and the best critical hits in the game, and the best trick shot powers, letting you do stuff like hit multiple targets with one volley, disarm enemies, etc. Submachine guns have a reliable chance to hit from sheer volume of bullets fired, and the SMG tree has very few powers and those are mostly frontloaded, which means you only need a small investment of points to get the most out of the weapon, making SMGs a perfect choice for characters like hackers or spellcasters who want to spend most of their points in their main thing instead of a gun skill.

    Melee is a somewhat mediocre - not cripplingly bad, just kind of eh - option in Shadowrun Returns but gets progressively better through the series, to the point where it’s very, very viable in Hong Kong.

    Grenades are pretty nice too, but with a single grenade taking up a full inventory slot, you can’t really have them as your main thing. They’re a great backup weapon option for combat-focused characters, though.

    When it comes to assigning points at the beginning, pick one thing to start out with - "I'm going to be really good at pistols," or whatever, and jack it up to 4 or 5 as soon as you can.

    Now, the way the skills work, your chance to hit in ranged or melee combat is determined by the Ranged Combat or Melee Combat skills, NOT by the Assault Rifle, Pistol, Unarmed, etc skills for specific weapons. What the specific weapon skills do is improve your criticals and unlock better powers with those weapons. So if you have a good ranged combat and focus on assault rifles, there's no reason not to pack a backup shotty or pistol or whatever just in case.

    So after you've got your main combat weapon chosen, pick a utility skill. By utilities I mean stuff like Biotech (which lets medkits heal you more, and in Dragonfall opens up a surprising number of bonus dialogue options), or Dodge (the ability not to be hit), or Body (which affects your HP). I think any character should probably have a minimum of 3 in Body but if you plan on doing a lot of melee or being in danger it is definitely worth pumping that up to 6 or even higher.

    Some good general character concepts:

    Pure street samurai: a lot of Body, Strength, and Quickness, a melee or unarmed skill, and a gun skill. Put leftover points into Dodge. You'll be a pure combat beast.

    Decker: You'll need a Decker on most missions to unlock doors and access extra information and cash, so being that dude yourself is often a good call. Decking goes well with a ranged combat skill (I like Pistols but other people are very happy with Rifles) but you can also get a huge amount of mileage out of being a Decker/Rigger, putting all your points into intelligence and not even bothering to carry a weapon - your robot friends are your weapon.

    Mage/Shaman - You can be a pure spellcaster, pumping up both Willpower and Charisma to get access to as many casting options as possible, or you can devote yourself to one specific flavor of magic (only spirit summoning or only arcane spellcasting, for instance) and use the other points to improve a melee or ranged weapon skill to add to your versatility.

    "Face" - a high-Charisma character with a lot of Etiquettes may not be a killer on the battlefield, but they often don't need to be, because the game gives you ample opportunities to bypass fights entirely or resolve otherwise unresolvable situations if you're a good fast-talker. Corporate and Security etiquettes are by far the most useful, followed by Gang, Academic, or Shadowrunner, with Socialite and Street coming in somewhat last.

    Lastly, unless you're a caster, you're going to want cyberware, but - and this is frustrating - WAIT. Don't buy the first stuff you see. The game releases progressively better and better cyberware as you progress, so your best bet is to wait till the later-game and stuff as much of that sweet 'ware into you as can fit rather than settle for some bulky, crappy cyberleg that will drop your Essence by a ton and prevent you getting something better later on.

    THE INTERFACE
    Press C to open your character sheet. f5 quicksaves and f9 quickloads. Left-Alt highlights all interactable objects you can currently see on the map. You can't trade items between characters, no dragging and dropping party member A's medkit onto party member B or whatever.

    COMBAT
    Combat works like XCOM, if you've played that. Characters get 2 Action Points. You can see, in their little portraits in the top right of the screen, a little number 2, 1, or 0 on the bottom right of the portrait; that is their current number of Action Points. You can use an Action Point to move or to shoot, and you can move twice, shoot twice, etc. Some actions - like certain powerful spells, or well-aimed shots from a rifle - take 2 action points to complete, so they will consume your full turn to use. You can tell what the action's AP cost is by looking at the number in the bottom right of the icon for that action.

    Characters with multiple weapons can switch between them by clicking the little weapon silhouettes on the bottom left of the screen. This costs no actions to do. Characters with multiple inventory types - like a spell book and a backpack full of grenades, or a list of miscellaneous special powers granted by equipment - can switch between those lists by clicking the little head and backpack icons on the bottom right of the screen. Again, this costs no action points to do.

    The goal of combat is to get your dudes into cover (symbolized by a little shield icon that is empty, half full, or full) and shoot at enemies that are out of cover (symbolized by either having no shield at all, which indicates that they are out in the open, or a shield that's been X-ed out, which indicates that they would have cover except that they're currently Flanked). The advantage of cover is that it reduces all incoming damage and also makes you immune to critical hits. Flanked enemies or enemies out in the open are not immune to critical hits and will explode into very satisfying blood chunks very quickly if you focus on them first.

    If an enemy is in cover, either try to work your way around to an uncovered side to attack them from, or hit them with an area of effect attack such as a grenade or a spell. Stunning attacks, such as flashbang grenades and tasers, drain enemy action points, making the enemy unable to move as much or take as many actions on their turn. If you drain ALL of an enemy's AP, they are completely stunned and fall out of cover, making them an easy target!

    You'll notice that some bigger or tougher-looking characters have little white pips along their health bars. This indicates their armor. Armor reduces all incoming damage by a flat amount (so armor 3 subtracts 3 damage from all incoming shots, let's say). Heavily armored enemies might be able to shrug off some attacks completely; that means your best bet is to use max-damage attacks or any sort of special ammunition, spells, or powers that grant an armor-piercing effect.

    Overwatch, the little dot icon with a semicircle over it, is unlocked for all weapons or melee attacks at rank 3. So if your character has Spellcasting 4 and Pistols 2, he can do Overwatch with his Arcane Bolt spell but not with his pistol. When you select Overwatch, you need to select the attack they'll be using and the direction they'll be looking for trouble in.

    Your party members' inventories replenish themselves after every mission so don't be shy about using their equipment. You already know what medkits and grenades do. Trauma kits automatically heal your characters for some amount of HP when they hit 0, OR, if a character without a trauma kit is downed, a character with a kit can run over and use it to revive them (within three rounds). Fetish totems are one-shot consumable items that shamans can use to summon spirits into battle. Most major battle areas in the game also have a couple of interactable points (visible during the shaman's turn) where you can click on them and a shaman character can summon a spirit for free, without a totem, and these spirits are often pretty powerful.

    THE MATRIX
    The electronic cyberwebs of the information superfreeway work exactly like movement and combat in the real world except that the decker character has a single basic attack and a suite of more powerful abilities (better attacks, area attacks, self-heals, buffs, debuffs, etc) based on what Programs he has chosen to install before hacking in - Programs have pretty self-explanatory names like Blaster, Killer, Medic, Shield, and so forth. ESPs are special programs that summon a digital ally to help out in combat, and although ESP programs are bought and sold from merchants under the "consumable" tab, they never actually go away. If your ESP dies in the Matrix you can't summon it again during that particular hack but if you jack out of the system and come back later it will be ready to summon again.

    LEVELING UP
    There seem to be three big competence thresholds: early on, if you have something (particularly a gun skill) at 4, you're about at the target difficulty. Later, in the mid game, you wnat things around 7. Finally, at the end game, you want your marquee stats at 9 or 10. So focus on getting your skills to those targets at those points.

    DRAGONFALL-SPECIFIC ADVICE
    The best Etiquettes in Dragonfall are Corporate and Security, easily. No others come up nearly as often or yield such tangible rewards. Academic is fantastic - it gives ok in-game rewards but is super handy for players who want to dig deeper into the story, as it lets your guy decipher scientific documents etc (this is also why the Biotech skill is useful specifically in this game)). Criminal and Shadowrunner are both useful on a couple of important occasions. Gang comes up like once and I am not sure if Socialite ever does.

    I think all the leveling up your party member paths are pretty valid but in Dietrich's case I was all about free extra spirits and Eiger's upgraded sniper rifle is a fucking beast.

    Finally,

    - talk to every NPC after important missions. It does affect the outcome of the late game in small but cool ways.
    - just like a Bioware game, all your companions have side stories (bar Dietrich, whose quest is also part of the main chain). Push them on their backstories. Glory doesn't want to talk to you and the options are kind of misleading and make it seem like if you wait she'll open up - she doesn't. You have to actually push her into talking a bit, but once you start it opens up some of the best content in the game.
    - Watch your back, shoot straight, conserve ammo, never make a deal with a dragon

    So, @Jacobkosh do you have more specified tips if I want to:
    -Deal elemental magic damage
    -Also be able to defend the character with medium range weaponry when my spells are exhausted (assuming they do get used up)?

    Most games I like to play a mage or battlemage concept, if that helps. In guns-only games I prefer sniper rifles and shotguns and rocket launchers, i.e. kill spell, cone spell, fireball. :razz:

    I make art things! deviantART: Kalnaur ::: Origin: Kalnaur ::: UPlay: Kalnaur
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    akajaybayakajaybay Registered User regular
    edited November 2018
    Fawst wrote: »
    You know what? My Fall Sale gift to myself is not adding to my backlog. I need to play through at least 15 games (1/10th of my library) before I get anything new.

    I think I’ll go with...
    Bastion
    Crysis
    Dungeon of the Endless
    Gunpoint
    Hacknet
    Hollow Knight (already 65 hours into it)
    Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light
    Mark of the Ninja
    Ori and the Blind Forest
    Resonance
    Shadowrun Returns
    Shadowrun: Dragonfall
    STALKER: SoC
    KoTOR II
    VtM: Bloodlines

    That’s actually the majority of games that seem to have an “end” that I haven’t already played before.

    What to play first...

    Geth roll a D15

    You left out the quantity of D15s to roll.
    Geth roll 1d15 for Fawst's Backlog Game

    I'd say if you want to play all of them at some point, play Shadowrun Returns before Dragonfall, or skip Returns if you want to go straight to Dragonfall. But Dragonfall to Returns might be a little disappointing. I've played both and Returns is certainly not bad, it's just not as good.
    I did also play Resonance, which not many may have. It's one of the pixelly adventure games from Wadget Eye. It's less well known than some of their others, but it has a few real strong moments that make it worth checking out. The whole list is good stuff, the only one I'm not sure on is Crysis really. It does have Geth's vote though.

    Fawst's Backlog Game:
    1d15 2 [1d15=2]

    akajaybay on
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    cooljammer00cooljammer00 Hey Small Christmas-Man!Registered User regular
    Just save yourself time and play Gunpoint.

    steam_sig.png

    3DS Friend Code: 2165-6448-8348 www.Twitch.TV/cooljammer00
    Battle.Net: JohnDarc#1203 Origin/UPlay: CoolJammer00
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    cB557cB557 voOOP Registered User regular
    If you play Crysis I'd also recommend Crysis 2.

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    MNC DoverMNC Dover Full-time Voice Actor Kirkland, WARegistered User regular
    Geth roll Mark of the Ninja for him.

    Need a voice actor? Hire me at bengrayVO.com
    Legends of Runeterra: MNCdover #moc
    Switch ID: MNC Dover SW-1154-3107-1051
    Steam ID
    Twitch Page
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    -Loki--Loki- Don't pee in my mouth and tell me it's raining. Registered User regular
    cB557 wrote: »
    If you play Crysis I'd also recommend Crysis 2.

    Also Crysis Warhead.

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    Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Kalnaur wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    Mugsley wrote: »
    So I pocked up the shadowrun games on sale, is there a newb resource anywhere to get my head around what’s going on with the classes and system? Its far enough away from traditional fighter/mage/priest/etc that I am having a hard time getting my bearings.

    I, too, would like this information.

    Jacobkosh

    You are summoned for Shadowrun lowdowns

    Mugsley here's my quickie guide to the game systems!
    WHAT THE STATS MEAN
    Body increases your hit points (10HP per point of Body). 3 Body for 30 HP is a good solid number. If you plan to take more damage (by being a front-line fighter) pump that one up.

    Strength increases your chance to hit with melee attacks and your damage with them. Close Combat is a sub-skill of Strength that allows you to do more critical damage and use better melee weapons, and its max value is capped at your strength score. Melee Weapons and Unarmed Combat are in turn sub-skills of Close Combat and give you extra abilities and accuracy with those weapon types - and again, they're capped at the max value of your Close Combat score. So if you want a 5 in Melee Weapons, you need a 5 in Close Combat and a 5 in Strength first - does that make sense? That attribute > skill > sub-skill thing is the basic structure for all the character options.

    Quickness increases your movement speed and ability to hit with ranged weapons. Ranged Weapons is a sub-skill of Quickness, and Pistols, Rifles, and Shotguns are sub-skills of Ranged Weapons. Again, raising each of those tracks not only improves your general to-hit and damage with those weapons but also unlocks various special abilities with them, like at pistols 4 you can reload without using an action. The Dodge skill improves your general ability to avoid melee attacks and gunfire.

    On its own, Intelligence mainly lets you pass a few dialogue checks; statistically, what it does is contribute to the success of all the skills beneath it. Deckers (hackers) will want the Decking and ESP control skills, while Riggers (dudes who deploy portable combat drones on the battlefield) use Drone Control and Drone Combat.

    Willpower determines your ability to resist magical attacks. Its subskills are Chi Casting. which allows the use of Chi spells that improve unarmed and melee attacks, and Spellcasting, which allows the casting of arcane magic (D&D type stuff: throwing fireballs, lightning, paralyzing dudes, etc).

    Charisma unlocks Etiquettes, which are special social interactions that let you talk your way past difficult situations in the game - if you have the Security etiquette, you might know the right thing to say to talk your way past a security guard without having to fight him, for instance, while Gang etiquette lets you know the right thing to say when accosted on the streets. Charisma's subskills are Spirit Summoning and Spirit Control, which allow shamans to call forth powerful spirit creatures to help them in battle (albeit with an increasing chance each round that the spirit will break free from their control and wreak havoc) and Conjuring unlocks the ability to cast conjuration spells, which generally revolve around the creation of barriers/force fields/traps/etc.

    BUILDING A GUY
    Pick a concept for the character you want to make - the system is flexible and the classes listed at character creation are just suggestions; you can build your own by spending an equivalent amount of karma points as you choose.

    A good approach to character building is to focus on one (1) combat skill, two (2) utilities, and Charisma. (There's never really a good reason not to be a charismatic main character in a PC RPG, because it always opens up so many options.)

    Pretty much any weapon approach is totally viable. Assault rifles are the best overall weapon, but tend to use both of your action points (leaving you unable to move after firing). Shotguns do massive damage up-close and get a couple of nasty powers as you level up your shotgun skill. Pistols do less damage round-to-round but have decent range and the best critical hits in the game, and the best trick shot powers, letting you do stuff like hit multiple targets with one volley, disarm enemies, etc. Submachine guns have a reliable chance to hit from sheer volume of bullets fired, and the SMG tree has very few powers and those are mostly frontloaded, which means you only need a small investment of points to get the most out of the weapon, making SMGs a perfect choice for characters like hackers or spellcasters who want to spend most of their points in their main thing instead of a gun skill.

    Melee is a somewhat mediocre - not cripplingly bad, just kind of eh - option in Shadowrun Returns but gets progressively better through the series, to the point where it’s very, very viable in Hong Kong.

    Grenades are pretty nice too, but with a single grenade taking up a full inventory slot, you can’t really have them as your main thing. They’re a great backup weapon option for combat-focused characters, though.

    When it comes to assigning points at the beginning, pick one thing to start out with - "I'm going to be really good at pistols," or whatever, and jack it up to 4 or 5 as soon as you can.

    Now, the way the skills work, your chance to hit in ranged or melee combat is determined by the Ranged Combat or Melee Combat skills, NOT by the Assault Rifle, Pistol, Unarmed, etc skills for specific weapons. What the specific weapon skills do is improve your criticals and unlock better powers with those weapons. So if you have a good ranged combat and focus on assault rifles, there's no reason not to pack a backup shotty or pistol or whatever just in case.

    So after you've got your main combat weapon chosen, pick a utility skill. By utilities I mean stuff like Biotech (which lets medkits heal you more, and in Dragonfall opens up a surprising number of bonus dialogue options), or Dodge (the ability not to be hit), or Body (which affects your HP). I think any character should probably have a minimum of 3 in Body but if you plan on doing a lot of melee or being in danger it is definitely worth pumping that up to 6 or even higher.

    Some good general character concepts:

    Pure street samurai: a lot of Body, Strength, and Quickness, a melee or unarmed skill, and a gun skill. Put leftover points into Dodge. You'll be a pure combat beast.

    Decker: You'll need a Decker on most missions to unlock doors and access extra information and cash, so being that dude yourself is often a good call. Decking goes well with a ranged combat skill (I like Pistols but other people are very happy with Rifles) but you can also get a huge amount of mileage out of being a Decker/Rigger, putting all your points into intelligence and not even bothering to carry a weapon - your robot friends are your weapon.

    Mage/Shaman - You can be a pure spellcaster, pumping up both Willpower and Charisma to get access to as many casting options as possible, or you can devote yourself to one specific flavor of magic (only spirit summoning or only arcane spellcasting, for instance) and use the other points to improve a melee or ranged weapon skill to add to your versatility.

    "Face" - a high-Charisma character with a lot of Etiquettes may not be a killer on the battlefield, but they often don't need to be, because the game gives you ample opportunities to bypass fights entirely or resolve otherwise unresolvable situations if you're a good fast-talker. Corporate and Security etiquettes are by far the most useful, followed by Gang, Academic, or Shadowrunner, with Socialite and Street coming in somewhat last.

    Lastly, unless you're a caster, you're going to want cyberware, but - and this is frustrating - WAIT. Don't buy the first stuff you see. The game releases progressively better and better cyberware as you progress, so your best bet is to wait till the later-game and stuff as much of that sweet 'ware into you as can fit rather than settle for some bulky, crappy cyberleg that will drop your Essence by a ton and prevent you getting something better later on.

    THE INTERFACE
    Press C to open your character sheet. f5 quicksaves and f9 quickloads. Left-Alt highlights all interactable objects you can currently see on the map. You can't trade items between characters, no dragging and dropping party member A's medkit onto party member B or whatever.

    COMBAT
    Combat works like XCOM, if you've played that. Characters get 2 Action Points. You can see, in their little portraits in the top right of the screen, a little number 2, 1, or 0 on the bottom right of the portrait; that is their current number of Action Points. You can use an Action Point to move or to shoot, and you can move twice, shoot twice, etc. Some actions - like certain powerful spells, or well-aimed shots from a rifle - take 2 action points to complete, so they will consume your full turn to use. You can tell what the action's AP cost is by looking at the number in the bottom right of the icon for that action.

    Characters with multiple weapons can switch between them by clicking the little weapon silhouettes on the bottom left of the screen. This costs no actions to do. Characters with multiple inventory types - like a spell book and a backpack full of grenades, or a list of miscellaneous special powers granted by equipment - can switch between those lists by clicking the little head and backpack icons on the bottom right of the screen. Again, this costs no action points to do.

    The goal of combat is to get your dudes into cover (symbolized by a little shield icon that is empty, half full, or full) and shoot at enemies that are out of cover (symbolized by either having no shield at all, which indicates that they are out in the open, or a shield that's been X-ed out, which indicates that they would have cover except that they're currently Flanked). The advantage of cover is that it reduces all incoming damage and also makes you immune to critical hits. Flanked enemies or enemies out in the open are not immune to critical hits and will explode into very satisfying blood chunks very quickly if you focus on them first.

    If an enemy is in cover, either try to work your way around to an uncovered side to attack them from, or hit them with an area of effect attack such as a grenade or a spell. Stunning attacks, such as flashbang grenades and tasers, drain enemy action points, making the enemy unable to move as much or take as many actions on their turn. If you drain ALL of an enemy's AP, they are completely stunned and fall out of cover, making them an easy target!

    You'll notice that some bigger or tougher-looking characters have little white pips along their health bars. This indicates their armor. Armor reduces all incoming damage by a flat amount (so armor 3 subtracts 3 damage from all incoming shots, let's say). Heavily armored enemies might be able to shrug off some attacks completely; that means your best bet is to use max-damage attacks or any sort of special ammunition, spells, or powers that grant an armor-piercing effect.

    Overwatch, the little dot icon with a semicircle over it, is unlocked for all weapons or melee attacks at rank 3. So if your character has Spellcasting 4 and Pistols 2, he can do Overwatch with his Arcane Bolt spell but not with his pistol. When you select Overwatch, you need to select the attack they'll be using and the direction they'll be looking for trouble in.

    Your party members' inventories replenish themselves after every mission so don't be shy about using their equipment. You already know what medkits and grenades do. Trauma kits automatically heal your characters for some amount of HP when they hit 0, OR, if a character without a trauma kit is downed, a character with a kit can run over and use it to revive them (within three rounds). Fetish totems are one-shot consumable items that shamans can use to summon spirits into battle. Most major battle areas in the game also have a couple of interactable points (visible during the shaman's turn) where you can click on them and a shaman character can summon a spirit for free, without a totem, and these spirits are often pretty powerful.

    THE MATRIX
    The electronic cyberwebs of the information superfreeway work exactly like movement and combat in the real world except that the decker character has a single basic attack and a suite of more powerful abilities (better attacks, area attacks, self-heals, buffs, debuffs, etc) based on what Programs he has chosen to install before hacking in - Programs have pretty self-explanatory names like Blaster, Killer, Medic, Shield, and so forth. ESPs are special programs that summon a digital ally to help out in combat, and although ESP programs are bought and sold from merchants under the "consumable" tab, they never actually go away. If your ESP dies in the Matrix you can't summon it again during that particular hack but if you jack out of the system and come back later it will be ready to summon again.

    LEVELING UP
    There seem to be three big competence thresholds: early on, if you have something (particularly a gun skill) at 4, you're about at the target difficulty. Later, in the mid game, you wnat things around 7. Finally, at the end game, you want your marquee stats at 9 or 10. So focus on getting your skills to those targets at those points.

    DRAGONFALL-SPECIFIC ADVICE
    The best Etiquettes in Dragonfall are Corporate and Security, easily. No others come up nearly as often or yield such tangible rewards. Academic is fantastic - it gives ok in-game rewards but is super handy for players who want to dig deeper into the story, as it lets your guy decipher scientific documents etc (this is also why the Biotech skill is useful specifically in this game)). Criminal and Shadowrunner are both useful on a couple of important occasions. Gang comes up like once and I am not sure if Socialite ever does.

    I think all the leveling up your party member paths are pretty valid but in Dietrich's case I was all about free extra spirits and Eiger's upgraded sniper rifle is a fucking beast.

    Finally,

    - talk to every NPC after important missions. It does affect the outcome of the late game in small but cool ways.
    - just like a Bioware game, all your companions have side stories (bar Dietrich, whose quest is also part of the main chain). Push them on their backstories. Glory doesn't want to talk to you and the options are kind of misleading and make it seem like if you wait she'll open up - she doesn't. You have to actually push her into talking a bit, but once you start it opens up some of the best content in the game.
    - Watch your back, shoot straight, conserve ammo, never make a deal with a dragon

    So, Jacobkosh do you have more specified tips if I want to:
    -Deal elemental magic damage
    -Also be able to defend the character with medium range weaponry when my spells are exhausted (assuming they do get used up)?

    Most games I like to play a mage or battlemage concept, if that helps. In guns-only games I prefer sniper rifles and shotguns and rocket launchers, i.e. kill spell, cone spell, fireball. :razz:

    Spells go on cooldown instead of being used up though you also get a dinky spell to use in place of a weapon that never goes on cooldown too. It doesn't do as much damage as a gun but IIRC it has some status debuff attached to it. Since you can slot multiple levels of the same attack spell and they don't share cooldowns eventually you'll just be cycling through spells all of the time. My Shadowrun: Hong Kong mage was just constantly burning things.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
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    jclastjclast Registered User regular
    TeeMan wrote: »
    jclast wrote: »
    I was wrong about Concrete Jungle. I only had 2 boxes available. Now I've been playing for a bit and I still have 3 to go. I'm sure as I complete these more will open up, too. I thought since I was on "Hard" levels that I was near the end. I was a fool.

    Oh, you're just starting the very hard levels? IMO there's not much that distinguishes them in terms of difficulty (read: they're still bloody tough nuts to crack). Have you gotten to the Prison/Industry woman yet? Getting past that is probably the biggest hurdle of the game

    I just beat her actually. It was a huge change to play somebody with a deck more geared toward fucking me up instead of earning herself points. I also really want to know what she kept playing that made minus points good for her. I could also go for an undo, but being card-based I totally understand why it's not there.

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    KalnaurKalnaur I See Rain . . . Centralia, WARegistered User regular
    Spells go on cooldown instead of being used up though you also get a dinky spell to use in place of a weapon that never goes on cooldown too. It doesn't do as much damage as a gun but IIRC it has some status debuff attached to it. Since you can slot multiple levels of the same attack spell and they don't share cooldowns eventually you'll just be cycling through spells all of the time. My Shadowrun: Hong Kong mage was just constantly burning things.

    So there's no reason to build a Battlemage besides maybe wanting to hit things with weapons or shoot things with guns?

    I make art things! deviantART: Kalnaur ::: Origin: Kalnaur ::: UPlay: Kalnaur
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    Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Kalnaur wrote: »
    Spells go on cooldown instead of being used up though you also get a dinky spell to use in place of a weapon that never goes on cooldown too. It doesn't do as much damage as a gun but IIRC it has some status debuff attached to it. Since you can slot multiple levels of the same attack spell and they don't share cooldowns eventually you'll just be cycling through spells all of the time. My Shadowrun: Hong Kong mage was just constantly burning things.

    So there's no reason to build a Battlemage besides maybe wanting to hit things with weapons or shoot things with guns?

    In theory, you have more options with an actual ranged weapon. The ley/dragon lines that boost spell power often put you outside of cover and those boosts are a big part of the power of offensive magic. Those boosts can also make things a bit more chaotic like the time I half killed my adoptive brother with the bounce effect added onto a fire spell in Hong Kong. And few things beat an assault rifle using automatic fire when a specific target needs to die now.

    In practice, you have 3 other party members to cover those bases and I only half killed Duncan while full killing some enemies.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
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    HeatwaveHeatwave Come, now, and walk the path of explosions with me!Registered User regular
    edited November 2018
    @Betsuni

    You son of a brick

    FOiweuq.jpg

    LPbB66L.jpg

    Heatwave on
    P2n5r3l.jpg
    Steam / Origin & Wii U: Heatwave111 / FC: 4227-1965-3206 / Battle.net: Heatwave#11356
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    Road BlockRoad Block Registered User regular
    A couple of game suggestions for anyone who likes incredibly meta games. (Both made by the same guy)

    Pony Island:
    Steam wrote:
    Pony Island is a suspense puzzle game in disguise. You are in limbo, trapped in a malevolent and malfunctioning arcade machine devised by the devil himself. It is not a game about ponies.

    The Hex
    Steam wrote:
    In a creaky old tavern, in a forgotten corner of the video-game universe, a storm is raging. An anonymous caller suggests that there is a murder plot. Six video game protagonists are the only plausible suspects...

    Both feature creatively varied gameplay (Particularly The Hex with all 6 protagonists featuring gameplay appropriate to their games) and some very cleverly hidden secrets.

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    JazzJazz Registered User regular
    The Hex is really cool and interesting, I need to get back to that.

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    LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    Road Block wrote: »
    A couple of game suggestions for anyone who likes incredibly meta games. (Both made by the same guy)

    Pony Island:
    Steam wrote:
    Pony Island is a suspense puzzle game in disguise. You are in limbo, trapped in a malevolent and malfunctioning arcade machine devised by the devil himself. It is not a game about ponies.

    The Hex
    Steam wrote:
    In a creaky old tavern, in a forgotten corner of the video-game universe, a storm is raging. An anonymous caller suggests that there is a murder plot. Six video game protagonists are the only plausible suspects...

    Both feature creatively varied gameplay (Particularly The Hex with all 6 protagonists featuring gameplay appropriate to their games) and some very cleverly hidden secrets.

    Pony Island is great, and
    I'm never uninstalling it

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    XaviarXaviar Registered User regular
    Does the Steam thread have an opinion on X4?

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    KarozKaroz Registered User regular
    If you somehow haven't jumped on Hitman GOTY yet, Indiegala has it for $10

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    SledGodSledGod Registered User regular
    Considering that I haven't prestiged in BLOPS4, have barely touched BFV, and have a huge backlog, I shouldn't partake in the sale...

    ...but I've really wanted EVERSPACE and Dead By Daylight for a minute, so screw it!

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    KarozKaroz Registered User regular
    Do it, get those teens off your lawn.

    And by "get" I mean put on sacrificial hooks to watch them struggle or be saved by their friends while the dark Entity feasts on their hope as it dims to nothing and impales them.

    That or get looped and pallet slammed a bunch.

    Ya know, whichever.

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    ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Here's my inputs for the game nominations:

    Most Fun with a Machine: BATTLETECH Hands down, the best stompy robot tactical game where you also get to play 0g soccer. Huge update is coming out that is going to extend the longevity by a lot and also improve the depth of the mission-to-mission play. True love is an AC/20 / SRM18 shot to straight to the cockpit. Cannot wait.

    Better with Friends: MechWarrior Online The Oosiks are still some of my favorite people 'round these parts, and MWO is a game that is fun on its own (PGI's screwiness aside), but is a fuckin' blast with a group at your back. My lack of Thursday night playtime is one of my this-year gaming regrets.

    Best Environment: Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice I really need to play more of this game, but it's gorgeous and creepy and ... alive.

    Best Developer: Paradox Development Studio Not even close here. Paradox is the (elective gavelkind) King of putting out good games and then nurturing them, allowing them to grow and change and turn into masterpieces. There's always a "Next Patch" coming that will take an underserved portion of their games and crank it to 11. Which of course leads to ...

    Best Alternate History: Crusader Kings II There is literally no contest here; this is the alternate history game every other alternate history game wants to be. Whether you're conquering the world as a Jewish tribe of Eurasian Horse Nomads, spreading the Reformed Norse faith through Africa, or just playing familial politics in the great merchant houses of Wales ... or are an immortal Emperor of Rus ... or are a secret Miaphysite hiding in the Caliph's court ... or a cat fighting over de jure duchy claims with the no-good dirty dogs in the next kingdom over ... CK2 offers innumerable ways to pick a time period, pick a goal, and go for it. The DLC list can be daunting, but it goes on sale as a package pretty often (like, say, right now). Hit us up in the CK2 thread if you want to Learn More (like how to start in Ireland as the Count of Dublin in 1066 so you, too, can experience Newbie Island (TM)).

    Labor of Love: I couldn't nominate CK2 for this one, too, so I went a bit farther afield, and chose to highlight one of my favorite smaller developers: Illwinter Game Design and their Dominions series, currently on its 5th iteration (Warriors of the Faith). Dominions 5 is a fantasy 4X(ish?) TBS (with scripted TB battles) wherein you take over the role of a potential god, design your portfolio, choose a fantasy empire, and attempt to ascend before your rivals do. Maybe you want to be the god of Tir na n'Og, and outfit a contingent of Elven warriors and witches to fly into an enemy's territory, conjure a storm, empower themselves with the storm's lightning, and then fry the everliving hell out of whatever's in your way. Maybe you want to take over the Inquisition of Marignon, and charge into the fray with heavily armed Paladins leading scores of ill-equipped peasant flagellants, wrapped in the power of your god and fire, all the while infiltrating and suppressing enemy faiths. Or maybe you're the giants of Niefelheim, and your win condition is wrecking everyone else's economies under mile-thick sheets of ice. Or you're Atlantis, seeking to rise again from the depths with the power of your amphibious mer-armies. Or you're Ulm, and your Conan-esque troops will use their advanced STEEL weapons to tear through the bronze and flint of your enemies, allowing you to drive them before you and hear the lamentation of the women. Or, or, or, or. Dominions 5 continues to get balance and bug fixes, as well as entirely new empires (!), on a routine basis. Each iteration of the game adds a new wrinkle, with Dominions 4 adding the Thrones of Ascension (well-defended magical sites spread around the world that provide empire-wide benefits and allow you to ascend to over-godhood) and 5 refining the way in which your god's statistics can improve your faction's holy warriors (known as your "Bless").

    Best VR Game: Still my favorite thing to do in VR (though it might be surpassed by Elite: Dangerous, should I get back into that game) - War Thunder, a fantastic way to tool around in WW2 / early modern jets in VR. Nominally free-to-play (and with one of my least favorite FTP in-game reward structures ever), War Thunder recently added a new Naval mode of play (to go with the tanks and airplanes that existed previously), which I really need to spend more time with. For me, though, the meat is definitely in the airplane modes, and especially the simulator mode in VR. Even just doing free-flight (no enemies) is a fun time - somewhere between exciting and relaxing depending on what you're flying! The biggest drawback to VR in the competitive modes is that the screen resolution on current commercial headsets is low enough that enemies (and allies) are mostly just vaguely airplane-shaped blurs until you get really close, at which point there's a good chance you've already been shot down. Playing in headtracking mode (via TrackIR, etc.) doesn't suffer from this issue.

    And now for something ... controversial.

    Game of the Year: Pathfinder: Kingmaker. Yeah, it's janky. Yeah, it has some balance issues. Yeah, it's based off a very complicated PnP system that doesn't translate 100% out to a real-time-with-pause computer system. But I unabashedly love it. Fantasy town and kingdom simulators are, like, my gaming white whale. Kingmaker marries one to a sometimes-serviceable, often-great adventure, and requires that you play back-and-forth between managing your burgeoning kingdom - prioritizing improvements in your settlements, sending advisers (and their abstracted staff) out to handle problems and opportunities - and personally adventuring - clearing monster-infested ruins, stopping invasions, etc. The best part is how they feed off each other - those ruins you cleared can become a fortress once restored by spending your build points; roaming warbands keep throwing out problems for your advisers to solve (preventing them from getting more important stuff done or stopping other problems) until you take out the demon leading the invasion, etc. It's still getting patches on the routine, and they've also announced the upcoming DLC - a new companion and associated adventure (new race tiefling and new class kineticist (blasty psionics!), both available to main characters as well); a side-story where you play as one of the neighboring realms; and an endless roguelike dungeon mode. All of them will tie back into the main campaign, if you want.

    There are a lot of people who have stepped away from PF:KM for various (probably valid ;) ) reasons, but it's my GOTY.

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    YallYall Registered User regular
    Smurph wrote: »
    I got Battle Brothers yesterday and it's real good. It scratched the Mount and Blade itch a bit with the managing of the company and stuff. It's X-COM hard though, it is totally happy to let you throw your under-prepared merc company into an unwinnable battle that ends up forcing you to start over. Save often. I think I had to start over 3 times before I finally survived more than one battle.

    Thanks for mentioning that it's on sale. I didn't see it on the main page but have been thinking about picking it up for a while now.

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    IoloIolo iolo Registered User regular
    You had me right up until that last one, @Elvenshae.

    Lt. Iolo's First Day
    Steam profile.
    Getting started with BATTLETECH: Part 1 / Part 2
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    MugsleyMugsley DelawareRegistered User regular
    edited November 2018
    Mostly because I just play it a lot in fits and starts, Rocket League is getting mentioned somewhere on my list. I slotted in Battletech for "Fun with Machines".

    I should totally add Hellblade for best environment. Thanks for reminding me, @Elvenshae . I currently have Grinding Gear Games as my dev because they are constantly updating Path of Exile; though I'm not sold on that choice. It's just that I played WoW a lot, still, through October-ish so I don't have many other games to look at for options.

    Case in point: I still have to find a nontraditional way to kill the first dude on the boat in HITMAN 1. Because I finally start finding some time to get into a game and someone in my house has some sort of crisis that requires I help my wife. Don't have kids, folks; or pay for the extra DLC that spawns them as teenagers.

    I don't really have a GOTY per se, though just based on my experiences the past few months, it would be Hellblade. Though that game released in 2017, so...... ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Mugsley on
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    KarozKaroz Registered User regular
    Yeah, I'm having a difficult time nominating 2018 games for the 2018 game awards. I seem to have fallen behind the times once more.

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    ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    edited November 2018
    Iolo wrote: »
    You had me right up until that last one, Elvenshae.

    I did say it was ... controversial! :D

    Elvenshae on
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    KoopahTroopahKoopahTroopah The koopas, the troopas. Philadelphia, PARegistered User regular
    JAYSON!
    jw868c7tmf34.png

    Thanks @JaysonFour ... This good game. I hope they patched it enough times for it to be good on Steam now.

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    Road BlockRoad Block Registered User regular
    LD50 wrote: »
    Road Block wrote: »
    A couple of game suggestions for anyone who likes incredibly meta games. (Both made by the same guy)

    Pony Island:
    Steam wrote:
    Pony Island is a suspense puzzle game in disguise. You are in limbo, trapped in a malevolent and malfunctioning arcade machine devised by the devil himself. It is not a game about ponies.

    The Hex
    Steam wrote:
    In a creaky old tavern, in a forgotten corner of the video-game universe, a storm is raging. An anonymous caller suggests that there is a murder plot. Six video game protagonists are the only plausible suspects...

    Both feature creatively varied gameplay (Particularly The Hex with all 6 protagonists featuring gameplay appropriate to their games) and some very cleverly hidden secrets.

    Pony Island is great, and
    I'm never uninstalling it

    That seems wise.

    I quiet like how Jeese Cox handled it.
    Placing the game on a Diablo USB that he could wear around his neck

    #FreeSatan

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    KarozKaroz Registered User regular
    Complete Tropico 5 Bundle on Fanatical.

    I did not like the game's emphasis on combat, but otherwise a fine entry in the series.

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    JazzJazz Registered User regular
    Tweaked my Steam Awards list a tad and bunged Assassin's Creed Odyssey (yes, @Pixelated Pixie , I caved, all your fault :razz: ) in Alternate History. Perhaps more valid, and it actually came out this year (one more game that did) so that's good.

    Only being able to nominate each game for only one category is a bit annoying.

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    JazzJazz Registered User regular
    Karoz wrote: »
    Complete Tropico 5 Bundle on Fanatical.

    I did not like the game's emphasis on combat, but otherwise a fine entry in the series.

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    RickRudeRickRude Registered User regular
    I might have to check out some reviews. I've always enjoyed tropico.

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    -Loki--Loki- Don't pee in my mouth and tell me it's raining. Registered User regular
    I have Tropico 5 but that’s mighty tempting for all the DLC.

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    destroyah87destroyah87 They/Them Preferred: She/Her - Please UseRegistered User regular
    Well, kitties are evil and not to be trusted.

    First @JaysonFour took a statement out of context yesterday and a gift resulted.
    8659z5mhjvaa.jpg

    Only to do it again just now.
    sehevgsai6wz.jpg

    Oh, and I'm sorry @Big Classy I hadn't yet thanked you for this last week. Thank you!
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    And in other news, I have a new Steam avatar because I noticed that games can have official avatars available to users to choose. So Subnautica avatar is go!
    (I give myself less than 24 hours before I go back to Watson.)

    camo_sig2.png
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    KarozKaroz Registered User regular
    @Werewolf2000ad

    After *checks* 44 hours, I am finally properly attired
    C5B4A671265EE2DB602576F6E1EB6C4F032349A3

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